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Brian[_2_]
November 23rd 10, 12:17 PM
I'm facing a decision that every pet owner hopes they never have to
have.
My cat has cancer in one of it's ears and the vet thinks that if the
cancer on his lower part of his ear is cut out then there is a change
that parts of the cancer will continue in another part of it's ear.
So it's a choice of operating on the cat or ending the cats life.
The cat is approx 15 years old and apart from the cancer is in good
health and is strong. Three months ago the cat was operated on for
skin cancer on his ear which was successful but this Cancer is in a
different location on the ear and is deeper in the skin (a hard lump).

Part of me feels that I want to give the cat a chance to live as he is
still in good health and part of me feels that it could be a wasted
operation if there's a good change of the cancer coming back, also
considering the cats age.

You comments would be very welcome

Regards Brian

Gandalf[_2_]
November 23rd 10, 01:29 PM
On Wed, 24 Nov 2010 01:17:19 +1300, Brian > wrote:

>I'm facing a decision that every pet owner hopes they never have to
>have.
>My cat has cancer in one of it's ears and the vet thinks that if the
>cancer on his lower part of his ear is cut out then there is a change
>that parts of the cancer will continue in another part of it's ear.
>So it's a choice of operating on the cat or ending the cats life.
>The cat is approx 15 years old and apart from the cancer is in good
>health and is strong. Three months ago the cat was operated on for
>skin cancer on his ear which was successful but this Cancer is in a
>different location on the ear and is deeper in the skin (a hard lump).
>
>Part of me feels that I want to give the cat a chance to live as he is
>still in good health and part of me feels that it could be a wasted
>operation if there's a good change of the cancer coming back, also
>considering the cats age.
>
>You comments would be very welcome
>
>Regards Brian
>

I'd say if you can afford the surgery, then go ahead and have it done.

If it comes back again, then you know what has to be done.

The chances of surgery actually 'curing' the cat without chemo and/or
radiation are not very good...just like with people.

But, there is a chance, and it also would give you some more 'good time'
with him.

I'm guessing the surgery isn't 'too expensive', since it's his ear, and
not internal.

Or, you can do nothing, and just wait until the cancer gets to the point
where the decision must be made to have him PTS.

This is a no win situation, in the end, unfortunately.

You have to weigh the surgery and recovery time against the time it
might buy him.

Was the previous surgery hard on him?

Did it take very long for him to recover?

I think those two questions are pretty important, in making a good
decision.

Best wishes for you and your cat, whatever you decide.

Rene
November 23rd 10, 02:35 PM
Brian,

While 15 is older for a cat, if he is in good health otherwise and you
can afford the surgery, I would certainly have the surgery. Make sure
to get bloodwork done first to see if he's a surgery candidate and
there aren't any hidden illnesses (like kidney disease).

Also, you might want to invest in a fabric-covered E collar while he
heals so he doesn't scratch his sutures. There are several brands
available in pet stores.

Rene

SJ
November 23rd 10, 02:56 PM
I would get more information, first, before making your decision.
Try a second opinion at a vet school or a vet specialist. There are
specialties in Veterinary Medicine, just as there are in people medicine.
There may be a best way to treat the cancer. Was a biopsy done to determine
the cell type? (Cancers come in many forms and many are benign or curable.)

15 years old is not too old, especially if the cat is healthy and happy.
In fact, the surgery could be a blessing in disguise for your cat, as
follows:
Before the surgery, ask the Vet to check the cat's teeth, and ask if a
dental cleaning can be done during the surgery. Older cats sometimes stop
eating because of dental problems that could have been prevented by annual
cleanings. Dental care on cats is usually done under very light anesthesia.

But only you can make the decision as to what is best for your cat. You know
your cat better than any other person does.


