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Timo J Keranen
April 8th 10, 06:55 PM
My cat Summerwind is a female, spayed.

When we once went to see my dad, Summerwind met (first time) another cat
in the hallway. They hissed and boared to each other. Summerwind was
in cage.

Now when we visit my dad, whether there is another cat or not,
Summerwind sort of panics, hides under furniture, and tries to bite.
Getting her back in cage is very difficult, she bites and claws, I
have to use thick leather gloves.

When we get to my home, Summerwind is like nothing was happened and is
totally normal.

Matthew[_3_]
April 8th 10, 07:18 PM
"Timo J Keranen" > wrote in message
...
> My cat Summerwind is a female, spayed.
>
> When we once went to see my dad, Summerwind met (first time) another cat
> in the hallway. They hissed and boared to each other. Summerwind was
> in cage.
>
> Now when we visit my dad, whether there is another cat or not,
> Summerwind sort of panics, hides under furniture, and tries to bite.
> Getting her back in cage is very difficult, she bites and claws, I
> have to use thick leather gloves.
>
> When we get to my home, Summerwind is like nothing was happened and is
> totally normal.
>
>
>
Yes when you take a cat into a unfamiliar environment they can react very
much the way you described. Cats are creatures of habits. If you are there
for awhile separate the furball from everyone else for a least a day and
only you visit plus feed. If you are there for only a few hours or less
than a day you may want to consider not causing the cat stress. It may take
a long time for the furball to get used to traveling and this situation. It
may never like it

Some cats are fine with what happens. I have a few that If they go out of
the house it is like there are about to die. I have one that is quiet as
can be as long as me or Mom is around

dgk
April 9th 10, 02:20 PM
On Thu, 8 Apr 2010 14:18:05 -0400, "Matthew"
> wrote:

>
>"Timo J Keranen" > wrote in message
...
>> My cat Summerwind is a female, spayed.
>>
>> When we once went to see my dad, Summerwind met (first time) another cat
>> in the hallway. They hissed and boared to each other. Summerwind was
>> in cage.
>>
>> Now when we visit my dad, whether there is another cat or not,
>> Summerwind sort of panics, hides under furniture, and tries to bite.
>> Getting her back in cage is very difficult, she bites and claws, I
>> have to use thick leather gloves.
>>
>> When we get to my home, Summerwind is like nothing was happened and is
>> totally normal.
>>
>>
>>
>Yes when you take a cat into a unfamiliar environment they can react very
>much the way you described. Cats are creatures of habits. If you are there
>for awhile separate the furball from everyone else for a least a day and
>only you visit plus feed. If you are there for only a few hours or less
>than a day you may want to consider not causing the cat stress. It may take
>a long time for the furball to get used to traveling and this situation. It
>may never like it
>
>Some cats are fine with what happens. I have a few that If they go out of
>the house it is like there are about to die. I have one that is quiet as
>can be as long as me or Mom is around
>

That's true; they're all different. I believe that are really two
kinds of cats:

Scaredy Cats
Curiosity Killed the Cat

Espy is CKTC. The doorbell rings, he comes running to see who's coming
in. Nipsy and Marlo are SC. Doorbell rings, they flee.

When I first moved into my house, I brought brothers Nico and Bushky
in a big cardboard box from the old apartment. Placed it in the living
room, and opened the top. Bushky is in the box whining. Nico jumps
out, wanders round the house, sniffing everything. He discovers the
stairs and heads up to see where it goes. Bushky is still in the box
whining.

That isn't the way to introduce cats to a new place I know now, but I
didn't know that then. But that is they way they were. One bold to the
point of dangerous, and the other scared of anything out of the
ordinary.

Back to the topic at hand, Summerwind is SC. If you have to make her
travel, she isn't going to like it but sometimes you have to do it
anyway.

April 9th 10, 04:27 PM
On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 09:20:29 -0400, dgk > wrote:

>That's true; they're all different. I believe that are really two
>kinds of cats:
>
>Scaredy Cats
>Curiosity Killed the Cat
>

I used to do cat foster care for an animal rescue group and there is a
whole continuum of personality types in that area.

Standard procedure was to being newcomers into the house and set them
up in an unused bathroom. I'd set the carrier down and open the door,
then leave it to them to decide when to come out of the carrier. The
door to the vanity was also left open so that once out of the carrier,
they could still have a hidey hole.

The little buggers ran the gamut from taking days just to leave the
carrier, to scooting immediately from the carrier to the bathroom door
and insisting on joining the rest of the "family."

One of our own cats, from the days before the rescue group, we called
our "greeter" cat. A car would pull in the drive, he'd run out to
greet the visitior, escort them to the house, then go back and sit on
the car hood until they were ready to leave. No cars were ever stolen
on his watch.

Timo J Keranen
April 10th 10, 08:51 PM
Would a new cage help?

Or a mild tranquilizer?

Or Feliway, face feronome ("Prozac" for cats)?

Regards
Timo and cat Summerwind

Matthew[_3_]
April 10th 10, 10:36 PM
"Timo J Keranen" > wrote in message
...
> Would a new cage help?
>
No that would increase the stress

> Or a mild tranquilizer?

Only if your trusted vet says it is ok

> Or Feliway, face feronome ("Prozac" for cats)?
>
Yes that can help spray some in the carrier and you can send some of the
dispensors to your dads to put in before you get there so it is circulating
before you get there


> Regards
> Timo and cat Summerwind