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Bohgosity BumaskiL
December 7th 10, 09:58 AM
170 mL London Drugs Tuna
2 Eggs
5 mL Wasabi Powder
5 mL Paprika
700 W microwave oven

Mix well. Microwave on high for three minutes.
Mix again. Microwave on high for another minute.
Serve hot.
-------
I picked up Stevie as a stray about six months ago. She had a persistent
case of diarrhea until about two weeks ago, when I started cooking for both
of my owners...can't keep Stevie out of Skittles' food, so they both get
cooking.

Stevie is a voracious eater of raw tuna--still goes bonkers, running and
jumping all over the place when I open a can. Unfortunately, raw tuna brings
diarrhea back. Now that Skittles has accepted the smell of Salmon (perhaps
due to Stevie's enthusiasm), I could serve that raw. Of course, Salmon, in
its nearly pure human-targeted form is a lot more expensive, so it will
likely be a special treat when I feel like eating some.

My owners won't touch raw or canned hamburger, and they love a grilled
pattie. I haven't fed my owners enough of it to know if beef is an option.
_______
[ http://ecn.ab.ca/~brewhaha/ BrewJay's Babble Bin]

Bohgosity BumaskiL
December 7th 10, 11:46 AM
That should say 170g Tuna (not mL). I think most tuna for cats is organ
meat, which is cheaper than white, because Iron won't hurt them.

SJ
December 8th 10, 03:03 PM
"Bohgosity BumaskiL" > wrote in message
...
> That should say 170g Tuna (not mL). I think most tuna for cats is organ
> meat, which is cheaper than white, because Iron won't hurt them.
>
I hope no one took brewhaha's post seriously.
Tuna is not recommended for cats, especially cats with many illnesses. And
giving wasabi powder to anyone with digestive problems, including diarrhea,
will make the diarrhea worse. Wasabi irritates bowels.

Matthew[_3_]
December 8th 10, 04:46 PM
"SJ" > wrote in message
...
> "Bohgosity BumaskiL" > wrote in message
> ...
>> That should say 170g Tuna (not mL). I think most tuna for cats is organ
>> meat, which is cheaper than white, because Iron won't hurt them.
>>
> I hope no one took brewhaha's post seriously.
> Tuna is not recommended for cats, especially cats with many illnesses. And
> giving wasabi powder to anyone with digestive problems, including
> diarrhea,
> will make the diarrhea worse. Wasabi irritates bowels.
>


I put the idiot in the stupid file the moment he posted

Bohgosity BumaskiL
December 19th 10, 09:33 AM
All ingredients in any recipe are optional.

"SJ" > wrote in message
...
> "Bohgosity BumaskiL" > wrote in message
> ...
>> That should say 170g Tuna (not mL). I think most tuna for cats is organ
>> meat, which is cheaper than white, because Iron won't hurt them.
>>
> I hope no one took brewhaha's post seriously.
> Tuna is not recommended for cats, especially cats with many illnesses.

Speak for yourself: You do not recommend Tuna for cats, especially cats with
many illnesses.

Tuna is choice food, because it is entirely meat, and extremely popular with
three of the cats I had or hav. I see no evidence for a supposition that
cats do anything but tolerate carbohydrates, some cats more than others.

> And
> giving wasabi powder to anyone with digestive
> problems, including diarrhea,
> will make the diarrhea worse.

That is not my experience, either personally or with cats. In other words,
this recipe continues to work for my cats. Perhaps you are talking about
uncooked Wasabi powder by itself. Wasabi loses most of its potence in
cooking. After cooking, it is like cabbage juice, which I recommend for
treating ulcers and morning sickness (see pineapple and red cabbage
smoothie).

> Wasabi irritates bowels.
>
>

Wasabi is wild cabbage. It is potent, though. One level teaspoon makes a
320g can of Salmon very tasty, and it is the source of one of the first
anti-oxidants anyone discovered; Horseradish Peroxidase. So, it can offset
some of the damaje that cooking or canning causes to polyunsaturated oils in
fish.

I was hoping that someone other than me would actually try my recipe before
they started arguing with me on amounts.

For all I really know, egg has more to do with Stevie's remission from
diarrhea than anything else in my recipe.
_______
Yoh mommuh soh ugly she mayd an unyun cry.

