PDA

View Full Version : cat with diaorrhea - but only when she goes outside


Mike Scott
May 21st 10, 02:01 PM
An odd one here.

We have two cats (mother - about 6 years old - and daughter); both
normally go out, both eat the same food (dry kibbles - neither will
touch wet food) which they've been on for years.

The mum has lately developed a problem with diaorrhea. But this only
seems to occur when she's allowed outside - keep her in for a couple of
days, and the problem clears; allow her out, and the problem recurs
quite quickly. She does seem very keen on eating grass from the garden
-- there are definitely no chemicals on it, but the amount seems to
have gone up; also she isn't making herself sick with the grass. Other
than the diaorrhea, she seems fine - alert, bright eyed, eating well, as
bossy as ever; no evidence of dehydration. She's been wormed recently -
but if it were a worm problem, just being indoors wouldn't clear it (I
think).

The daughter is fine.

It seems an odd one, and I'm not sure whether a vet would have much to
suggest. Any ideas would be welcome, thanks!


--
Mike Scott (unet2 <at> [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk)
Harlow Essex England

jmc[_2_]
May 22nd 10, 02:10 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Mike Scott exclaimed (5/21/2010 9:01 AM):
> An odd one here.
>
> We have two cats (mother - about 6 years old - and daughter); both
> normally go out, both eat the same food (dry kibbles - neither will
> touch wet food) which they've been on for years.
>
> The mum has lately developed a problem with diaorrhea. But this only
> seems to occur when she's allowed outside - keep her in for a couple of
> days, and the problem clears; allow her out, and the problem recurs
> quite quickly. She does seem very keen on eating grass from the garden
> -- there are definitely no chemicals on it, but the amount seems to
> have gone up; also she isn't making herself sick with the grass. Other
> than the diaorrhea, she seems fine - alert, bright eyed, eating well, as
> bossy as ever; no evidence of dehydration. She's been wormed recently -
> but if it were a worm problem, just being indoors wouldn't clear it (I
> think).
>
> The daughter is fine.
>
> It seems an odd one, and I'm not sure whether a vet would have much to
> suggest. Any ideas would be welcome, thanks!
>
>


Well, the obvious answer is to keep her inside. She's eating
*something* that is disagreeing with her - my worry would be she's
catching poisoned rodents. I'd definitely take her into the vet.

jmc

Bill Graham
May 22nd 10, 05:22 AM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, Mike Scott exclaimed (5/21/2010 9:01 AM):
>> An odd one here.
>>
>> We have two cats (mother - about 6 years old - and daughter); both
>> normally go out, both eat the same food (dry kibbles - neither will touch
>> wet food) which they've been on for years.
>>
>> The mum has lately developed a problem with diaorrhea. But this only
>> seems to occur when she's allowed outside - keep her in for a couple of
>> days, and the problem clears; allow her out, and the problem recurs quite
>> quickly. She does seem very keen on eating grass from the garden --
>> there are definitely no chemicals on it, but the amount seems to have
>> gone up; also she isn't making herself sick with the grass. Other than
>> the diaorrhea, she seems fine - alert, bright eyed, eating well, as bossy
>> as ever; no evidence of dehydration. She's been wormed recently - but if
>> it were a worm problem, just being indoors wouldn't clear it (I think).
>>
>> The daughter is fine.
>>
>> It seems an odd one, and I'm not sure whether a vet would have much to
>> suggest. Any ideas would be welcome, thanks!
>>
>>
>
>
> Well, the obvious answer is to keep her inside. She's eating *something*
> that is disagreeing with her - my worry would be she's catching poisoned
> rodents. I'd definitely take her into the vet.
>
> jmc

Or snails.....She could be eating garden snails, and they could be poisoned
by your neighbors.....

