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JEP
January 3rd 11, 01:06 AM
I just lost my 14 year old cat Harpo two weeks ago to cancer, three years
after his best buddy Gulliver died of cancer. Two sweet wonderful joyful
critters who are sorely missed. I am about to go to the shelters to start
looking for another kitten or two, and am leaning towards getting male cats
again, because they seem (in my admittedly limited experience) to be more
affectionate than female cats.

I don't mean to open up that can of worms, though. Rather, I am posting to
ask if there are differences between male and female cats in terms of
health and medical issues they are susceptible to.

Any kittens I get will be neutered and will be indoor-only, and I know that
every cat is different. With that in mind, however, are there some
health/medical/behavioral problems (apart from spraying) that males are
more prone to and some that females are more prone to?

Thanks.

JEP

cshenk
January 3rd 11, 01:14 AM
"JEP" wrote

> critters who are sorely missed. I am about to go to the shelters to start
> looking for another kitten or two, and am leaning towards getting male
> cats
> again, because they seem (in my admittedly limited experience) to be more
> affectionate than female cats.

> I don't mean to open up that can of worms, though. Rather, I am posting
> to
> ask if there are differences between male and female cats in terms of
> health and medical issues they are susceptible to.

Hi Jep, the only one I know of is males are more susceptible to urinary
issues.

Also if getting a pair, look for 2 who are sleeping on each other in the
same cage.

dgk
January 3rd 11, 03:17 PM
On Sun, 2 Jan 2011 20:14:59 -0500, "cshenk" > wrote:

>"JEP" wrote
>
>> critters who are sorely missed. I am about to go to the shelters to start
>> looking for another kitten or two, and am leaning towards getting male
>> cats
>> again, because they seem (in my admittedly limited experience) to be more
>> affectionate than female cats.
>
>> I don't mean to open up that can of worms, though. Rather, I am posting
>> to
>> ask if there are differences between male and female cats in terms of
>> health and medical issues they are susceptible to.
>
>Hi Jep, the only one I know of is males are more susceptible to urinary
>issues.
>
>Also if getting a pair, look for 2 who are sleeping on each other in the
>same cage.

That's the advice I was going to give. And it always seems best to
take two since they care for each other.

Rene
January 3rd 11, 03:56 PM
I'm not trying to open a can of worms, but if fed a dry-food-only
diet, males are more likely to have urinary tract issues. This isn't
an issue if they are fed a wet (raw or canned) diet.

Other than that, there are no differences between the two. Yes, a pair
will be better (and more fun). . .and if you see an adult pair in the
same cage, please consider them also. :-)

Rene

Phyllis Stone
January 3rd 11, 10:04 PM
"JEP" wrote in message
.130...

I just lost my 14 year old cat Harpo two weeks ago to cancer, three years
after his best buddy Gulliver died of cancer. Two sweet wonderful joyful
critters who are sorely missed. I am about to go to the shelters to start
looking for another kitten or two, and am leaning towards getting male cats
again, because they seem (in my admittedly limited experience) to be more
affectionate than female cats.

I don't mean to open up that can of worms, though. Rather, I am posting to
ask if there are differences between male and female cats in terms of
health and medical issues they are susceptible to.

Any kittens I get will be neutered and will be indoor-only, and I know that
every cat is different. With that in mind, however, are there some
health/medical/behavioral problems (apart from spraying) that males are
more prone to and some that females are more prone to?

Thanks.

JEP


I am very sorry for your loss. My vet said that girl dogs and boy cats make
the best pets. I have just the opposite and my pets are great. I usually
had boy cats and this was the first girl in a long time. She is different.
She likes hanging around inside and only goes out occasionally. She moved
herself in and became one of the family. She is also much more skittish and
hides when someone comes over.

dgk
January 4th 11, 02:58 PM
On Mon, 3 Jan 2011 07:56:51 -0800 (PST), Rene >
wrote:

>I'm not trying to open a can of worms, but if fed a dry-food-only
>diet, males are more likely to have urinary tract issues. This isn't
>an issue if they are fed a wet (raw or canned) diet.
>
>Other than that, there are no differences between the two. Yes, a pair
>will be better (and more fun). . .and if you see an adult pair in the
>same cage, please consider them also. :-)
>
>Rene

My cats ate only wet food, except for occasional Temptations, and one
developed a urinary blockage. They really don't know what caused it
though but it sure is more likely with males.

Most of my cats have been male, and of my current four, one is female.
She is very skittish but not as big a wuss as the largest male, who is
a total scaredy-cat. She is very sweet though and often comes to plop
in my lap.

chatnoir
January 18th 11, 02:22 AM
On Jan 4, 6:58*am, dgk > wrote:
> On Mon, 3 Jan 2011 07:56:51 -0800 (PST), Rene >
> wrote:
>
> >I'm not trying to open a can of worms, but if fed a dry-food-only
> >diet, males are more likely to have urinary tract issues. This isn't
> >an issue if they are fed a wet (raw or canned) diet.
>
> >Other than that, there are no differences between the two. Yes, a pair
> >will be better (and more fun). . .and if you see an adult pair in the
> >same cage, please consider them also. :-)
>
> >Rene
>
> My cats ate only wet food, except for occasional Temptations, and one
> developed a urinary blockage. They really don't know what caused it
> though but it sure is more likely with males.

Did the blockage reoccur or not? One of my male cats had a blockage.
I switched to just wet food. With your experience, I am not sure that
was really necessary now


>
> Most of my cats have been male, and of my current four, one is female.
> She is very skittish but not as big a wuss as the largest male, who is
> a total scaredy-cat. She is very sweet though and often comes to plop
> in my lap.

dgk
January 20th 11, 02:08 PM
On Mon, 17 Jan 2011 18:22:51 -0800 (PST), chatnoir
> wrote:

>On Jan 4, 6:58*am, dgk > wrote:
>> On Mon, 3 Jan 2011 07:56:51 -0800 (PST), Rene >
>> wrote:
>>
>> >I'm not trying to open a can of worms, but if fed a dry-food-only
>> >diet, males are more likely to have urinary tract issues. This isn't
>> >an issue if they are fed a wet (raw or canned) diet.
>>
>> >Other than that, there are no differences between the two. Yes, a pair
>> >will be better (and more fun). . .and if you see an adult pair in the
>> >same cage, please consider them also. :-)
>>
>> >Rene
>>
>> My cats ate only wet food, except for occasional Temptations, and one
>> developed a urinary blockage. They really don't know what caused it
>> though but it sure is more likely with males.
>
>Did the blockage reoccur or not? One of my male cats had a blockage.
>I switched to just wet food. With your experience, I am not sure that
>was really necessary now
>
>
>>

Hasn't yet and it's been about 18 months. I read that it's much less
likely in cats over seven years old and Espy is now eight so I'm
hopeful that this is over. In fact, I've recently allowed the cats to
eat some "healthy" dry food in addition to the wet. They really like
it so it seems unfair to ban it without a very good reason and they
don't even know why he was blocked in the first place.

Dominic
March 1st 11, 12:02 PM
Hi dude,..
great information shared here about cats Health and diet having,....
useful one,...

thanks,..