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KenK
August 1st 10, 02:47 PM
Anyone tried the Whiska's 'Temptations' hairball control cat snacks? I've
unsuccessfully tried everything else I'm aware of or heard about here
(anti-hairball food I've tried gives her diarrhea). BM problems? Other
problems? I'm going to try Google later this morning.

TIA



--
"When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner

cshenk
August 1st 10, 03:28 PM
"KenK" wrote

> Anyone tried the Whiska's 'Temptations' hairball control cat snacks? I've
> unsuccessfully tried everything else I'm aware of or heard about here
> (anti-hairball food I've tried gives her diarrhea). BM problems? Other
> problems? I'm going to try Google later this morning.

Hi KenK, not being sure what you may have tried, here's the gist of what
I've read.

Most commercial anti-hairball things all act like a laxative. Some more
strongly than others. Many (myself included) feel this isn't healthy over
long term so have taken to other methods. These assume you are well past
the basics of brushing as much excess as feasible on a regular basis.

Several chimed in recently with a sort of 'fiber addition'. I've not used
this personally in any deliberate way but others have had success. Most
mentioned pumpkin (the orange stuff used at Halloween if you aren't USA and
pumpkin has a wider meaning). Folks get cans of it then freeze in small
portions and dole out with the food. Some mentioned this works for any
'winter squash' that the cat likes. It's pureed fairly fine and added by
the tablespoon or with some cats, 1/2 tablespoon twice a day. My cat and
dog like acorn squash baked with butter so they always get a little scoop
when we make some. Apparent effect here on both pets is a mild stool
softening but not at all like diarrhea.

My own methods seem to be related to feeding broth (home made, salt free,
bone broth mostly left over chicken carcasses tossed in a crockpot) and
feeding a bit of extra fat (Olive oil, bacon or chicken rendered fat etc).

Both methods are utterly harmless to try with the fiber addition being the
more well known one. Just keep it salt free as possible for pet use (They
aren't as sodium tolerant as we are in the long run).

Last but not least, my experience has been that cats fed on a dry kibble
diet, no matter how high the quality of it, tend to have more furball
problems. They also have a higher prevalence of other problems due to
moisture intake issues not related to your question.

The easiest path if you are dry feeding now, is to try wet feeding for a
week (remove the dry) and see if it helps. Best method is a small can in
the morning and another in the evening. Fancy Feast may not be the best on
the market, but will do for this and you don't have to mess with storing 1/2
the larger can in the fridge for 'dinner'.

KenK
August 1st 10, 04:26 PM
"cshenk" > wrote in
:

> "KenK" wrote
>
>> Anyone tried the Whiska's 'Temptations' hairball control cat snacks?
>> I've unsuccessfully tried everything else I'm aware of or heard about
>> here (anti-hairball food I've tried gives her diarrhea). BM problems?
>> Other problems? I'm going to try Google later this morning.
>
> Hi KenK, not being sure what you may have tried, here's the gist of
> what I've read.
>
> Most commercial anti-hairball things all act like a laxative. Some
> more strongly than others. Many (myself included) feel this isn't
> healthy over long term so have taken to other methods.

I did some research since I posted and the snacks I mentioned contain
petrolatum. Same as Laxatone. Quarter to half teaspoon doses of Laxatone
every two or three days don't help her. A single teaspoon dose helps for
a day or two but really screws up her BMs - soft and way too often, last
time five or six in two days! So I likely won't bother trying the snacks.

> These assume
> you are well past the basics of brushing as much excess as feasible on
> a regular basis.

Yes. She's a short-hair.

>
> Several chimed in recently with a sort of 'fiber addition'. I've not
> used this personally in any deliberate way but others have had
> success.

I've been using 1/8 tsp. generic unflavored Metamucil in each of all
three meals for months now. Can't see that it is helping any. She
dislikes it. I probably should quit.

> Most mentioned pumpkin (the orange stuff used at Halloween
> if you aren't USA and pumpkin has a wider meaning). Folks get cans of
> it then freeze in small portions and dole out with the food. Some
> mentioned this works for any 'winter squash' that the cat likes. It's
> pureed fairly fine and added by the tablespoon or with some cats, 1/2
> tablespoon twice a day. My cat and dog like acorn squash baked with
> butter so they always get a little scoop when we make some. Apparent
> effect here on both pets is a mild stool softening but not at all like
> diarrhea.

I've tried a teaspoon of pumpkin before, once a day for a few days with
little success. I'm cuuently trying is again, this time for at least a
week, mixed with one of her meals. She'll eat it, but not by itself.

> My own methods seem to be related to feeding broth (home made, salt
> free, bone broth mostly left over chicken carcasses tossed in a
> crockpot) and feeding a bit of extra fat (Olive oil, bacon or chicken
> rendered fat etc).

I've tried olive oil. A quarter tsp. with each of three meals doesn't
help. I upped it to 1/2 tsp. but she won't eat her food then.

> Both methods are utterly harmless to try with the fiber addition being
> the more well known one. Just keep it salt free as possible for pet
> use (They aren't as sodium tolerant as we are in the long run).
>
> Last but not least, my experience has been that cats fed on a dry
> kibble diet, no matter how high the quality of it, tend to have more
> furball problems. They also have a higher prevalence of other
> problems due to moisture intake issues not related to your question.

I only feed her Wellness canned chicken. For months now. Any other brand
or dry food, even Wellness, gives her diarrhea, some more often than
others, usually one meal will do it. The Fancy Feast trout feast doesn't
bother her most of the time, but can be difficult to find. Feeding canned
Wellness, purchased by the case, is simpler. Odd, a year or so ago she
could eat anything. She's 14 - 15 now.

