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KenK
May 7th 11, 06:32 PM
I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I try not to cough
or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless. So far, evidently no harm done.
Or what about her lying on my chest and, once in a great while, sneezing in
my face? I suspect our viruses are not compatible. At least the common ones
like those I mentioned.



--
"Experience is something you don't get until
just after you need it." Steven Wright

Matthew[_3_]
May 7th 11, 06:48 PM
"KenK" > wrote in message
...
> I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I try not to
> cough
> or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless. So far, evidently no harm
> done.
> Or what about her lying on my chest and, once in a great while, sneezing
> in
> my face? I suspect our viruses are not compatible. At least the common
> ones
> like those I mentioned.
>
>
>
> --
> "Experience is something you don't get until
> just after you need it." Steven Wright
>
Most human illnesses do not transfer to cats or other pets. Lots of
parasites can be spread back and forth (ie worms and lyme disease from ticks
that may bite both pet and owner), and of course all mammals are susceptible
to rabies. Supposedly Bird Flu can be caught by cats, but I don't know if
its from mosquito bites, or catching infected birds, or what

John Ross Mc Master
May 7th 11, 10:33 PM
On 7 May 2011 17:32:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:

>I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I try not to cough
>or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless. So far, evidently no harm done.
>Or what about her lying on my chest and, once in a great while, sneezing in
>my face? I suspect our viruses are not compatible. At least the common ones
>like those I mentioned.

Ringworm is a bad one. We can get it from each other. A cat gave it to
a friend's wife and she still has it 2 years later.

at
May 8th 11, 12:46 AM
On 7 May 2011 17:32:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:

>I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I try not to cough
>or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless. So far, evidently no harm done.
>Or what about her lying on my chest and, once in a great while, sneezing in
>my face? I suspect our viruses are not compatible. At least the common ones
>like those I mentioned.

Relatively few human diseases can be contracted by cats.

Rabies, which can infect almost all mammals, is one of them.

Some internal parasites can infect humans and cats, but the risk is
usually for the human to catch it from their cat, not the other way
around.

Don't worry about common human illness: you can't 'give' them to you
cat.

Thank you for being so concerned about the well being of your cat.

One thing that does have a big impact on your cat's well being is if you
keep your cats indoors.

There are may perils for your cat outdoors, from being hit by cars, to
dogs and other cats. Perhaps the biggest risk factor is other humans,
who may do something very bad to your cat.

I know there are many people who believe that cats should be let out of
doors regularly, but the fact remains that most cats are very content
living indoors, and they are far less likely to be injured, or contract
an illness from another cat.

This has been studied extensively, and it is irrefutable: indoor cats
tend to live longer, healthier lives.

KenK
May 8th 11, 06:51 PM
Gandalf ingold1234(at)yahoo(dot)com (Gandalf) wrote in
:

> On 7 May 2011 17:32:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>
>>I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I try not to
>>cough or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless. So far, evidently no
>>harm done. Or what about her lying on my chest and, once in a great
>>while, sneezing in my face? I suspect our viruses are not compatible.
>>At least the common ones like those I mentioned.
>
> Relatively few human diseases can be contracted by cats.
>
> Rabies, which can infect almost all mammals, is one of them.
>
> Some internal parasites can infect humans and cats, but the risk is
> usually for the human to catch it from their cat, not the other way
> around.
>
> Don't worry about common human illness: you can't 'give' them to you
> cat.
>
> Thank you for being so concerned about the well being of your cat.
>
> One thing that does have a big impact on your cat's well being is if
> you keep your cats indoors.
>
> There are may perils for your cat outdoors, from being hit by cars, to
> dogs and other cats. Perhaps the biggest risk factor is other humans,
> who may do something very bad to your cat.
>
> I know there are many people who believe that cats should be let out
> of doors regularly, but the fact remains that most cats are very
> content living indoors, and they are far less likely to be injured, or
> contract an illness from another cat.
>
> This has been studied extensively, and it is irrefutable: indoor cats
> tend to live longer, healthier lives.
>

Yes, she's strictly an inside cat. I've had cats some 50 years now and
they've always been inside-cats.

