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B
March 21st 11, 03:38 PM
My cat is 16 yrs. old and for the past several months constantly
throws up. The vet did some blood work and his sugar was a little
high, which she attributed to the stress of the visit. His kidney
function is slowing down a bit and now she wants to take a urine
sample. She has changed his food to a type that can only be bought at
the office and is a gastroenteric formula. The food is not cheap, $34
for a case of canned and $28 for a 6# bag of dry food. I don't know
what to do for him; there are times that he doesn't seem to know where
he is or who I am. Is some of this just part of the "aging process"?
He is an indoor cat, up to date on his shots and has never been sick.
I really don't know what more to do for him. Has anyone else faced
this problem or had a similar situation w/their cat?

Matthew[_3_]
March 21st 11, 03:44 PM
"B" > wrote in message
...
> My cat is 16 yrs. old and for the past several months constantly
> throws up. The vet did some blood work and his sugar was a little
> high, which she attributed to the stress of the visit. His kidney
> function is slowing down a bit and now she wants to take a urine
> sample. She has changed his food to a type that can only be bought at
> the office and is a gastroenteric formula. The food is not cheap, $34
> for a case of canned and $28 for a 6# bag of dry food. I don't know
> what to do for him; there are times that he doesn't seem to know where
> he is or who I am. Is some of this just part of the "aging process"?
> He is an indoor cat, up to date on his shots and has never been sick.
> I really don't know what more to do for him. Has anyone else faced
> this problem or had a similar situation w/their cat?

Did he check for thyroid problems also?. Some vets only do a partial panel
for blood and not a full work up.

Sorry about the furball I lost my beloved Phantom at age 16. He was at
that point that I needed to help him cross the bridge.

Since he is having problems with his kidneys IMO try to stay away from the
dry food Your cat is equal to a 81 year old human. Let us know what the
results of the urine testing is. I might shed so more light on the
situation

jmc[_2_]
March 21st 11, 09:43 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Matthew exclaimed (3/21/2011 10:44 AM):
> > wrote in message
> ...
>> My cat is 16 yrs. old and for the past several months constantly
>> throws up. The vet did some blood work and his sugar was a little
>> high, which she attributed to the stress of the visit. His kidney
>> function is slowing down a bit and now she wants to take a urine
>> sample. She has changed his food to a type that can only be bought at
>> the office and is a gastroenteric formula. The food is not cheap, $34
>> for a case of canned and $28 for a 6# bag of dry food. I don't know
>> what to do for him; there are times that he doesn't seem to know where
>> he is or who I am. Is some of this just part of the "aging process"?
>> He is an indoor cat, up to date on his shots and has never been sick.
>> I really don't know what more to do for him. Has anyone else faced
>> this problem or had a similar situation w/their cat?
>
> Did he check for thyroid problems also?. Some vets only do a partial panel
> for blood and not a full work up.
>
> Sorry about the furball I lost my beloved Phantom at age 16. He was at
> that point that I needed to help him cross the bridge.
>
> Since he is having problems with his kidneys IMO try to stay away from the
> dry food Your cat is equal to a 81 year old human. Let us know what the
> results of the urine testing is. I might shed so more light on the
> situation
>
>

I feel your pain. My cat will be 16 in a couple of months. She already
has health issues, so I get anxious every time she has a bad day...

I agree with what is said above - get him on wet food, and suggest a
full thyroid workup.

I'd be a little leery of the vet-recommended food. Sometimes it's not
really the best for them... years ago the vet I had then put Meep on
Royal Canin Urinary (dry) for cystitis problems... she continued to have
problems until I stopped ALL dry food. Now she eats 100% canned/wet
food, and is much healthier. It's a mix of the expensive stuff, and
select varieties of Fancy Feast, to help keep the cost down.


jmc

Buddy's Mom
March 22nd 11, 11:07 AM
Along with checking the thyroid, I would also wonder if she has
hairballs. As they age, they lack the ability to get rid of them. I
would highly suggest using Temptations for Hairballs or Cat Lax for a
couple of weeks to help the hairballs pass and see if this decreases
the vomiting.