Gandalf
May 22nd 10, 05:57 AM
On Fri, 21 May 2010 21:10:10 -0400, jmc >
wrote:

>Suddenly, without warning, Mike Scott exclaimed (5/21/2010 9:01 AM):
>> An odd one here.
>>
>> We have two cats (mother - about 6 years old - and daughter); both
>> normally go out, both eat the same food (dry kibbles - neither will
>> touch wet food) which they've been on for years.
>>
>> The mum has lately developed a problem with diaorrhea. But this only
>> seems to occur when she's allowed outside - keep her in for a couple of
>> days, and the problem clears; allow her out, and the problem recurs
>> quite quickly. She does seem very keen on eating grass from the garden
>> -- there are definitely no chemicals on it, but the amount seems to
>> have gone up; also she isn't making herself sick with the grass. Other
>> than the diaorrhea, she seems fine - alert, bright eyed, eating well, as
>> bossy as ever; no evidence of dehydration. She's been wormed recently -
>> but if it were a worm problem, just being indoors wouldn't clear it (I
>> think).
>>
>> The daughter is fine.
>>
>> It seems an odd one, and I'm not sure whether a vet would have much to
>> suggest. Any ideas would be welcome, thanks!
>>
>>
>
>
>Well, the obvious answer is to keep her inside. She's eating
>*something* that is disagreeing with her - my worry would be she's
>catching poisoned rodents. I'd definitely take her into the vet.
>
>jmc

Absolutely take her to the vet.

And, keep her indoors.

Having diarrhea depletes various ions from the body required for normal
health.

Principally among them is potassium, which is strictly regulated by the
body. It is essential for normal cardiac activity, among other things.

Frequent bouts of diarrhea, and with some cats, only one or two, can
deplete potassium badly. The results can be sudden, and fatal, heart
failure.

You need to find out how low her potassium has gotten, since treatment
may be required.

Finding the cause of the diarrhea is also important.

Or, just keep her inside.

But do get her to the vet, ASAP.


---
avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
Virus Database (VPS): 100522-0, 05/22/2010
Tested on: 5/21/2010 11:57:25 PM
avast! - copyright (c) 1988-2010 ALWIL Software.
http://www.avast.com

cshenk
May 22nd 10, 03:54 PM
"Gandalf" wrote
> jmc wrote:
>> Mike Scott exclaimed

>>> The mum has lately developed a problem with diaorrhea. But this only
>>> seems to occur when she's allowed outside - keep her in for a couple of
>>> days, and the problem clears; allow her out, and the problem recurs
>>> quite quickly. She does seem very keen on eating grass from the garden
>>> -- there are definitely no chemicals on it, but the amount seems to

>>Well, the obvious answer is to keep her inside. She's eating
>>*something* that is disagreeing with her - my worry would be she's
>>catching poisoned rodents. I'd definitely take her into the vet.
>>jmc

> Absolutely take her to the vet. And, keep her indoors.

> You need to find out how low her potassium has gotten, since treatment
> may be required. Finding the cause of the diarrhea is also important.

Reformatted a little but kept the gist. Vet time, yes and I agree, she's
eating something or has some dietary deficiency that is driving her to eat
something that isnt agreeing with her.

kraut[_2_]
May 22nd 10, 04:28 PM
On Sat, 22 May 2010 10:54:49 -0400, "cshenk" > wrote:

>
>>>> The mum has lately developed a problem with diaorrhea. But this only
>>>> seems to occur when she's allowed outside - keep her in for a couple of
>>>> days, and the problem clears; allow her out, and the problem recurs
>>>> quite quickly. She does seem very keen on eating grass from the garden
>>>> -- there are definitely no chemicals on it, but the amount seems to
>
>>>Well, the obvious answer is to keep her inside. She's eating
>>>*something* that is disagreeing with her - my worry would be she's
>>>catching poisoned rodents. I'd definitely take her into the vet.
>>>jmc
>
>> Absolutely take her to the vet. And, keep her indoors.
>
>> You need to find out how low her potassium has gotten, since treatment
>> may be required. Finding the cause of the diarrhea is also important.
>
>Reformatted a little but kept the gist. Vet time, yes and I agree, she's
>eating something or has some dietary deficiency that is driving her to eat
>something that isnt agreeing with her.


