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rose ricciuto
August 28th 10, 03:19 AM
My son in law has an 18 yr old long haired female cat (Moo) who has an
ulcerated tongue and had to have a feeding tube inserted today. She's
been unable to eat for days. She is also diabetic. Anyone with
experience in this area?
All advice gratefully accepted!

Bill Graham
August 28th 10, 04:01 AM
"rose ricciuto" > wrote in message
...
> My son in law has an 18 yr old long haired female cat (Moo) who has an
> ulcerated tongue and had to have a feeding tube inserted today. She's
> been unable to eat for days. She is also diabetic. Anyone with
> experience in this area?
> All advice gratefully accepted!
>

Unless your vet says her condition is easily curable, I would seriously
consider putting her down....After all, she has had 18 (presumably good)
years, and it doesn't sound to me like she is going to enjoy whatever time
she has left......I know its hard to do, but there comes a time when its
really the best thing for the cat......

catlady
August 28th 10, 07:12 AM
On Aug 27, 10:01*pm, "Bill Graham" > wrote:
> "rose ricciuto" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> > My son in law has an 18 yr old long haired female cat (Moo) who has an
> > ulcerated tongue and had to have a feeding tube inserted today. She's
> > been unable to eat for days. *She is also diabetic. *Anyone with
> > experience in this area?
> > All advice gratefully accepted!
>
> Unless your vet says her condition is easily curable, I would seriously
> consider putting her down....After all, she has had 18 (presumably good)
> years,

Listen, asshole-
Don't you ever tell someone to kill their cat when you don't know the
first thing about the cat's condition. The cat has an ulcerated tongue
which is a common symptom of a calici break. It's treatable as is the
diabetes. A feeding tube is being used to give the cat some relief and
keep her weight up while she's being treated and her tongue can heal.
And so what if the cat is 18. Many cats are now living into their
twenties and it's sickening that you would write off a cat just
because she's older. If you have some ideas on how to keep her
comfortable that's fine. But you're putting the cart so far before the
horse it's not visible. This person came asking for advice to help
the cat, not a recommendation to kill it.

catlady
August 28th 10, 07:31 AM
On Aug 27, 9:19*pm, (rose ricciuto) wrote:
> My son in law has an 18 yr old long haired female cat (Moo) who has an
> ulcerated tongue and had to have a feeding tube inserted today. She's
> been unable to eat for days. *She is also diabetic. *Anyone with
> experience in this area? *
> All advice gratefully accepted!

Has the cause of the ulcers been determined? Regardless, once
treatment begins it can take up to a few weeks for those to heal so be
patient. Pain medication is also helpful and ideally buprenex would be
the best option. Athough most people are instructed to squirt this
particular medication in the cheek pouch with a syringe, this can be
problematic as, if it is missed and the cat swallows it instead the
pain control will be ineffective. Since your son is givng the cat
insulin shots he can give this medication by injection as well and
that will ensure the cat gets the full effect of the pain meds. As to
the feeding tube, if the cat has to wear a cone you should look into
getting one of the softsided ones. These are much more comfortable for
the cat and they can get around better.

Gandalf[_2_]
August 28th 10, 02:24 PM
On Fri, 27 Aug 2010 22:19:57 -0400, (rose ricciuto)
wrote:

>My son in law has an 18 yr old long haired female cat (Moo) who has an
>ulcerated tongue and had to have a feeding tube inserted today. She's
>been unable to eat for days. She is also diabetic. Anyone with
>experience in this area?
>All advice gratefully accepted!

The ulcer on the tongue could have any number of causes.

Because she is diabetic, and at her age, getting it to heal could be
difficult to impossible.

Your vet can probably, with enough tests, find the cause for the ulcer,
and a possible treatment.

The question is whether Moo can have any sort of quality of life, while
being fed through a tube, and having an ulcer on her tongue, a very
sensitive part of her body.

I have to say if she were my cat, I would think it may time to consider
letting her go, given her age and illness.

But, she is not my cat, and I can't see how sick she is.


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Bill Graham
August 29th 10, 01:37 AM
"catlady" > wrote in message
...
On Aug 27, 10:01 pm, "Bill Graham" > wrote:
> "rose ricciuto" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> > My son in law has an 18 yr old long haired female cat (Moo) who has an
> > ulcerated tongue and had to have a feeding tube inserted today. She's
> > been unable to eat for days. She is also diabetic. Anyone with
> > experience in this area?
> > All advice gratefully accepted!
>
> Unless your vet says her condition is easily curable, I would seriously
> consider putting her down....After all, she has had 18 (presumably good)
> years,

Listen, asshole-
Don't you ever tell someone to kill their cat when you don't know the
first thing about the cat's condition. The cat has an ulcerated tongue
which is a common symptom of a calici break. It's treatable as is the
diabetes. A feeding tube is being used to give the cat some relief and
keep her weight up while she's being treated and her tongue can heal.
And so what if the cat is 18. Many cats are now living into their
twenties and it's sickening that you would write off a cat just
because she's older. If you have some ideas on how to keep her
comfortable that's fine. But you're putting the cart so far before the
horse it's not visible. This person came asking for advice to help
the cat, not a recommendation to kill it.