Bill Graham
December 20th 10, 02:24 AM
Bohgosity BumaskiL wrote:
> All ingredients in any recipe are optional.
>
> "SJ" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Bohgosity BumaskiL" > wrote in
>> message ...
>>> That should say 170g Tuna (not mL). I think most tuna for cats is
>>> organ meat, which is cheaper than white, because Iron won't hurt
>>> them.
>> I hope no one took brewhaha's post seriously.
>> Tuna is not recommended for cats, especially cats with many
>> illnesses.
>
> Speak for yourself: You do not recommend Tuna for cats, especially
> cats with many illnesses.
>
> Tuna is choice food, because it is entirely meat, and extremely
> popular with three of the cats I had or hav. I see no evidence for a
> supposition that cats do anything but tolerate carbohydrates, some
> cats more than others.

I was in Safeway a couple of years ago, and they had cans of tuna on sale
for 40 cents a can. Since the cat food was 50 cents a can, (same size can) I
decided to buy a dozen cans or so for my cats. - Big mistake! When I got
home and opened one of these cans, it looked horrible.....Worse than cat
food. My cats wouldn't touch it. I ended up throwing it all away....

Bohgosity BumaskiL
December 23rd 10, 10:27 AM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in message
...
> Bohgosity BumaskiL wrote:
>> All ingredients in any recipe are optional.
>>
>> "SJ" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> "Bohgosity BumaskiL" > wrote in
>>> message ...
>>>> That should say 170g Tuna (not mL). I think most tuna for cats is
>>>> organ meat, which is cheaper than white, because Iron won't hurt
>>>> them.
>>> I hope no one took brewhaha's post seriously.
>>> Tuna is not recommended for cats, especially cats with many
>>> illnesses.
>>
>> Speak for yourself: You do not recommend Tuna for cats, especially
>> cats with many illnesses.
>>
>> Tuna is choice food, because it is entirely meat, and extremely
>> popular with three of the cats I had or hav. I see no evidence for a
>> supposition that cats do anything but tolerate carbohydrates, some
>> cats more than others.
>
> I was in Safeway a couple of years ago, and they had cans of tuna on sale
> for 40 cents a can. Since the cat food was 50 cents a can, (same size can)
> I decided to buy a dozen cans or so for my cats. - Big mistake! When I got
> home and opened one of these cans, it looked horrible.....Worse than cat
> food. My cats wouldn't touch it. I ended up throwing it all away....

Skittles was like that at first, even with Salmon; didn't like the smell,
and Stevie's enthusiasm for Tuna and Salmon eventually caused Skittles to
try it. Perhaps there was one time Skittles was particularly hungry at
dinner-time, too. Skittles will eat either one, now, although she is partial
to her old Turkey and Cheese, despite the moronic Wheat Gluten and Corn it
contains. I wish Stevie knew her own stomach regarding diarrhea. If I could
trust Stevie not to get into it, then I could feed Turkey and Cheese to
Skittles. Cats are lejendary for being finicky; unwilling to try anything
different, which is probably in their own interests, because many cats will
get diarrhea from chaynjez in their food.

Did I mention that eggs are cheaper than Tuna?
_______
To believe it makes it true, therefore it's brain fart.

Bill Graham
December 24th 10, 04:40 AM
Bohgosity BumaskiL wrote:
> "Bill Graham" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Bohgosity BumaskiL wrote:
>>> All ingredients in any recipe are optional.
>>>
>>> "SJ" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> "Bohgosity BumaskiL" > wrote in
>>>> message ...
>>>>> That should say 170g Tuna (not mL). I think most tuna for cats is
>>>>> organ meat, which is cheaper than white, because Iron won't hurt
>>>>> them.
>>>> I hope no one took brewhaha's post seriously.
>>>> Tuna is not recommended for cats, especially cats with many
>>>> illnesses.
>>>
>>> Speak for yourself: You do not recommend Tuna for cats, especially
>>> cats with many illnesses.
>>>
>>> Tuna is choice food, because it is entirely meat, and extremely
>>> popular with three of the cats I had or hav. I see no evidence for a
>>> supposition that cats do anything but tolerate carbohydrates, some
>>> cats more than others.
>>
>> I was in Safeway a couple of years ago, and they had cans of tuna on
>> sale for 40 cents a can. Since the cat food was 50 cents a can,
>> (same size can) I decided to buy a dozen cans or so for my cats. -
>> Big mistake! When I got home and opened one of these cans, it looked
>> horrible.....Worse than cat food. My cats wouldn't touch it. I ended
>> up throwing it all away....
>
> Skittles was like that at first, even with Salmon; didn't like the
> smell, and Stevie's enthusiasm for Tuna and Salmon eventually caused
> Skittles to try it. Perhaps there was one time Skittles was
> particularly hungry at dinner-time, too. Skittles will eat either
> one, now, although she is partial to her old Turkey and Cheese,
> despite the moronic Wheat Gluten and Corn it contains. I wish Stevie
> knew her own stomach regarding diarrhea. If I could trust Stevie not
> to get into it, then I could feed Turkey and Cheese to Skittles. Cats
> are lejendary for being finicky; unwilling to try anything different,
> which is probably in their own interests, because many cats will get
> diarrhea from chaynjez in their food.