"Brian" > wrote in message
...
> I'm facing a decision that every pet owner hopes they never have to
> have.
> My cat has cancer in one of it's ears and the vet thinks that if the
> cancer on his lower part of his ear is cut out then there is a change
> that parts of the cancer will continue in another part of it's ear.
> So it's a choice of operating on the cat or ending the cats life.
> The cat is approx 15 years old and apart from the cancer is in good
> health and is strong. Three months ago the cat was operated on for
> skin cancer on his ear which was successful but this Cancer is in a
> different location on the ear and is deeper in the skin (a hard lump).
>
> Part of me feels that I want to give the cat a chance to live as he is
> still in good health and part of me feels that it could be a wasted
> operation if there's a good change of the cancer coming back, also
> considering the cats age.
>
> You comments would be very welcome
>
> Regards Brian
>
>

barb
November 23rd 10, 07:00 PM
I'd go with the surgery. He deserves a chance. Good luck.

Barb

Bill Graham
November 24th 10, 12:05 AM
Brian wrote:
> I'm facing a decision that every pet owner hopes they never have to
> have.
> My cat has cancer in one of it's ears and the vet thinks that if the
> cancer on his lower part of his ear is cut out then there is a change
> that parts of the cancer will continue in another part of it's ear.
> So it's a choice of operating on the cat or ending the cats life.
> The cat is approx 15 years old and apart from the cancer is in good
> health and is strong. Three months ago the cat was operated on for
> skin cancer on his ear which was successful but this Cancer is in a
> different location on the ear and is deeper in the skin (a hard lump).
>
> Part of me feels that I want to give the cat a chance to live as he is
> still in good health and part of me feels that it could be a wasted
> operation if there's a good change of the cancer coming back, also
> considering the cats age.
>
> You comments would be very welcome
>
> Regards Brian

If the cancer is on the external part of the ear, it strikes me that the
operation shouldn't be too expensive, and you should get it done. There are
few things more satisfying than having a cat that has been given several
more years of life because you dropped a few hundred for it. If the
operation would seriously cripple the cat, and cause it to not be able to
enjoy the remainder of its life, then that's a different story, and it is a
decision that you really have to make yourself, because only you know the
cat and the circumstances of its existence.

Patty Jo
November 24th 10, 02:08 AM
I'm real sorry you have to deal with this. I know how tough it is. My
son had a white cat that had the same thing.
He opted for 2 surgeries & then a third. Each time taking more of the
cat's ear. I felt the Vet was taking advantage of the situation. The
poor cat suffered needlessly. The cancer just kept on growing. Finally,
I convinced my son to have her put to sleep.
It's a decision only you can make. I just wanted to give my input. I do
feel 15 yrs. is a relatively long life for a cat. You could maybe buy
her some more time. But at what cost to her?..pj

MLB[_2_]
November 24th 10, 02:59 AM
Brian wrote:
> I'm facing a decision that every pet owner hopes they never have to
> have.
> My cat has cancer in one of it's ears and the vet thinks that if the
> cancer on his lower part of his ear is cut out then there is a change
> that parts of the cancer will continue in another part of it's ear.
> So it's a choice of operating on the cat or ending the cats life.
> The cat is approx 15 years old and apart from the cancer is in good
> health and is strong. Three months ago the cat was operated on for
> skin cancer on his ear which was successful but this Cancer is in a
> different location on the ear and is deeper in the skin (a hard lump).
>
> Part of me feels that I want to give the cat a chance to live as he is
> still in good health and part of me feels that it could be a wasted
> operation if there's a good change of the cancer coming back, also
> considering the cats age.
>
> You comments would be very welcome
>
> Regards Brian
>
>
Suggestion: Go to RPCA (Rec. Pets.Cats.Anecdotes) and PING Arthur Shapiro.
He has told us about his two white cats who had similar cancer
surgery. As I recall, he spent over $7,000 trying to save the second
cat but it didn't succeed. MLB