Stay on canned food. Fancy Feast is actually very good for cats.
High protein and low or no carbs.

Rene
March 22nd 11, 05:16 PM
It would help if you could describe the vomiting a little more (I
know, it's sort of gross). When does he vomit and what is in the
vomit?

I agree with jmc in saying that I don't trust vet-recommended food. If
you look at the ingredients, they are downright scary. There are
probably grains in that food too, which can sometimes be an allergen
for cats. IMO you should feed a high-quality, grain free wet food. It
won't cost any more than the prescription food. Try a novel protein
like duck, venison, or quail to see if it helps. No fish, as that can
be an allergen too.

Warm the food a bit. Sometimes cold food can cause a cat to vomit, and
at age 16, it will make the food more appealing to his diminished
sense of smell.

I know how frustrating this is. Vomiting is one of those catch-all
things that can be difficult to diagnose.

dberrycat
March 22nd 11, 07:51 PM
On Mar 21, 10:38*am, B > wrote:
> My cat is 16 yrs. old and for the past several months constantly
> throws up. *The vet did some blood work and his sugar was a little
> high, which she attributed to the stress of the visit. *His kidney
> function is slowing down a bit and now she wants to take a urine
> sample. *She has changed his food to a type that can only be bought at
> the office and is a gastroenteric formula. *The food is not cheap, $34
> for a case of canned and $28 for a 6# bag of dry food. *I don't know
> what to do for him; there are times that he doesn't seem to know where
> he is or who I am. *Is some of this just part of the "aging process"?
> He is an indoor cat, up to date on his shots and has never been sick.
> I really don't know what more to do for him. *Has anyone else faced
> this problem or had a similar situation w/their cat?

Sorry to hear that your cat is having problems. I have a cat with
kidney
disease and, as per the vet, started giving her 1/4 of a pepcid 10mg
tablet
daily. I hide it in a pill pocket, which she loves. That really
helped with
her throwing up. I know you want to have less protein for cats with
kidney
disease, but I haven't had much luck with her wanting to eat the
kidney
diet food. She will eat it for a while then just turn up her nose. I
gave up and mostly feed her Proplan wet and a little Nutro dry. So
far her kidney numbers are staying pretty stable. She is older and
thinner than she should be so it is more important for her to eat
something healthy that she likes than to eat the kidney food, IMHO.

I don't know about the disorientation. I haven't had a cat that
experienced
that so far. As long as he seems happy, wants to cuddle, eats and
enjoys most of his life (like napping, sitting in the sun, etc) then I
guess you just try to treat the kidney disease and love him. If he
starts to get very fearful then you should talk with you vet about
his quality of life.

Wishing you luck,

Debbie

Bill Graham
March 22nd 11, 08:27 PM
Rene wrote:
> It would help if you could describe the vomiting a little more (I
> know, it's sort of gross). When does he vomit and what is in the
> vomit?
>
> I agree with jmc in saying that I don't trust vet-recommended food. If
> you look at the ingredients, they are downright scary. There are
> probably grains in that food too, which can sometimes be an allergen
> for cats. IMO you should feed a high-quality, grain free wet food. It
> won't cost any more than the prescription food. Try a novel protein
> like duck, venison, or quail to see if it helps. No fish, as that can
> be an allergen too.
>
> Warm the food a bit. Sometimes cold food can cause a cat to vomit, and
> at age 16, it will make the food more appealing to his diminished
> sense of smell.
>
> I know how frustrating this is. Vomiting is one of those catch-all
> things that can be difficult to diagnose.