Purrs and prayers sent you way that the problem clears up on its own
or with a vets help.

Good luck.

Mike Scott
May 22nd 10, 05:28 PM
kraut wrote:
> On Sat, 22 May 2010 10:54:49 -0400, "cshenk" > wrote:
>
>>>>> The mum has lately developed a problem with diaorrhea. But this only
>>>>> seems to occur when she's allowed outside - keep her in for a couple of
>>>>> days, and the problem clears; allow her out, and the problem recurs
>>>>> quite quickly. She does seem very keen on eating grass from the garden
>>>>> -- there are definitely no chemicals on it, but the amount seems to
>>>> Well, the obvious answer is to keep her inside. She's eating
>>>> *something* that is disagreeing with her - my worry would be she's
>>>> catching poisoned rodents. I'd definitely take her into the vet.
>>>> jmc
>>> Absolutely take her to the vet. And, keep her indoors.
>>> You need to find out how low her potassium has gotten, since treatment
>>> may be required. Finding the cause of the diarrhea is also important.
>> Reformatted a little but kept the gist. Vet time, yes and I agree, she's
>> eating something or has some dietary deficiency that is driving her to eat
>> something that isnt agreeing with her.
>
>
> Purrs and prayers sent you way that the problem clears up on its own
> or with a vets help.
>
> Good luck.
>
>

Thank you, and to the others for suggestions. We're keeping her inside
for the moment and keeping a careful eye on things.

(Oh, and I /can/ spell diarrhoea. Really, I can :-) )


--
Mike Scott (unet2 <at> [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk)
Harlow Essex England

cshenk
May 22nd 10, 07:19 PM
"Mike Scott" wrote

> Thank you, and to the others for suggestions. We're keeping her inside for
> the moment and keeping a careful eye on things.

Thats good to hear. There could even be some special weed that's sprung up
this year that she's going for (and daughter cat isn't)

> (Oh, and I /can/ spell diarrhoea. Really, I can :-) )
(grin).

Gandalf
May 23rd 10, 11:10 AM
On Sat, 22 May 2010 17:28:59 +0100, Mike Scott
> wrote:

>kraut wrote:
>> On Sat, 22 May 2010 10:54:49 -0400, "cshenk" > wrote:
>>
>>>>>> The mum has lately developed a problem with diaorrhea. But this only
>>>>>> seems to occur when she's allowed outside - keep her in for a couple of
>>>>>> days, and the problem clears; allow her out, and the problem recurs
>>>>>> quite quickly. She does seem very keen on eating grass from the garden
>>>>>> -- there are definitely no chemicals on it, but the amount seems to
>>>>> Well, the obvious answer is to keep her inside. She's eating
>>>>> *something* that is disagreeing with her - my worry would be she's
>>>>> catching poisoned rodents. I'd definitely take her into the vet.
>>>>> jmc
>>>> Absolutely take her to the vet. And, keep her indoors.
>>>> You need to find out how low her potassium has gotten, since treatment
>>>> may be required. Finding the cause of the diarrhea is also important.
>>> Reformatted a little but kept the gist. Vet time, yes and I agree, she's
>>> eating something or has some dietary deficiency that is driving her to eat
>>> something that isnt agreeing with her.
>>
>>
>> Purrs and prayers sent you way that the problem clears up on its own
>> or with a vets help.
>>
>> Good luck.
>>
>>
>
>Thank you, and to the others for suggestions. We're keeping her inside
>for the moment and keeping a careful eye on things.
>
>(Oh, and I /can/ spell diarrhoea. Really, I can :-) )

If she'll stay indoors (some cats absolutely won't) that might be all
the 'treatment' she needs. Taking her to the vet can be pretty
expensive.