> The easiest path if you are dry feeding now, is to try wet feeding for
> a week (remove the dry) and see if it helps. Best method is a small
> can in the morning and another in the evening. Fancy Feast may not be
> the best on the market, but will do for this and you don't have to
> mess with storing 1/2 the larger can in the fridge for 'dinner'.
>
>



--
"When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner

cshenk
August 1st 10, 06:05 PM
"KenK" wrote
> "cshenk" wrote in

>>> Anyone tried the Whiska's 'Temptations' hairball control cat snacks?

>> Hi KenK, not being sure what you may have tried, here's the gist of
>> what I've read.

>> Most commercial anti-hairball things all act like a laxative. Some
>> more strongly than others. Many (myself included) feel this isn't
>> healthy over long term so have taken to other methods.

> I did some research since I posted and the snacks I mentioned contain
> petrolatum. Same as Laxatone. Quarter to half teaspoon doses of Laxatone
> every two or three days don't help her. A single teaspoon dose helps for
> a day or two but really screws up her BMs - soft and way too often, last
> time five or six in two days! So I likely won't bother trying the snacks.

Yes, messes with her digestion of nutients as well over time.

>> These assume
>> you are well past the basics of brushing as much excess as feasible on
>> a regular basis.

> Yes. She's a short-hair.

That actually means less than you may think. Had a set of long hair and
short once. Short hair had the issues and it wasnt just him grooming the
long hair. I had to get a sort of rubber mitt for him. Standard brushes
only work on middle to long hairs. You probably tried this already and do
it but worth mentioning if another didnt know it.

>> Several chimed in recently with a sort of 'fiber addition'. I've not
>> used this personally in any deliberate way but others have had
>> success.
>
> I've been using 1/8 tsp. generic unflavored Metamucil in each of all
> three meals for months now. Can't see that it is helping any. She
> dislikes it. I probably should quit.

I wouldnt bother with that.

>> Most mentioned pumpkin (the orange stuff used at Halloween
>> if you aren't USA and pumpkin has a wider meaning). Folks get cans of
>> it then freeze in small portions and dole out with the food. Some
>> mentioned this works for any 'winter squash' that the cat likes. It's
>> pureed fairly fine and added by the tablespoon or with some cats, 1/2
>> tablespoon twice a day. My cat and dog like acorn squash baked with
>> butter so they always get a little scoop when we make some. Apparent
>> effect here on both pets is a mild stool softening but not at all like
>> diarrhea.
>
> I've tried a teaspoon of pumpkin before, once a day for a few days with
> little success. I'm cuuently trying is again, this time for at least a
> week, mixed with one of her meals. She'll eat it, but not by itself.

I am pretty sure the amounts needed to be more. I do know my current cat
Daisy loves acorn squash with butter. Just as is. Lots of butter Mom!

She doesnt get this regular as we don't make winter squashes that regular,
but when we do, she gets it as a variation.

>> My own methods seem to be related to feeding broth (home made, salt
>> free, bone broth mostly left over chicken carcasses tossed in a
>> crockpot) and feeding a bit of extra fat (Olive oil, bacon or chicken
>> rendered fat etc).
>
> I've tried olive oil. A quarter tsp. with each of three meals doesn't
> help. I upped it to 1/2 tsp. but she won't eat her food then.

See if bacon fat (just save it up in a jar) works better? Unless you don't
do bacon. If so and you have no objection, you can probably find a friend
willing to save off a bit for your cat. Another one is butter which works
in small amounts as most cats are lactose intolerant but in small bits, they
all love it from my experience (note, butter. Most will ignore margarine).

>> Last but not least, my experience has been that cats fed on a dry
>> kibble diet, no matter how high the quality of it, tend to have more
>> furball problems. They also have a higher prevalence of other
>> problems due to moisture intake issues not related to your question.
>
> I only feed her Wellness canned chicken. For months now. Any other brand
> or dry food, even Wellness, gives her diarrhea, some more often than
> others, usually one meal will do it. The Fancy Feast trout feast doesn't
> bother her most of the time, but can be difficult to find. Feeding canned
> Wellness, purchased by the case, is simpler. Odd, a year or so ago she
> could eat anything. She's 14 - 15 now.

This sounds like an allergy. That can develop over time. If your furball
issues developed at the same time as the picky eating, then the next step
might be to start checking foods without the common allergens. These are
corn, wheat, and soy.

KenK
August 1st 10, 06:34 PM
"cshenk" > wrote in
:

> "KenK" wrote
>> "cshenk" wrote in
>
>>>> Anyone tried the Whiska's 'Temptations' hairball control cat
>>>> snacks?
>
>>> Hi KenK, not being sure what you may have tried, here's the gist of
>>> what I've read.
>
>>> Most commercial anti-hairball things all act like a laxative. Some
>>> more strongly than others. Many (myself included) feel this isn't
>>> healthy over long term so have taken to other methods.
>
>> I did some research since I posted and the snacks I mentioned contain
>> petrolatum. Same as Laxatone. Quarter to half teaspoon doses of
>> Laxatone every two or three days don't help her. A single teaspoon
>> dose helps for a day or two but really screws up her BMs - soft and
>> way too often, last time five or six in two days! So I likely won't
>> bother trying the snacks.
>
> Yes, messes with her digestion of nutients as well over time.
>
>>> These assume
>>> you are well past the basics of brushing as much excess as feasible
>>> on a regular basis.
>
>> Yes. She's a short-hair.
>
> That actually means less than you may think. Had a set of long hair
> and short once. Short hair had the issues and it wasnt just him
> grooming the long hair. I had to get a sort of rubber mitt for him.
> Standard brushes only work on middle to long hairs. You probably
> tried this already and do it but worth mentioning if another didnt
> know it.