Well, we have a former feral cat that eats anything we throw at him. Almost
like a dog, the first time it touches him when you throw it in the air is
when it hits the bottom of his stomach. (Not actually, but he does love
people food.) The others are, however a lot more finicky

Kelly Greene[_4_]
January 23rd 11, 03:26 PM
"Bohgosity BumaskiL" > wrote in message
...
>>
> Tuna is choice food, because it is entirely meat, and extremely popular
> with three of the cats I had or hav. I see no evidence for a supposition
> that cats do anything but tolerate carbohydrates, some cats more than
> others.
>

Tuna is not a natural part of a cat's diet. It should be a treat, not fed
daily.

Bill Graham
January 24th 11, 08:46 AM
Kelly Greene wrote:
> "Bohgosity BumaskiL" > wrote in
> message ...
>>>
>> Tuna is choice food, because it is entirely meat, and extremely
>> popular with three of the cats I had or hav. I see no evidence for a
>> supposition that cats do anything but tolerate carbohydrates, some
>> cats more than others.
>>
>
> Tuna is not a natural part of a cat's diet. It should be a treat,
> not fed daily.

In Japan, they sometimes get over $100,000 for just one tuna fish. - I am
amazed at the price in the local super. I pay 50 cents for a 5-1/2 oz. can.
Of course, they ruin it by cooking it...:^)

JWL
March 11th 11, 03:05 AM
Kelly Greene wrote:
> "Bohgosity BumaskiL" > wrote in
> message ...
>>>
>> Tuna is choice food, because it is entirely meat, and extremely
>> popular with three of the cats I had or hav. I see no evidence for
>> a
>> supposition that cats do anything but tolerate carbohydrates, some
>> cats more than others.
>>
>
> Tuna is not a natural part of a cat's diet. It should be a treat,
> not fed daily.

For one of my cats, the recipe at the top of this thread is the only
thing I know that does not cause diarrhea. I can't omit Wasabi,
either. I do not know about Paprika, because I've never run out of
that. It goes with eggs, anyway.

My other cat seems to be able to eat just about anything; kibble,
canned turkey and cheeze, tuna keesh, popcorn, mayonaise, butter --
and she haz never had diarrhea. She does occasionally barf, though I
think that haz more to do with hairballs than anything else, now that
she is over three years old.
_______
Cats do not really hav names. The only thing in the world that knows
the name of a cat is an electric can opener or a warm lap.

JWL
March 11th 11, 03:15 AM
Bill Graham wrote:
> Kelly Greene wrote:
>> "Bohgosity BumaskiL" > wrote in
>> message ...
>>>>
>>> Tuna is choice food, because it is entirely meat, and extremely
>>> popular with three of the cats I had or hav. I see no evidence for
>>> a
>>> supposition that cats do anything but tolerate carbohydrates, some
>>> cats more than others.
>>>
>>
>> Tuna is not a natural part of a cat's diet. It should be a treat,
>> not fed daily.
>
> In Japan, they sometimes get over $100,000 for just one tuna fish. -
> I am amazed at the price in the local super. I pay 50 cents for a
> 5-1/2 oz. can. Of course, they ruin it by cooking it...:^)

My owner in topic absolutely devours raw tuna. If it did not seem to
be part of the only way to avoid diarrhea in that cat, I would not
cook Tuna with eggs. I know that cooking degrades some oils in fish.
So, when I eat fish myself, it is canned and not cooked.
_______
Sorry, but I forgot all about the Amnesia Convention!

cshenk
March 11th 11, 02:59 PM
"JWL" wrote
> Bill Graham wrote:

>> In Japan, they sometimes get over $100,000 for just one tuna fish. -

Thats 100,000 yen. That would be a live large one (several hundred lbs) and
to translate to dollars, remove the first 2 zeros for a rough estimate.

Cut down, you have over 100 lbs of sashimi or '10$ a lb'.

>> I am amazed at the price in the local super. I pay 50 cents for a
>> 5-1/2 oz. can. Of course, they ruin it by cooking it...:^)

There's 'tuna' and there's 'tuna'. Several types of fish are called that.
The type in cans isn't the expensive version.