I'd like it if I was an inside-human too, but haven't figured out how to
arrange it on my income.



--
"Experience is something you don't get until
just after you need it." Steven Wright

dgk
May 11th 11, 01:56 PM
On 8 May 2011 17:51:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:

>Gandalf ingold1234(at)yahoo(dot)com (Gandalf) wrote in
:
>
>> On 7 May 2011 17:32:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>
>>>I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I try not to
>>>cough or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless. So far, evidently no
>>>harm done. Or what about her lying on my chest and, once in a great
>>>while, sneezing in my face? I suspect our viruses are not compatible.
>>>At least the common ones like those I mentioned.
>>
>> Relatively few human diseases can be contracted by cats.
>>
>> Rabies, which can infect almost all mammals, is one of them.
>>
>> Some internal parasites can infect humans and cats, but the risk is
>> usually for the human to catch it from their cat, not the other way
>> around.
>>
>> Don't worry about common human illness: you can't 'give' them to you
>> cat.
>>
>> Thank you for being so concerned about the well being of your cat.
>>
>> One thing that does have a big impact on your cat's well being is if
>> you keep your cats indoors.
>>
>> There are may perils for your cat outdoors, from being hit by cars, to
>> dogs and other cats. Perhaps the biggest risk factor is other humans,
>> who may do something very bad to your cat.
>>
>> I know there are many people who believe that cats should be let out
>> of doors regularly, but the fact remains that most cats are very
>> content living indoors, and they are far less likely to be injured, or
>> contract an illness from another cat.
>>
>> This has been studied extensively, and it is irrefutable: indoor cats
>> tend to live longer, healthier lives.
>>
>
>Yes, she's strictly an inside cat. I've had cats some 50 years now and
>they've always been inside-cats.
>
>I'd like it if I was an inside-human too, but haven't figured out how to
>arrange it on my income.

I fenced in my little backyard so the cats can't get out and I let
them out there even in the winter. They don't stay out long in the
winter though, but in summer I just leave the back door open and they
wander in and out all day long. As long as I'm home, of course.

at
May 12th 11, 01:57 AM
On Wed, 11 May 2011 08:56:36 -0400, dgk > wrote:

>On 8 May 2011 17:51:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>
>>Gandalf ingold1234(at)yahoo(dot)com (Gandalf) wrote in
:
>>
>>> On 7 May 2011 17:32:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>
>>>>I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I try not to
>>>>cough or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless. So far, evidently no
>>>>harm done. Or what about her lying on my chest and, once in a great
>>>>while, sneezing in my face? I suspect our viruses are not compatible.
>>>>At least the common ones like those I mentioned.
>>>
>>> Relatively few human diseases can be contracted by cats.
>>>
>>> Rabies, which can infect almost all mammals, is one of them.
>>>
>>> Some internal parasites can infect humans and cats, but the risk is
>>> usually for the human to catch it from their cat, not the other way
>>> around.
>>>
>>> Don't worry about common human illness: you can't 'give' them to you
>>> cat.
>>>
>>> Thank you for being so concerned about the well being of your cat.
>>>
>>> One thing that does have a big impact on your cat's well being is if
>>> you keep your cats indoors.
>>>
>>> There are may perils for your cat outdoors, from being hit by cars, to
>>> dogs and other cats. Perhaps the biggest risk factor is other humans,
>>> who may do something very bad to your cat.
>>>
>>> I know there are many people who believe that cats should be let out
>>> of doors regularly, but the fact remains that most cats are very
>>> content living indoors, and they are far less likely to be injured, or
>>> contract an illness from another cat.
>>>
>>> This has been studied extensively, and it is irrefutable: indoor cats
>>> tend to live longer, healthier lives.
>>>
>>
>>Yes, she's strictly an inside cat. I've had cats some 50 years now and
>>they've always been inside-cats.
>>
>>I'd like it if I was an inside-human too, but haven't figured out how to
>>arrange it on my income.
>
>I fenced in my little backyard so the cats can't get out and I let
>them out there even in the winter. They don't stay out long in the
>winter though, but in summer I just leave the back door open and they
>wander in and out all day long. As long as I'm home, of course.