No, I didn't know it. I've been using a brush with wire bristles first
(which gets a _lot_ of hair!), followed by a regular pet brush.

>>> Several chimed in recently with a sort of 'fiber addition'. I've
>>> not used this personally in any deliberate way but others have had
>>> success.
>>
>> I've been using 1/8 tsp. generic unflavored Metamucil in each of all
>> three meals for months now. Can't see that it is helping any. She
>> dislikes it. I probably should quit.
>
> I wouldnt bother with that.

But it works for me! I've taken it for decades and I don't have any
hairball problems at all!

>>> Most mentioned pumpkin (the orange stuff used at Halloween
>>> if you aren't USA and pumpkin has a wider meaning). Folks get cans
>>> of it then freeze in small portions and dole out with the food.
>>> Some mentioned this works for any 'winter squash' that the cat
>>> likes. It's pureed fairly fine and added by the tablespoon or with
>>> some cats, 1/2 tablespoon twice a day. My cat and dog like acorn
>>> squash baked with butter so they always get a little scoop when we
>>> make some. Apparent effect here on both pets is a mild stool
>>> softening but not at all like diarrhea.
>>
>> I've tried a teaspoon of pumpkin before, once a day for a few days
>> with little success. I'm cuuently trying is again, this time for at
>> least a week, mixed with one of her meals. She'll eat it, but not by
>> itself.
>
> I am pretty sure the amounts needed to be more.

I have a ton of pumpkin in the freezer plus a large unopened can. Not pie
filling. Hard to find. I can't recall ever seeing canned squash and I
don't eat the stuff. I'll try two teaspoons of pumpkin once a day?

> I do know my current
> cat Daisy loves acorn squash with butter. Just as is. Lots of butter
> Mom!
>
> She doesnt get this regular as we don't make winter squashes that
> regular, but when we do, she gets it as a variation.
>
>>> My own methods seem to be related to feeding broth (home made, salt
>>> free, bone broth mostly left over chicken carcasses tossed in a
>>> crockpot) and feeding a bit of extra fat (Olive oil, bacon or
>>> chicken rendered fat etc).
>>
>> I've tried olive oil. A quarter tsp. with each of three meals doesn't
>> help. I upped it to 1/2 tsp. but she won't eat her food then.
>
> See if bacon fat (just save it up in a jar) works better? Unless you
> don't do bacon. If so and you have no objection, you can probably
> find a friend willing to save off a bit for your cat. Another one is
> butter which works in small amounts as most cats are lactose
> intolerant but in small bits, they all love it from my experience
> (note, butter. Most will ignore margarine).

I'll think about this. Though since the 1/4 tsp. olive oil per meal
didn't help a bit...

>>> Last but not least, my experience has been that cats fed on a dry
>>> kibble diet, no matter how high the quality of it, tend to have more
>>> furball problems. They also have a higher prevalence of other
>>> problems due to moisture intake issues not related to your question.
>>
>> I only feed her Wellness canned chicken. For months now. Any other
>> brand or dry food, even Wellness, gives her diarrhea, some more often
>> than others, usually one meal will do it. The Fancy Feast trout feast
>> doesn't bother her most of the time, but can be difficult to find.
>> Feeding canned Wellness, purchased by the case, is simpler. Odd, a
>> year or so ago she could eat anything. She's 14 - 15 now.
>
> This sounds like an allergy. That can develop over time. If your
> furball issues developed at the same time as the picky eating, then
> the next step might be to start checking foods without the common
> allergens. These are corn, wheat, and soy.

The furballs started when I switched her to Wellness canned. No problems
with the Fancy Feast trout feast. I'll see what I can discover. Maybe I
can find a food she can eat that is also anti-hairball.





--
"When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner

KenK
August 1st 10, 06:43 PM
"cshenk" > wrote in
:

> This sounds like an allergy. That can develop over time. If your
> furball issues developed at the same time as the picky eating, then
> the next step might be to start checking foods without the common
> allergens. These are corn, wheat, and soy.
>

That doesn't seem to be it. She gets diarrhea from one Wellness Indoor
Health dry food meal and I just checked and it doesn't list any of these in
the ingredients. Maybe something else?


--
"When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner

Stan Brown
August 2nd 10, 08:14 AM
On Sun, 1 Aug 2010 10:28:07 -0400, cshenk wrote:
> My own methods seem to be related to feeding broth (home made, salt free,
> bone broth mostly left over chicken carcasses tossed in a crockpot) and
> feeding a bit of extra fat (Olive oil, bacon or chicken rendered fat etc).

As you mentioned later, salt is an issue with broth (depending on
your recipe) and most definitely with bacon fat.

I'm a little nervous about the idea of feeding any cat extra dietary
fat on a regular basis. Wouldn't that tend to either depress the
appetite, thus leading to protein deficiency, or else have them
eating too many calories?

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...

Rene
August 2nd 10, 05:04 PM
On Aug 1, 12:43*pm, KenK > wrote:
> "cshenk" > wrote om:
>
> > This sounds like an allergy. *That can develop over time. *If your
> > furball issues developed at the same time as the picky eating, then
> > the next step might be to start checking foods without the common
> > allergens. *These are corn, wheat, and soy.
>
> That doesn't seem to be it. She gets diarrhea from one Wellness Indoor
> Health dry food meal and I just checked and it doesn't list any of these in
> the ingredients. Maybe something else?

Fish is also a common allergen. You said she is able to eat the canned
Wellness chicken. Have you tried the Wellness canned turkey as a test
(green can)?