I know ALL about that: my elderly cat has multiple health problems, and
I'm out of work :(

Are you feeding her a 'good' cat food? There is a tremendous difference
in price.... and quality, among cat foods. Basically, you get what you
pay for.

Since this COULD be diet related, it may something to consider.

Science Diet, which is generally good food, is now available at
'discount' stores. Not too many years ago, you could only buy it at a
pet store, and it was pricy.

Giving your cat the very best food you can afford can really pay off in
the long run.

Basically, if you are using a dry food, and some sort of grain is the
first ingredient listed on the label, you should switch to something
better, if at all possible.

If you consider switching, do some rsearch...this forum is a good place
to ask for advice.

I hope your cat's problems are over. I really worry when my cat isn't
well :(

Good luck to you and your cat :)


---
avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
Virus Database (VPS): 100522-1, 05/22/2010
Tested on: 5/23/2010 5:10:00 AM
avast! - copyright (c) 1988-2010 ALWIL Software.
http://www.avast.com

Mike Scott
May 24th 10, 09:08 AM
Gandalf wrote:
.....
> If she'll stay indoors (some cats absolutely won't) that might be all
> the 'treatment' she needs. Taking her to the vet can be pretty
> expensive.

Especially if it's not something a vet can treat. Knocking on 50 just
for the vet to look in the box, never mind analysis of stools.

Yes, she will stay indoors, but loves to be out - she absolutely loves
to run the garden length.

>
> I know ALL about that: my elderly cat has multiple health problems, and
> I'm out of work :(
>
> Are you feeding her a 'good' cat food? There is a tremendous difference
> in price.... and quality, among cat foods. Basically, you get what you
> pay for.

Yes. It's some of the James Wellbeloved range - I'm told this is pretty
good stuff.

.....
> I hope your cat's problems are over. I really worry when my cat isn't
> well :(

She's been indoors a few days now, and the problem has cleared up
completely. Maybe we'll wait a while, then let her out under observation
for short periods and see what happens.

Thanks again to all.


--
Mike Scott (unet2 <at> [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk)
Harlow Essex England

Gandalf
May 25th 10, 03:04 AM
On Mon, 24 May 2010 09:08:32 +0100, Mike Scott
> wrote:

>Gandalf wrote:
>....
>> If she'll stay indoors (some cats absolutely won't) that might be all
>> the 'treatment' she needs. Taking her to the vet can be pretty
>> expensive.
>
>Especially if it's not something a vet can treat. Knocking on 50 just
>for the vet to look in the box, never mind analysis of stools.
>
>Yes, she will stay indoors, but loves to be out - she absolutely loves
>to run the garden length.
>
>>
>> I know ALL about that: my elderly cat has multiple health problems, and
>> I'm out of work :(
>>
>> Are you feeding her a 'good' cat food? There is a tremendous difference
>> in price.... and quality, among cat foods. Basically, you get what you
>> pay for.
>
>Yes. It's some of the James Wellbeloved range - I'm told this is pretty
>good stuff.
>
>....
>> I hope your cat's problems are over. I really worry when my cat isn't
>> well :(
>
>She's been indoors a few days now, and the problem has cleared up
>completely. Maybe we'll wait a while, then let her out under observation
>for short periods and see what happens.
>
>Thanks again to all.

When my (indoor only) cat first got sick, over a year ago, I decided to
start feeding her a very expensive, 'natural' food. I figured: better
food, might help her immune system, etc.

Well, slowly, over time, she started to develop diarrhea. Very
intermittent at first, then happening more often.

At first I thought it was due to her health problems. Then I decided to
switch her back to her previous food.

Her diarrhea disappeared as soon as she was eating (100%) her previous
food.

It is possible that you cat's food, along with something outdoors, might
be upsetting her GI tract.

If you cat is otherwise healthy, if she was mine, I would try another
food, just in case her lower GI tract is always a little irritated, and
then a little grass or other vegetation is enough to cause the diarrhea.

If her GI tract IS irritated all the time, it could get much worse,
before too long.