Having a completely fenced in yard eliminates most, but not all, risks
for cats. You still have to be concerned about fleas, and insect borne
illness/parasites, such as heartworm.

Using Frontline or Advantage will eliminate fleas and ticks.

And, depending on where you live, the risks may be small, and I'm sure
you cats enjoy access to your yard.

Nitesbane
May 12th 11, 12:21 PM
<Gandalf ingold1234 (at) yahoo (dot) com (Gandalf)> wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 11 May 2011 08:56:36 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>
>>On 8 May 2011 17:51:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>
>>>Gandalf ingold1234(at)yahoo(dot)com (Gandalf) wrote in
:
>>>
>>>> On 7 May 2011 17:32:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I try not to
>>>>>cough or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless. So far, evidently no
>>>>>harm done. Or what about her lying on my chest and, once in a great
>>>>>while, sneezing in my face? I suspect our viruses are not compatible.
>>>>>At least the common ones like those I mentioned.
>>>>
>>>> Relatively few human diseases can be contracted by cats.
>>>>
>>>> Rabies, which can infect almost all mammals, is one of them.
>>>>
>>>> Some internal parasites can infect humans and cats, but the risk is
>>>> usually for the human to catch it from their cat, not the other way
>>>> around.
>>>>
>>>> Don't worry about common human illness: you can't 'give' them to you
>>>> cat.
>>>>
>>>> Thank you for being so concerned about the well being of your cat.
>>>>
>>>> One thing that does have a big impact on your cat's well being is if
>>>> you keep your cats indoors.
>>>>
>>>> There are may perils for your cat outdoors, from being hit by cars, to
>>>> dogs and other cats. Perhaps the biggest risk factor is other humans,
>>>> who may do something very bad to your cat.
>>>>
>>>> I know there are many people who believe that cats should be let out
>>>> of doors regularly, but the fact remains that most cats are very
>>>> content living indoors, and they are far less likely to be injured, or
>>>> contract an illness from another cat.
>>>>
>>>> This has been studied extensively, and it is irrefutable: indoor cats
>>>> tend to live longer, healthier lives.
>>>>
>>>
>>>Yes, she's strictly an inside cat. I've had cats some 50 years now and
>>>they've always been inside-cats.
>>>
>>>I'd like it if I was an inside-human too, but haven't figured out how to
>>>arrange it on my income.
>>
>>I fenced in my little backyard so the cats can't get out and I let
>>them out there even in the winter. They don't stay out long in the
>>winter though, but in summer I just leave the back door open and they
>>wander in and out all day long. As long as I'm home, of course.
>
>
> Having a completely fenced in yard eliminates most, but not all, risks
> for cats. You still have to be concerned about fleas, and insect borne
> illness/parasites, such as heartworm.
>

Coyotes can also be a problem in some areas, even if your yard is completely
fenced in.

dgk
May 12th 11, 01:42 PM
On Thu, 12 May 2011 00:57:04 GMT, Gandalf ingold1234(at)yahoo(dot)com
(Gandalf) wrote:

>On Wed, 11 May 2011 08:56:36 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>
>>On 8 May 2011 17:51:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>
>>>Gandalf ingold1234(at)yahoo(dot)com (Gandalf) wrote in
:
>>>
>>>> On 7 May 2011 17:32:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I try not to
>>>>>cough or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless. So far, evidently no
>>>>>harm done. Or what about her lying on my chest and, once in a great
>>>>>while, sneezing in my face? I suspect our viruses are not compatible.
>>>>>At least the common ones like those I mentioned.
>>>>
>>>> Relatively few human diseases can be contracted by cats.
>>>>
>>>> Rabies, which can infect almost all mammals, is one of them.
>>>>
>>>> Some internal parasites can infect humans and cats, but the risk is
>>>> usually for the human to catch it from their cat, not the other way
>>>> around.
>>>>
>>>> Don't worry about common human illness: you can't 'give' them to you
>>>> cat.
>>>>
>>>> Thank you for being so concerned about the well being of your cat.
>>>>
>>>> One thing that does have a big impact on your cat's well being is if
>>>> you keep your cats indoors.
>>>>
>>>> There are may perils for your cat outdoors, from being hit by cars, to
>>>> dogs and other cats. Perhaps the biggest risk factor is other humans,
>>>> who may do something very bad to your cat.
>>>>
>>>> I know there are many people who believe that cats should be let out
>>>> of doors regularly, but the fact remains that most cats are very
>>>> content living indoors, and they are far less likely to be injured, or
>>>> contract an illness from another cat.
>>>>
>>>> This has been studied extensively, and it is irrefutable: indoor cats
>>>> tend to live longer, healthier lives.
>>>>
>>>
>>>Yes, she's strictly an inside cat. I've had cats some 50 years now and
>>>they've always been inside-cats.
>>>
>>>I'd like it if I was an inside-human too, but haven't figured out how to
>>>arrange it on my income.
>>
>>I fenced in my little backyard so the cats can't get out and I let
>>them out there even in the winter. They don't stay out long in the
>>winter though, but in summer I just leave the back door open and they
>>wander in and out all day long. As long as I'm home, of course.
>
>
>Having a completely fenced in yard eliminates most, but not all, risks
>for cats. You still have to be concerned about fleas, and insect borne
>illness/parasites, such as heartworm.
>
>Using Frontline or Advantage will eliminate fleas and ticks.
>
>And, depending on where you live, the risks may be small, and I'm sure
>you cats enjoy access to your yard.
>
>

There are some risks indeed. First, other cats can get in. I leave
open part of the fence when my cats aren't back there so the other
critters can get out. I always look around to make sure there are no
outside cats but once in a great while I miss one and end up having to
keep Espy from attacking it.

Other animals, particularly raccoons, have chewed holes in the metal
fencing and, while I check, I could miss one.

Also, once we were back there and saw two hawks (or similar birds)
circiling high above. I took the cats in and a few minutes later the
birds left. Coincidence? Don't know.

And, of course, they could get out of the yard. Several evergreens are
taller than the fence and I've seen neighborhood cats fly up the trees
and over the fence so I know that they can do it.

Which is why I have the Loc8tor on all my cats collars. At least if
they get out, I can find them. But in 15 years, only Marlo ever left
the yard, and that was when I first took her off the street and there
was a hole that I hadn't noticed.

But they do love it so. When I get home, Espy goes to the back door
and starts trying to turn the door knob.

dgk
May 12th 11, 01:44 PM
On Thu, 12 May 2011 07:21:05 -0400, "Nitesbane"
> wrote:

>
><Gandalf ingold1234 (at) yahoo (dot) com (Gandalf)> wrote in message
...
>> On Wed, 11 May 2011 08:56:36 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>
>>>On 8 May 2011 17:51:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>
>>>>Gandalf ingold1234(at)yahoo(dot)com (Gandalf) wrote in
:
>>>>
>>>>> On 7 May 2011 17:32:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I try not to
>>>>>>cough or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless. So far, evidently no
>>>>>>harm done. Or what about her lying on my chest and, once in a great
>>>>>>while, sneezing in my face? I suspect our viruses are not compatible.
>>>>>>At least the common ones like those I mentioned.
>>>>>
>>>>> Relatively few human diseases can be contracted by cats.
>>>>>
>>>>> Rabies, which can infect almost all mammals, is one of them.
>>>>>
>>>>> Some internal parasites can infect humans and cats, but the risk is
>>>>> usually for the human to catch it from their cat, not the other way
>>>>> around.
>>>>>
>>>>> Don't worry about common human illness: you can't 'give' them to you
>>>>> cat.
>>>>>
>>>>> Thank you for being so concerned about the well being of your cat.
>>>>>
>>>>> One thing that does have a big impact on your cat's well being is if
>>>>> you keep your cats indoors.
>>>>>
>>>>> There are may perils for your cat outdoors, from being hit by cars, to
>>>>> dogs and other cats. Perhaps the biggest risk factor is other humans,
>>>>> who may do something very bad to your cat.
>>>>>
>>>>> I know there are many people who believe that cats should be let out
>>>>> of doors regularly, but the fact remains that most cats are very
>>>>> content living indoors, and they are far less likely to be injured, or
>>>>> contract an illness from another cat.
>>>>>
>>>>> This has been studied extensively, and it is irrefutable: indoor cats
>>>>> tend to live longer, healthier lives.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Yes, she's strictly an inside cat. I've had cats some 50 years now and
>>>>they've always been inside-cats.
>>>>
>>>>I'd like it if I was an inside-human too, but haven't figured out how to
>>>>arrange it on my income.
>>>
>>>I fenced in my little backyard so the cats can't get out and I let
>>>them out there even in the winter. They don't stay out long in the
>>>winter though, but in summer I just leave the back door open and they
>>>wander in and out all day long. As long as I'm home, of course.
>>
>>
>> Having a completely fenced in yard eliminates most, but not all, risks
>> for cats. You still have to be concerned about fleas, and insect borne
>> illness/parasites, such as heartworm.
>>
>
>Coyotes can also be a problem in some areas, even if your yard is completely
>fenced in.
>

