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View Full Version : Mirco Chiping a cat


Rebel Rouser
April 5th 10, 09:13 PM
Is there a certain brand of chip that is best ? Has anyone had any
problems or good results from getting their cat chiped ?
Thank You very much,

Michael Lane

" Life ain't easy, when your fat & greasy "






























**
**

Rene S.
April 5th 10, 11:35 PM
I highly recommend microchipping your cats, even if they are indoor
only. Emergencies can happen and they can get out. If you heard any of
the Katrina stories, pets who were chipped were much more likely to be
reunited with their owners.

I like Avis chips. You pay a one-time fee to get registered (entered
into their database). You don't need to pay again unless there is a
change (address, owner, etc.). Some other brands charge an annual fee.
Avis is commonly used at vets and animal shelters, so should your pet
get lost the chip will be easily recognized.

Rene

Phil P.
April 6th 10, 03:33 AM
"Rene S." > wrote in message
...
>
> I like Avis chips.

Its "AVID" (American Veterinary Identification Devices). Avis is a car
rental company.

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
April 6th 10, 06:46 PM
"Rebel Rouser" > wrote in message
...
Is there a certain brand of chip that is best ? Has anyone had any
problems or good results from getting their cat chiped ?
Thank You very much,


Before you do it, research the cancer risk. I adopted a chipped cat back in
06 and last year I elected to have the chip removed. For me, the risk was
too high.

Paul

Rene
April 6th 10, 07:32 PM
>
> > I like Avis chips.
>
> Its "AVID" (American Veterinary Identification Devices). Avis is a car
> rental company.

Sorry about that. I DID mean Avid!

starcat
April 7th 10, 04:41 AM
"Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Rebel Rouser" > wrote in message
> ...
> Is there a certain brand of chip that is best ? Has anyone had any
> problems or good results from getting their cat chiped ?
> Thank You very much,
>
>
> Before you do it, research the cancer risk. I adopted a chipped cat back
> in 06 and last year I elected to have the chip removed. For me, the risk
> was too high.
>
> Paul
>

The risk of your cat being lost and never returned, particularly since cats
are wonderful escape artists and also find ways to get out of their collars,
is much greater than the risk of cancer or any other perceived risk with a
microchip. Just take a look at all the lost cats on your local Craig's
List, for example. Unlike dogs, many cat owners don't put a collar and tags
on their cats, and indoor-only cats are really screwed if they get outside
accidentally. With a chip there's always hope you'll be reunited, but
without one - the chances just aren't that great.

Both of my indoor-only cats are chipped, and so is our dog. Dogs get out of
their collars, after all. It's not a sure thing, but it certainly increases
the chances of us getting reunited if any of them is lost. Plus vets will
scan animals for free.

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
April 7th 10, 05:38 AM
"starcat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Rebel Rouser" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> Is there a certain brand of chip that is best ? Has anyone had any
>> problems or good results from getting their cat chiped ?
>> Thank You very much,
>>
>>
>> Before you do it, research the cancer risk. I adopted a chipped cat back
>> in 06 and last year I elected to have the chip removed. For me, the risk
>> was too high.
>>
>> Paul
>>
>
> The risk of your cat being lost and never returned, particularly since
> cats are wonderful escape artists and also find ways to get out of their
> collars, is much greater than the risk of cancer or any other perceived
> risk with a microchip. Just take a look at all the lost cats on your
> local Craig's List, for example. Unlike dogs, many cat owners don't put a
> collar and tags on their cats, and indoor-only cats are really screwed if
> they get outside accidentally. With a chip there's always hope you'll be
> reunited, but without one - the chances just aren't that great.
>

In my experience cats don't wander off and get lost like dogs do. They know
where they live and seldom wander if spayed or neutered. When I hear of
cats that go missing it's usually because they got killed or some human did
something very bad to them..

> Both of my indoor-only cats are chipped, and so is our dog. Dogs get out
> of their collars, after all. It's not a sure thing, but it certainly
> increases the chances of us getting reunited if any of them is lost. Plus
> vets will scan animals for free.

It's a personal choice. I opted to have it removed. I feel good about it
especially because the manufacturer, VeriChip, falsified its clinical
findings and on more occasions misrepresented studies that found a causal
link between those chips and fibrosarcomas. That same manufacturer also
tried to hide cancer studies when they pursued the federal government with a
plan to implant chips in babies and children.

http://www.antichips.com/press-releases/verichip-cancer-report.html

Paul

April 7th 10, 07:03 AM
The local shelters and rescue groups here chip all of the animals
before they adopt them out. Just last year, one rescue group got in a
cat that had been adopted out by another local rescue group. They
called, and the first group picked up the cat.

