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Jane[_2_]
October 19th 10, 03:05 PM
I have three cats. Two females ages 2 and 3. One male age 10. They
are all indoor cats with voracious appetites. I feed them all Science
Diet Light (the amount depends upon their size). I also give them
each a treat of Fancy Feast in the afternoon - 1/2 can between the
three. The younger females also get some Science Diet Oral Care at
bedtime. The male can't chew so I clean his teeth with dental pads.
He has gingivitis which is being watched by the vet.

I volunteer at the MSPCA and have talked to a couple of vets there.
They all said that they like Science Diet and feed it to their pets,
something I know that many of you will disagree with. I asked them,
instead of my own vet because they don't have anything to sell me and
so would be more honest. My vet sells the stuff.

While my male cat has episodes of pancreatitis I am assured it is not
related to the food, since what I give him is low fat which is
important. Otherwise they are very healthy with nice soft and shiny
coats, which I brush often.

My question: should I be feeding the older cat something for mature
cats? He really is a chubby fellow and I'd like to keep his weight
under control. However I'm wondering if he needs the senior food.
What about dry vs. wet? I've always done dry and he never has a
problem with it.

Again, I know that Science Diet won't be everyone's favorite, but I
get it at a huge discount at the shelter. I'm retired with a limited
income and three cats to take care of, and I do. Please keep that in
mind before you suggest I change to anything expensive.

Thanks.

Jane

Gandalf[_2_]
October 19th 10, 11:07 PM
On Tue, 19 Oct 2010 07:05:51 -0700 (PDT), Jane
> wrote:

>I have three cats. Two females ages 2 and 3. One male age 10. They
>are all indoor cats with voracious appetites. I feed them all Science
>Diet Light (the amount depends upon their size). I also give them
>each a treat of Fancy Feast in the afternoon - 1/2 can between the
>three. The younger females also get some Science Diet Oral Care at
>bedtime. The male can't chew so I clean his teeth with dental pads.
>He has gingivitis which is being watched by the vet.
>
>I volunteer at the MSPCA and have talked to a couple of vets there.
>They all said that they like Science Diet and feed it to their pets,
>something I know that many of you will disagree with. I asked them,
>instead of my own vet because they don't have anything to sell me and
>so would be more honest. My vet sells the stuff.
>
>While my male cat has episodes of pancreatitis I am assured it is not
>related to the food, since what I give him is low fat which is
>important. Otherwise they are very healthy with nice soft and shiny
>coats, which I brush often.
>
>My question: should I be feeding the older cat something for mature
>cats? He really is a chubby fellow and I'd like to keep his weight
>under control. However I'm wondering if he needs the senior food.
>What about dry vs. wet? I've always done dry and he never has a
>problem with it.
>
>Again, I know that Science Diet won't be everyone's favorite, but I
>get it at a huge discount at the shelter. I'm retired with a limited
>income and three cats to take care of, and I do. Please keep that in
>mind before you suggest I change to anything expensive.
>
>Thanks.
>
>Jane

I asked my vet this exact question when my cat became a 'senior' cat
some years ago.

She said that as long as the cat is getting a 'premium' cat food, there
is no need, or reason, to buy a 'special' food for 'senior cats'.

She explained that in the past 20 years or so, cat food has increased in
quality significantly, especially among the 'premium' brands.

Aside from keeping your pancreatitis prone cat on a reduced fat diet, I
would feel no need to change to a 'senior cat' food.

THe vet that gave me this information sells a LOT of cat food, so if she
was looking to increase her sales, she certainly didn't. Hence, i tend
to trust what she told me.

I asked the younger vet in the clinic the same question about a year
ago, and I got pretty much exactly the same answer.

While Science Diet may not be the 'best' food on the planet, it far
better than most, and now some 'discount' stores are selling it.

If money is tight, as it is for most people, I see no reason to change
foods.

As an aside: I decided to switch my cat to a 'better' premium food,
about a year ago: Wellness. No corn, no wheat, no meat by products, no
soy. Very expensive.

Slowly over time, it gave my cat diarrhea! I took quite awhile, and at
first it was very occasional, then increased in frequency.

I switched her back to her 'old food', as quickly as I could (about a
week of mixing it) and the diarrhea disappeared, and never returned.

I never figured out WHY the 'better' food gave her diarrhea, but I'm
glad I didn't take her to the vet and had a bunch of expensive tests
run!

Asking what the 'best food' for you cat is really opens a can of worms!
The nut cases will climb out of the cracks in the floor, and abuse you
for feeding your cats Science Diet!

There are people who believe cats should eat NOTHING but raw meat,
NOTHING but canned food, NOTHING but ORGANIC foods, etc. etc. etc.

And, they will stand on their soap box and rail at you endlessly, trying
to convince you that ONLY they (ALL of them, individually) are RIGHT.


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cshenk
October 19th 10, 11:39 PM
"Jane" wrote

>I have three cats. Two females ages 2 and 3. One male age 10.

