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Mike[_5_]
June 13th 10, 01:32 PM
Our 4 year old had a catheter for urinary blockage. We brought him
in early Wed morning...he had the catheter from then until Thursday
around noon. The vet watched him for 24 hours and we took him home
Friday evening. The problem now is whenever he has to urinate, he
goes in the box....a decent amount comes out but it takes a long
time...then for the next hour or so he's squatting all over the house
urinating varied amounts and then lays on his side when he's exhausted
and it leaks out. After about an hour he's peppy, playing and normal
until the next time he tries to urinate. The urine is clear and he's
eating fine. Is this normal? How long will this last if it is?
We've called the vet and they said it's normal leakage but my faith in
them is a little weary (our normal vet is closed until Monday...this
is a vet we use for emergencies).

Max[_2_]
June 16th 10, 07:10 AM
On Jun 13, 8:32*am, Mike > wrote:
> Our 4 year old had *a catheter for urinary blockage. *We brought him
> in early Wed morning...he had the catheter from then until Thursday
> around noon. *The vet watched him for 24 hours and we took him home
> Friday evening. * The problem now is whenever he has to urinate, he
> goes in the box....a decent amount comes out but it takes a long
> time...then for the next hour or so he's squatting all over the house
> urinating varied amounts and then lays on his side when he's exhausted
> and it leaks out. *After about an hour he's peppy, playing and normal
> until the next time he tries to urinate. * The urine is clear and he's
> eating fine. * Is this normal? * How long will this last if it is?
> We've called the vet and they said it's normal leakage but my faith in
> them is a little weary (our normal vet is closed until Monday...this
> is a vet we use for emergencies). *

Wet cat food... lots of liquid. You can do a whole lot to help your
cat by feeding a canned (wet diet). I learned this the hard way, and I
hope you don't have to. It is absolutely true. Vets will recommend a
dry diet, but your cat needs more liquid. Others on this board can
explain it better than I. A wet diet increases moisture and helps
dissolve the crystals that are forming in your cats urinary tract.

There is NOTHING NORMAL about your cats discomfort!!!

Rene
June 16th 10, 05:24 PM
> Wet cat food... lots of liquid. You can do a whole lot to help your
> cat by feeding a canned (wet diet). I learned this the hard way, and I
> hope you don't have to. It is absolutely true. Vets will recommend a
> dry diet, but your cat needs more liquid. Others on this board can
> explain it better than I. A wet diet increases moisture and helps
> dissolve the crystals that are forming in your cats urinary tract.
>
> There is NOTHING NORMAL about your cats discomfort!!!

Max is right. Your cat should be on a high-quality wet food diet. Our
oldest cat had urinary problems at age 1.5 (!) but since I've had him
on wet food, he's been fine (and he's almost 12 now). Your vet might
try to sell you prescription dry food--don't do it. The ingredient
lists on those "foods" are downright scary.

Here is a great article on feline nutrition that all cat owners should
read: http://www.catinfo.org/

Mike[_5_]
July 3rd 10, 12:56 AM
On Wed, 16 Jun 2010 09:24:11 -0700 (PDT), Rene >
wrote:

>
>> Wet cat food... lots of liquid. You can do a whole lot to help your
>> cat by feeding a canned (wet diet). I learned this the hard way, and I
>> hope you don't have to. It is absolutely true. Vets will recommend a
>> dry diet, but your cat needs more liquid. Others on this board can
>> explain it better than I. A wet diet increases moisture and helps
>> dissolve the crystals that are forming in your cats urinary tract.
>>
>> There is NOTHING NORMAL about your cats discomfort!!!
>
>Max is right. Your cat should be on a high-quality wet food diet. Our
>oldest cat had urinary problems at age 1.5 (!) but since I've had him
>on wet food, he's been fine (and he's almost 12 now). Your vet might
>try to sell you prescription dry food--don't do it. The ingredient
>lists on those "foods" are downright scary.
>
>Here is a great article on feline nutrition that all cat owners should
>read: http://www.catinfo.org/

Been a while but he got through everything. He was put on a steroid
for inflamation and the next day seemed alot better. He's been on wet
food his whole life. Now he's on a presciption diet for the crystals
(Purina UR) which I'm not thrilled about due to everything I read
saying not to feed by-prodcuts and this food's 1st ingredient is a
by-product. We've always fed our cats Performatrin Ultra which we've
read is good food. Not really sure what to do now.

jmc[_2_]
July 3rd 10, 02:04 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Mike exclaimed (7/2/2010 7:56 PM):
> On Wed, 16 Jun 2010 09:24:11 -0700 (PDT), Rene >
> wrote:
>
>>> Wet cat food... lots of liquid. You can do a whole lot to help your
>>> cat by feeding a canned (wet diet). I learned this the hard way, and I
>>> hope you don't have to. It is absolutely true. Vets will recommend a
>>> dry diet, but your cat needs more liquid. Others on this board can
>>> explain it better than I. A wet diet increases moisture and helps
>>> dissolve the crystals that are forming in your cats urinary tract.
>>>
>>> There is NOTHING NORMAL about your cats discomfort!!!
>> Max is right. Your cat should be on a high-quality wet food diet. Our
>> oldest cat had urinary problems at age 1.5 (!) but since I've had him
>> on wet food, he's been fine (and he's almost 12 now). Your vet might
>> try to sell you prescription dry food--don't do it. The ingredient
>> lists on those "foods" are downright scary.
>>
>> Here is a great article on feline nutrition that all cat owners should
>> read: http://www.catinfo.org/
>
> Been a while but he got through everything. He was put on a steroid
> for inflamation and the next day seemed alot better. He's been on wet
> food his whole life. Now he's on a presciption diet for the crystals
> (Purina UR) which I'm not thrilled about due to everything I read
> saying not to feed by-prodcuts and this food's 1st ingredient is a
> by-product. We've always fed our cats Performatrin Ultra which we've
> read is good food. Not really sure what to do now.

FWIW, prescription food didn't really help Meep's cystitis - in fact,
because it was dry, I think it was hurting. Some of the prescription
stuff is aweful. You might split the difference, use half Purina UR and
half Performatrin Ultra... We don't feed Meep anything prescription at
this point, but she's on a glucosamine supplement. She's also on a
chronic pain med now too, and it's helping a lot, but we don't know if
her pain is structural (she's already on metacam for arthritis) or
digestive, or bladder. It helps though, which is the important thing.

jmc