Not only that, but all vet recommended food is horribly expensive. We have
five cats, and we not only feed them, but also a bunch of wild raccoons and
a couple of possums and unknown number of squirrels and birds. We spend a
significent percentage of our household income on critter food, and we can't
afford to buy specialty cat food that costs several dollars a pound. Our
cats get an unending supply of cheap kibbles, and lots of roasted chicken,
which is a great buy in today's inflated market. If I were doing it all over
again, I would have bought a chicken farm when I retired, and have 50 cats
instead of five.

cshenk
March 23rd 11, 01:23 AM
"B" wrote

> My cat is 16 yrs. old and for the past several months constantly
> throws up. The vet did some blood work and his sugar was a little
> high, which she attributed to the stress of the visit. His kidney
> function is slowing down a bit and now she wants to take a urine
> sample. She has changed his food to a type that can only be bought at
> the office and is a gastroenteric formula. The food is not cheap, $34
> for a case of canned and $28 for a 6# bag of dry food. I don't know
> what to do for him; there are times that he doesn't seem to know where
> he is or who I am. Is some of this just part of the "aging process"?

It can be several things but the 'don't know who he is or you who are' sends
a signal of kidney problems to me.

Kidney problems are far more common in Cats fed mostly dry food over years
of time. It doesnt matter that many of the web sites about this are wacky
'new age', it's a fact shown by stats but even those fed always wet, can
develop problems by age 16.

The only answer having dealt with this many times (I rescue elderly cats) is
to get more water into them then have a vet who actually knows geriatric
cats and how to read bloodwork. Most of the cats I have rescued have been
14-18 and fed crap like 'purina' until suddenly they 'developed problems the
owner could not deal with'. Basic alzheimers sort of thing.

At this point, I dump a vet who first takes me to the KD dry (or wet) stuff.
My experience is that they know far less than I do (and i am always into
follow vet advice normally but this is the exception if they do that).

Commmon sense, kidney problems in cats are usually related to not drinking
enough. Over years, this can make it worse and damage the kidneys. Cats
don't really like 'water' that much but an effective way to get them to
drink is by adding a bowl of salt-free broth (2-3 TB) about 3 times a day if
possible. Feeding wet food also helps a good bit.

I agree with one of the posters, that once you learn to read *labels* much
of the 'Fancy Feast' is workable. About 40% of the versions are grainfree.

Please do NOT take to hairball remedy laxitives. Sure, cats hurl hairballs
at times, but that is a laxitive which makes dehydration worse if your kitty
has kidney issues.

jmc[_2_]
March 23rd 11, 02:36 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Buddy's Mom exclaimed (3/22/2011 6:07 AM):
> Along with checking the thyroid, I would also wonder if she has
> hairballs. As they age, they lack the ability to get rid of them. I
> would highly suggest using Temptations for Hairballs or Cat Lax for a
> couple of weeks to help the hairballs pass and see if this decreases
> the vomiting.
>
> Stay on canned food. Fancy Feast is actually very good for cats.
> High protein and low or no carbs.

Well... some varieties. My understanding is that the quality of Fancy
Feast varies between varieties.

For instance, I remember reading that the grilled versions are not a
good choice, though I can't cite my reference. Meep mostly gets the
classics, usually something with liver or giblets.

jmc

jmc[_2_]
March 23rd 11, 02:40 AM
Suddenly, without warning, cshenk exclaimed (3/22/2011 8:23 PM):
> "B" wrote
>
>> My cat is 16 yrs. old and for the past several months constantly
>> throws up. The vet did some blood work and his sugar was a little
>> high, which she attributed to the stress of the visit. His kidney
>> function is slowing down a bit and now she wants to take a urine
>> sample. She has changed his food to a type that can only be bought at
>> the office and is a gastroenteric formula. The food is not cheap, $34
>> for a case of canned and $28 for a 6# bag of dry food. I don't know
>> what to do for him; there are times that he doesn't seem to know where
>> he is or who I am. Is some of this just part of the "aging process"?
>
> It can be several things but the 'don't know who he is or you who are'
> sends a signal of kidney problems to me.
>
> Kidney problems are far more common in Cats fed mostly dry food over
> years of time. It doesnt matter that many of the web sites about this
> are wacky 'new age', it's a fact shown by stats but even those fed
> always wet, can develop problems by age 16.
>
> The only answer having dealt with this many times (I rescue elderly
> cats) is to get more water into them then have a vet who actually knows
> geriatric cats and how to read bloodwork. Most of the cats I have
> rescued have been 14-18 and fed crap like 'purina' until suddenly they
> 'developed problems the owner could not deal with'. Basic alzheimers
> sort of thing.
>
> At this point, I dump a vet who first takes me to the KD dry (or wet)
> stuff. My experience is that they know far less than I do (and i am
> always into follow vet advice normally but this is the exception if they
> do that).
>
> Commmon sense, kidney problems in cats are usually related to not
> drinking enough. Over years, this can make it worse and damage the
> kidneys. Cats don't really like 'water' that much but an effective way
> to get them to drink is by adding a bowl of salt-free broth (2-3 TB)
> about 3 times a day if possible. Feeding wet food also helps a good bit.
>
> I agree with one of the posters, that once you learn to read *labels*
> much of the 'Fancy Feast' is workable. About 40% of the versions are
> grainfree.
>
> Please do NOT take to hairball remedy laxitives. Sure, cats hurl
> hairballs at times, but that is a laxitive which makes dehydration worse
> if your kitty has kidney issues.
>