> My question: should I be feeding the older cat something for mature
> cats? He really is a chubby fellow and I'd like to keep his weight
> under control.

Not really needed.

> What about dry vs. wet? I've always done dry and he never has a
> problem with it.

Then keep to it.

> Again, I know that Science Diet won't be everyone's favorite, but I
> get it at a huge discount at the shelter. I'm retired with a limited
> income and three cats to take care of, and I do. Please keep that in
> mind before you suggest I change to anything expensive.

No problem Jane. See if you see 'Evolve' locally. It was much cheaper than
science diet locally (almost 1/2 the price and no sale involved) and better
overall in ingredients. I mention it only as a decent one that actually
costs less you may want to try. The one I have is a lower calorie sort so
they don't get shorted on volume.

cshenk
October 19th 10, 11:52 PM
"ingold1234 (Gandalf)" wrote
> Jane wrote:
>
>>I have three cats. Two females ages 2 and 3. One male age 10. They
>>are all indoor cats with voracious appetites. I feed them all Science
>>Diet Light (the amount depends upon their size).

> She said that as long as the cat is getting a 'premium' cat food, there
> is no need, or reason, to buy a 'special' food for 'senior cats'.

I agree with your vet. All that is needed is to know that it isn't just
high priced for no reason.

> Aside from keeping your pancreatitis prone cat on a reduced fat diet, I
> would feel no need to change to a 'senior cat' food.

Same here. I see no need for her to change anything. I only 'suggested'
she see if she can find a brand we have here. It's cheaper and actually
better. That doesn't mean she can find it, or that it isn't on a major
markup where she is so more expensive for her. It's just a lead of a
possible.

> While Science Diet may not be the 'best' food on the planet, it far
> better than most, and now some 'discount' stores are selling it.

It's not bad. I'd call it a 3 on a 6 scale. The 'Evolve' is about 5?

> If money is tight, as it is for most people, I see no reason to change
> foods.

Exactly.

> As an aside: I decided to switch my cat to a 'better' premium food,
> about a year ago: Wellness. No corn, no wheat, no meat by products, no
> soy. Very expensive.
>
> Slowly over time, it gave my cat diarrhea! I took quite awhile, and at
> first it was very occasional, then increased in frequency.

And no fiber (grin). Thats why I think?

> Asking what the 'best food' for you cat is really opens a can of worms!
> The nut cases will climb out of the cracks in the floor, and abuse you
> for feeding your cats Science Diet!

LOL! True!

Wellness just hit my local store. I looked at it for cats and dogs. It
cost more than Blue Wilderness and wasn't as good in ingredient list. I
passed.

Gandalf[_2_]
October 20th 10, 01:39 AM
On Tue, 19 Oct 2010 18:39:32 -0400, "cshenk" > wrote:

>"Jane" wrote
>
>>I have three cats. Two females ages 2 and 3. One male age 10.
>
>> My question: should I be feeding the older cat something for mature
>> cats? He really is a chubby fellow and I'd like to keep his weight
>> under control.
>
>Not really needed.
>
>> What about dry vs. wet? I've always done dry and he never has a
>> problem with it.
>
>Then keep to it.
>
>> Again, I know that Science Diet won't be everyone's favorite, but I
>> get it at a huge discount at the shelter. I'm retired with a limited
>> income and three cats to take care of, and I do. Please keep that in
>> mind before you suggest I change to anything expensive.
>
>No problem Jane. See if you see 'Evolve' locally. It was much cheaper than
>science diet locally (almost 1/2 the price and no sale involved) and better
>overall in ingredients. I mention it only as a decent one that actually
>costs less you may want to try. The one I have is a lower calorie sort so
>they don't get shorted on volume.
>
I can't remember ever seeing Evolve.

I'm going to look for it, and compare it to what I'm feeding now.

I would like to save some money, but only if it's at least as good as
what I'm feeding my 15 year old cat now.

Since cats only eat one thing for the most part, what you feed them is
SO important.

I won't cut back on quality to save a little on cat food: one trip to
the vet, with no other testing or fees, costs as much as a 20 lb. bag of
REALLY premium food!