I am sorry you are still having hairball problems. As another poster
said, my experience has been that hairballs decrease when I feed a
canned only diet. IMO since you are having possible allergy problems,
I would avoid the Temptations treats. Stick with Petromalt or just
plain petroleum jelly.

KenK
August 2nd 10, 06:34 PM
Rene > wrote in
:

> On Aug 1, 12:43*pm, KenK > wrote:
>> "cshenk" > wrote
>> innews:[email protected]
> giganews.com:
>>
>> > This sounds like an allergy. *That can develop over time. *If your
>> > furball issues developed at the same time as the picky eating, then
>> > the next step might be to start checking foods without the common
>> > allergens. *These are corn, wheat, and soy.
>>
>> That doesn't seem to be it. She gets diarrhea from one Wellness
>> Indoor Health dry food meal and I just checked and it doesn't list
>> any of these
> in
>> the ingredients. Maybe something else?
>
> Fish is also a common allergen. You said she is able to eat the canned
> Wellness chicken. Have you tried the Wellness canned turkey as a test
> (green can)?

Can't. Only dealer here sells only by the case. Since she seems to be
thriving on chicken I don't want to spend ~$30 on a food she may/can not
eat. Wellness doesn't seem to provide samples of their canned stuff, just
dry. Also, the Fancy Feast trout feast agreed with her before I switched
to Wellness.

> I am sorry you are still having hairball problems. As another poster
> said, my experience has been that hairballs decrease when I feed a
> canned only diet. IMO since you are having possible allergy problems,
> I would avoid the Temptations treats. Stick with Petromalt or just
> plain petroleum jelly.

Currently I'm going with pumpkin once a day again; this time I'll stay
with it for a week or two. I've been adding a teaspoon to one meal a day.
Advice here was for more. I briefly Googled and 1 tsp. seems to be the
popular dose. I think I'll stay with that. If it doesn't help I'll try 2
tsp. I tried two yesterday as an experiment and she ate it without a
problem. I rashly assume the stuff is harmless to her. I decided to drop
the 1/8 tsp generic Metamucil added to each meal. She dislikes it and it
doesn't seem to matter.






--
"When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner

Rene
August 2nd 10, 07:13 PM
> Can't. Only dealer here sells only by the case. Since she seems to be
> thriving on chicken I don't want to spend ~$30 on a food she may/can not
> eat. Wellness doesn't seem to provide samples of their canned stuff, just
> dry. Also, the Fancy Feast trout feast agreed with her before I switched
> to Wellness.

Have you called Wellness to ask? They might send you some money-off
coupons for the canned, at least. I've called them in the past and
they have been helpful, even sending me vouchers when I had vomiting
problems with their beef and chicken canned.

> Currently I'm going with pumpkin once a day again; this time I'll stay
> with it for a week or two. I've been adding a teaspoon to one meal a day.
> Advice here was for more. I briefly Googled and 1 tsp. seems to be the
> popular dose. I think I'll stay with that. If it doesn't help I'll try 2
> tsp. I tried two yesterday as an experiment and she ate it without a
> problem. I rashly assume the stuff is harmless to her. I decided to drop
> the 1/8 tsp generic Metamucil added to each meal. She dislikes it and it
> doesn't seem to matter.

That right, you were using the pumpkin. I'd stick with it for a few
weeks and see what happens.

cshenk
August 2nd 10, 11:19 PM
"KenK" wrote
> "cshenk" wrote

>>>> These assume
>>>> you are well past the basics of brushing as much excess as feasible
>>>> on a regular basis.
>>
>>> Yes. She's a short-hair.

>> That actually means less than you may think. Had a set of long hair
>> and short once. Short hair had the issues and it wasnt just him
>> grooming the long hair. I had to get a sort of rubber mitt for him.
>> Standard brushes only work on middle to long hairs. You probably
>> tried this already and do it but worth mentioning if another didnt
>> know it.

> No, I didn't know it. I've been using a brush with wire bristles first
> (which gets a _lot_ of hair!), followed by a regular pet brush.

You probably are doing it right but next time you go to your local pet
supply store, you may want to check into the rubber hand mitts with rubber
'nubbles' on them. They actually work very well. We use a regular simple
brush on Daisy (medium hair) but Cash-pup gets the hand mitt (short hair).
Last time I had a short hair cat, I had a mitt too and it worked very well.

>>> I've been using 1/8 tsp. generic unflavored Metamucil in each of all
>>> three meals for months now. Can't see that it is helping any. She
>>> dislikes it. I probably should quit.
>>
>> I wouldnt bother with that.
>
> But it works for me! I've taken it for decades and I don't have any
> hairball problems at all!

LOL! I'm not sure the metabolisms are close enough for that to work (that's
what I meant above).

>>>> Most mentioned pumpkin (the orange stuff used at Halloween
>>>> if you aren't USA and pumpkin has a wider meaning). Folks get cans
(snippies)

>>> I've tried a teaspoon of pumpkin before, once a day for a few days
>>> with little success. I'm cuuently trying is again, this time for at
>>> least a week, mixed with one of her meals. She'll eat it, but not by
>>> itself.
>>
>> I am pretty sure the amounts needed to be more.

> I have a ton of pumpkin in the freezer plus a large unopened can. Not pie
> filling. Hard to find. I can't recall ever seeing canned squash and I
> don't eat the stuff. I'll try two teaspoons of pumpkin once a day?

That is closer to what I heard here is needed. Far as I know, needs to be
what they call 'winter squash' (often called pumpkins in some other
countries like OZ and I believe England). Butternut, Mother hubbard, Acorn
squash are suitable. Spagetti squash is probably as well. Don't worr about
canned or if it is 'pie filling' or not. Canned is convienent if you find
it but with a microwave and a fresh one, you can make enough for your needs
for probably 3 months or more off one squash.

