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ensoul[_2_]
May 3rd 10, 05:23 PM
two males, Moe & Rudy (brothers) indor & nutered...first I had to get
rid all of my plants because thye were eating the plants -- then I
found they didn't bother my cati and succlents...then my grandaughters
who's only 5 asked why Moe was eating dirt, then today I find Rudy
eating the dirt..it'd the dirt from my potted plants

ensoul

Matthew[_3_]
May 3rd 10, 07:05 PM
"ensoul" > wrote in message
...
> two males, Moe & Rudy (brothers) indor & nutered...first I had to get
> rid all of my plants because thye were eating the plants -- then I
> found they didn't bother my cati and succlents...then my grandaughters
> who's only 5 asked why Moe was eating dirt, then today I find Rudy
> eating the dirt..it'd the dirt from my potted plants
>
> ensoul

Potted as in fertilized soil PROBLEM Poisons are in there and it
could be a sign of a major problem in the furball such as anemia

Rene
May 3rd 10, 09:29 PM
Can you grow some cat grass for the cats? Be sure to use plain potting
soil and no fertilizer.

Also, I would schedule a visit to the vet. Eating dirt can signal a
nutritional deficiency.

ensoul[_2_]
May 4th 10, 12:27 AM
On May 3, 4:29*pm, Rene > wrote:
> Can you grow some cat grass for the cats? Be sure to use plain potting
> soil and no fertilizer.
>
> Also, I would schedule a visit to the vet. Eating dirt can signal a
> nutritional deficiency.

I have tried growing grass for them and they really enjoy eating it
then promptly throw all up..as for the vet I have to come with the $
please don't jump on for saying that, I've seen in here before not
saying that you would do that Renee or Mattew...when we got my hubby
was still living and if there any prob. with Mor or Rudy we got them
to the vet promptly

I will call the Vet, she if she has any ideas though

and thank you

ensoul

Matthew[_3_]
May 4th 10, 02:13 AM
"ensoul" > wrote in message
...
On May 3, 4:29 pm, Rene > wrote:
> Can you grow some cat grass for the cats? Be sure to use plain potting
> soil and no fertilizer.
>
> Also, I would schedule a visit to the vet. Eating dirt can signal a
> nutritional deficiency.

I have tried growing grass for them and they really enjoy eating it
then promptly throw all up..as for the vet I have to come with the $
please don't jump on for saying that, I've seen in here before not
saying that you would do that Renee or Mattew...when we got my hubby
was still living and if there any prob. with Mor or Rudy we got them
to the vet promptly

I will call the Vet, she if she has any ideas though

and thank you

ensoul

Hey ensoul I know how tight money Is. I have been lucky having the money to
pay for the vet bills. I think we will have to take Dumplin to a vet soon he
has lost some weight real quickly.
The only way I will jump on some one is if they refuse to do what is
obvious that needs to be done. You are calling the vet and willing to do
what needs to be done you are on the right track ;-)

dgk
May 4th 10, 01:23 PM
On Mon, 3 May 2010 16:27:56 -0700 (PDT), ensoul >
wrote:

>On May 3, 4:29*pm, Rene > wrote:
>> Can you grow some cat grass for the cats? Be sure to use plain potting
>> soil and no fertilizer.
>>
>> Also, I would schedule a visit to the vet. Eating dirt can signal a
>> nutritional deficiency.
>
>I have tried growing grass for them and they really enjoy eating it
>then promptly throw all up..as for the vet I have to come with the $
>please don't jump on for saying that, I've seen in here before not
>saying that you would do that Renee or Mattew...when we got my hubby
>was still living and if there any prob. with Mor or Rudy we got them
>to the vet promptly
>
>I will call the Vet, she if she has any ideas though
>
>and thank you
>
>ensoul


I think it's ok for them to throw it up. That's what my cats do. I let
them in the backyard (fenced in) and they eat some grass and throw it
up. I think it helps them get rid of the hair that they ingest before
it can clump into hairballs and cause more problems. That's my theory
anyway because they sure like eating grass and throwing it up.

I don't use any chemicals in the yard and don't let them out for a few
days after using any kind of fertilizer.