Bill Graham
November 24th 10, 04:16 AM
Patty Jo wrote:
> I'm real sorry you have to deal with this. I know how tough it is. My
> son had a white cat that had the same thing.
> He opted for 2 surgeries & then a third. Each time taking more of the
> cat's ear. I felt the Vet was taking advantage of the situation. The
> poor cat suffered needlessly. The cancer just kept on growing.
> Finally, I convinced my son to have her put to sleep.
> It's a decision only you can make. I just wanted to give my input. I
> do feel 15 yrs. is a relatively long life for a cat. You could maybe
> buy her some more time. But at what cost to her?..pj

There's something I apparently don't understand here. If the cancer is on
the cat's ear, then why doesn't surgically removing it work? If it comes
back, then why would it necessarily come back to the same ear.....It would
metastacise to anywhere else in the cat, wouldn't it? If it does come back,
then either the Vet didn't get it all, or the problem is internal within the
cat, and wasn't an ear problem to begin with. (It seems to me, but what do I
know?)

Brian[_2_]
November 24th 10, 05:22 AM
Brian > wrote:

>I'm facing a decision that every pet owner hopes they never have to
>have.
>My cat has cancer in one of it's ears and the vet thinks that if the
>cancer on his lower part of his ear is cut out then there is a change
>that parts of the cancer will continue in another part of it's ear.
>So it's a choice of operating on the cat or ending the cats life.
>The cat is approx 15 years old and apart from the cancer is in good
>health and is strong. Three months ago the cat was operated on for
>skin cancer on his ear which was successful but this Cancer is in a
>different location on the ear and is deeper in the skin (a hard lump).
>
>Part of me feels that I want to give the cat a chance to live as he is
>still in good health and part of me feels that it could be a wasted
>operation if there's a good change of the cancer coming back, also
>considering the cats age.
>
>You comments would be very welcome
>
>Regards Brian
>
Thanks for your replies and support.
What seems strange to me is that two weeks ago the cat's ear was
examined by the Vet (when we found it bleeding) and it was found that
the cat had an infection inside his ear. At that time the Vet did not
report the cat as having cancer on the lower part of his ear. Can
cancer grow within 2 weeks?
The reason why we took the cat back to the vet after the vet had
examined the cats ear two weeks ago was that we had removed the cats
cover (shaped like a cone) that stops him from scratching his ear and
making it bleed. When we removed the cone collar he scratched his ear
and it started to bleed.
After wearing the collar while he had stitches for his first ear
cancer operation that cat was feeling pleased not to have the cone
collar around his neck after the stitches were removed. It then needed
the cone collar while we treated his ear for an infection inside his
ear with cream. Now he has to wear his cone collar for a third time as
he now has cancer in his ear again which causes him to scratch his ear
causing it to bleed.

Timeline
Vet finds skin cancer on cat's ear
Vet removes stitches
....3 months later
Vet finds infection inside cats ear
....2 weeks later
Vet finds deeper skin cancer inside cats ear

Regards Brian

Brian[_2_]
November 24th 10, 05:24 AM
ingold1234[at]yahoo[dot]com (Gandalf) wrote:

>On Wed, 24 Nov 2010 01:17:19 +1300, Brian > wrote:
>
>>I'm facing a decision that every pet owner hopes they never have to
>>have.
>>My cat has cancer in one of it's ears and the vet thinks that if the
>>cancer on his lower part of his ear is cut out then there is a change
>>that parts of the cancer will continue in another part of it's ear.
>>So it's a choice of operating on the cat or ending the cats life.
>>The cat is approx 15 years old and apart from the cancer is in good
>>health and is strong. Three months ago the cat was operated on for
>>skin cancer on his ear which was successful but this Cancer is in a
>>different location on the ear and is deeper in the skin (a hard lump).
>>
>>Part of me feels that I want to give the cat a chance to live as he is
>>still in good health and part of me feels that it could be a wasted
>>operation if there's a good change of the cancer coming back, also
>>considering the cats age.
>>
>>You comments would be very welcome
>>
>>Regards Brian
>>
>
>I'd say if you can afford the surgery, then go ahead and have it done.
>
>If it comes back again, then you know what has to be done.
>
>The chances of surgery actually 'curing' the cat without chemo and/or
>radiation are not very good...just like with people.
>
>But, there is a chance, and it also would give you some more 'good time'
>with him.
>
>I'm guessing the surgery isn't 'too expensive', since it's his ear, and
>not internal.
>
>Or, you can do nothing, and just wait until the cancer gets to the point
>where the decision must be made to have him PTS.
>
>This is a no win situation, in the end, unfortunately.
>
>You have to weigh the surgery and recovery time against the time it
>might buy him.
>
>Was the previous surgery hard on him?
>
>Did it take very long for him to recover?
>
>I think those two questions are pretty important, in making a good
>decision.
>
>Best wishes for you and your cat, whatever you decide.