> My owner in topic absolutely devours raw tuna. If it did not seem to be
> part of the only way to avoid diarrhea in that cat, I would not cook Tuna
> with eggs. I know that cooking degrades some oils in fish. So, when I eat
> fish myself, it is canned and not cooked.

Grin, hate to tell you but all canned fish is cooked. It's part of the
canning process. It's not only for presevation but to kill any possible
marine parasites.

Bill Graham
March 12th 11, 04:21 AM
JWL wrote:
> Bill Graham wrote:
>> Kelly Greene wrote:
>>> "Bohgosity BumaskiL" > wrote in
>>> message ...
>>>>>
>>>> Tuna is choice food, because it is entirely meat, and extremely
>>>> popular with three of the cats I had or hav. I see no evidence for
>>>> a
>>>> supposition that cats do anything but tolerate carbohydrates, some
>>>> cats more than others.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Tuna is not a natural part of a cat's diet. It should be a treat,
>>> not fed daily.
>>
>> In Japan, they sometimes get over $100,000 for just one tuna fish. -
>> I am amazed at the price in the local super. I pay 50 cents for a
>> 5-1/2 oz. can. Of course, they ruin it by cooking it...:^)
>
> My owner in topic absolutely devours raw tuna. If it did not seem to
> be part of the only way to avoid diarrhea in that cat, I would not
> cook Tuna with eggs. I know that cooking degrades some oils in fish.
> So, when I eat fish myself, it is canned and not cooked.

I love sushi, and the best is made with sashimi, or raw fish. but I know
that every time I eat it, I am taking a chance on picking up some kind of
aquatic worm, so My cats and I don't indulge much anymore.....

Bill Graham
March 12th 11, 04:27 AM
cshenk wrote:
> "JWL" wrote
>> Bill Graham wrote:
>
>>> In Japan, they sometimes get over $100,000 for just one tuna fish. -
>
> Thats 100,000 yen. That would be a live large one (several hundred
> lbs) and to translate to dollars, remove the first 2 zeros for a
> rough estimate.
> Cut down, you have over 100 lbs of sashimi or '10$ a lb'.
>
>>> I am amazed at the price in the local super. I pay 50 cents for a
>>> 5-1/2 oz. can. Of course, they ruin it by cooking it...:^)
>
> There's 'tuna' and there's 'tuna'. Several types of fish are called
> that. The type in cans isn't the expensive version.
>
>> My owner in topic absolutely devours raw tuna. If it did not seem to
>> be part of the only way to avoid diarrhea in that cat, I would not
>> cook Tuna with eggs. I know that cooking degrades some oils in fish.
>> So, when I eat fish myself, it is canned and not cooked.
>
> Grin, hate to tell you but all canned fish is cooked. It's part of
> the canning process. It's not only for presevation but to kill any
> possible marine parasites.

Yes. Nowadays, the closest I usually come to raw fish is lox, which is
heavily smolked, and hardly "raw". One of my cats loves it too, but it is
very salty, and I don't think it is good for her. I used to eat a canned
sardine that was packed in Jalapeno's. One of my cats loved it, even though
it was so hot I could barely stand it. I finally decided that she couldn't
taste the heat, probably because cats don't eat vegatable matter, so after
millions of years, their tongues have probably lost their ability to taste
red pepper acid. Anyway, she and I would really enjoy those canned
treats......

Patok[_2_]
March 12th 11, 05:01 AM
Bill Graham wrote:
> JWL wrote:
>>
>> My owner in topic absolutely devours raw tuna. If it did not seem to
>> be part of the only way to avoid diarrhea in that cat, I would not
>> cook Tuna with eggs. I know that cooking degrades some oils in fish.
>> So, when I eat fish myself, it is canned and not cooked.
>
> I love sushi, and the best is made with sashimi, or raw fish. but I know
> that every time I eat it, I am taking a chance on picking up some kind
> of aquatic worm, so My cats and I don't indulge much anymore.....

That's why you must have sake with sushi, to kill the worms. :)

--
You'd be crazy to e-mail me with the crazy. But leave the div alone.
*
Whoever bans a book, shall be banished. Whoever burns a book, shall burn.