To add to the water bit - I add a tablespoon or two of warm water to
each of Meep's feedings, plus she has a Petco brand water fountain that
she drinks from a lot more than the Drinkwell she had before.

Between those two, she's remained hydrated enough to have almost no
cystitis attacks in the last few years, and despite being geriatric, she
looks great and her kidneys are fine. Still, we do a workup every 6
months to ensure if they start to fail, we'll know about it early.

jmc

dgk
March 23rd 11, 02:42 PM
On Mon, 21 Mar 2011 07:38:00 -0700 (PDT), B >
wrote:

>My cat is 16 yrs. old and for the past several months constantly
>throws up. The vet did some blood work and his sugar was a little
>high, which she attributed to the stress of the visit. His kidney
>function is slowing down a bit and now she wants to take a urine
>sample. She has changed his food to a type that can only be bought at
>the office and is a gastroenteric formula. The food is not cheap, $34
>for a case of canned and $28 for a 6# bag of dry food. I don't know
>what to do for him; there are times that he doesn't seem to know where
>he is or who I am. Is some of this just part of the "aging process"?
>He is an indoor cat, up to date on his shots and has never been sick.
>I really don't know what more to do for him. Has anyone else faced
>this problem or had a similar situation w/their cat?

Most folks have given good advice so far - avoid dry food.

Nico was my 15 year old cat who started throwing up a lot. It turns
out that it was inflamatory bowel disease. There really isn't a whole
lot do be done with that, even in humans. Prednisone keeps it down,
but long term use of that is very bad. Unlike in humans, IBD in cats
often becomes lymphoma, and that's what happened with Nico.

After he collapsed one day I rushed him to the vet and he sent me to
the vet specialists who kept him alive and diagnosed the IBD. After
four days and around $4000, I picked him up and no animal was ever
more happy to see his slave. He sat on my lap as I drove home.
Unfortunately he had picked up rather severe diarrhea, which made for
a messy trip home.

I gave him prednisone and leukeran for several months. He got better,
but never was his old self. He never climibed the cat tree after his
collapse so I have to assume that he felt too ****ty. He diied after
around six months of that.

I don't know that your cat has IBD, although a CBC should reveal anyf
lymphoma. Hopefully it is something less serious.

cshenk
March 24th 11, 12:02 AM
"jmc" wrote

>> Stay on canned food. Fancy Feast is actually very good for cats.
>> High protein and low or no carbs.

> Well... some varieties. My understanding is that the quality of Fancy
> Feast varies between varieties.

Correct. About 40% of them are grain-free and perfectly fine.

> For instance, I remember reading that the grilled versions are not a good
> choice, though I can't cite my reference. Meep mostly gets the classics,
> usually something with liver or giblets.

I read the cans and get the grain free ones (she has had ear and coat issues
on grain versions, pretty sure it's wheat gluten in her case). Daisy-chan
can handle a few treats with grain (say, 1-2 pounce a day) with no harm, but
not her regular food.