Thanks ingold.
See my reply attached to these groups of replies
(look for Brian >

Regards Brian

Brian[_2_]
November 24th 10, 05:25 AM
Rene > wrote:

>Brian,
>
>While 15 is older for a cat, if he is in good health otherwise and you
>can afford the surgery, I would certainly have the surgery. Make sure
>to get bloodwork done first to see if he's a surgery candidate and
>there aren't any hidden illnesses (like kidney disease).
>
>Also, you might want to invest in a fabric-covered E collar while he
>heals so he doesn't scratch his sutures. There are several brands
>available in pet stores.
>
>Rene

Thanks Rene.
See my reply attached to these groups of replies.
(look for Brian >)

Regards Brian

Rene
November 24th 10, 02:23 PM
Can
> cancer grow within 2 weeks?

Oh yes, it can, especially if it's an aggressive kind. I'm assuming
your vet did a biopsy of the first cancer. Perhaps you can get a
biopsy of the current cancer and find out what type it is. If it's
particularly aggressive, sadly, it may have already spread. But it's
worth checking out to see if he has a chance of recovering IMO.

Rene

chili
November 27th 10, 04:14 PM
On Nov 23, 7:17*am, Brian > wrote:
> I'm facing a decision that every pet owner hopes they never have to
> have.
> My cat has cancer in one of it's ears and the vet thinks that if the
> cancer on his lower part of his ear is cut out then there is a change
> that parts of the cancer will continue in another part of it's ear.
> So it's a choice of operating on the cat or ending the cats life.
> The cat is approx 15 years old and apart from the cancer is in good
> health and is strong. Three months ago the cat was operated on for
> skin cancer on his ear which was successful but this Cancer is in a
> different location on the ear and is deeper in the skin (a hard lump).
>
> Part of me feels that I want to give the cat a chance to live as he is
> still in good health and part of me feels that it could be a wasted
> operation if there's a good change of the cancer coming back, also
> considering the cats age.
>
> You comments would be very welcome
>
> Regards Brian

..22

back of the head

cheap and easy

Brian[_2_]
November 28th 10, 06:02 AM
chili > wrote:

>On Nov 23, 7:17*am, Brian > wrote:
>> I'm facing a decision that every pet owner hopes they never have to
>> have.
>> My cat has cancer in one of it's ears and the vet thinks that if the
>> cancer on his lower part of his ear is cut out then there is a change
>> that parts of the cancer will continue in another part of it's ear.
>> So it's a choice of operating on the cat or ending the cats life.
>> The cat is approx 15 years old and apart from the cancer is in good
>> health and is strong. Three months ago the cat was operated on for
>> skin cancer on his ear which was successful but this Cancer is in a
>> different location on the ear and is deeper in the skin (a hard lump).
>>
>> Part of me feels that I want to give the cat a chance to live as he is
>> still in good health and part of me feels that it could be a wasted
>> operation if there's a good change of the cancer coming back, also
>> considering the cats age.
>>
>> You comments would be very welcome
>>
>> Regards Brian
>
>.22
>
>back of the head
>
>cheap and easy

To have a cat is better than not to have a cat.

Regards Brian