Bill Graham
March 12th 11, 05:07 AM
Patok wrote:
> Bill Graham wrote:
>> JWL wrote:
>>>
>>> My owner in topic absolutely devours raw tuna. If it did not seem to
>>> be part of the only way to avoid diarrhea in that cat, I would not
>>> cook Tuna with eggs. I know that cooking degrades some oils in fish.
>>> So, when I eat fish myself, it is canned and not cooked.
>>
>> I love sushi, and the best is made with sashimi, or raw fish. but I
>> know that every time I eat it, I am taking a chance on picking up
>> some kind of aquatic worm, so My cats and I don't indulge much
>> anymore.....
>
> That's why you must have sake with sushi, to kill the worms. :)

I can do that, but I don't think I can get my cats to do it.....

Patok[_2_]
March 12th 11, 05:07 AM
Bill Graham wrote:
>
> Yes. Nowadays, the closest I usually come to raw fish is lox, which is
> heavily smolked, and hardly "raw". One of my cats loves it too, but it
> is very salty, and I don't think it is good for her. I used to eat a
> canned sardine that was packed in Jalapeno's. One of my cats loved it,
> even though it was so hot I could barely stand it. I finally decided
> that she couldn't taste the heat, probably because cats don't eat
> vegatable matter, so after millions of years, their tongues have
> probably lost their ability to taste red pepper acid.

Actually, Bill, it is the other way around. Peppers have evolved their "hot"
substance to be specific against mammal plant-eaters. Because peppers are meant
to be eaten by birds, the substance is selectively hot against mammals, while
the birds don't feel it and eat peppers to spread the seeds. While mammals
(especially rodents) destroy the seeds with their teeth while eating them, and
the peppers don't want that!

--
You'd be crazy to e-mail me with the crazy. But leave the div alone.
*
Whoever bans a book, shall be banished. Whoever burns a book, shall burn.

Bill Graham
March 13th 11, 12:34 AM
Patok wrote:
> Bill Graham wrote:
>>
>> Yes. Nowadays, the closest I usually come to raw fish is lox, which
>> is heavily smolked, and hardly "raw". One of my cats loves it too,
>> but it is very salty, and I don't think it is good for her. I used
>> to eat a canned sardine that was packed in Jalapeno's. One of my
>> cats loved it, even though it was so hot I could barely stand it. I
>> finally decided that she couldn't taste the heat, probably because
>> cats don't eat vegatable matter, so after millions of years, their
>> tongues have probably lost their ability to taste red pepper acid.
>
> Actually, Bill, it is the other way around. Peppers have evolved
> their "hot" substance to be specific against mammal plant-eaters.
> Because peppers are meant to be eaten by birds, the substance is
> selectively hot against mammals, while the birds don't feel it and
> eat peppers to spread the seeds. While mammals (especially rodents)
> destroy the seeds with their teeth while eating them, and the peppers
> don't want that!

Its amazing to me that the pepper seeds manage to make it through the
digestive process without harm... Ain't evolution grand?

KenK
March 13th 11, 07:05 PM
"Bohgosity BumaskiL" > wrote in
:

> 170 mL London Drugs Tuna
> 2 Eggs
> 5 mL Wasabi Powder
> 5 mL Paprika
> 700 W microwave oven
>
> Mix well. Microwave on high for three minutes.
> Mix again. Microwave on high for another minute.
> Serve hot.
> -------
> I picked up Stevie as a stray about six months ago. She had a
> persistent case of diarrhea until about two weeks ago, when I started
> cooking for both of my owners...can't keep Stevie out of Skittles'
> food, so they both get cooking.
>
> Stevie is a voracious eater of raw tuna--still goes bonkers, running
> and jumping all over the place when I open a can. Unfortunately, raw
> tuna brings diarrhea back. Now that Skittles has accepted the smell of
> Salmon (perhaps due to Stevie's enthusiasm), I could serve that raw.
> Of course, Salmon, in its nearly pure human-targeted form is a lot
> more expensive, so it will likely be a special treat when I feel like
> eating some.
>
> My owners won't touch raw or canned hamburger, and they love a grilled
> pattie. I haven't fed my owners enough of it to know if beef is an
> option. _______
> [ http://ecn.ab.ca/~brewhaha/ BrewJay's Babble Bin]
>
>

I certainly haven't tried everything but my cat has diarrhea from
everything I tried except two flavors of Fancy Feast 'Trout Feast' and
'Chicken Feast in Gravy'. Both are very scarce locally. However, I found
that she can eat Wellness plain chicken canned food with no problem,
right from the first meal. She's grown tired of it but will still eat it
if nothing else is available. I've not tried other flavors because the
store that carries Wellness only orders by the case - none for sale from
stock. Wellness does not provide samples of canned food. I tried one meal
with a sample of the Wellness dry 'Indoor Health' food but it caused
diarrhea. Unfortunately the only store here that carries Wellness has
terrible service. I'm about to run out again after two two-case orders
were not filled. Ordering on-line has very expensive shipping.