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Jane[_2_]
October 20th 10, 01:48 PM
On Oct 19, 6:07*pm, ingold1234[at]yahoo[dot]com (Gandalf) wrote:
> On Tue, 19 Oct 2010 07:05:51 -0700 (PDT), Jane
>
>
>
> > wrote:
> >I have three cats. *Two females ages 2 and 3. *One male age 10. *They
> >are all indoor cats with voracious appetites. *I feed them all Science
> >Diet Light (the amount depends upon their size). *I also give them
> >each a treat of Fancy Feast in the afternoon - 1/2 can between the
> >three. *The younger females also get some Science Diet Oral Care at
> >bedtime. *The male can't chew so I clean his teeth with dental pads.
> >He has gingivitis which is being watched by the vet.
>
> >I volunteer at the MSPCA and have talked to a couple of vets there.
> >They all said that they like Science Diet and feed it to their pets,
> >something I know that many of you will disagree with. *I asked them,
> >instead of my own vet because they don't have anything to sell me and
> >so would be more honest. *My vet sells the stuff.
>
> >While my male cat has episodes of pancreatitis I am assured it is not
> >related to the food, since what I give him is low fat which is
> >important. *Otherwise they are very healthy with nice soft and shiny
> >coats, which I brush often.
>
> >My question: *should I be feeding the older cat something for mature
> >cats? *He really is a chubby fellow and I'd like to keep his weight
> >under control. *However I'm wondering if he needs the senior food.
> >What about dry vs. wet? *I've always done dry and he never has a
> >problem with it.
>
> >Again, I know that Science Diet won't be everyone's favorite, but I
> >get it at a huge discount at the shelter. *I'm retired with a limited
> >income and three cats to take care of, and I do. *Please keep that in
> >mind before you suggest I change to anything expensive.
>
> >Thanks.
>
> >Jane
>
> I asked my vet this exact question when my cat became a 'senior' cat
> some years ago.
>
> She said that as long as the cat is getting a 'premium' cat food, there
> is no need, or reason, to buy a 'special' food for 'senior cats'.
>
> She explained that in the past 20 years or so, cat food has increased in
> quality significantly, especially among the 'premium' brands.
>
> Aside from keeping your pancreatitis prone cat on a reduced fat diet, I
> would feel no need to change to a 'senior cat' food.
>
> THe vet that gave me this information sells a LOT of cat food, so if she
> was looking to increase her sales, she certainly didn't. Hence, i tend
> to trust what she told me.
>
> I asked the younger vet in the clinic the same question about a year
> ago, and I got pretty much exactly the same answer.
>
> While Science Diet may not be the 'best' food on the planet, it far
> better than most, and now some 'discount' stores are selling it.
>
> If money is tight, as it is for most people, I see no reason to change
> foods.
>
> As an aside: I decided to switch my cat to a 'better' premium food,
> about a year ago: Wellness. No corn, no wheat, no meat by products, no
> soy. Very expensive.
>
> Slowly over time, it gave my cat diarrhea! I took quite awhile, and at
> first it was very occasional, then increased in frequency.
>
> I switched her back to her 'old food', as quickly as I could (about a
> week of mixing it) and the diarrhea disappeared, and never returned.
>
> I never figured out WHY the 'better' food gave her diarrhea, but I'm
> glad I didn't take her to the vet and had a bunch of expensive tests
> run!
>
> Asking what the 'best food' for you cat is really opens a can of worms!
> The nut cases will climb out of the cracks in the floor, and abuse you
> for feeding your cats Science Diet!
>
> There are people who believe cats should eat NOTHING but raw meat,
> NOTHING but canned food, NOTHING but ORGANIC foods, etc. etc. etc.
>
> And, they will stand on their soap box and rail at you endlessly, trying
> to convince you that ONLY they (ALL of them, individually) are RIGHT.
>
> ---
> avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
> Virus Database (VPS): 101019-1, 10/19/2010
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> avast! - copyright (c) 1988-2010 ALWIL Software.http://www.avast.com

Thanks for your thoughtful answer. I actually talked to the vet
yesterday and she pretty much said the same thing to me. Since it's a
low fat food, which is what he needs for the pancreatitis, she said to
just continue with it. Besides, they really have no clue what causes
this condition in cats.

As for the "food nuts", you are so right. I've posted before and
thought they would come and haul me away to kitty court.

Jane[_2_]
October 20th 10, 01:49 PM
On Oct 19, 6:39*pm, "cshenk" > wrote:
> "Jane" wrote
>
> >I have three cats. *Two females ages 2 and 3. *One male age 10.
> > My question: *should I be feeding the older cat something for mature
> > cats? *He really is a chubby fellow and I'd like to keep his weight
> > under control.
>
> Not really needed.
>
> > What about dry vs. wet? *I've always done dry and he never has a
> > problem with it.
>
> Then keep to it.
>
> > Again, I know that Science Diet won't be everyone's favorite, but I
> > get it at a huge discount at the shelter. *I'm retired with a limited
> > income and three cats to take care of, and I do. *Please keep that in
> > mind before you suggest I change to anything expensive.
>
> No problem Jane. *See if you see 'Evolve' locally. *It was much cheaper than
> science diet locally (almost 1/2 the price and no sale involved) and better
> overall in ingredients. *I mention it only as a decent one that actually
> costs less you may want to try. *The one I have is a lower calorie sort so
> they don't get shorted on volume.

Don't think I've ever since Evolve, but I'll look for it.

Is it dry or wet?

