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jmc[_2_]
August 4th 10, 10:03 PM
Poor Meep. We had to go to the emergency vet once again, as not only
had she not peed for two days (one day hasn't been unusual for her and
the vet is aware), but she was starting to look really uncomfortable.
She was exhibiting none of her usual cystitis symptoms, in fact hadn't
even been to visit the box (I keep it clean and flatten the surface so I
can tell when she's visited).

Her bladder was huge, but not hard, according to the vet, at least until
she finally let loose and peed all over everyone (poor thing! But it
meant she was physically ABLE to go - no stones). Urinalysis was clean
and the culture is ongoing... but I think the feeling the vet and I
share is this is not a cystitis issue, but something new. We will need
to get new x-rays to determine what's going on with her skeletal system.
The vet offered three thoughts:

1. The Tramodol is not totally controlling her arthritis pain. This is
fixable, the vet feels there is room to increase either the dosage, the
frequency, or both.

2. Her bladder has lost elasticity, so she's unable to pee. This is
treatable.

3. She's developed bony protrusions where her spine is deformed (the
bone where her hips attack), impinging on the nerves that tell her she
has to go, so she never feels like she has to. This, I'm told, may not
be treatable.

It's the possibility of #2 I'm most worried about. I get the impression
I could express her bladder manually, but my feeling is this could even
severely impact her quality-of-life. I'm looking for information from
people who have had cats with this issue - what treatment options were
offered, what did you decide to do, and how did it go?

Meep is "only" 14, so I'm hoping and praying that #1 is the reason for
her holding onto her pee like it was gold. I'm quite worried about her.

jmc

cshenk
August 4th 10, 11:11 PM
"jmc" wrote

> 3. She's developed bony protrusions where her spine is deformed (the
> bone where her hips attack), impinging on the nerves that tell her she has
> to go, so she never feels like she has to. This, I'm told, may not be
> treatable.

I can't give you the cat answer here for this one but I can give you the
human answer as well as a testing that will define this.

The is a high likelyhood that only an MRI will show if the nerves are being
compressed causing this. An Xray may show some abnormality but won't have
the soft tissue definition needed.

There is a specific set of nerves that run to the groin (at least in humans
and I bet same in animals). These in addition to other things, also control
the bladder and 'bladder release muscles'. Often combined with it are
tingling feet or legs and feet and a general lack of ability to use them.

Causations vary but impact injury or long term degenerative progressive disc
disease often related.

For a human, the signals are tingling or lack of feeling in the groin and it
can cause the actual muscles to 'sieze up tight'. It may or may not come
with a 'need to pee' feeling depending on location and level of damage. It
normally mandates both a catheter right away then emergency surgery. It can
lead (depending on damage to the nerves) in lifelong catheter needs. I do
not think they have developed this same surgery for cats and there's really
no way to permanently cath a cat (infection potential combined with QOL for
both of you).

Best I can do on this one. Sad grin, I can't get within 50 ft of a Doctor
who's seen my medical records without being reminded of this one and what to
watch for. (no, I don't have this......yet).

Hard as it is to say, *if* this turns out to be it, it's probably best to
let her go softly. Lets hope it's something else.

Feel free to hit me up with direct email if you have more questions on the
fugly/ugly of this one.

jmc[_2_]
August 4th 10, 11:47 PM
Suddenly, without warning, cshenk exclaimed (8/4/2010 6:11 PM):
> "jmc" wrote
>
> > 3. She's developed bony protrusions where her spine is deformed (the
>> bone where her hips attack), impinging on the nerves that tell her she
>> has to go, so she never feels like she has to. This, I'm told, may
>> not be treatable.
>
> I can't give you the cat answer here for this one but I can give you the
> human answer as well as a testing that will define this.
>
> The is a high likelyhood that only an MRI will show if the nerves are
> being compressed causing this. An Xray may show some abnormality but
> won't have the soft tissue definition needed.
>
> There is a specific set of nerves that run to the groin (at least in
> humans and I bet same in animals). These in addition to other things,
> also control the bladder and 'bladder release muscles'. Often combined
> with it are tingling feet or legs and feet and a general lack of ability
> to use them.
>
> Causations vary but impact injury or long term degenerative progressive
> disc disease often related.
>
> For a human, the signals are tingling or lack of feeling in the groin
> and it can cause the actual muscles to 'sieze up tight'. It may or may
> not come with a 'need to pee' feeling depending on location and level of
> damage. It normally mandates both a catheter right away then emergency
> surgery. It can lead (depending on damage to the nerves) in lifelong
> catheter needs. I do not think they have developed this same surgery
> for cats and there's really no way to permanently cath a cat (infection
> potential combined with QOL for both of you).
>
> Best I can do on this one. Sad grin, I can't get within 50 ft of a
> Doctor who's seen my medical records without being reminded of this one
> and what to watch for. (no, I don't have this......yet).
>
> Hard as it is to say, *if* this turns out to be it, it's probably best
> to let her go softly. Lets hope it's something else.
>
> Feel free to hit me up with direct email if you have more questions on
> the fugly/ugly of this one.

Thank you for this. Yes, I believe an MRI was mentioned too but I was a
little overwrought last night and had forgotten. She doesn't seem to
have any of the muscle problems you mention - she's always been weak in
the hind end - the bad bone is a congenital defect - her ability to move
around seems no worse than before. Just appears to be less comfortable.

I am very much hoping that it's not this though - I realize that
probably the only thing to do would be to let her go, and that would
break my heart, since otherwise her quality of life is good, despite a
growing list of health issues.

With the vet's blessing we are still going on vacation - Meep is going
to a cattery with a very good vet (both the same business) which might
actually work out - they'll be better able to tell than me what's going
on, and in the confines of her "cell" will help in determining if this
is a behavioral or medical issue. She's been going to this place for
years, so they know what her normal kennel behavior is. I've spoken to
her normal vet, the boarding place, and the boarding place's vet office,
so I'm happy she will get the care and attention she needs, and will be
under close observation, something that's very difficult when both of us
are away from home during the day.

jmc