Unfotunately this canned Wellness evidently has no fiber so I have to add
Benefiber to one meal and canned pumkin to another to reduce the number
of hairballs. A PITA!



--
"When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner

Bill Graham
March 14th 11, 03:04 AM
KenK wrote:
> "Bohgosity BumaskiL" > wrote in
> :
>
>> 170 mL London Drugs Tuna
>> 2 Eggs
>> 5 mL Wasabi Powder
>> 5 mL Paprika
>> 700 W microwave oven
>>
>> Mix well. Microwave on high for three minutes.
>> Mix again. Microwave on high for another minute.
>> Serve hot.
>> -------
>> I picked up Stevie as a stray about six months ago. She had a
>> persistent case of diarrhea until about two weeks ago, when I started
>> cooking for both of my owners...can't keep Stevie out of Skittles'
>> food, so they both get cooking.
>>
>> Stevie is a voracious eater of raw tuna--still goes bonkers, running
>> and jumping all over the place when I open a can. Unfortunately, raw
>> tuna brings diarrhea back. Now that Skittles has accepted the smell
>> of Salmon (perhaps due to Stevie's enthusiasm), I could serve that
>> raw. Of course, Salmon, in its nearly pure human-targeted form is a
>> lot more expensive, so it will likely be a special treat when I feel
>> like eating some.
>>
>> My owners won't touch raw or canned hamburger, and they love a
>> grilled pattie. I haven't fed my owners enough of it to know if beef
>> is an option. _______
>> [ http://ecn.ab.ca/~brewhaha/ BrewJay's Babble Bin]
>>
>>
>
> I certainly haven't tried everything but my cat has diarrhea from
> everything I tried except two flavors of Fancy Feast 'Trout Feast' and
> 'Chicken Feast in Gravy'. Both are very scarce locally. However, I
> found that she can eat Wellness plain chicken canned food with no
> problem, right from the first meal. She's grown tired of it but will
> still eat it if nothing else is available. I've not tried other
> flavors because the store that carries Wellness only orders by the
> case - none for sale from stock. Wellness does not provide samples of
> canned food. I tried one meal with a sample of the Wellness dry
> 'Indoor Health' food but it caused diarrhea. Unfortunately the only
> store here that carries Wellness has terrible service. I'm about to
> run out again after two two-case orders were not filled. Ordering
> on-line has very expensive shipping.
>
> Unfotunately this canned Wellness evidently has no fiber so I have to
> add Benefiber to one meal and canned pumkin to another to reduce the
> number of hairballs. A PITA!

Strays tend to pick up worms and other diseases from eating raw food, and
old food. After you've had them a while, and had the vet deworm them, they
usually turn out to be OK.

chaniarts
March 14th 11, 06:30 PM
KenK wrote:
> Unfotunately this canned Wellness evidently has no fiber so I have to
> add Benefiber to one meal and canned pumkin to another to reduce the
> number of hairballs. A PITA!

tip: at halloween time, buy a leftover pumpkin. i find that the day of
halloween or the day after, they're really cheap, or free. i got one for $1
this year. cut into chunks and bake in a flat pan with water inthe bottom in
the oven until soft (about 45 minutes). scrape the insides into a bowl,
puree in a food processor. i was able to get the equivalent of 12 large cans
out of one medium sized pumpkin that i stored in my freezer.

i have trouble keeping my wife from using the stash to make pies, to my
waist's detriment.

JWL
April 3rd 11, 09:30 AM
cshenk wrote:
> "JWL" wrote
>> Bill Graham wrote:
>
>>> In Japan, they sometimes get over $100,000 for just one tuna
>>> fish. -
>
> Thats 100,000 yen. That would be a live large one (several hundred
> lbs) and to translate to dollars, remove the first 2 zeros for a
> rough estimate.
> Cut down, you have over 100 lbs of sashimi or '10$ a lb'.
>
>>> I am amazed at the price in the local super. I pay 50 cents for a
>>> 5-1/2 oz. can. Of course, they ruin it by cooking it...:^)
>
> There's 'tuna' and there's 'tuna'. Several types of fish are called
> that. The type in cans isn't the expensive version.
>
>> My owner in topic absolutely devours raw tuna. If it did not seem
>> to
>> be part of the only way to avoid diarrhea in that cat, I would not
>> cook Tuna with eggs. I know that cooking degrades some oils in
>> fish.
>> So, when I eat fish myself, it is canned and not cooked.
>
> Grin, hate to tell you but all canned fish is cooked. It's part of
> the canning process. It's not only for presevation but to kill any
> possible marine parasites.