Jane[_2_]
October 20th 10, 01:50 PM
On Oct 19, 6:07*pm, ingold1234[at]yahoo[dot]com (Gandalf) wrote:
> On Tue, 19 Oct 2010 07:05:51 -0700 (PDT), Jane
>
>
>
> > wrote:
> >I have three cats. *Two females ages 2 and 3. *One male age 10. *They
> >are all indoor cats with voracious appetites. *I feed them all Science
> >Diet Light (the amount depends upon their size). *I also give them
> >each a treat of Fancy Feast in the afternoon - 1/2 can between the
> >three. *The younger females also get some Science Diet Oral Care at
> >bedtime. *The male can't chew so I clean his teeth with dental pads.
> >He has gingivitis which is being watched by the vet.
>
> >I volunteer at the MSPCA and have talked to a couple of vets there.
> >They all said that they like Science Diet and feed it to their pets,
> >something I know that many of you will disagree with. *I asked them,
> >instead of my own vet because they don't have anything to sell me and
> >so would be more honest. *My vet sells the stuff.
>
> >While my male cat has episodes of pancreatitis I am assured it is not
> >related to the food, since what I give him is low fat which is
> >important. *Otherwise they are very healthy with nice soft and shiny
> >coats, which I brush often.
>
> >My question: *should I be feeding the older cat something for mature
> >cats? *He really is a chubby fellow and I'd like to keep his weight
> >under control. *However I'm wondering if he needs the senior food.
> >What about dry vs. wet? *I've always done dry and he never has a
> >problem with it.
>
> >Again, I know that Science Diet won't be everyone's favorite, but I
> >get it at a huge discount at the shelter. *I'm retired with a limited
> >income and three cats to take care of, and I do. *Please keep that in
> >mind before you suggest I change to anything expensive.
>
> >Thanks.
>
> >Jane
>
> I asked my vet this exact question when my cat became a 'senior' cat
> some years ago.
>
> She said that as long as the cat is getting a 'premium' cat food, there
> is no need, or reason, to buy a 'special' food for 'senior cats'.
>
> She explained that in the past 20 years or so, cat food has increased in
> quality significantly, especially among the 'premium' brands.
>
> Aside from keeping your pancreatitis prone cat on a reduced fat diet, I
> would feel no need to change to a 'senior cat' food.
>
> THe vet that gave me this information sells a LOT of cat food, so if she
> was looking to increase her sales, she certainly didn't. Hence, i tend
> to trust what she told me.
>
> I asked the younger vet in the clinic the same question about a year
> ago, and I got pretty much exactly the same answer.
>
> While Science Diet may not be the 'best' food on the planet, it far
> better than most, and now some 'discount' stores are selling it.
>
> If money is tight, as it is for most people, I see no reason to change
> foods.
>
> As an aside: I decided to switch my cat to a 'better' premium food,
> about a year ago: Wellness. No corn, no wheat, no meat by products, no
> soy. Very expensive.
>
> Slowly over time, it gave my cat diarrhea! I took quite awhile, and at
> first it was very occasional, then increased in frequency.
>
> I switched her back to her 'old food', as quickly as I could (about a
> week of mixing it) and the diarrhea disappeared, and never returned.
>
> I never figured out WHY the 'better' food gave her diarrhea, but I'm
> glad I didn't take her to the vet and had a bunch of expensive tests
> run!
>
> Asking what the 'best food' for you cat is really opens a can of worms!
> The nut cases will climb out of the cracks in the floor, and abuse you
> for feeding your cats Science Diet!
>
> There are people who believe cats should eat NOTHING but raw meat,
> NOTHING but canned food, NOTHING but ORGANIC foods, etc. etc. etc.
>
> And, they will stand on their soap box and rail at you endlessly, trying
> to convince you that ONLY they (ALL of them, individually) are RIGHT.
>
> ---
> avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
> Virus Database (VPS): 101019-1, 10/19/2010
> Tested on: 10/19/2010 5:07:09 PM
> avast! - copyright (c) 1988-2010 ALWIL Software.http://www.avast.com

One more question - do you use dry or wet food?