Here's how (I don't know if you cook much, apologies if this is old hat to
you but another may benefit so worth typing the basics).

Cut squash in half. May freeze the other half in a double wrapped airtight
'ziplock' if desired. Scoop out any seeds (all of them are edible, if you
want, rinse those then salt and spread thin on a cookie sheet or something
and bake at 350 for about 15 mins for a munchie treat). Add 1-2 TB water to
the squash half then cover with a paper towel (or a clean damp kitchen towel
works). Nuke on high for about 10 mins then let sit and check to see if it
is soft enough. Depending on the size of the winter squash, this may be all
it needs or it may need up to 2 repetitons of this. Once nice and soft,
scoop out then freeze in usable portions for your needs. Defrosted in the
fridge, it will hold well for up to 5 days so a baggie of 3-5 TB may work
well for you. *If* your cat likes butter (Most of mine *luv* butter and
hated margarine), add a little real butter while still warm and mix that in
as it melts by mashing the baggie or if doing icecube trays which you freeze
then once hard load in a larger freezer bag for use one by one, a little pat
on-top each one.

I don't suggest Mother Hubbard as you don't like squash and they are very
hard to cut open. If it helps, this is really easy to do with Acorn squash
which I just set in a microwave safe bowl so the cut halves stand up nicely.
I'm fixing those for us 2 foots though and the fact that they pets like it
is just a side benefit.

Daisy-cat doesn't have any furball issues, having hurked maybe 3 since we
got her 2.5 years ago with 2 in her first week and a 3rd about a year ago
when she had the sniffles.

>> See if bacon fat (just save it up in a jar) works better? Unless you
>> don't do bacon. If so and you have no objection, you can probably
>> find a friend willing to save off a bit for your cat. Another one is
>> butter which works in small amounts as most cats are lactose
>> intolerant but in small bits, they all love it from my experience
>> (note, butter. Most will ignore margarine).
>
> I'll think about this. Though since the 1/4 tsp. olive oil per meal
> didn't help a bit...

It may not work. It's just one of those 'harmless to try' things. I
started this route when dealing with a long ago cat who had coat issues and
noted the side benefit of reduced furballs. I suspect the broth feeding is
probably doing more benefit.

>>> I only feed her Wellness canned chicken. For months now. Any other
>>> brand or dry food, even Wellness, gives her diarrhea, some more often
>>> than others, usually one meal will do it. The Fancy Feast trout feast
>>> doesn't bother her most of the time, but can be difficult to find.
>>> Feeding canned Wellness, purchased by the case, is simpler. Odd, a
>>> year or so ago she could eat anything. She's 14 - 15 now.
>>
>> This sounds like an allergy. That can develop over time. If your
>> furball issues developed at the same time as the picky eating, then
>> the next step might be to start checking foods without the common
>> allergens. These are corn, wheat, and soy.

> The furballs started when I switched her to Wellness canned. No problems
> with the Fancy Feast trout feast. I'll see what I can discover. Maybe I
> can find a food she can eat that is also anti-hairball.

Might! Sometimes it takes a bit. One of the things I always try to avoid
is letting a cat get too particular to a brand and type of food. I've had
bad issues with rescues who were fed only 'one thing' for a long time and
then either can't find that one, or something else crop up requiring a
change. I know, this can be hard to put into practice with a stubborn
eater!

When Daisy first came to us, she wouldn't eat anything but the specific
kibble (Purina Pro) her foster mom's all had her on for 18 months. I had to
convince her that 'wet was food' and it took a bit. Now she gets a variety
of brands (not all the top of the market but at least it's wet and most is
upscale based on label reading to the best of my knowledge).

cshenk
August 2nd 10, 11:33 PM
"KenK" wrote
> "cshenk" wrote

>> This sounds like an allergy. That can develop over time. If your
>> furball issues developed at the same time as the picky eating, then
>> the next step might be to start checking foods without the common
>> allergens. These are corn, wheat, and soy.

> That doesn't seem to be it. She gets diarrhea from one Wellness Indoor
> Health dry food meal and I just checked and it doesn't list any of these
> in
> the ingredients. Maybe something else?

Probably somethingelse then. Wellness (no local places I go to sell it so
havent tried that one) is reputed to be a top of the line product with no
allergins of the common sort added.

Could she be having issues with whatever you use for treats? That shouldn't
cause the wellness to make her go off but folks sometimes don't think of the
treat as part of it all.

Example: I make most of the pet treats here now. Had to swap as Cash-pup
seems to have a potential corn or soy issue. He doesnt seem to have a wheat
one. He may *very well* have one to some common preservative as well.
Narrowing down was harder when it came to biscuits than just making my own.
I've been using a breadmachine practically since they first came out and
have 2 high end ones so this is an easy trick. Finding bonemeal was the
only somewhat hard one but we mail ordered a big bag that resides in the
spare chest freezer.

I also made (yesterday) a large batch of dehydrator 'treats' which are now
cut to small bits. Some are in the fridge as they were mostly fatty meat so
never will dry fully for true cabinet storage but the rest was very lean
beef cuts now chopped and in the treat jar as crunchy bits.

Although it would be easier to just get doggie biscuits, this is actually
not that hard to do if you don't care that the shape of his 'biscuit' or
dehydrator treat, is 'perfect'. I assure you, they don't care at all
(grin).

cshenk
August 2nd 10, 11:52 PM
"Stan Brown" wrote
> cshenk wrote:

>> My own methods seem to be related to feeding broth (home made, salt free,
>> bone broth mostly left over chicken carcasses tossed in a crockpot) and
>> feeding a bit of extra fat (Olive oil, bacon or chicken rendered fat
>> etc).