Have some trouble reading, huh? - I suggest you take a remedial reading
course before you resume calling people assholes......Try bringing my post
to your first class meeting, and let the instructor tell you what I said.

Bill Graham
August 29th 10, 01:40 AM
"ingold1234[at]yahoo[dot]com (Gandalf)" wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 27 Aug 2010 22:19:57 -0400, (rose ricciuto)
> wrote:
>
>>My son in law has an 18 yr old long haired female cat (Moo) who has an
>>ulcerated tongue and had to have a feeding tube inserted today. She's
>>been unable to eat for days. She is also diabetic. Anyone with
>>experience in this area?
>>All advice gratefully accepted!
>
> The ulcer on the tongue could have any number of causes.
>
> Because she is diabetic, and at her age, getting it to heal could be
> difficult to impossible.
>
> Your vet can probably, with enough tests, find the cause for the ulcer,
> and a possible treatment.
>
> The question is whether Moo can have any sort of quality of life, while
> being fed through a tube, and having an ulcer on her tongue, a very
> sensitive part of her body.
>
> I have to say if she were my cat, I would think it may time to consider
> letting her go, given her age and illness.
>
> But, she is not my cat, and I can't see how sick she is.


Be careful....."catlady" will call you an asshole.......:^)

dgk
August 31st 10, 04:13 PM
On Sat, 28 Aug 2010 17:40:44 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
wrote:

>
>"ingold1234[at]yahoo[dot]com (Gandalf)" wrote in message
...
>> On Fri, 27 Aug 2010 22:19:57 -0400, (rose ricciuto)
>> wrote:
>>
>>>My son in law has an 18 yr old long haired female cat (Moo) who has an
>>>ulcerated tongue and had to have a feeding tube inserted today. She's
>>>been unable to eat for days. She is also diabetic. Anyone with
>>>experience in this area?
>>>All advice gratefully accepted!
>>
>> The ulcer on the tongue could have any number of causes.
>>
>> Because she is diabetic, and at her age, getting it to heal could be
>> difficult to impossible.
>>
>> Your vet can probably, with enough tests, find the cause for the ulcer,
>> and a possible treatment.
>>
>> The question is whether Moo can have any sort of quality of life, while
>> being fed through a tube, and having an ulcer on her tongue, a very
>> sensitive part of her body.
>>
>> I have to say if she were my cat, I would think it may time to consider
>> letting her go, given her age and illness.
>>
>> But, she is not my cat, and I can't see how sick she is.
>
>
>Be careful....."catlady" will call you an asshole.......:^)

I've made the mistake of trying too hard to save a cat so I know where
you're coming from. I suspect that I just made his last few months of
life painful and uncomfortable because I didn't want to let him go.
But it does seem a bit too soon for Moo, not in terms of age, but
because she clearly has a vet and they're treating her.

If it looks like she just needs to get past a few weeks of discomfort
and then will resume a reasonably happy life, then fine. But if she's
about to undergo a lengthy period of discomfort and will just die
anyway, then 18 has been a pretty long life.

I've never had a cat live longer than 16, and I've always given them
good vet care and quality food.

Bill Graham
September 1st 10, 08:48 AM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 28 Aug 2010 17:40:44 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"ingold1234[at]yahoo[dot]com (Gandalf)" wrote in message
...
>>> On Fri, 27 Aug 2010 22:19:57 -0400, (rose ricciuto)
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>>My son in law has an 18 yr old long haired female cat (Moo) who has an
>>>>ulcerated tongue and had to have a feeding tube inserted today. She's
>>>>been unable to eat for days. She is also diabetic. Anyone with
>>>>experience in this area?
>>>>All advice gratefully accepted!
>>>
>>> The ulcer on the tongue could have any number of causes.
>>>
>>> Because she is diabetic, and at her age, getting it to heal could be
>>> difficult to impossible.
>>>
>>> Your vet can probably, with enough tests, find the cause for the ulcer,
>>> and a possible treatment.
>>>
>>> The question is whether Moo can have any sort of quality of life, while
>>> being fed through a tube, and having an ulcer on her tongue, a very
>>> sensitive part of her body.
>>>
>>> I have to say if she were my cat, I would think it may time to consider
>>> letting her go, given her age and illness.
>>>
>>> But, she is not my cat, and I can't see how sick she is.
>>
>>
>>Be careful....."catlady" will call you an asshole.......:^)
>
> I've made the mistake of trying too hard to save a cat so I know where
> you're coming from. I suspect that I just made his last few months of
> life painful and uncomfortable because I didn't want to let him go.
> But it does seem a bit too soon for Moo, not in terms of age, but
> because she clearly has a vet and they're treating her.
>
> If it looks like she just needs to get past a few weeks of discomfort
> and then will resume a reasonably happy life, then fine. But if she's
> about to undergo a lengthy period of discomfort and will just die
> anyway, then 18 has been a pretty long life.
>
> I've never had a cat live longer than 16, and I've always given them
> good vet care and quality food.