Jane[_2_]
October 20th 10, 01:52 PM
On Oct 19, 8:39*pm, ingold1234[at]yahoo[dot]com (Gandalf) wrote:
> On Tue, 19 Oct 2010 18:39:32 -0400, "cshenk" > wrote:
> >"Jane" wrote
>
> >>I have three cats. *Two females ages 2 and 3. *One male age 10.
>
> >> My question: *should I be feeding the older cat something for mature
> >> cats? *He really is a chubby fellow and I'd like to keep his weight
> >> under control.
>
> >Not really needed.
>
> >> What about dry vs. wet? *I've always done dry and he never has a
> >> problem with it.
>
> >Then keep to it.
>
> >> Again, I know that Science Diet won't be everyone's favorite, but I
> >> get it at a huge discount at the shelter. *I'm retired with a limited
> >> income and three cats to take care of, and I do. *Please keep that in
> >> mind before you suggest I change to anything expensive.
>
> >No problem Jane. *See if you see 'Evolve' locally. *It was much cheaper than
> >science diet locally (almost 1/2 the price and no sale involved) and better
> >overall in ingredients. *I mention it only as a decent one that actually
> >costs less you may want to try. *The one I have is a lower calorie sort so
> >they don't get shorted on volume.
>
> I can't remember ever seeing Evolve.
>
> I'm going to look for it, and compare it to what I'm feeding now.
>
> I would like to save some money, but only if it's at least as good as
> what I'm feeding my 15 year old cat now.
>
> Since cats only eat one thing for the most part, what you feed them is
> SO important.
>
> I won't cut back on quality to save a little on cat food: one trip to
> the vet, with no other testing or fees, costs as much as a 20 lb. bag of
> REALLY premium food!
>
> ---
> avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
> Virus Database (VPS): 101019-1, 10/19/2010
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> avast! - copyright (c) 1988-2010 ALWIL Software.http://www.avast.com

BTW - what brand are you using for your 15 year old cat? Is it
Science Diet?

Rene
October 20th 10, 08:00 PM
I hope I won't be considered a "food nut," but I do have some strong
opinions on food. Just to let you know for background information, I
too have an older cat (12), who got a UTI at age 1.5, bladder crystals
and surgery at age 3, was overweight at age 4, and had pancreatitis
when he was 8. I've fed "light" and prescription dry food, and had
nothing but problems and weight gain.

First of all, you don't need to feed a senior type diet. As long as
it's a high-quality food, that's all you need. Secondly, I'm skeptical
of the low-fat diet for pancreatitis. I've read a lot on the subject,
and the majority of cases in cats are idiopathic. And, unfortunately,
when a dry food takes out fat, they add carbohydrates, which are even
worse for cats.

You should read this great article about feline nutrition: http://www.catinfo.org/

I understand that you are on a fixed income. However, it would be
healthier for all of your cats to be on at least a partially canned/
wet diet, but especially your 15 year old. There are now lots of
brands of grain-free wet food available. I like Innova Evo, Nature's
Variety, and Wellness (grain free varieties), but if you do your
homework you will find other brands. Some stores offer case discounts
or punch cards for savings--but you have to ask first.

In my experience, I have had much fewer health problems when feeding
canned food. Our oldest has not had any more UTIs or bladder crystals.
Also, canned will help with his weight problems. Tucker lost 6 pounds
(slowly) on Wellness and has kept the weight off (which is better for
his joints, preventing diabetes, etc.).

Sorry to be so long. Email me if you have further questions.

Rene
October 20th 10, 08:01 PM
Sorry, I apparently added the ages of your cats together. I meant your
TEN year old!

Rene

cshenk
October 21st 10, 12:21 AM
"Jane" wrote
"cshenk" wrote:

>> > Again, I know that Science Diet won't be everyone's favorite, but I
>> > get it at a huge discount at the shelter. I'm retired with a limited
>> > income and three cats to take care of, and I do. Please keep that in
>> > mind before you suggest I change to anything expensive.

>> No problem Jane. See if you see 'Evolve' locally. It was much cheaper
>> than
>> science diet locally (almost 1/2 the price and no sale involved) and
>> better
>> overall in ingredients. I mention it only as a decent one that actually
>> costs less you may want to try. The one I have is a lower calorie sort so
>> they don't get shorted on volume.

> Don't think I've ever since Evolve, but I'll look for it.
> Is it dry or wet?

That one is a dry. It may even be a local brand not well seen outside my
local area yet? I mostly wet feed cats but I have no problem helping folks
find a decent dry if that is a need. I got the Blue Wilderness and the
Evolve for our occasional needs. Evolve isn't 'BW' but it's perfectly fine
enough unless I am missing something. We use both for cat treats an
occasional full feeding. I got the BW as was almost out the other other and
it wasn't sold at the store i was in at the time when I needed more.

Gandalf[_2_]
October 21st 10, 01:50 AM
On Wed, 20 Oct 2010 05:50:45 -0700 (PDT), Jane
> wrote:

