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Medea
May 30th 10, 07:58 PM
My beautiful 16 pound Siamese marked longhair, overnight
developed a mildly clouded cornea. The left eye is bright blue and
clear, but the right eye is mildy cloudy. The pupil reacts to light,
the eye does not seem irritated or running, and it does not seem to
bother him. The right eye looks gray because of the clouding and
the pupil not as black as the left eye. I can't get him to his regular
vet before Tuesday, and don't want to take him to the emergency vet
who is miles away.

Has anyine ever heard of a condition like this? I'm almost positive
it not a catariac, since it happened overnight.

Any info please advise. I am very worried. The cat seems normal in
every other way.

Thank you for any help.
Medea


at
May 30th 10, 09:20 PM
On Sun, 30 May 2010 14:58:23 -0400, Medea > wrote:

>
>
> My beautiful 16 pound Siamese marked longhair, overnight
>developed a mildly clouded cornea. The left eye is bright blue and
>clear, but the right eye is mildy cloudy. The pupil reacts to light,
>the eye does not seem irritated or running, and it does not seem to
>bother him. The right eye looks gray because of the clouding and
>the pupil not as black as the left eye. I can't get him to his regular
>vet before Tuesday, and don't want to take him to the emergency vet
> who is miles away.
>
> Has anyine ever heard of a condition like this? I'm almost positive
>it not a catariac, since it happened overnight.
>
> Any info please advise. I am very worried. The cat seems normal in
>every other way.
>
> Thank you for any help.
>Medea
>

>
>
Since it happened overnight, it is most likely an infection of some
kind. *Probably* a bacterial infection, since viral infections are
usually slower 'growing'.

Emergency vets are VERY expensive, but if it IS a bacterial infection,
taking him in ASAP could mean the difference between the eye making a
complete recovery, and perhaps having permanent damage, and even
blindness, due to delay.

Eye infection are particularly bad because the body's immune system is
not active, at ALL, in the anterior portion of the eye: where the lens
is.

If you can afford the emergency vet, I would get him there ASAP!

Good luck, and keep us posted, please!


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MaryL
May 30th 10, 10:09 PM
"Medea" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> My beautiful 16 pound Siamese marked longhair, overnight
> developed a mildly clouded cornea. The left eye is bright blue and
> clear, but the right eye is mildy cloudy. The pupil reacts to light,
> the eye does not seem irritated or running, and it does not seem to
> bother him. The right eye looks gray because of the clouding and
> the pupil not as black as the left eye. I can't get him to his regular
> vet before Tuesday, and don't want to take him to the emergency vet
> who is miles away.
>
> Has anyine ever heard of a condition like this? I'm almost positive
> it not a catariac, since it happened overnight.
>
> Any info please advise. I am very worried. The cat seems normal in
> every other way.
>
> Thank you for any help.
> Medea
>
>
>
>
>

Do not delay! This decision could be the difference between blindness and
saving his sight. I would try to call his regular vet and see if a vet is
on call even if your regular vet does not answer. Otherwise, it is worth
the drive to get to an emergency vet.

Good luck with this, but *please* do not put it off.

MaryL

Rene S.
May 31st 10, 01:13 AM
On May 30, 4:09�pm, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> "Medea" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > � �My beautiful 16 pound Siamese marked longhair, overnight
> > developed a mildly clouded cornea. The left eye is bright blue and
> > clear, but the right eye is mildy cloudy. The pupil reacts to light,
> > the eye does not seem irritated or running, and it does not seem to
> > bother him. The right eye looks gray because of the clouding and
> > the pupil not as black as the left eye. I can't get him to his regular
> > vet before Tuesday, and don't want to take him to the emergency vet
> > who is miles away.
>
> > Has anyine ever heard of a condition like this? I'm almost positive
> > it not a catariac, since it happened overnight.
>
> > Any info please advise. I am very worried. The cat seems normal in
> > every other way.
>
> > �Thank you for any help.
> > Medea
>
> >
>
> Do not delay! �This decision could be the difference between blindness and
> saving his sight. �I would try to call his regular vet and see if a vet is
> on call even if your regular vet does not answer. �Otherwise, it is worth
> the drive to get to an emergency vet.
>
> Good luck with this, but *please* do not put it off.
>
> MaryL- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I agree with MaryL, if you haven't already done so. Try to call your
regular vet and see if someone is on call or just go to the emergency
vet.