One of the great advantages cats, and other pets have over us humans, is
that when their quality of life becomes very bad, we can put them down. And,
they die peacefully in the hands of a vet who knows what he/she is doing. I
only wish I could have that advantage when the time comes, but alas, we
humans are forced to suffer. Even when we choose death, and find a good
doctor to help us, the society throws him in jail! - Go figure.....

rose ricciuto
September 9th 10, 12:45 AM
Thank you all for responding. Moo had to be put to sleep last week.
She began vomiting the food from the tube which caused her tongue to
bleed severely and was urinating blood as well. She was truly loved and
queen of the house. My poor son in law still thinks he killed her by not
doing enough.
Sorry about the delay in saying thank you but we were up north dealing
with my mother in law who is now in hospice. We can truly be kinder to
our furred friends than we can to our fellow humans.
Rose

MLB[_2_]
September 9th 10, 01:47 AM
rose ricciuto wrote:
> Thank you all for responding. Moo had to be put to sleep last week.
> She began vomiting the food from the tube which caused her tongue to
> bleed severely and was urinating blood as well. She was truly loved and
> queen of the house. My poor son in law still thinks he killed her by not
> doing enough.
> Sorry about the delay in saying thank you but we were up north dealing
> with my mother in law who is now in hospice. We can truly be kinder to
> our furred friends than we can to our fellow humans.
> Rose
>


"....Rise up slowly, Angel...."
It's hard to let you go.

Sincere sympathy for your current problems. MLB

Kelly Greene[_2_]
September 9th 10, 02:47 AM
"rose ricciuto" > wrote in message
...
> My son in law has an 18 yr old long haired female cat (Moo) who has an
> ulcerated tongue and had to have a feeding tube inserted today. She's
> been unable to eat for days. She is also diabetic. Anyone with
> experience in this area?
> All advice gratefully accepted!
>


For starters he needs to get her off dry kibble loaded with cheap filler
carbohydrates. Or cheap canned food full of these useless fillers.

Here's some good links to start you off:
Feline nutrition information: http://www.catinfo.org/
www.catnutrition.org
History of dry food (a must-read article):
http://www.catnutrition.org/diabetes.php
http://www.yourdiabeticcat.com/
http://www.fnes.org/diet-and-disease/diabetes-and-obesity-preventable-epidemics
(Elizabeth Hodgkins, DVM)
http://maxshouse.com/feline_nutrition.htm
http://www.catinfo.org/ by Lisa A. Pierson, DVM
http://www.catinfo.org/zorans_article.pdf
http://www.catinfo.org/#Cats_Need_Animal-Based_Protein_
http://www.catinfo.org/#We_Are_Feeding_Cats_Too_Many_Carbohydrates

Gandalf[_2_]
September 10th 10, 08:16 AM
On Wed, 8 Sep 2010 19:45:59 -0400, (rose ricciuto)
wrote:

>Thank you all for responding. Moo had to be put to sleep last week.
>She began vomiting the food from the tube which caused her tongue to
>bleed severely and was urinating blood as well. She was truly loved and
>queen of the house. My poor son in law still thinks he killed her by not
>doing enough.
>Sorry about the delay in saying thank you but we were up north dealing
>with my mother in law who is now in hospice. We can truly be kinder to
>our furred friends than we can to our fellow humans.
>Rose

I'm very sorry to hear about Moo. But, everything that could possibly
have been done WAS done.

She lived longer than most cats do; and considering she was diabetic,
that is remarkable.

I'm sorry to hear about your Mother, too :(


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rose ricciuto
September 12th 10, 02:37 AM
The vet did a biopsy of her tongue and it was cancer.
She'd been on special food for her diabetes for several years now so
stuff your dry kibble

Bill Graham
September 12th 10, 08:56 PM
"rose ricciuto" > wrote in message
...
> The vet did a biopsy of her tongue and it was cancer.
> She'd been on special food for her diabetes for several years now so
> stuff your dry kibble
>

You did the right thing....When our, "Missy" stopped eating a few years ago,
we called the vet immediately. She operates a roving vet service, mostly for
cats, and she came by the house in a few hours, and told us that Missy had
jaw cancer, and had to be put down. We had no way of knowing this in
advance, because she didn't exhibit any pain, and it was only when she
stopped eating that we realized something was wrong with her. She must have
been suffering badly for the last few weeks, but with cats, there is no way
to tell because they suffer in silence. To do otherwise in the wild would be
to tip off predators to your vulnerable condition.