>On Oct 19, 6:07*pm, ingold1234[at]yahoo[dot]com (Gandalf) wrote:
>> On Tue, 19 Oct 2010 07:05:51 -0700 (PDT), Jane
>>
>>
>>
>> > wrote:
>> >I have three cats. *Two females ages 2 and 3. *One male age 10. *They
>> >are all indoor cats with voracious appetites. *I feed them all Science
>> >Diet Light (the amount depends upon their size). *I also give them
>> >each a treat of Fancy Feast in the afternoon - 1/2 can between the
>> >three. *The younger females also get some Science Diet Oral Care at
>> >bedtime. *The male can't chew so I clean his teeth with dental pads.
>> >He has gingivitis which is being watched by the vet.
>>
>> >I volunteer at the MSPCA and have talked to a couple of vets there.
>> >They all said that they like Science Diet and feed it to their pets,
>> >something I know that many of you will disagree with. *I asked them,
>> >instead of my own vet because they don't have anything to sell me and
>> >so would be more honest. *My vet sells the stuff.
>>
>> >While my male cat has episodes of pancreatitis I am assured it is not
>> >related to the food, since what I give him is low fat which is
>> >important. *Otherwise they are very healthy with nice soft and shiny
>> >coats, which I brush often.
>>
>> >My question: *should I be feeding the older cat something for mature
>> >cats? *He really is a chubby fellow and I'd like to keep his weight
>> >under control. *However I'm wondering if he needs the senior food.
>> >What about dry vs. wet? *I've always done dry and he never has a
>> >problem with it.
>>
>> >Again, I know that Science Diet won't be everyone's favorite, but I
>> >get it at a huge discount at the shelter. *I'm retired with a limited
>> >income and three cats to take care of, and I do. *Please keep that in
>> >mind before you suggest I change to anything expensive.
>>
>> >Thanks.
>>
>> >Jane
>>
>> I asked my vet this exact question when my cat became a 'senior' cat
>> some years ago.
>>
>> She said that as long as the cat is getting a 'premium' cat food, there
>> is no need, or reason, to buy a 'special' food for 'senior cats'.
>>
>> She explained that in the past 20 years or so, cat food has increased in
>> quality significantly, especially among the 'premium' brands.
>>
>> Aside from keeping your pancreatitis prone cat on a reduced fat diet, I
>> would feel no need to change to a 'senior cat' food.
>>
>> THe vet that gave me this information sells a LOT of cat food, so if she
>> was looking to increase her sales, she certainly didn't. Hence, i tend
>> to trust what she told me.
>>
>> I asked the younger vet in the clinic the same question about a year
>> ago, and I got pretty much exactly the same answer.
>>
>> While Science Diet may not be the 'best' food on the planet, it far
>> better than most, and now some 'discount' stores are selling it.
>>
>> If money is tight, as it is for most people, I see no reason to change
>> foods.
>>
>> As an aside: I decided to switch my cat to a 'better' premium food,
>> about a year ago: Wellness. No corn, no wheat, no meat by products, no
>> soy. Very expensive.
>>
>> Slowly over time, it gave my cat diarrhea! I took quite awhile, and at
>> first it was very occasional, then increased in frequency.
>>
>> I switched her back to her 'old food', as quickly as I could (about a
>> week of mixing it) and the diarrhea disappeared, and never returned.
>>
>> I never figured out WHY the 'better' food gave her diarrhea, but I'm
>> glad I didn't take her to the vet and had a bunch of expensive tests
>> run!
>>
>> Asking what the 'best food' for you cat is really opens a can of worms!
>> The nut cases will climb out of the cracks in the floor, and abuse you
>> for feeding your cats Science Diet!
>>
>> There are people who believe cats should eat NOTHING but raw meat,
>> NOTHING but canned food, NOTHING but ORGANIC foods, etc. etc. etc.
>>
>> And, they will stand on their soap box and rail at you endlessly, trying
>> to convince you that ONLY they (ALL of them, individually) are RIGHT.
>>
>> ---
>> avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
>> Virus Database (VPS): 101019-1, 10/19/2010
>> Tested on: 10/19/2010 5:07:09 PM
>> avast! - copyright (c) 1988-2010 ALWIL Software.http://www.avast.com
>
>One more question - do you use dry or wet food?

I feed dry food.

My cat won't eat canned food; even Fancy Feast!

I've tried MANY kinds of canned cat food, when she's been sick, and
wouldn't eat: I have yet to find ANY canned food she will eat, even if
she is hungry! Strange cat...

Dry food is so much easier to deal with, too.

My cat is almost 15, and she likes to 'nibble' throughout the day; I
haven't seen her eat a LOT of food for a long time.

That would be hard to do for her with canned food: it dries out quickly,
now that the humidity is low....and if the humidity is high, I would
worry about canned food spoiling in hot humid weather.

My vet says canned food causes plaque to build up on cats' teeth MUCH
more quickly, meaning more frequent dental cleanings, which are both
very expensive, and not without risk, for an elderly cat, because of the
anesthesia.

I will concede that high quality canned cat food may be 'better' for
some cats...it has a lot of water in it, and may be easier for some cats
to digest...but it has many drawbacks, not the least of which is it is
REALLY expensive, compared to dry food.