Microchipping is very safe. The odds of a problem are extremely small.
How often does an indoor only cat get outside? Mine don't hover by the
door or try very much, but they still manage to escape on rare
occasions. I've had Jay Jay for 5 years now, and he escaped twice in
the first year. I've had Sassy Taz for a year and a half, and she has
gotten out at least 5 times. (None of these times were because of me).
We got them back inside quickly. But it proves that it can happen.

Add in an earthquake, fire, floods, etc, and you may need that
microchip to pick up your cat from a shelter holding hundreds of
suddenly rescued pets. Most vets also have scanners, so people who
find a pet wandering can go to their local vet and have it scanned.
Collars come off. That's the whole point of a break-away collar, to
come off if it gets caught on something.

I would also point out that many horse registries have been using
microchips for over 10 years as the official method of identification.
I go to the annual friesian judging, and they don't judge a horse
until the microchip has been scanned. Foals are chipped by the
judges, and the dam is scanned for a chip. I've seen hundreds of
horses scanned, and only one chip had moved noticeably. And I have
never heard any horse owner complain about them. These are horses that
start out at $6,000 - $10,000 for a foal and only get more expensive.
They would not be doing the chips if they considered them risky.

April 7th 10, 07:10 AM
On Apr 6, 9:38*pm, "Paul M. Cook" > wrote:

> In my experience cats don't wander off and get lost like dogs do. *They know
> where they live and seldom wander if spayed or neutered. *When I hear of
> cats that go missing it's usually because they got killed or some human did
> something very bad to them..
>


This may be true of indoor/outdoor cats. But not of indoor only cats
who get out by accident, get hit by a car, get spooked, panic in an
earthquake or 4th of july fireworks, etc.

Cats can also get into things. Ever hear stories of cats getting into
moving vans, shipping containers, etc, and then being found at the
final destination? That actually happens more often than getting
cancer from a micrchip. Wouldn't it be nice if you got your cat back
after it traveled in a moving van with your old neighbor?

Or there's the case of the helpful neighbor who thinks your cat is
lost, and takes him to the shelter, trying to be helpful. We used to
have an indoor/outdoor cat because he had a huge spraying problem
(even after being neutered and given multiple medications). We had two
neighbors "return" him to us because they thought he was lost. Another
neighbor stole him for 3 days. We had missing cat signs up, so they
knew he was ours. He must have sprayed their house pretty good,
because they released him after a few days and commented later about
how friendly he was.

Bill Graham
April 7th 10, 08:53 PM
> wrote in message
...
> Microchipping is very safe. The odds of a problem are extremely small.
> How often does an indoor only cat get outside? Mine don't hover by the
> door or try very much, but they still manage to escape on rare
> occasions. I've had Jay Jay for 5 years now, and he escaped twice in
> the first year. I've had Sassy Taz for a year and a half, and she has
> gotten out at least 5 times. (None of these times were because of me).
> We got them back inside quickly. But it proves that it can happen.

I suppose it depends on where you live, but I've never had that kind of
problem with my cats. They are all "outside" cats, but they seldom leave the
property. One of them was an inside cat for about 7 years before we got her,
and the first time she went through the cat door to the outside, she just
lay on the front lawn and rolled around and really enjoyed being outside,
but then she came right in again and now she never leaves the property at
all. The only two I have that wander at all never go further than a half
block away, either to the mailbox to greet the neighbors when they pick up
their mail, or across the street to their former owners. (who got a dog that
they can't stand)
I can understand keeping cats inside to protect them from autos and or
other predators, but to prevent them from running away just doesn't compute
with me. All the "inside" cats I have ever known, won't go more than 20 feet
away from their front doors whenever they get the chance to go outside, and
even my outside cats seldom leave the property.