I vary the brands about though as I learned a long time ago, a cat fed the
same thing too long gets turned into a picky eater and i don't mean just the
normal 'I don't like (insert type of meat)' but refuses to eat anything else
even when obviously hungry. Oddly most of my cats have refused 'tuna' but
they generally like anything else though they may have a second item they
didn't like much. (Vamp didn't like shrimp, Roscoe wasn't fond of chicken,
Face wasn't fond of beef and so on).

I vary types of food and brands as well. I don't get wellness. They don';t
have any grain free versions here.

Buddy's Mom
March 25th 11, 01:42 AM
Temptations for Hairballs and/or Cat Lax will not cause dehydration if
given at the recommended dosage. Diarrhea can cause dehydratiion,
but if you use the products as recommended, you shouldn't have that
problem.

Having a cat that wouldn't eat and kept throwing up and lost 50
percent of his body weight and the vets had no idea what was wrong -
even after going to a specialist some distance away, I tried the hair
ball products and after 13 days of hurling a hairball - that is 13
hairballs people - the cat was fine again. Do you have any idea what
space hairballs consume in a cat? The older they get the less likely
they are to rid them by themselves. The petroleum coats the hairballs
and makes them easier to eliminate by either end.

>
> Please do NOT take to hairball remedy laxitives. *Sure, cats hurl hairballs
> at times, but that is a laxitive which makes dehydration worse if your kitty
> has kidney issues.

Bill Graham
March 25th 11, 02:34 AM
Buddy's Mom wrote:
> Temptations for Hairballs and/or Cat Lax will not cause dehydration if
> given at the recommended dosage. Diarrhea can cause dehydratiion,
> but if you use the products as recommended, you shouldn't have that
> problem.
>
> Having a cat that wouldn't eat and kept throwing up and lost 50
> percent of his body weight and the vets had no idea what was wrong -
> even after going to a specialist some distance away, I tried the hair
> ball products and after 13 days of hurling a hairball - that is 13
> hairballs people - the cat was fine again. Do you have any idea what
> space hairballs consume in a cat? The older they get the less likely
> they are to rid them by themselves. The petroleum coats the hairballs
> and makes them easier to eliminate by either end.
>
>>
>> Please do NOT take to hairball remedy laxitives. Sure, cats hurl
>> hairballs at times, but that is a laxitive which makes dehydration
>> worse if your kitty has kidney issues.

Our Meggie, (about 10 years old) had a huge growth in her abdomen, qnd
stopped eating. the vet operated on her, and found the "growth" was inside
her stomach. They opened up her stomach, and there was a huge hairball. They
removed it, and Meggie is fine. That was a couple of years ago. Total cost:
a little over $800.

Nitesbane
March 27th 11, 03:42 AM
"cshenk" > wrote in message
...
> "jmc" wrote
>
>>> Stay on canned food. Fancy Feast is actually very good for cats.
>>> High protein and low or no carbs.
>
>> Well... some varieties. My understanding is that the quality of Fancy
>> Feast varies between varieties.
>
> Correct. About 40% of them are grain-free and perfectly fine.
>

Do you have a list of which ones these are?

cshenk
March 27th 11, 04:51 PM
"Nitesbane" wrote
> "cshenk" wrote
>> "jmc" wrote

>>>> Stay on canned food. Fancy Feast is actually very good for cats.
>>>> High protein and low or no carbs.

>>> Well... some varieties. My understanding is that the quality of Fancy
>>> Feast varies between varieties.

>> Correct. About 40% of them are grain-free and perfectly fine.

> Do you have a list of which ones these are?

No sorry, I just read the labels. I know if I randomly select 10 versions
out of their 30 or so, 4 will be grain-free. It may be higher because
Daisy-chan will not touch tuna so I don't bother to check ones with tuna
obvious on the label.

What I have now (not all is fancy feast but this is the fancy feast onhand
list) is "Cod, Sole, and Shrimp Feast classic", "Tender Beef and Liver
Feast, Classic", "Tender Liver and Chicken Feast classic'. Don't let the
'classic' on all 3 lead you astray, that's just what was on sale for 55cents
a can that day. I got a box of each (24 per box) with a bunch of 1$ off per
box coupons inside them.