> As you mentioned later, salt is an issue with broth (depending on
> your recipe) and most definitely with bacon fat.

Yes, bacon fat has to be either low-sodium bacon or the simple country
version that is often called 'raw bacon' and isn't treated. It's common in
Australia but you have to hunt here at times for it. The taste is *not* the
same but it works in much of our cookery so we get it and the fat, is mostly
with no salt added.

Often as not, the fat is from the drippings that develop from a skin-on pork
shoulder slowly rendered in a crockpot (nothing added at that stage at all)
then decanted.

> I'm a little nervous about the idea of feeding any cat extra dietary
> fat on a regular basis. Wouldn't that tend to either depress the
> appetite, thus leading to protein deficiency, or else have them
> eating too many calories?

I don't use that much per feeding. It's not been a problem on any cat once
converted fully to wet. Then again, I've never had a really overweight cat
although Daisy is 7% over optimal per last vet check. She was overweight
when we got her but slowly trimmed down to a decent shaqpe.

KenK
August 3rd 10, 05:45 PM
"cshenk" > wrote in
:

> Could she be having issues with whatever you use for treats? That
> shouldn't cause the wellness to make her go off but folks sometimes
> don't think of the treat as part of it all.
>

No, that's not it. Since she started having dietary problems a year or so
ago I took her off everything but the regular cat food I was currently
feeding her to try to pin down her problems. From habit, I've done so ever
since.

Ken


--
"When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner

KenK
August 3rd 10, 06:03 PM
"cshenk" > wrote in
:

> That is closer to what I heard here is needed. Far as I know, needs
> to be what they call 'winter squash' (often called pumpkins in some
> other countries like OZ and I believe England). Butternut, Mother
> hubbard, Acorn squash are suitable. Spagetti squash is probably as
> well. Don't worr about canned or if it is 'pie filling' or not.
> Canned is convienent if you find it but with a microwave and a fresh
> one, you can make enough for your needs for probably 3 months or more
> off one squash.
>
>

Now I'm confused. Are you sure the pumpkin recommended for cat hairballs
is not what we call pumpkin in the US? I've read that squash 'also'
works, but not 'instead of'. I'd think they were much the same thing. I
suspect pumpkin is just one kind of squash. As to dosage, a quick Google
search shows one teaspoon/day to be the usual. I'm giving Emily one
teaspoon a day mixed with her afternoon meal. About three or four days so
far. So far, so good (knock on wood!). If they come back I'll increase to
two. I wonder what the limit is? I really hate to keep messing with her
food! I assume the stuff won't harm her. I've not read anywhere that it's
dangerous. I've read though that the pumpkin 'pie filling' canned has
spice additions not good for cats.

Ken


--
"When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner

Rene
August 3rd 10, 07:04 PM
> Now I'm confused. Are you sure the pumpkin recommended for cat hairballs
> is not what we call pumpkin in the US? I've read that squash 'also'
> works, but not 'instead of'. I'd think they were much the same thing. I
> suspect pumpkin is just one kind of squash. As to dosage, a quick Google
> search shows one teaspoon/day to be the usual. I'm giving Emily one
> teaspoon a day mixed with her afternoon meal. About three or four days so
> far. So far, so good (knock on wood!). If they come back I'll increase to
> two. I wonder what the limit is? I really hate to keep messing with her
> food! I assume the stuff won't harm her. I've not read anywhere that it's
> dangerous. I've read though that the pumpkin 'pie filling' canned has
> spice additions not good for cats.

Ken,
A pumpkin is a type of squash. I would imagine the fiber content in
most squashes is similar. Stick with what you're doing. The pumpkin
pie filling is not a good idea. It has spices and sugar, neither of
which is good for cats.

Rene

cshenk
August 3rd 10, 11:26 PM
"KenK" wrote
> "cshenk" wrote in

>> to be what they call 'winter squash' (often called pumpkins in some
>> other countries like OZ and I believe England). Butternut, Mother
>> hubbard, Acorn squash are suitable. Spagetti squash is probably as
>> well. Don't worr about canned or if it is 'pie filling' or not.
>> Canned is convienent if you find it but with a microwave and a fresh
>> one, you can make enough for your needs for probably 3 months or more
>> off one squash.

> Now I'm confused. Are you sure the pumpkin recommended for cat hairballs
> is not what we call pumpkin in the US? I've read that squash 'also'

No. I am not sure. I just know I get the same gereral effect that would be
needed when I use Acorn squash. The problem is semantics and I wasn't sure
if you were USA (Canada tends to same terms for this).

> works, but not 'instead of'. I'd think they were much the same thing. I
> suspect pumpkin is just one kind of squash. As to dosage, a quick Google

From what I gather, it has to be a winter squash. Basically a hard shelled
sort. They crop in late autum to early winter and tend to hold well for
several months in the right environment.

> search shows one teaspoon/day to be the usual. I'm giving Emily one
> teaspoon a day mixed with her afternoon meal. About three or four days so
> far. So far, so good (knock on wood!). If they come back I'll increase to
> two. I wonder what the limit is? I really hate to keep messing with her
> food! I assume the stuff won't harm her. I've not read anywhere that it's
> dangerous. I've read though that the pumpkin 'pie filling' canned has
> spice additions not good for cats.

As we started, I will try to help but do not use this method in any
deliberate manner. I was given the impression that a little more was needed
but if the average on a search shows 1 TS, use that then and ignore me.