Switching to a different food might help her, and, it shouldn't hurt
her. But it may give you some valuable information

Look for a food with a different grain than what's in what she's eating
now. Add the new food to the 'old' food, and gradually add more of the
new food over a week to 2 weeks, to make the adjustment easy for her.

Good luck.




---
avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
Virus Database (VPS): 100524-1, 05/24/2010
Tested on: 5/24/2010 9:04:02 PM
avast! - copyright (c) 1988-2010 ALWIL Software.
http://www.avast.com

cshenk
May 28th 10, 03:14 PM
"Kelly Greene" wrote
> "cshenk" wrote in message

>> Reformatted a little but kept the gist. Vet time, yes and I agree, she's
>> eating something or has some dietary deficiency that is driving her to
>> eat
>> something that isnt agreeing with her.

> You may also want to get her on a good wet food diet. It can be done.
> I've succeeded with 5 cats in the past year.

Um, I'm the one that said to the other person vet time. Mine are all on
wet.

Mike Scott
June 11th 10, 02:36 PM
Gandalf wrote:
> On Fri, 21 May 2010 21:10:10 -0400, jmc >
> wrote:
>
>> Suddenly, without warning, Mike Scott exclaimed (5/21/2010 9:01 AM):
>>> An odd one here.
>>>
>>> We have two cats (mother - about 6 years old - and daughter); both
>>> normally go out, both eat the same food (dry kibbles - neither will
>>> touch wet food) which they've been on for years.
>>>
>>> The mum has lately developed a problem with diaorrhea. But this only
>>> seems to occur when she's allowed outside - keep her in for a couple of
>>> days, and the problem clears; allow her out, and the problem recurs
>>> quite quickly. She does seem very keen on eating grass from the garden
.....snip....
> Finding the cause of the diarrhea is also important.
>
> Or, just keep her inside.
>
> But do get her to the vet, ASAP.

I thought I'd give an update, not that it's helpful.

The problem persists, she's fine when kept indoors.

However, my wife took her to the vet today. He was just as stumped as we
are. Says she's a perfectly healthy-looking moggy, and has no idea what
could be causing the trouble. He wondered if more frequent worming might
help (probably not - the problem was there immediately after worming
recently) and wondered if a more bland diet might help on the offchance
her digestive system was a bit delicate. (We could try that; but he's
only guessing).

So, not really further forward.

--
Mike Scott (unet2 <at> [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk)
Harlow Essex England

cybercat
June 12th 10, 03:22 PM
"Mike Scott" > wrote in message
...
> Gandalf wrote:
>> On Fri, 21 May 2010 21:10:10 -0400, jmc >
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Suddenly, without warning, Mike Scott exclaimed (5/21/2010 9:01 AM):
>>>> An odd one here.
>>>>
>>>> We have two cats (mother - about 6 years old - and daughter); both
>>>> normally go out, both eat the same food (dry kibbles - neither will
>>>> touch wet food) which they've been on for years.
>>>>
>>>> The mum has lately developed a problem with diaorrhea. But this only
>>>> seems to occur when she's allowed outside - keep her in for a couple of
>>>> days, and the problem clears; allow her out, and the problem recurs
>>>> quite quickly. She does seem very keen on eating grass from the garden
> ....snip....
>> Finding the cause of the diarrhea is also important.
>>
>> Or, just keep her inside.
>>
>> But do get her to the vet, ASAP.
>
> I thought I'd give an update, not that it's helpful.
>
> The problem persists, she's fine when kept indoors.
>
> However, my wife took her to the vet today. He was just as stumped as we
> are. Says she's a perfectly healthy-looking moggy, and has no idea what
> could be causing the trouble. He wondered if more frequent worming might
> help (probably not - the problem was there immediately after worming
> recently) and wondered if a more bland diet might help on the offchance
> her digestive system was a bit delicate. (We could try that; but he's only
> guessing).
>
> So, not really further forward.
>
> --
> Mike Scott (unet2 <at> [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk)
> Harlow Essex England

Meanwhile you don't have a problem if you keep her inside.