I just grab a can, take my glasses off (the print is pretty small) and look
for: Wheat gluten, vital wheat gluten, gluten, soy or soy by-products, corn
or corn by-products, corn starch and skip those cans.

With cats, you see mostly the wheat gluten (especially on beef ones with
'gravy' made to look tastey to us '2foots' but cats don't care about that).

Dry food, I use a little kibble because she likes it as a treat. There, you
have really GOT to check labels. Some of the most expensive 'promises to be
perfect' foods are worse than alley cat. I allow only 'Blue Wilderness' and
a local brand that is of same level grain free quality.

I have the wonderful luck to have a cat and 2 dogs, all with grain allergies
so my idea of a good food is a grain-free one.

With dog food cans you have to check for all 3 (wheat, corn and soy). I've
not seen soy in a canned cat food that I can recall but i probably put it
back so fast I never looked at the brand again.

In general, it is *much* more problematic to get quality dry items at a
decent price that are grain free for cats and dogs. The only 'dry treats'
Daisy-chan can get, are from the doggie isle. Dried duck, chicken, or beef
and sometimes you see salmon. These are sold as pet jerky and we snap off
little bits as treats for them all.

The last time they had a friskies canned sale, I didn't find any that suited
us but i seem to recall they have a few that are decently grain free.
Wellness also per the web site has some that are grain free but are not sold
in my area.

Common grain allergy symptoms in cats: Ear infections, over grooming
especially of the belly (may lick bare patches). Advanced cases, raw patches
and severe skin issues. Scratches self alot.

Common grain allergy symptoms in dogs: Ear Infections, chewing on toes and
belly or legs, bare patches. Advanced cases, may knaw holes in skin
creating lesions and other severe skin issues. Lots of self scratching.

Both tend to be mis-diagnosed as ear mites and flea allergies (even when
they have no fleas or ear mites). You can spend a bundle at the vets or you
can just test grain free only foods for a few weeks and watch it go away
(but you'll still have to treat the ear infection caused by the grains
untikl it goes away).

The Nice Mean Man[_2_]
March 28th 11, 06:37 AM
On Mar 21, 10:38*am, B > wrote:
> My cat is 16 yrs. old and for the past several months constantly
> throws up. *The vet did some blood work and his sugar was a little
> high, which she attributed to the stress of the visit. *His kidney
> function is slowing down a bit and now she wants to take a urine
> sample. *She has changed his food to a type that can only be bought at
> the office and is a gastroenteric formula. *The food is not cheap, $34
> for a case of canned and $28 for a 6# bag of dry food. *I don't know
> what to do for him; there are times that he doesn't seem to know where
> he is or who I am. *Is some of this just part of the "aging process"?
> He is an indoor cat, up to date on his shots and has never been sick.
> I really don't know what more to do for him. *Has anyone else faced
> this problem or had a similar situation w/their cat?

Quite feeding him milk, ASSHOLE.

Gz
April 13th 11, 03:17 AM
On Mar 21, 10:38*am, B > wrote:
> My cat is 16 yrs. old and for the past several months constantly
> throws up. *The vet did some blood work and his sugar was a little
> high, which she attributed to the stress of the visit. *His kidney
> function is slowing down a bit and now she wants to take a urine
> sample. *She has changed his food to a type that can only be bought at
> the office and is a gastroenteric formula. *The food is not cheap, $34
> for a case of canned and $28 for a 6# bag of dry food. *I don't know
> what to do for him; there are times that he doesn't seem to know where
> he is or who I am. *Is some of this just part of the "aging process"?
> He is an indoor cat, up to date on his shots and has never been sick.
> I really don't know what more to do for him. *Has anyone else faced
> this problem or had a similar situation w/their cat?

I swear my bros dog had acid problems fixed with an acid reducer pill.

I am Leary of vet food. Vet suggested food for our bird. Bird would
not touch it.
Smelled like cardboard and I tasted it, cardboard.

Greg