Netmask[_2_]
April 8th 10, 05:01 AM
Rebel Rouser wrote:
> Is there a certain brand of chip that is best ? Has anyone had any
> problems or good results from getting their cat chiped ?
> Thank You very much,
>
> Michael Lane
>
> " Life ain't easy, when your fat & greasy "
>


This how it works in Australia

http://www.petregister.com.au/

dgk
April 8th 10, 02:44 PM
On Wed, 7 Apr 2010 12:53:57 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
wrote:

>
> wrote in message
...
>> Microchipping is very safe. The odds of a problem are extremely small.
>> How often does an indoor only cat get outside? Mine don't hover by the
>> door or try very much, but they still manage to escape on rare
>> occasions. I've had Jay Jay for 5 years now, and he escaped twice in
>> the first year. I've had Sassy Taz for a year and a half, and she has
>> gotten out at least 5 times. (None of these times were because of me).
>> We got them back inside quickly. But it proves that it can happen.
>
>I suppose it depends on where you live, but I've never had that kind of
>problem with my cats. They are all "outside" cats, but they seldom leave the
>property. One of them was an inside cat for about 7 years before we got her,
>and the first time she went through the cat door to the outside, she just
>lay on the front lawn and rolled around and really enjoyed being outside,
>but then she came right in again and now she never leaves the property at
>all. The only two I have that wander at all never go further than a half
>block away, either to the mailbox to greet the neighbors when they pick up
>their mail, or across the street to their former owners. (who got a dog that
>they can't stand)
> I can understand keeping cats inside to protect them from autos and or
>other predators, but to prevent them from running away just doesn't compute
>with me. All the "inside" cats I have ever known, won't go more than 20 feet
>away from their front doors whenever they get the chance to go outside, and
>even my outside cats seldom leave the property.


The major worry here in NYC is the street traffic. It's pretty much a
matter of luck if they're going to get hit since they just don't look
before crossing the road. That's pretty much the only reason I don't
let them out, and I do let them in the backyard which I've fenced in.

I have one cat that does still have wander rights and he almost always
leaves in the morning when I do and comes in at night. He lost his
collar during the snowstorm and I found it a week later in a tree
across the street. But they really don't travel very far.

Bill Graham
April 9th 10, 06:23 AM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 7 Apr 2010 12:53:57 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
> wrote:
>
>>
> wrote in message
...
>>> Microchipping is very safe. The odds of a problem are extremely small.
>>> How often does an indoor only cat get outside? Mine don't hover by the
>>> door or try very much, but they still manage to escape on rare
>>> occasions. I've had Jay Jay for 5 years now, and he escaped twice in
>>> the first year. I've had Sassy Taz for a year and a half, and she has
>>> gotten out at least 5 times. (None of these times were because of me).
>>> We got them back inside quickly. But it proves that it can happen.
>>
>>I suppose it depends on where you live, but I've never had that kind of
>>problem with my cats. They are all "outside" cats, but they seldom leave
>>the
>>property. One of them was an inside cat for about 7 years before we got
>>her,
>>and the first time she went through the cat door to the outside, she just
>>lay on the front lawn and rolled around and really enjoyed being outside,
>>but then she came right in again and now she never leaves the property at
>>all. The only two I have that wander at all never go further than a half
>>block away, either to the mailbox to greet the neighbors when they pick up
>>their mail, or across the street to their former owners. (who got a dog
>>that
>>they can't stand)
>> I can understand keeping cats inside to protect them from autos and or
>>other predators, but to prevent them from running away just doesn't
>>compute
>>with me. All the "inside" cats I have ever known, won't go more than 20
>>feet
>>away from their front doors whenever they get the chance to go outside,
>>and
>>even my outside cats seldom leave the property.
>
>
> The major worry here in NYC is the street traffic. It's pretty much a
> matter of luck if they're going to get hit since they just don't look
> before crossing the road. That's pretty much the only reason I don't
> let them out, and I do let them in the backyard which I've fenced in.
>
> I have one cat that does still have wander rights and he almost always
> leaves in the morning when I do and comes in at night. He lost his
> collar during the snowstorm and I found it a week later in a tree
> across the street. But they really don't travel very far.