Having a cat with eye problems, things can change quickly and possibly
for the worse. Good luck.

cybercat
May 31st 10, 01:25 AM
"Rene S." > wrote :
>Having a cat with eye problems, things can change quickly and possibly
>for the worse. Good luck.

I am just trying to imagine finding my cat with a cloudy eye and not packing
her up immediately and finding any vet that is open, however far away.

jmc[_2_]
May 31st 10, 03:27 AM
Suddenly, without warning, cybercat exclaimed (5/30/2010 8:25 PM):
> "Rene S." > wrote :
>> Having a cat with eye problems, things can change quickly and possibly
>> for the worse. Good luck.
>
> I am just trying to imagine finding my cat with a cloudy eye and not packing
> her up immediately and finding any vet that is open, however far away.
>
>

Well, not everyone realizes it could be an emergency, that's why people
post here.... why stress your cat out for something that might be
nothing at all, or spend money going to the emergency vet for something
minor, when that money would be better spent for a true emergency
(especially if one is short on cash)? Now, you and I would realize that
a cloudy eye is likely not "nothing" - my experience comes from horses
but the problems are similar - but not everyone knows that.

So now he has the information he needed, hopefully the cat's been taken
off to the vet, or at the very least, a phone call made.

Oh, and while we're on the subject of eyes, an important point: If you
have an eye ointment for some specific problem your pet has had, if they
have a new and different problem, DO NOT use that ointment unless told
by the vet that it's safe - some that are safe for one kind of eye
problem can really damage the eye when used for something else!

jmc

MaryL
May 31st 10, 03:34 AM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Rene S." > wrote :
>>Having a cat with eye problems, things can change quickly and possibly
>>for the worse. Good luck.
>
> I am just trying to imagine finding my cat with a cloudy eye and not
> packing her up immediately and finding any vet that is open, however far
> away.
>
>

It is painful for me to even think about some of the possibilities. As you
know, Duffy is blind. He was born blind, and he was several years old when
I adopted him--but to envision something like that happening that possibly
could have been prevented is hard to even consider.

MaryL

May 31st 10, 04:34 AM
On May 30, 5:25*pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "Rene S." > wrote :
>
> >Having a cat with eye problems, things can change quickly and possibly
> >for the worse. Good luck.
>
> I am just trying to imagine finding my cat with a cloudy eye and not packing
> her up immediately and finding any vet that is open, however far away.

Or calling a 24 hour vet, even if it isn't local. Lots of cities have
emergency vets, so there would be somebody there who could tell you if
you have a real emergency or not.

Years ago, before we had a local (45 minutes away) emergency vet,
there was an all-night vet's number listed on the regular vet's
outgoing answering machine. I thought I had an emergency, and they
were able to help me over the phone with a solution. Had it been more
serious, I'm sure they could have given me a list where to I could go
for immediate treatment.

May 31st 10, 04:36 AM
On May 30, 7:27*pm, jmc > wrote:
> Suddenly, without warning, cybercat exclaimed (5/30/2010 8:25 PM):
>

>
> Well, not everyone realizes it could be an emergency, that's why people
> post here.... why stress your cat out for something that might be
> nothing at all, or spend money going to the emergency vet for something
> minor, when that money would be better spent for a true emergency
> (especially if one is short on cash)? Now, you and I would realize that
> a cloudy eye is likely not "nothing" - my experience comes from horses
> but the problems are similar - but not everyone knows that.
>

That's why there are phones.