In NYC we do get possums and raccoons, but not coyotes. Although I do
believe that some do wander in from the north; they get noticed pretty
quickly.

Bill Graham
May 12th 11, 08:42 PM
dgk wrote:
> On Thu, 12 May 2011 07:21:05 -0400, "Nitesbane"
> > wrote:
>
>>
>> <Gandalf ingold1234 (at) yahoo (dot) com (Gandalf)> wrote in message
>> ...
>>> On Wed, 11 May 2011 08:56:36 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 8 May 2011 17:51:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Gandalf ingold1234(at)yahoo(dot)com (Gandalf) wrote in
>>>>> :
>>>>>
>>>>>> On 7 May 2011 17:32:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I try
>>>>>>> not to cough or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless. So
>>>>>>> far, evidently no harm done. Or what about her lying on my
>>>>>>> chest and, once in a great while, sneezing in my face? I
>>>>>>> suspect our viruses are not compatible. At least the common
>>>>>>> ones like those I mentioned.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Relatively few human diseases can be contracted by cats.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Rabies, which can infect almost all mammals, is one of them.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Some internal parasites can infect humans and cats, but the risk
>>>>>> is usually for the human to catch it from their cat, not the
>>>>>> other way around.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Don't worry about common human illness: you can't 'give' them to
>>>>>> you cat.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thank you for being so concerned about the well being of your
>>>>>> cat.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> One thing that does have a big impact on your cat's well being
>>>>>> is if you keep your cats indoors.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> There are may perils for your cat outdoors, from being hit by
>>>>>> cars, to dogs and other cats. Perhaps the biggest risk factor is
>>>>>> other humans, who may do something very bad to your cat.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I know there are many people who believe that cats should be let
>>>>>> out of doors regularly, but the fact remains that most cats are
>>>>>> very content living indoors, and they are far less likely to be
>>>>>> injured, or contract an illness from another cat.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> This has been studied extensively, and it is irrefutable: indoor
>>>>>> cats tend to live longer, healthier lives.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Yes, she's strictly an inside cat. I've had cats some 50 years
>>>>> now and they've always been inside-cats.
>>>>>
>>>>> I'd like it if I was an inside-human too, but haven't figured out
>>>>> how to arrange it on my income.
>>>>
>>>> I fenced in my little backyard so the cats can't get out and I let
>>>> them out there even in the winter. They don't stay out long in the
>>>> winter though, but in summer I just leave the back door open and
>>>> they wander in and out all day long. As long as I'm home, of
>>>> course.
>>>
>>>
>>> Having a completely fenced in yard eliminates most, but not all,
>>> risks for cats. You still have to be concerned about fleas, and
>>> insect borne illness/parasites, such as heartworm.
>>>
>>
>> Coyotes can also be a problem in some areas, even if your yard is
>> completely fenced in.
>>
>
> In NYC we do get possums and raccoons, but not coyotes. Although I do
> believe that some do wander in from the north; they get noticed pretty
> quickly.