I don't know what pie filling might be dangerous in spicing to a cat unless
they added a lot of salt? When I do let the cat have some winter squash,
it's from a cooked one we make here and either plain or with butter added.

KenK
August 4th 10, 06:21 PM
"cshenk" > wrote in
:

> As we started, I will try to help but do not use this method in any
> deliberate manner. I was given the impression that a little more was
> needed but if the average on a search shows 1 TS, use that then and
> ignore me.
>

I'll stay with 1 tsp if it works; I can always increase if it doesn't.

Well, for four or five days of pumpkin, no hairballs. I was getting them
almost daily. Then last night something new - instead of a small patch of
hair in a puddle of thin vomit I got a big moist hairball all by itself.
Didn't see it come out since it must have done so quietly as I was
reading or sleeping in another room. Evidently the pumpkin had something
to do with this but I don't know what. It's a big improvement for me, but
I don't know about Emily.



--
"When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner

Bill Graham
August 4th 10, 08:36 PM
"KenK" > wrote in message
...
> "cshenk" > wrote in
> :
>
>> As we started, I will try to help but do not use this method in any
>> deliberate manner. I was given the impression that a little more was
>> needed but if the average on a search shows 1 TS, use that then and
>> ignore me.
>>
>
> I'll stay with 1 tsp if it works; I can always increase if it doesn't.
>
> Well, for four or five days of pumpkin, no hairballs. I was getting them
> almost daily. Then last night something new - instead of a small patch of
> hair in a puddle of thin vomit I got a big moist hairball all by itself.
> Didn't see it come out since it must have done so quietly as I was
> reading or sleeping in another room. Evidently the pumpkin had something
> to do with this but I don't know what. It's a big improvement for me, but
> I don't know about Emily.
>
Well that beats what happened to my Meggie....Her's was so big the vet
thought it was a tumor.....She operated on Meggie with the understanding
that if it had metastasized, she would put her down......After opening up
her abdomen, she found Meggie's stomach was huge and filling her whole
abdomen. So, they opened up her stomach to find a huge hairball. "The
biggest one I have ever found" said the vet. So they took it out, and Meggie
has been fine ever since...(Two years now) But the whole thing cost me over
$800.......:^)

KenK
August 5th 10, 06:10 PM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in
:

>
> "KenK" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "cshenk" > wrote in
>> :
>>
>>> As we started, I will try to help but do not use this method in any
>>> deliberate manner. I was given the impression that a little more
>>> was needed but if the average on a search shows 1 TS, use that then
>>> and ignore me.
>>>
>>
>> I'll stay with 1 tsp if it works; I can always increase if it
>> doesn't.
>>
>> Well, for four or five days of pumpkin, no hairballs. I was getting
>> them almost daily. Then last night something new - instead of a small
>> patch of hair in a puddle of thin vomit I got a big moist hairball
>> all by itself. Didn't see it come out since it must have done so
>> quietly as I was reading or sleeping in another room. Evidently the
>> pumpkin had something to do with this but I don't know what. It's a
>> big improvement for me, but I don't know about Emily.
>>
> Well that beats what happened to my Meggie....Her's was so big the vet
> thought it was a tumor.....She operated on Meggie with the
> understanding that if it had metastasized, she would put her
> down......After opening up her abdomen, she found Meggie's stomach was
> huge and filling her whole abdomen. So, they opened up her stomach to
> find a huge hairball. "The biggest one I have ever found" said the
> vet. So they took it out, and Meggie has been fine ever since...(Two
> years now) But the whole thing cost me over $800.......:^)
>
>

I hope at least they gave you that expensive hairball as a remembrance. <g>

Emily got plugged up with hair and couldn't hold down her food many years
ago but it came out ok at the vet with an enema (IIRC) and laxative. My
introduction to Laxatone.

Emily went four days with pumpkin and without a hairball but now two in a
row. The one previously described yesterday and the usual vomit and small
amount of hair today. <sigh> I'm going to increase her to two teaspoons of
pumpkin, if she'll eat it. If that doesn't do it I give up. Evidently
nothing works with her. I believe I've tried everything she'll tolerate.
<sigh> Maybe a diet change would do it but I had so much trouble with
diarrhea and soft BMs before I switched her to canned Wellness I hesitate
to experiment again. Poor Emily!


--
"When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner

Bill Graham
August 6th 10, 02:49 AM
"KenK" > wrote in message
...
> "Bill Graham" > wrote in
> :
>
>>
>> "KenK" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> "cshenk" > wrote in
>>> :
>>>
>>>> As we started, I will try to help but do not use this method in any
>>>> deliberate manner. I was given the impression that a little more
>>>> was needed but if the average on a search shows 1 TS, use that then
>>>> and ignore me.
>>>>
>>>
>>> I'll stay with 1 tsp if it works; I can always increase if it
>>> doesn't.
>>>
>>> Well, for four or five days of pumpkin, no hairballs. I was getting
>>> them almost daily. Then last night something new - instead of a small
>>> patch of hair in a puddle of thin vomit I got a big moist hairball
>>> all by itself. Didn't see it come out since it must have done so
>>> quietly as I was reading or sleeping in another room. Evidently the
>>> pumpkin had something to do with this but I don't know what. It's a
>>> big improvement for me, but I don't know about Emily.
>>>
>> Well that beats what happened to my Meggie....Her's was so big the vet
>> thought it was a tumor.....She operated on Meggie with the
>> understanding that if it had metastasized, she would put her
>> down......After opening up her abdomen, she found Meggie's stomach was
>> huge and filling her whole abdomen. So, they opened up her stomach to
>> find a huge hairball. "The biggest one I have ever found" said the
>> vet. So they took it out, and Meggie has been fine ever since...(Two
>> years now) But the whole thing cost me over $800.......:^)
>>
>>
>
> I hope at least they gave you that expensive hairball as a remembrance.
> <g>
>
> Emily got plugged up with hair and couldn't hold down her food many years
> ago but it came out ok at the vet with an enema (IIRC) and laxative. My
> introduction to Laxatone.
>
> Emily went four days with pumpkin and without a hairball but now two in a
> row. The one previously described yesterday and the usual vomit and small
> amount of hair today. <sigh> I'm going to increase her to two teaspoons of
> pumpkin, if she'll eat it. If that doesn't do it I give up. Evidently
> nothing works with her. I believe I've tried everything she'll tolerate.
> <sigh> Maybe a diet change would do it but I had so much trouble with
> diarrhea and soft BMs before I switched her to canned Wellness I hesitate
> to experiment again. Poor Emily!
>