Why would somebody post a question to a bunch of strangers who are not
vets, when they could simply call a vet (even if it isn't local) and
ask the same question? Then they would know if it was an emergency,
and most vets will be happy to listen to the situation and tell you if
they think it rates an immediate visit or not, without charging a fee.
There is simply no reason NOT to call.

jmc[_2_]
May 31st 10, 04:23 PM
Suddenly, without warning, exclaimed
(5/30/2010 11:36 PM):
> On May 30, 7:27 pm, jmc > wrote:
>> Suddenly, without warning, cybercat exclaimed (5/30/2010 8:25 PM):
>>
>
>> Well, not everyone realizes it could be an emergency, that's why people
>> post here.... why stress your cat out for something that might be
>> nothing at all, or spend money going to the emergency vet for something
>> minor, when that money would be better spent for a true emergency
>> (especially if one is short on cash)? Now, you and I would realize that
>> a cloudy eye is likely not "nothing" - my experience comes from horses
>> but the problems are similar - but not everyone knows that.
>>
>
> That's why there are phones.
>
> Why would somebody post a question to a bunch of strangers who are not
> vets, when they could simply call a vet (even if it isn't local) and
> ask the same question? Then they would know if it was an emergency,
> and most vets will be happy to listen to the situation and tell you if
> they think it rates an immediate visit or not, without charging a fee.
> There is simply no reason NOT to call.
>

Don't know. Maybe they didn't realize they could call the emergency vet
just to ask a question? Might have thought there would be a fee (not
that that would stop me). I have called the emergency vet after hours,
but the answer is almost always, "if you were worried enough to call,
you should probably bring her in". Meep has a bad habit of doing
worrisome things on Saturday nights and holidays, silly thing.

But I ask questions here when I'm fairly certain it's not an emergency,
but I'm not 100% sure. Would guess this person did the same thing, and
knows they made an incorrect assumption - which is OK, because hopefully
by now the cat's seen help, based on our responses.

I don't want to discourage that, because at least they are *asking* and
not ignoring the problem, hoping it'll go away.

jmc

Bill Graham
June 1st 10, 01:51 AM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, exclaimed (5/30/2010
> 11:36 PM):
>> On May 30, 7:27 pm, jmc > wrote:
>>> Suddenly, without warning, cybercat exclaimed (5/30/2010 8:25 PM):
>>>
>>
>>> Well, not everyone realizes it could be an emergency, that's why people
>>> post here.... why stress your cat out for something that might be
>>> nothing at all, or spend money going to the emergency vet for something
>>> minor, when that money would be better spent for a true emergency
>>> (especially if one is short on cash)? Now, you and I would realize that
>>> a cloudy eye is likely not "nothing" - my experience comes from horses
>>> but the problems are similar - but not everyone knows that.
>>>
>>
>> That's why there are phones.
>>
>> Why would somebody post a question to a bunch of strangers who are not
>> vets, when they could simply call a vet (even if it isn't local) and
>> ask the same question? Then they would know if it was an emergency,
>> and most vets will be happy to listen to the situation and tell you if
>> they think it rates an immediate visit or not, without charging a fee.
>> There is simply no reason NOT to call.
>>
>
> Don't know. Maybe they didn't realize they could call the emergency vet
> just to ask a question? Might have thought there would be a fee (not that
> that would stop me). I have called the emergency vet after hours, but the
> answer is almost always, "if you were worried enough to call, you should
> probably bring her in". Meep has a bad habit of doing worrisome things on
> Saturday nights and holidays, silly thing.
>
> But I ask questions here when I'm fairly certain it's not an emergency,
> but I'm not 100% sure. Would guess this person did the same thing, and
> knows they made an incorrect assumption - which is OK, because hopefully
> by now the cat's seen help, based on our responses.
>
> I don't want to discourage that, because at least they are *asking* and
> not ignoring the problem, hoping it'll go away.
>
> jmc