I haven't seen any up here in Oregon, but there were lots of them in
California where I lived for 40 years. They are quite tame in some areas. I
saw two sitting at the side of the road once up in the mountains near
Yosemite park. The were healthy looking and unafraid of the cars whizzing
by. They looked like domestic dogs, but without collars.... As we take over
their territories, they will either have to learn to live with us or die
out. The same is true of bears and mountain lions. (and many other animals)

at
May 12th 11, 11:08 PM
On Thu, 12 May 2011 08:44:04 -0400, dgk > wrote:

>On Thu, 12 May 2011 07:21:05 -0400, "Nitesbane"
> wrote:
>
>>
>><Gandalf ingold1234 (at) yahoo (dot) com (Gandalf)> wrote in message
...
>>> On Wed, 11 May 2011 08:56:36 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>>
>>>>On 8 May 2011 17:51:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>Gandalf ingold1234(at)yahoo(dot)com (Gandalf) wrote in
:
>>>>>
>>>>>> On 7 May 2011 17:32:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I try not to
>>>>>>>cough or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless. So far, evidently no
>>>>>>>harm done. Or what about her lying on my chest and, once in a great
>>>>>>>while, sneezing in my face? I suspect our viruses are not compatible.
>>>>>>>At least the common ones like those I mentioned.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Relatively few human diseases can be contracted by cats.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Rabies, which can infect almost all mammals, is one of them.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Some internal parasites can infect humans and cats, but the risk is
>>>>>> usually for the human to catch it from their cat, not the other way
>>>>>> around.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Don't worry about common human illness: you can't 'give' them to you
>>>>>> cat.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thank you for being so concerned about the well being of your cat.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> One thing that does have a big impact on your cat's well being is if
>>>>>> you keep your cats indoors.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> There are may perils for your cat outdoors, from being hit by cars, to
>>>>>> dogs and other cats. Perhaps the biggest risk factor is other humans,
>>>>>> who may do something very bad to your cat.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I know there are many people who believe that cats should be let out
>>>>>> of doors regularly, but the fact remains that most cats are very
>>>>>> content living indoors, and they are far less likely to be injured, or
>>>>>> contract an illness from another cat.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> This has been studied extensively, and it is irrefutable: indoor cats
>>>>>> tend to live longer, healthier lives.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>Yes, she's strictly an inside cat. I've had cats some 50 years now and
>>>>>they've always been inside-cats.
>>>>>
>>>>>I'd like it if I was an inside-human too, but haven't figured out how to
>>>>>arrange it on my income.
>>>>
>>>>I fenced in my little backyard so the cats can't get out and I let
>>>>them out there even in the winter. They don't stay out long in the
>>>>winter though, but in summer I just leave the back door open and they
>>>>wander in and out all day long. As long as I'm home, of course.
>>>
>>>
>>> Having a completely fenced in yard eliminates most, but not all, risks
>>> for cats. You still have to be concerned about fleas, and insect borne
>>> illness/parasites, such as heartworm.
>>>
>>
>>Coyotes can also be a problem in some areas, even if your yard is completely
>>fenced in.
>>
>
>In NYC we do get possums and raccoons, but not coyotes. Although I do
>believe that some do wander in from the north; they get noticed pretty
>quickly.

There is a pretty large population of raccoons where I live.

There is a large creek a few blocks away, (in Europe, it would probably
be called a small river) which empties into the Mississippi River, about
a mile away.

The raccoons live along the banks of both, and use the storm drains like
their own private subway system.

While raccoons are interesting to watch, from a distance, they are
mostly traveling bags of disease and pestilence.

If it was legal,and safe, I would shoot every single one I see.


Common Infectious Diseases of Raccoons

Raccoons are susceptible to a large number of different infectious
agents including bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Several of these
infectious diseases are zoonotic. Veterinarians are faced with the
diagnosis and treatment of wildlife including raccoons and need to be
able to make the correct diagnosis as well as educate clients on the
potential hazards associated with exposure to raccoons.

Leptospirosis is a common bacterial disease in raccoons caused by a
number of different species of Leptospira. Trans-mission is thought to
occur via urine contamination of feed and water. Antemortem
diagnosis is based upon serology and dark field examination of urine.
Histopathologic examination and fluorescent antibody testing of liver
and kidney are two postmortem procedures that can be done to help
further aid the diagnosis of leptospirosis. Other natural bacterial
infections reported in raccoons are
listeriosis,yersiniosis,pasteurellosis, and tularemia.