Well, I am not a vet, and I tend to take the direct approach.....I would
brush the hell out of her, and perhaps even use one of these razor-type
devices that remove much of the excess hair. If there is nothing for her to
ingest, then she can't get any hairballs. If she is an inside cat, then you
can just keep the house, or some part of the house nice and warm for her,
and she won't need any hair at all.......

KenK
August 6th 10, 06:45 PM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in
:

>
> "KenK" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Bill Graham" > wrote in
>> :
>>
>>>
>>> "KenK" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> "cshenk" > wrote in
>>>> :
>>>>
>>>>> As we started, I will try to help but do not use this method in
>>>>> any deliberate manner. I was given the impression that a little
>>>>> more was needed but if the average on a search shows 1 TS, use
>>>>> that then and ignore me.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I'll stay with 1 tsp if it works; I can always increase if it
>>>> doesn't.
>>>>
>>>> Well, for four or five days of pumpkin, no hairballs. I was getting
>>>> them almost daily. Then last night something new - instead of a
>>>> small patch of hair in a puddle of thin vomit I got a big moist
>>>> hairball all by itself. Didn't see it come out since it must have
>>>> done so quietly as I was reading or sleeping in another room.
>>>> Evidently the pumpkin had something to do with this but I don't
>>>> know what. It's a big improvement for me, but I don't know about
>>>> Emily.
>>>>
>>> Well that beats what happened to my Meggie....Her's was so big the
>>> vet thought it was a tumor.....She operated on Meggie with the
>>> understanding that if it had metastasized, she would put her
>>> down......After opening up her abdomen, she found Meggie's stomach
>>> was huge and filling her whole abdomen. So, they opened up her
>>> stomach to find a huge hairball. "The biggest one I have ever found"
>>> said the vet. So they took it out, and Meggie has been fine ever
>>> since...(Two years now) But the whole thing cost me over
>>> $800.......:^)
>>>
>>>
>>
>> I hope at least they gave you that expensive hairball as a
>> remembrance. <g>
>>
>> Emily got plugged up with hair and couldn't hold down her food many
>> years ago but it came out ok at the vet with an enema (IIRC) and
>> laxative. My introduction to Laxatone.
>>
>> Emily went four days with pumpkin and without a hairball but now two
>> in a row. The one previously described yesterday and the usual vomit
>> and small amount of hair today. <sigh> I'm going to increase her to
>> two teaspoons of pumpkin, if she'll eat it. If that doesn't do it I
>> give up. Evidently nothing works with her. I believe I've tried
>> everything she'll tolerate. <sigh> Maybe a diet change would do it
>> but I had so much trouble with diarrhea and soft BMs before I
>> switched her to canned Wellness I hesitate to experiment again. Poor
>> Emily!
>>
>
> Well, I am not a vet, and I tend to take the direct approach.....I
> would brush the hell out of her, and perhaps even use one of these
> razor-type devices that remove much of the excess hair. If there is
> nothing for her to ingest, then she can't get any hairballs. If she is
> an inside cat, then you can just keep the house, or some part of the
> house nice and warm for her, and she won't need any hair at all.......
>
>

Good thinking! Rather obvious but it hadn't occured to me.

I'll check out grooming tools. Someone else mentioned a grooming glove.
I'm going to Walmart tomorrow - I'll see what they have. Also, perhaps
instead of grooming her just at noon, I'll groom her also in the morning
and evening; she enjoys it so that shouldn't be a problem. Trouble is,
doesn't seem to take much hair to set off her hairball/vomit alarm
sequence. Sometimes I can't even see any hair, most of the time there is
very little, just a very thin patch the size of a quarter, if that.


--
"When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner

tivoglio
August 25th 10, 06:24 PM
On Aug 1, 8:47*am, KenK > wrote:
> Anyone tried the Whiska's 'Temptations' hairball control cat snacks? I've
> unsuccessfully tried everything else I'm aware of or heard about here
> (anti-hairball food I've tried gives her diarrhea). BM problems? Other
> problems? I'm going to try Google later this morning.
>
> TIA
>
> --
> "When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
> remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner

Ken, I'm new to this group, but I have a longhaired Himalayan who
sheds enough hair in the summer that you could knit another cat out of
it. I brush him twice a day and use a Furminator, but what I haven't
seen in all the replies is the use of a gel to help. Some websites
said that a dollop of Vaseline works, but I was reluctant to use that.
Instead, I bought a tube of Hartz Hairball Remedy Plus (looks a little
like Vaseline in a toothpaste-type tube) for about four bucks. It's
salmon-flavored, so my cat licks it off his paw when I use it - about
twice a week. He's on his second tube, and I don't know how much it
helps, but it sure didn't hurt.
Tom