Okay, "canned", to be precise over what I said was raw. Whatever the
process, it doesn't seem to cause much obvious difference.

I know that canning is a kind of cooking, and only briefly, and if
it's done right, then it is in presence of steam, not air, so the oil
degradation is minimual compared to say, grilling fish, which stinks.
Unless I miss my guess, fish canning is done at Ultra High Temperature
under pressure, something beyond boiling. I do not know the period,
and it basically steriilizes fish. It is more thorough than
pasturization at 150F|65C.

JWL
April 3rd 11, 10:11 AM
Here is an update on what is very probably the ultimate cause of my
Cat's diarrhea:
http://ecn.ab.ca/~brewhaha/img/stevie_dorsal.jpg
http://ecn.ab.ca/~brewhaha/img/stevie_lateral.jpg

You can see a calcified stretch of stomach tissue in each of those
x-rays; one near her spine, the same near her skin in the lateral
view. An eraser, possibly with some wood in it, lodged in her stomach.
She could've eaten it before I met her, about a year ago, when I
accidentally helped her get into a Seven Eleven. I do not think I ever
had anything like that particular kind of eraser in my place, because
I hav been using mechanical pencils for about five years.

My vet wanted her to eat chicken from a can. For this week, she will
be getting salmon (human purity), because her stomach iz probably
still inflamed. I suspect that she won't be nearly az prone to
diarrhea, so I will experiment (in two weeks, perhaps) even with
kibble to see for sure that her diarrhea is gone.

So, it looks like I was able to mask a problem until it became more
serious.
I suspect that her immune system attacked the eraser like it would any
other foreign body, only since rubber is so biologically stable, all
that did was cause swelling in her stomach; recoil from her own immune
system. Eventually, the swelling gave way to dead tissue, and her body
started calcifying it.

My vet probably cut out that entire calcified part, plus some
inflammed stomach tissue nearby.

Last Monday, she barfed about five times, to the point of dehydration.
Bile is normally green, and it was getting thicker. When a vet
rehydrated her intravenously, she started barfing, again. Those x-rays
wer taken some time after that.

My vet said that a blockage that full is rare.
_______
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.pets.cats.health+behav/msg/bc647b390b85f361

cshenk
April 3rd 11, 04:45 PM
"JWL" wrote

> Here is an update on what is very probably the ultimate cause of my Cat's
> diarrhea:
> http://ecn.ab.ca/~brewhaha/img/stevie_dorsal.jpg
> http://ecn.ab.ca/~brewhaha/img/stevie_lateral.jpg

> My vet wanted her to eat chicken from a can. For this week, she will be
> getting salmon (human purity), because her stomach iz probably still
> inflamed. I suspect that she won't be nearly az prone to diarrhea, so I
> will experiment (in two weeks, perhaps) even with kibble to see for sure
> that her diarrhea is gone.

A little human level salmon will be fine for a short time. Long term, it
doesnt have the right balance for her health (she needs taurine especially
which isn't in human grade canned salmon). It's kinda like letting a kid
eat just icecream for a few days after tonsil removal. Harmless for a short
period and more important to get 'something' into her.

I highly suggest a grain free kibble at least at the start. Hopefully you
can get 'Blue Wilderness' cat kibble (Canadian company, top of the line).
Whether she had or has grain allergies before, she's apt to develop them if
you feed grains too soon. You'll see in another thread (16 year old cat
throwing up) where I list out how to check for this and even some decent
versions of the common 'fancy feast' that are grain-free.

Another short term item that may be of use (again, we are talking no more
than a week unless you get taurine and other suppliments from the vet) is
the ground chicken human babyfood. Check the label but you should be able
to find ones that are just ground chicken with a little chicken broth.

Don't be lead by hype on the claims of cat or dog food. Read the labels.
Some of the so called 'best' are actually mid-grade or even 1 star foods.
Wellness for example, seems to have a grainfree version but it is not
marketed where I am. The one they market here and claim is the best, costs
more (1/3rd more) than Blue Wilderness and uses wheat as it's 3rd or 4th top
ingredient. The wellness sold here is only a 2star food at best. Their dog
food version sold here is a 1 star. Blue wilderness consistantly (and for
good reason) will rate 5-6 stars. Even their lesser 'Blue Mountain'
versions are pretty decent (3-4 star).

cshenk
April 3rd 11, 04:59 PM
"JWL" wrote
> cshenk wrote:

>>> My owner in topic absolutely devours raw tuna. If it did not seem to be
>>> part of the only way to avoid diarrhea in that cat, I would not
>>> cook Tuna with eggs. I know that cooking degrades some oils in fish. So,
>>> when I eat fish myself, it is canned and not cooked.