Mike Scott
June 12th 10, 04:19 PM
cybercat wrote:
.....
>> The problem persists, she's fine when kept indoors.
>>
>> However, my wife took her to the vet today. He was just as stumped as we
>> are. Says she's a perfectly healthy-looking moggy, and has no idea what
>> could be causing the trouble. He wondered if more frequent worming might
>> help (probably not - the problem was there immediately after worming
>> recently) and wondered if a more bland diet might help on the offchance
>> her digestive system was a bit delicate. (We could try that; but he's only
>> guessing).
>>
>> So, not really further forward.
>>
>> --
>> Mike Scott (unet2 <at> [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk)
>> Harlow Essex England
>
> Meanwhile you don't have a problem if you keep her inside.
>
>
No physical problem. But it's quite clear she'd really love to be
allowed out. Not that either cat ever goes far - but there are lots of
hidey holes and space to run in the garden.


--
Mike Scott (unet2 <at> [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk)
Harlow Essex England

cybercat
June 15th 10, 03:54 PM
"Mike Scott" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
> ....
>>> The problem persists, she's fine when kept indoors.
>>>
>>> However, my wife took her to the vet today. He was just as stumped as we
>>> are. Says she's a perfectly healthy-looking moggy, and has no idea what
>>> could be causing the trouble. He wondered if more frequent worming might
>>> help (probably not - the problem was there immediately after worming
>>> recently) and wondered if a more bland diet might help on the offchance
>>> her digestive system was a bit delicate. (We could try that; but he's
>>> only guessing).
>>>
>>> So, not really further forward.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Mike Scott (unet2 <at> [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk)
>>> Harlow Essex England
>>
>> Meanwhile you don't have a problem if you keep her inside.
> No physical problem. But it's quite clear she'd really love to be allowed
> out. Not that either cat ever goes far - but there are lots of hidey holes
> and space to run in the garden.
>
Mine would love to go out too, but happily they are attached to a human with
a slightly larger forebrain than they have, so instead, they sit in windows
and enjoy the smells and sights without the danger of disease or injury the
outside brings. Everywhere, not just in the US. Every seen the cam someone
used to find out that cats do the same thing outdoors as they do indoors all
day? 5% play, 95 percent lounging and sleeping.

cshenk
June 15th 10, 04:13 PM
"cybercat" wrote

> Mine would love to go out too, but happily they are attached to a human
with
> a slightly larger forebrain than they have,

Lol!

Well, Daisy (ressurrected semi-feral) got out just once and was terrified
she'd lose us when the door shut (screen, leads to fenced backyard). This
is a kitty who can barely meow and her purrs are more felt than heard. She
started almost screaming and Cash ran back in panic to let us know she
wanted in NOW!

She ran in and jumped on the sofa where Don was and just smoozed him for 30
mins.

cybercat
June 15th 10, 06:34 PM
"cshenk" > wrote in message
...
> "cybercat" wrote
>
> > Mine would love to go out too, but happily they are attached to a human
> with
>> a slightly larger forebrain than they have,
>
> Lol!
>
> Well, Daisy (ressurrected semi-feral) got out just once and was terrified
> she'd lose us when the door shut (screen, leads to fenced backyard). This
> is a kitty who can barely meow and her purrs are more felt than heard.
> She started almost screaming and Cash ran back in panic to let us know she
> wanted in NOW!
>
> She ran in and jumped on the sofa where Don was and just smoozed him for
> 30 mins.
>

heh! I think I wrote here about early on when Gracie was young and new here,
she ran out the front door (we live on a busy street, residential but people
"cut through" and speed) and I shrieked, instantly in tears "GRACIE
NOOOO!!!!!!" so she circled the azaleas between the front wall and the
front sidewalk then ran back into the front door, eyes wide, face total
alarm, like "w-w-w-WHAT???!!" And she never, ever tried it again. :)

cshenk
June 15th 10, 09:04 PM
"cybercat" wrote
> "cshenk" wrote

>> wanted in NOW!