Viral diseases of raccoons include rabies, canine distemper, raccoon
parvoviralenteritis, infectious canine hepatitis, and pseudorabies.
Rabies is a zoonotic disease that is endemic in raccoon populations in
Pennsylvania and New England. In recent years, there has been a shift of
rabies infected raccoons westward into Ohio (see Diagnostic Forum Vol.
8, No 2, 1997).

Canine distemper virus infection is probably the most common viral
disease in raccoons. The clinical signs, and gross and histopathologic
lesions in raccoons are similar to distemper in dogs. Neurologic signs
due to distemper virus infection in raccoons are virtually
indistinguishable from rabies induced neurologic disease.

Diagnosis is based upon histopathologic lesions in brain, lung, spleen,
and small intestine. Intranuclear and intracytoplasmicinclusion bodies
can be visualized in many cells including epithelial cells in the
respiratory epithelium, gastric mucosa, and transitional epithelium
lining the renal pelvis and urinary bladder. The best tissues for
fluorescent antibody testing and virus isolation of canine distemper
virus are lung, brain, stomach, small intestine, kidney, and urinary
bladder.

Parvoviral enteritis in raccoons is due to a unique raccoon parvovirus
that is most antigenically similar to feline parvovirus. Clinical
signs include bloody diarrhea, lethargy, inappetance, and loss of fear
of humans. Raccoons do not develop clinical disease when exposed to
canine parvovirus. Diagnosis is based upon histopathologic lesions
of necrotizing enteritis and identification of the virus by fluorescent
antibody testing. The most common method in which raccoons acquire
pseudorabies virus infection is via the ingestion of virus-infected pig
carcasses.

An important parasitic disease of raccoons is toxoplasmosis, which is a
protozoal disease caused by Toxoplasmagondii.

Felines are the definitive host for T. gondii, and they excrete
potentially infective oocysts in their feces. Toxoplasmosis in raccoons
is commonly associated with immunosuppression from canine distemper
virus infection. Necrotizing encephalitis and pneumonitis are frequent
lesions associated with toxoplasmosis.

Another parasite of importance in raccoons is Baylisascarisprocyonis,
which is an intestinal roundworm of raccoons. Baylisascaris is a known
cause of cerebral nematodiasis and ocular and visceral larval migrans in
domestic and non-domestic animals, and humans. Transmission commonly
occurs through the ingestion of infective eggs, which results in
aberrant migration in hosts other than raccoons.

