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View Full Version : Emergency kits for Fast Eddie and Princess Flora MacDonald (ScottishFolds)


John Bartley K7AAY
March 30th 10, 05:21 AM
Now that Chile's stopped pogo-ing, it's real clear they didn't know
how to build for the vertical oscillations of a subduction zone
quake. If the Republica de Chile, with pretty ood building codes,
couldn't effectively limit damage, there's a fair chance Portland's
buildings will be frakked up as well, when our Juan de Fuca subduction
zone cuts loose and we get our Big One.

And, when that happens, if in our lifetime, we will have two Scottish
Folds, all-indoor family members, we may need to evac with, if our
house doesn't survive. Therefore, we're thinking about an evac kit,
with enough gear and chow to keep them healthy while we struggle down
the Willamette Valley or over the Cascades (depending on the time of
year and what's left of the roads) to connect with family.

1) DOGGIE DOWNERS: Is there any point in adding a small dose of tranks
to the food to keep them very, very mellow? Fast Eddie is a kinetic
talkative 4 y.o., whereas his aunt Princess Flora MacDonald is 13 and
somewhat arthritic, though equally talkative. Either could drive our
neighbors in a tent city stark raving Republican.

2) FOOD:
http://www.homelandpreparedness.com/cgi-bin/shop/sc_searchz.cgi?user_id=id&database=dbase1.exm&template=prod_supp_food_sr2.htm&0_option=1&0=PCF
is absurdly expensive, IMHO. They normally eat Royal Canin Oral
Sensitivity 30 http://www.amazon.com/Royal-Canin-Feline-Nutrition-Sensitive/dp/B000HAJZM2
(closest to the vet food our vet prescribed) - should we just pack
that kibble, on the theory that a constant food supply will stress
them less?

3) GEAR:
http://www.homelandpreparedness.com/cgi-bin/shop/sc_search_related.cgi?user_id=98593&database=dbase1.exm&template=prod_related_sr2.htm&0_option=1&0=PSKDCK
shows their idea of an emergency kit. What would you pack, and how
would you structure it so it could be towed behind a bicycle as well
as fit in a small Jeep?

Those of you who have assembled cat-go-kits, how have you done it?

Thank you in advance for thoughtful and on-topic replies.

dgk
March 31st 10, 03:50 PM
On Mon, 29 Mar 2010 21:21:58 -0700 (PDT), John Bartley K7AAY
> wrote:

>Now that Chile's stopped pogo-ing, it's real clear they didn't know
>how to build for the vertical oscillations of a subduction zone
>quake. If the Republica de Chile, with pretty ood building codes,
>couldn't effectively limit damage, there's a fair chance Portland's
>buildings will be frakked up as well, when our Juan de Fuca subduction
>zone cuts loose and we get our Big One.
>
>And, when that happens, if in our lifetime, we will have two Scottish
>Folds, all-indoor family members, we may need to evac with, if our
>house doesn't survive. Therefore, we're thinking about an evac kit,
>with enough gear and chow to keep them healthy while we struggle down
>the Willamette Valley or over the Cascades (depending on the time of
>year and what's left of the roads) to connect with family.
>
>1) DOGGIE DOWNERS: Is there any point in adding a small dose of tranks
>to the food to keep them very, very mellow? Fast Eddie is a kinetic
>talkative 4 y.o., whereas his aunt Princess Flora MacDonald is 13 and
>somewhat arthritic, though equally talkative. Either could drive our
>neighbors in a tent city stark raving Republican.
>
>2) FOOD:
>http://www.homelandpreparedness.com/cgi-bin/shop/sc_searchz.cgi?user_id=id&database=dbase1.exm&template=prod_supp_food_sr2.htm&0_option=1&0=PCF
>is absurdly expensive, IMHO. They normally eat Royal Canin Oral
>Sensitivity 30 http://www.amazon.com/Royal-Canin-Feline-Nutrition-Sensitive/dp/B000HAJZM2
>(closest to the vet food our vet prescribed) - should we just pack
>that kibble, on the theory that a constant food supply will stress
>them less?
>
>3) GEAR:
>http://www.homelandpreparedness.com/cgi-bin/shop/sc_search_related.cgi?user_id=98593&database=dbase1.exm&template=prod_related_sr2.htm&0_option=1&0=PSKDCK
>shows their idea of an emergency kit. What would you pack, and how
>would you structure it so it could be towed behind a bicycle as well
>as fit in a small Jeep?
>
>Those of you who have assembled cat-go-kits, how have you done it?
>
>Thank you in advance for thoughtful and on-topic replies.



At first I figured you owned that site and was trolling for business
but you have posted before so that seems out. I was just going to
laugh off the concept of an pet evacuation kit, but, however
unpleasant to think about, the idea does have some merit. While I
don't live in an earthquake zone and do live on one of the highest
areas of land around, things can happen.

It's good the kit includes the furry mice. My cats won't go anywhere
without those. I always have a bag of dry food for the cats and
usually an extra, so I don't think I need the 5 year expiration date.
Besides, they would probably hate the food as much as they hate most
food that I try to give them.

Normally I feed them canned food but they also get some dry so that
would come along in the event of an emergency. If you're going to be
outside, you won't need a litterbox. And the difference between
something that gets towed behind a car is very different from
something that gets towed behind a bike. For a bike, something like a
Bob Yak Trailer would work but is expensive. Maybe something like
this:
http://www.performancebike.com/bikes//Product_10052_10551_1081351_-1___

That would be good, you could carry supplies and the cats, but at $300
it isn't cheap.

But you have me thinking. I'll look into what I can put together just
in case I have to get out suddenly.