Rene
May 4th 10, 04:21 PM
> I have tried growing grass for them and they really enjoy eating it
> then promptly throw all up..as for the vet I have to come with the $
> please don't jump on for saying that, I've seen in here before not
> saying that you would do that Renee or Mattew...when we got my hubby
> was still living and if there any prob. with Mor or Rudy we got them
> to the vet promptly
>
> I will call the Vet, she if she has any ideas though

I know you are a regular here, and you take your cats to the vet. I
was not trying to jump on you at all, honestly.

I only wanted to let you know that eating dirt (or any other non-food
item, such as blankets) can be a sign of a problem.

As for the throwing up grass, that is normal. Cats will sometimes seek
out grass to help them throw up.

Please let us know what the vet says after you call.

ensoul[_2_]
May 5th 10, 05:17 AM
On May 4, 8:23*am, dgk > wrote:
> On Mon, 3 May 2010 16:27:56 -0700 (PDT), ensoul >
> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> >On May 3, 4:29*pm, Rene > wrote:
> >> Can you grow some cat grass for the cats? Be sure to use plain potting
> >> soil and no fertilizer.
>
> >> Also, I would schedule a visit to the vet. Eating dirt can signal a
> >> nutritional deficiency.
>
> >I have tried growing grass for them and they really enjoy eating it
> >then promptly throw all up..as for the vet I have to come with the $
> >please don't jump on for saying that, I've seen in here before not
> >saying that you would do that Renee or Mattew...when we got my hubby
> >was still living and if there any prob. with Mor or Rudy we got them
> >to the vet promptly
>
> >I will call the Vet, she if she has any ideas though
>
> >and thank you
>
> >ensoul
>
> I think it's ok for them to throw it up. That's what my cats do. I let
> them in the backyard (fenced in) and they eat some grass and throw it
> up. I think it helps them get rid of the hair that they ingest before
> it can clump into hairballs and cause more problems. That's my theory
> anyway because they sure like eating grass and throwing it up.
>
> I don't use any chemicals in the yard and don't let them out for a few
> days after using any kind of fertilizer.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I'm in subzided (sp) housing, had to fight to have 2 cats-- one you
can have with a doctors statement, 2 it was big battle and only 3
months after my hubby died when all you had to do was look at me and
I'd cry I do Rick was adament about getting 2 cats having some sense
of his death, though it was approx. a year later

the office B!*%$ called me on it right after he died said you have to
get rid of one one them, I started sobbing -- hated that, the more you
try not the more you do it, like it was only a few months after his
death, sorry rambling

any who -- pets are not all out side unless on lease it's grounds for
eviction and she has done when friend's cat got out and you have use a
popper scopper, these guys are big 16 lbs it's in the 20 pg lease I'm
not ex, too late can't think straight...and I will call the vet

many thanks

ensoul


I guess a drag queen’s like an oil painting: You gotta stand back from
it to get the full effect.
~Harvey Fierstein

Netmask[_2_]
May 5th 10, 08:38 AM
ensoul wrote:
> two males, Moe & Rudy (brothers) indor & nutered...first I had to get
> rid all of my plants because thye were eating the plants -- then I
> found they didn't bother my cati and succlents...then my grandaughters
> who's only 5 asked why Moe was eating dirt, then today I find Rudy
> eating the dirt..it'd the dirt from my potted plants
>
> ensoul

Go to the vet immediately - almost 12 months ago my beloved Max died
from a brain cancer. The early symptoms some 3 months earlier were dirt
eating and lick the ground.

dgk
May 5th 10, 02:00 PM
On Wed, 05 May 2010 07:38:08 GMT, Netmask >
wrote:

>ensoul wrote:
>> two males, Moe & Rudy (brothers) indor & nutered...first I had to get
>> rid all of my plants because thye were eating the plants -- then I
>> found they didn't bother my cati and succlents...then my grandaughters
>> who's only 5 asked why Moe was eating dirt, then today I find Rudy
>> eating the dirt..it'd the dirt from my potted plants
>>
>> ensoul
>
>Go to the vet immediately - almost 12 months ago my beloved Max died
>from a brain cancer. The early symptoms some 3 months earlier were dirt
>eating and lick the ground.