Yes. You get information wherever you can find it. You can Google, go to
Wikipedia, go to your public library, phone a friend.....Whatever. but if
you are doing something in order to learn, then you are way ahead of those
who just pop another beer and do nothing. If I went to the local emergency
room whenever I had some problem or pain, then I would be living there, and
they would be sick and tired of me......It is crowded enough. When I have
some problem, I wait some suitable period of time to see if it improves or
gets worse.....During this time, I investigate and try to learn what I can.
Then, if seeking professional help is indicated, then I do so.....But many
times it is not. I do the same for my pets. If I can't figure out what is
wrong, then I call the vet, but in many cases I can help them without doing
that......In other words, I use what is generally called, "Common sense". In
the case of a cloudy eye, I think my common sense tells me that going to the
vet immediately is a wise choice. But that seems to be what everyone on this
forum advised, didn't they?

cybercat
June 1st 10, 08:00 AM
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
...
>
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Rene S." > wrote :
>>>Having a cat with eye problems, things can change quickly and possibly
>>>for the worse. Good luck.
>>
>> I am just trying to imagine finding my cat with a cloudy eye and not
>> packing her up immediately and finding any vet that is open, however far
>> away.
>>
>>
>
> It is painful for me to even think about some of the possibilities. As
> you know, Duffy is blind. He was born blind, and he was several years old
> when I adopted him--but to envision something like that happening that
> possibly could have been prevented is hard to even consider.
>
Yes, I was thinking about Duffy. I guess I am just a freak, my cats really
are like my babies.

June 1st 10, 11:31 AM
On Jun 1, 12:00*am, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
> > "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
>
> >> "Rene S." > wrote :
> >>>Having a cat with eye problems, things can change quickly and possibly
> >>>for the worse. Good luck.
>
> >> I am just trying to imagine finding my cat with a cloudy eye and not
> >> packing her up immediately and finding any vet that is open, however far
> >> away.
>
> > It is painful for me to even think about some of the possibilities. *As
> > you know, Duffy is blind. *He was born blind, and he was several years old
> > when I adopted him--but to envision something like that happening that
> > possibly could have been prevented is hard to even consider.
>
> Yes, I was thinking about Duffy. I guess I am just a freak, my cats really
> are like my babies.

Mine are too. I have no interest in human babies. Nice to borrow, bot
so great to keep.

In april, my cat (who shows in the household pet class) reacted to a
couple of the judges. I could not get her to react to me even though I
went over her whole body, intentionally being rougher than any judge.
She just purred and rubbed her head against me in a happy way. Not
helpful for a diagnosis. She seemed fine. Other than those really odd
reactions (a sudden jerk as she turned and faced the judge with an
unhappy expression on her face). So, I took her to the vet.

She had a reabsorbed tooth. Basically, the cells that help to get rid
of baby teeth reactive and eat the enamel off the adult tooth. In one
tooth, the vet could see the nerve exposed. No wonder she reacted to
the judges. But no idea why I could not produce this reaction at home.
She ate fine, played with chew toys, etc. She must have been in
horrible pain, but she acted normal. It was all I could do to wait the
4 days for the scheduled surgery. And then waiting during the surgery.
I actually went back to the vet's office a couple hours early and just
waited in the waiting area. I was still anxious, but I did get some
updates (out of surgery, waking up, starting to stand up, etc).

Overall, she got 2 teeth pulled (3 were questionable) and the rest
were cleaned really well. It was expensive as the surgery took an hour
and a half. I had to borrow some of the money and pay it back with my
next paycheck. But I was so relieved to get it done as fast as
possible. And I am grateful that I was showing her and she at least
reacted to a couple judges. Who knows how much longer it would have
taken before she showed symptoms at home. There really wasn't much to
go by as clues, just a gut instinct that my cat was in pain and not
just being a grump with the judges.

A suddenly cloudy eye would scare me into an instant visit or call,
ore depnding on the time of day. There's an emergency vet about 45
minutes away. They are actually open evings, weekends, and holidays,
and NOT normal business hours. You call ahead, tell them what you are
bringing, and then ring the door bell when you get there. I think they
have a living area upstairs for the vet and tech on call. They helped
a previous cat on an Easter Sunday several years ago.