Yes....that's why I began my post with, "I suppose it depends on where you
live, but....." If I lived in downtown NYC, (where I was born, by the way)
I certainly wouldn't have "outside" cats.

dgk
April 9th 10, 02:02 PM
On Thu, 8 Apr 2010 22:23:20 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
wrote:

>
>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>> On Wed, 7 Apr 2010 12:53:57 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
> wrote in message
...
>>>> Microchipping is very safe. The odds of a problem are extremely small.
>>>> How often does an indoor only cat get outside? Mine don't hover by the
>>>> door or try very much, but they still manage to escape on rare
>>>> occasions. I've had Jay Jay for 5 years now, and he escaped twice in
>>>> the first year. I've had Sassy Taz for a year and a half, and she has
>>>> gotten out at least 5 times. (None of these times were because of me).
>>>> We got them back inside quickly. But it proves that it can happen.
>>>
>>>I suppose it depends on where you live, but I've never had that kind of
>>>problem with my cats. They are all "outside" cats, but they seldom leave
>>>the
>>>property. One of them was an inside cat for about 7 years before we got
>>>her,
>>>and the first time she went through the cat door to the outside, she just
>>>lay on the front lawn and rolled around and really enjoyed being outside,
>>>but then she came right in again and now she never leaves the property at
>>>all. The only two I have that wander at all never go further than a half
>>>block away, either to the mailbox to greet the neighbors when they pick up
>>>their mail, or across the street to their former owners. (who got a dog
>>>that
>>>they can't stand)
>>> I can understand keeping cats inside to protect them from autos and or
>>>other predators, but to prevent them from running away just doesn't
>>>compute
>>>with me. All the "inside" cats I have ever known, won't go more than 20
>>>feet
>>>away from their front doors whenever they get the chance to go outside,
>>>and
>>>even my outside cats seldom leave the property.
>>
>>
>> The major worry here in NYC is the street traffic. It's pretty much a
>> matter of luck if they're going to get hit since they just don't look
>> before crossing the road. That's pretty much the only reason I don't
>> let them out, and I do let them in the backyard which I've fenced in.
>>
>> I have one cat that does still have wander rights and he almost always
>> leaves in the morning when I do and comes in at night. He lost his
>> collar during the snowstorm and I found it a week later in a tree
>> across the street. But they really don't travel very far.
>
>Yes....that's why I began my post with, "I suppose it depends on where you
>live, but....." If I lived in downtown NYC, (where I was born, by the way)
>I certainly wouldn't have "outside" cats.


But there's always some threat. If it isn't urban enough for cars to
be a problem, then it's rural enough for coyotes. Hmm. Maybe there IS
some middle ground.

Of course in NYC, most people have apartments and can't let their cats
roam, except in the hallways and that's sure to **** off the
neighbors. I used to live in a small apartment building and for a
treat my cats got to go "out" into the hallway while I kept them from
going downstairs. I was on the top floor so they couldn't go up.

In fact, I bought my house so that my cats could have a better life
and go into the yard. That really was a primary motive. The apartment
didn't even have a south facing window.

As soon as they were comfortable in the new house (which was already
three times as large as the apartment) I fenced in the yard and out
they went. To this day, when I get home, they line up to go out and
they often get the chance.

Matthew[_3_]
April 11th 10, 08:55 PM
something to look at for those who are not sure about getting a lost pet
back


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/glasgow_and_west/8612006.stm

April 12th 10, 02:36 AM
On Apr 9, 6:02*am, dgk > wrote:

>
> But there's always some threat. If it isn't urban enough for cars to
> be a problem, then it's rural enough for coyotes. Hmm. Maybe there IS
> some middle ground.
>

We have both at the same time. We live on a high traffic street as it
is a main artery and gets a lot of traffic during rush hours. We also
have a wooded area behind the house.

Last year, my sister (who lives next door) lost her older cat, the
last one that she let go outside. The next 3 days, we saw a coyote in
the backyard and driveway.

Other dangers could be cat hating neighbors, accidental poisoning
(antifreeze, etc), owls, dogs, other cats, etc. I don't think anywhere
is really safe. We have multiple cat trees, cat beds, tons of toys,
etc, so our cats get a lot of physical and mental activity. They have
a great life.

Kterl email
April 14th 10, 05:35 AM
Nooooooooooo
Please don't chip a pet.

Kterl email
April 14th 10, 05:50 AM
Paul sounds informed IMO.

There are always some that don't want to/don't have the time to
investigate on their own. Thank you Paul for your patience in sharing
your findings with others for the health of our pets.

starcat
April 15th 10, 02:45 AM
"Kterl email" > wrote in message
...
> Nooooooooooo
> Please don't chip a pet.
>

Too late. Mine are all chipped.

cybercat
April 15th 10, 09:01 PM
"starcat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Kterl email" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Nooooooooooo
>> Please don't chip a pet.
>>
>
> Too late. Mine are all chipped.

Good for you, too.