Gandalf[_2_]
October 21st 10, 02:02 AM
On Wed, 20 Oct 2010 05:52:51 -0700 (PDT), Jane
> wrote:

>On Oct 19, 8:39*pm, ingold1234[at]yahoo[dot]com (Gandalf) wrote:
>> On Tue, 19 Oct 2010 18:39:32 -0400, "cshenk" > wrote:
>> >"Jane" wrote
>>
>> >>I have three cats. *Two females ages 2 and 3. *One male age 10.
>>
>> >> My question: *should I be feeding the older cat something for mature
>> >> cats? *He really is a chubby fellow and I'd like to keep his weight
>> >> under control.
>>
>> >Not really needed.
>>
>> >> What about dry vs. wet? *I've always done dry and he never has a
>> >> problem with it.
>>
>> >Then keep to it.
>>
>> >> Again, I know that Science Diet won't be everyone's favorite, but I
>> >> get it at a huge discount at the shelter. *I'm retired with a limited
>> >> income and three cats to take care of, and I do. *Please keep that in
>> >> mind before you suggest I change to anything expensive.
>>
>> >No problem Jane. *See if you see 'Evolve' locally. *It was much cheaper than
>> >science diet locally (almost 1/2 the price and no sale involved) and better
>> >overall in ingredients. *I mention it only as a decent one that actually
>> >costs less you may want to try. *The one I have is a lower calorie sort so
>> >they don't get shorted on volume.
>>
>> I can't remember ever seeing Evolve.
>>
>> I'm going to look for it, and compare it to what I'm feeding now.
>>
>> I would like to save some money, but only if it's at least as good as
>> what I'm feeding my 15 year old cat now.
>>
>> Since cats only eat one thing for the most part, what you feed them is
>> SO important.
>>
>> I won't cut back on quality to save a little on cat food: one trip to
>> the vet, with no other testing or fees, costs as much as a 20 lb. bag of
>> REALLY premium food!
>>
>> ---
>> avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
>> Virus Database (VPS): 101019-1, 10/19/2010
>> Tested on: 10/19/2010 7:39:09 PM
>> avast! - copyright (c) 1988-2010 ALWIL Software.http://www.avast.com
>
>BTW - what brand are you using for your 15 year old cat? Is it
>Science Diet?

No, I'm feeding her Nutro indoor adult dry food. When she was
overweight, I fed her the 'weight control' formula.

I fed my previous cat Science Diet, and she lived to 18YO, and was NEVER
sick, until the last week or so of her life. Eighteen is a pretty good
age for a cat, so I can say it was certainly VERY good for my cat!

As I said before, Science Diet MAY not be the absolute best food
available, but it's far, FAR better than a lot of 'grocery store' cat
foods....and now you can buy it in places outside of pet stores, so the
price is lower than it used to be.

If you cat is healthy, with a nice shiny coat, and is active within
reason for his/her age, I see no reason to switch.

I switched my cat to a 'better' food once, as I said, and it made her
sick! And, not right away, either.

When a cat only eats ONE thing for most of it's caloric intake, changing
that CAN (and in my case WAS) cause some serious problems.

Kelly Greene[_3_]
October 21st 10, 03:10 AM
"Jane" > wrote in message
...
> Again, I know that Science Diet won't be everyone's favorite, but I
> get it at a huge discount at the shelter. I'm retired with a limited
> income and three cats to take care of, and I do. Please keep that in
> mind before you suggest I change to anything expensive.

I wouldn't feed Science Diet. I never heard of a shelter selling cat food.

Gandalf[_2_]
October 21st 10, 05:28 PM
On Wed, 20 Oct 2010 21:10:24 -0500, "Kelly Greene" >
wrote:

>
>"Jane" > wrote in message
...
>> Again, I know that Science Diet won't be everyone's favorite, but I
>> get it at a huge discount at the shelter. I'm retired with a limited
>> income and three cats to take care of, and I do. Please keep that in
>> mind before you suggest I change to anything expensive.
>
>I wouldn't feed Science Diet. I never heard of a shelter selling cat food.

My local Humane Society has a pretty big 'store' on site, with very good
prices on 'bulk' clumping litter, cat and dog food (including Science
Diet) water and food bowls, collars, leashes, toys, etc., etc.

You know: ALL the stuff you need when you get a new pet.

Their prices are very competitive with pet stores, and the money helps
support the shelter.

The Humane Society isn't my favorite shelter, by far, but they DO save a
lot of cats and dogs....it's far better than no shelter at all.

cshenk
October 21st 10, 10:30 PM
"ingold1234 (Gandalf)" wrote

> I feed dry food.
> My cat won't eat canned food; even Fancy Feast!

Gigglz! I remember you mentioning that before. I've had cats resist the
change too. Took a bit with Daisy-chan in fact.

> I've tried MANY kinds of canned cat food, when she's been sick, and
> wouldn't eat: I have yet to find ANY canned food she will eat, even if
> she is hungry! Strange cat...

Happens!

> Dry food is so much easier to deal with, too.
> My cat is almost 15, and she likes to 'nibble' throughout the day; I
> haven't seen her eat a LOT of food for a long time.

Definately. Unfortunately I can't leave dry out for Daisy. Even if Cash
can't reach it, it drives him crazy to sniff it and he's almost hurt himself
trying to get at it.

> That would be hard to do for her with canned food: it dries out quickly,
> now that the humidity is low....and if the humidity is high, I would
> worry about canned food spoiling in hot humid weather.