> heh! I think I wrote here about early on when Gracie was young and new
> here, she ran out the front door (we live on a busy street, residential
> but people "cut through" and speed) and I shrieked, instantly in tears
> "GRACIE NOOOO!!!!!!" so she circled the azaleas between the front wall
> and the front sidewalk then ran back into the front door, eyes wide, face
> total alarm, like "w-w-w-WHAT???!!" And she never, ever tried it again. :)

Purrfect! I've always converted my kitties to indoor with no trouble.

With Daisy, she has a purch on the pet carriers inside our fully screened
porch (nice silky rug on top for her). There she can survey her yard and
bitch at the birds while dreaming in safety of being a ferocious wild kitty
again.

cybercat
June 18th 10, 08:43 PM
"cshenk" > wrote
> With Daisy, she has a purch on the pet carriers inside our fully screened
> porch (nice silky rug on top for her). There she can survey her yard and
> bitch at the birds while dreaming in safety of being a ferocious wild
> kitty again.

This is how they are happiest, totally absorbed in the sights and sounds,
and safe on top of it.

Mike Scott
July 13th 10, 11:04 AM
Mike Scott wrote:
> cybercat wrote:
> ....
>>> The problem persists, she's fine when kept indoors.
>>>
>>> However, my wife took her to the vet today. He was just as stumped as
>>> we are. Says she's a perfectly healthy-looking moggy, and has no idea
>>> what could be causing the trouble. He wondered if more frequent
>>> worming might help (probably not - the problem was there immediately
>>> after worming recently) and wondered if a more bland diet might help
>>> on the offchance her digestive system was a bit delicate. (We could
>>> try that; but he's only guessing).
>>>
>>> So, not really further forward.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Mike Scott (unet2 <at> [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk)
>>> Harlow Essex England
>>
>> Meanwhile you don't have a problem if you keep her inside.
>>
> No physical problem. But it's quite clear she'd really love to be
> allowed out. Not that either cat ever goes far - but there are lots of
> hidey holes and space to run in the garden.
>
>

As a footnote, whatever was causing the problem seems to have gone away
of its own accord. She's been fine the past weeks; just as well as the
hot weather has meant leaving doors and windows open. We still have no
idea what the problem was, or whether it'll recur.

--
Mike Scott (unet2 <at> [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk)
Harlow Essex England

dgk
July 14th 10, 02:23 PM
On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 11:04:54 +0100, Mike Scott
> wrote:

>Mike Scott wrote:
>> cybercat wrote:
>> ....
>>>> The problem persists, she's fine when kept indoors.
>>>>
>>>> However, my wife took her to the vet today. He was just as stumped as
>>>> we are. Says she's a perfectly healthy-looking moggy, and has no idea
>>>> what could be causing the trouble. He wondered if more frequent
>>>> worming might help (probably not - the problem was there immediately
>>>> after worming recently) and wondered if a more bland diet might help
>>>> on the offchance her digestive system was a bit delicate. (We could
>>>> try that; but he's only guessing).
>>>>
>>>> So, not really further forward.
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Mike Scott (unet2 <at> [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk)
>>>> Harlow Essex England
>>>
>>> Meanwhile you don't have a problem if you keep her inside.
>>>
>> No physical problem. But it's quite clear she'd really love to be
>> allowed out. Not that either cat ever goes far - but there are lots of
>> hidey holes and space to run in the garden.
>>
>>
>
>As a footnote, whatever was causing the problem seems to have gone away
>of its own accord. She's been fine the past weeks; just as well as the
>hot weather has meant leaving doors and windows open. We still have no
>idea what the problem was, or whether it'll recur.


So it goes with many health things. A friend of mine got hives all
over his legs for several days, then they went away. No idea what
caused it. Thanks for keeping up posted.