>> Grin, hate to tell you but all canned fish is cooked. It's part of
>> the canning process. It's not only for presevation but to kill any
>> possible marine parasites.

> Okay, "canned", to be precise over what I said was raw. Whatever the
> process, it doesn't seem to cause much obvious difference.

Thats ok, I know what you mean. Being as i've lived coastal most of my life
and in Japan for 7 years, I'm more familiar with the real 'raw fish'
(Sashimi) and tuna is one of my favorites. Real raw fish tuna is very
different from the canned types but it is a cultural wording to often think
of tuna (or salmon, sardines, etc) as 'raw'. You aren't alone and I was
being pedantic ;-)

My mind associates 'raw tuna' with a fish still flipping about that morning
when I have it for lunch or dinner. We clean and dress it ourself if it is
a small whole one. We can also get it by the lb in Virginia Beach at the
local stores when the Atlantic Tuna are running.

> I know that canning is a kind of cooking, and only briefly, and if it's
> done right, then it is in presence of steam, not air, so the oil
> degradation is minimual compared to say, grilling fish, which stinks.
> Unless I miss my guess, fish canning is done at Ultra High Temperature
> under pressure, something beyond boiling. I do not know the period, and it
> basically steriilizes fish. It is more thorough than pasturization at
> 150F|65C.

I think you are pretty close. I can't feed my cat canned human grade tuna
unless it's water packed because the oil packed ones normally use grain oil
bases. Canola based ones 'may' be ok but she's very grain sensitive.
Waterpacked though should be ok.

Bill Graham
April 4th 11, 05:46 AM
JWL wrote:
> cshenk wrote:
>> "JWL" wrote
>>> Bill Graham wrote:
>>
>>>> In Japan, they sometimes get over $100,000 for just one tuna
>>>> fish. -
>>
>> Thats 100,000 yen. That would be a live large one (several hundred
>> lbs) and to translate to dollars, remove the first 2 zeros for a
>> rough estimate.
>> Cut down, you have over 100 lbs of sashimi or '10$ a lb'.
>>
>>>> I am amazed at the price in the local super. I pay 50 cents for a
>>>> 5-1/2 oz. can. Of course, they ruin it by cooking it...:^)
>>
>> There's 'tuna' and there's 'tuna'. Several types of fish are called
>> that. The type in cans isn't the expensive version.
>>
>>> My owner in topic absolutely devours raw tuna. If it did not seem
>>> to
>>> be part of the only way to avoid diarrhea in that cat, I would not
>>> cook Tuna with eggs. I know that cooking degrades some oils in
>>> fish.
>>> So, when I eat fish myself, it is canned and not cooked.
>>
>> Grin, hate to tell you but all canned fish is cooked. It's part of
>> the canning process. It's not only for presevation but to kill any
>> possible marine parasites.
>
> Okay, "canned", to be precise over what I said was raw. Whatever the
> process, it doesn't seem to cause much obvious difference.
>
> I know that canning is a kind of cooking, and only briefly, and if
> it's done right, then it is in presence of steam, not air, so the oil
> degradation is minimual compared to say, grilling fish, which stinks.
> Unless I miss my guess, fish canning is done at Ultra High Temperature
> under pressure, something beyond boiling. I do not know the period,
> and it basically steriilizes fish. It is more thorough than
> pasturization at 150F|65C.

I found this through Google:
Fresh tuna is even more prohibitive. High-end restaurants and sushi bars are
paying 5,188 yen a kilogram -- 84 percent more than in 2005, government
figures show.

January 27th 13, 05:08 PM
On Wednesday, December 8, 2010 7:03:10 AM UTC-7, SJ wrote:
> "Bohgosity BumaskiL" > wrote in message ... > That should say 170g Tuna (not mL).. I think most tuna for cats is organ > meat, which is cheaper than white, because Iron won't hurt them. >I hope no one took brewhaha's post seriously.. Tuna is not recommended for cats, especially cats with many illnesses. And giving wasabi powder to anyone with digestive problems, including diarrhea, will make the diarrhea worse. Wasabi irritates bowels.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitamin_U Not if a cat's cousin of Helicobacter Pylori iz irritating her bowels first.