What? Not true evidence, just anecdotal and likely a complete
coincidence. And, given that Moe and Rudy are both eating dirt, the
chance that it indicates a sick cat is almost nonexistent. Far more
likely that it just smells/tastes good or contains something that
their diet is lacking. It might be that the OP should make sure that
they're eating good quality food though.

Bill Graham
May 5th 10, 11:53 PM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 05 May 2010 07:38:08 GMT, Netmask >
> wrote:
>
>>ensoul wrote:
>>> two males, Moe & Rudy (brothers) indor & nutered...first I had to get
>>> rid all of my plants because thye were eating the plants -- then I
>>> found they didn't bother my cati and succlents...then my grandaughters
>>> who's only 5 asked why Moe was eating dirt, then today I find Rudy
>>> eating the dirt..it'd the dirt from my potted plants
>>>
>>> ensoul
>>
>>Go to the vet immediately - almost 12 months ago my beloved Max died
>>from a brain cancer. The early symptoms some 3 months earlier were dirt
>>eating and lick the ground.
>
> What? Not true evidence, just anecdotal and likely a complete
> coincidence. And, given that Moe and Rudy are both eating dirt, the
> chance that it indicates a sick cat is almost nonexistent. Far more
> likely that it just smells/tastes good or contains something that
> their diet is lacking. It might be that the OP should make sure that
> they're eating good quality food though.

It could be a brain tumor, though....So don't discount the possibility. I
had a human friend who had one....One of the early symptoms was he started
eating the butter out of the butter dish one day while we were eating
dinner. (He was a roomer in my house) Almost any symptoms can be a brain
tumor, though, so it is admittedly unlikely......

Netmask[_2_]
May 6th 10, 05:05 AM
dgk wrote:
> On Wed, 05 May 2010 07:38:08 GMT, Netmask >
> wrote:
>
>> ensoul wrote:
>>> two males, Moe & Rudy (brothers) indor & nutered...first I had to get
>>> rid all of my plants because thye were eating the plants -- then I
>>> found they didn't bother my cati and succlents...then my grandaughters
>>> who's only 5 asked why Moe was eating dirt, then today I find Rudy
>>> eating the dirt..it'd the dirt from my potted plants
>>>
>>> ensoul
>> Go to the vet immediately - almost 12 months ago my beloved Max died
>>from a brain cancer. The early symptoms some 3 months earlier were dirt
>> eating and lick the ground.
>
> What? Not true evidence, just anecdotal and likely a complete
> coincidence. And, given that Moe and Rudy are both eating dirt, the
> chance that it indicates a sick cat is almost nonexistent. Far more
> likely that it just smells/tastes good or contains something that
> their diet is lacking. It might be that the OP should make sure that
> they're eating good quality food though.


I follow the dictum that if behavior changes for no obvious reason then
the best conservative approach is to seek professional advise. I've done
that with myself and picked up my prostate cancer at the treatable
stage along with various skin cancers. See a change then do something
about it rather than "Oh I must check that out........ sometime" = never.

I even have a "state of change" burglary alarm - I can walk out of the
house and leave the door open or a window open (I don't actually do
that!) and if some one unauthorised comes in and typically closes the
door or moves anything off goes the silent alarm to the security firm 2
minutes away.

The point of this is if you observe a change in your animals or for that
matter yourself then it is prudent to do something about it...


So yes there is no scientific relationship purely anecdotal. My vet
however told me and she is also a lecturer at Sydney University in
veterinary science told me that dirt eating is a marker and worthy of
investigating if it continues for any length of time.

dgk
May 6th 10, 01:34 PM
On Thu, 06 May 2010 04:05:23 GMT, Netmask >
wrote:

>dgk wrote:
>> On Wed, 05 May 2010 07:38:08 GMT, Netmask >
>> wrote:
>>
>>> ensoul wrote:
>>>> two males, Moe & Rudy (brothers) indor & nutered...first I had to get
>>>> rid all of my plants because thye were eating the plants -- then I
>>>> found they didn't bother my cati and succlents...then my grandaughters
>>>> who's only 5 asked why Moe was eating dirt, then today I find Rudy
>>>> eating the dirt..it'd the dirt from my potted plants
>>>>
>>>> ensoul
>>> Go to the vet immediately - almost 12 months ago my beloved Max died
>>>from a brain cancer. The early symptoms some 3 months earlier were dirt
>>> eating and lick the ground.
>>
>> What? Not true evidence, just anecdotal and likely a complete
>> coincidence. And, given that Moe and Rudy are both eating dirt, the
>> chance that it indicates a sick cat is almost nonexistent. Far more
>> likely that it just smells/tastes good or contains something that
>> their diet is lacking. It might be that the OP should make sure that
>> they're eating good quality food though.
>
>
>I follow the dictum that if behavior changes for no obvious reason then
>the best conservative approach is to seek professional advise. I've done
>that with myself and picked up my prostate cancer at the treatable
>stage along with various skin cancers. See a change then do something
>about it rather than "Oh I must check that out........ sometime" = never.
>
>I even have a "state of change" burglary alarm - I can walk out of the
>house and leave the door open or a window open (I don't actually do
>that!) and if some one unauthorised comes in and typically closes the
>door or moves anything off goes the silent alarm to the security firm 2
>minutes away.
>
>The point of this is if you observe a change in your animals or for that
>matter yourself then it is prudent to do something about it...
>
>
>So yes there is no scientific relationship purely anecdotal. My vet
>however told me and she is also a lecturer at Sydney University in
>veterinary science told me that dirt eating is a marker and worthy of
>investigating if it continues for any length of time.

Yes, but TWO cats at the same time. No two cats are going to develop
brain cancer at the same time. But I agree, any changes in behavior
are worth investigating since that's usually our only clue that
something is wrong.

Bill Graham
May 7th 10, 01:06 AM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 06 May 2010 04:05:23 GMT, Netmask >
> wrote:
>
>>dgk wrote:
>>> On Wed, 05 May 2010 07:38:08 GMT, Netmask >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> ensoul wrote:
>>>>> two males, Moe & Rudy (brothers) indor & nutered...first I had to get
>>>>> rid all of my plants because thye were eating the plants -- then I
>>>>> found they didn't bother my cati and succlents...then my grandaughters
>>>>> who's only 5 asked why Moe was eating dirt, then today I find Rudy
>>>>> eating the dirt..it'd the dirt from my potted plants
>>>>>
>>>>> ensoul
>>>> Go to the vet immediately - almost 12 months ago my beloved Max died
>>>>from a brain cancer. The early symptoms some 3 months earlier were dirt
>>>> eating and lick the ground.
>>>
>>> What? Not true evidence, just anecdotal and likely a complete
>>> coincidence. And, given that Moe and Rudy are both eating dirt, the
>>> chance that it indicates a sick cat is almost nonexistent. Far more
>>> likely that it just smells/tastes good or contains something that
>>> their diet is lacking. It might be that the OP should make sure that
>>> they're eating good quality food though.
>>
>>
>>I follow the dictum that if behavior changes for no obvious reason then
>>the best conservative approach is to seek professional advise. I've done
>>that with myself and picked up my prostate cancer at the treatable
>>stage along with various skin cancers. See a change then do something
>>about it rather than "Oh I must check that out........ sometime" = never.
>>
>>I even have a "state of change" burglary alarm - I can walk out of the
>>house and leave the door open or a window open (I don't actually do
>>that!) and if some one unauthorised comes in and typically closes the
>>door or moves anything off goes the silent alarm to the security firm 2
>>minutes away.
>>
>>The point of this is if you observe a change in your animals or for that
>>matter yourself then it is prudent to do something about it...
>>
>>
>>So yes there is no scientific relationship purely anecdotal. My vet
>>however told me and she is also a lecturer at Sydney University in
>>veterinary science told me that dirt eating is a marker and worthy of
>>investigating if it continues for any length of time.
>
> Yes, but TWO cats at the same time. No two cats are going to develop
> brain cancer at the same time. But I agree, any changes in behavior
> are worth investigating since that's usually our only clue that
> something is wrong.

If you have two cats, and they both have started eating dirt, then I very
much suspect that their diet is lacking in some mineral that they
need.....Perhaps salt. Change their diet.....Give them a selection of
several different brands of canned food, and several different brands of dry
food. Buy a salt lick at your local pet store, too.