Yes, these are the detractions of wet feeding.

> My vet says canned food causes plaque to build up on cats' teeth MUCH
> more quickly, meaning more frequent dental cleanings, which are both
> very expensive, and not without risk, for an elderly cat, because of the
> anesthesia.

I'm not so sure. All the times when I had plaque build issues with cats,
they were on dry. This may well just be 'dumb luck' that my wet fed ones
have never had a problem.

> I will concede that high quality canned cat food may be 'better' for
> some cats...it has a lot of water in it, and may be easier for some cats
> to digest...but it has many drawbacks, not the least of which is it is
> REALLY expensive, compared to dry food.

I will happily conceed that there are really high quality drys out there now
for cats and and as long as you make sure the cat is drinking enough,
there's no reason not to use them. I'd be totally comfortable dry feeding
Daisy-chan (if there were no dog issue as above) and adding lots of broth
(which she loves!) in a separate bowl in 1/4 cup or so amounts per dry
feeding. That afterall exceeds the amount of water she gets from a can of
the size we use per feeding.

As it is, Daisy-chan happily shares the waterfeeder with the 2 dogs. Litter
shows she's drinking plenty.

My impression is many of us who wet feed, are older and are unaware of the
quality level improvement in dry cat foods. With my first cats, it was a
world of 'kit-n-kabootle' or 'meow-mix' and such. There was little
information available to the average person (internet at home was still a
dream awaiting birth and cable TV gave a whopping 12 channels). As people
demanded better, information and products surfaced but there's a lot of
dreck out there still pretending to be 'good stuff' with often a higher
price than the genuinely good stuff. This is as true of cans, as dry.

Jane[_2_]
October 22nd 10, 01:18 AM
On Oct 20, 3:00*pm, Rene > wrote:
> I hope I won't be considered a "food nut," but I do have some strong
> opinions on food. Just to let you know for background information, I
> too have an older cat (12), who got a UTI at age 1.5, bladder crystals
> and surgery at age 3, was overweight at age 4, and had pancreatitis
> when he was 8. I've fed "light" and prescription dry food, and had
> nothing but problems and weight gain.
>
> First of all, you don't need to feed a senior type diet. As long as
> it's a high-quality food, that's all you need. Secondly, I'm skeptical
> of the low-fat diet for pancreatitis. I've read a lot on the subject,
> and the majority of cases in cats are idiopathic. And, unfortunately,
> when a dry food takes out fat, they add carbohydrates, which are even
> worse for cats.
>
> You should read this great article about feline nutrition:http://www.catinfo.org/
>
> I understand that you are on a fixed income. However, it would be
> healthier for all of your cats to be on at least a partially canned/
> wet diet, but especially your 15 year old. There are now lots of
> brands of grain-free wet food available. I like Innova Evo, Nature's
> Variety, and Wellness (grain free varieties), but if you do your
> homework you will find other brands. Some stores offer case discounts
> or punch cards for savings--but you have to ask first.
>
> In my experience, I have had much fewer health problems when feeding
> canned food. Our oldest has not had any more UTIs or bladder crystals.
> Also, canned will help with his weight problems. Tucker lost 6 pounds
> (slowly) on Wellness and has kept the weight off (which is better for
> his joints, preventing diabetes, etc.).
>
> Sorry to be so long. Email me if you have further questions.

Thanks. Actually I did look around for a grain free food a while ago
and found Evo. Turns out they won't eat it. As far as I can tell
from the ingredients, Fancy Feast is grain free, which is why I use it
for an afternoon treat for them.

Kelly Greene[_4_]
November 3rd 10, 07:05 AM
"ingold1234[at]yahoo[dot]com (Gandalf)" wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 20 Oct 2010 21:10:24 -0500, "Kelly Greene" >
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Jane" > wrote in message
...
>>> Again, I know that Science Diet won't be everyone's favorite, but I
>>> get it at a huge discount at the shelter. I'm retired with a limited
>>> income and three cats to take care of, and I do. Please keep that in
>>> mind before you suggest I change to anything expensive.
>>
>>I wouldn't feed Science Diet. I never heard of a shelter selling cat
>>food.
>
> My local Humane Society has a pretty big 'store' on site, with very good
> prices on 'bulk' clumping litter, cat and dog food (including Science
> Diet) water and food bowls, collars, leashes, toys, etc., etc.

This is new to me. The shelter here does sell used carriers and other used
items people donate or leave with their pets, but not new stuff or food.

>
> You know: ALL the stuff you need when you get a new pet.
>
> Their prices are very competitive with pet stores, and the money helps
> support the shelter.
>
> The Humane Society isn't my favorite shelter, by far, but they DO save a
> lot of cats and dogs....it's far better than no shelter at all.

This is true. We don't have a Humane Society here. Just the county
kill-shelter and assorted Rescue Groups.