- by Jim Raymond, DVM

- edited by M. Randy White, DVM, PhD

Bill Graham
May 13th 11, 08:52 AM
> On Thu, 12 May 2011 08:44:04 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>
>> On Thu, 12 May 2011 07:21:05 -0400, "Nitesbane"
>> > wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> <Gandalf ingold1234 (at) yahoo (dot) com (Gandalf)> wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> On Wed, 11 May 2011 08:56:36 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On 8 May 2011 17:51:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Gandalf ingold1234(at)yahoo(dot)com (Gandalf) wrote in
>>>>>> :
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On 7 May 2011 17:32:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I try
>>>>>>>> not to cough or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless. So
>>>>>>>> far, evidently no harm done. Or what about her lying on my
>>>>>>>> chest and, once in a great while, sneezing in my face? I
>>>>>>>> suspect our viruses are not compatible. At least the common
>>>>>>>> ones like those I mentioned.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Relatively few human diseases can be contracted by cats.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Rabies, which can infect almost all mammals, is one of them.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Some internal parasites can infect humans and cats, but the
>>>>>>> risk is usually for the human to catch it from their cat, not
>>>>>>> the other way around.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Don't worry about common human illness: you can't 'give' them
>>>>>>> to you cat.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Thank you for being so concerned about the well being of your
>>>>>>> cat.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> One thing that does have a big impact on your cat's well being
>>>>>>> is if you keep your cats indoors.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> There are may perils for your cat outdoors, from being hit by
>>>>>>> cars, to dogs and other cats. Perhaps the biggest risk factor
>>>>>>> is other humans, who may do something very bad to your cat.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I know there are many people who believe that cats should be
>>>>>>> let out of doors regularly, but the fact remains that most cats
>>>>>>> are very content living indoors, and they are far less likely
>>>>>>> to be injured, or contract an illness from another cat.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> This has been studied extensively, and it is irrefutable:
>>>>>>> indoor cats tend to live longer, healthier lives.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Yes, she's strictly an inside cat. I've had cats some 50 years
>>>>>> now and they've always been inside-cats.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I'd like it if I was an inside-human too, but haven't figured
>>>>>> out how to arrange it on my income.
>>>>>
>>>>> I fenced in my little backyard so the cats can't get out and I let
>>>>> them out there even in the winter. They don't stay out long in the
>>>>> winter though, but in summer I just leave the back door open and
>>>>> they wander in and out all day long. As long as I'm home, of
>>>>> course.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Having a completely fenced in yard eliminates most, but not all,
>>>> risks for cats. You still have to be concerned about fleas, and
>>>> insect borne illness/parasites, such as heartworm.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Coyotes can also be a problem in some areas, even if your yard is
>>> completely fenced in.
>>>
>>
>> In NYC we do get possums and raccoons, but not coyotes. Although I do
>> believe that some do wander in from the north; they get noticed
>> pretty quickly.
>
> There is a pretty large population of raccoons where I live.
>
> There is a large creek a few blocks away, (in Europe, it would
> probably be called a small river) which empties into the Mississippi
> River, about a mile away.
>
> The raccoons live along the banks of both, and use the storm drains
> like their own private subway system.
>
> While raccoons are interesting to watch, from a distance, they are
> mostly traveling bags of disease and pestilence.
>
> If it was legal,and safe, I would shoot every single one I see.
>
>
> Common Infectious Diseases of Raccoons
>
> Raccoons are susceptible to a large number of different infectious
> agents including bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Several of these
> infectious diseases are zoonotic. Veterinarians are faced with the
> diagnosis and treatment of wildlife including raccoons and need to be
> able to make the correct diagnosis as well as educate clients on the
> potential hazards associated with exposure to raccoons.
>
> Leptospirosis is a common bacterial disease in raccoons caused by a
> number of different species of Leptospira. Trans-mission is thought
> to occur via urine contamination of feed and water. Antemortem
> diagnosis is based upon serology and dark field examination of urine.
> Histopathologic examination and fluorescent antibody testing of liver
> and kidney are two postmortem procedures that can be done to help
> further aid the diagnosis of leptospirosis. Other natural bacterial
> infections reported in raccoons are
> listeriosis,yersiniosis,pasteurellosis, and tularemia.
>
> Viral diseases of raccoons include rabies, canine distemper, raccoon
> parvoviralenteritis, infectious canine hepatitis, and pseudorabies.
> Rabies is a zoonotic disease that is endemic in raccoon populations in
> Pennsylvania and New England. In recent years, there has been a shift
> of rabies infected raccoons westward into Ohio (see Diagnostic Forum
> Vol. 8, No 2, 1997).
>
> Canine distemper virus infection is probably the most common viral
> disease in raccoons. The clinical signs, and gross and histopathologic
> lesions in raccoons are similar to distemper in dogs. Neurologic signs
> due to distemper virus infection in raccoons are virtually
> indistinguishable from rabies induced neurologic disease.
>
> Diagnosis is based upon histopathologic lesions in brain, lung,
> spleen, and small intestine. Intranuclear and
> intracytoplasmicinclusion bodies can be visualized in many cells
> including epithelial cells in the respiratory epithelium, gastric
> mucosa, and transitional epithelium lining the renal pelvis and
> urinary bladder. The best tissues for fluorescent antibody testing
> and virus isolation of canine distemper virus are lung, brain,
> stomach, small intestine, kidney, and urinary bladder.
>
> Parvoviral enteritis in raccoons is due to a unique raccoon parvovirus
> that is most antigenically similar to feline parvovirus.
> Clinical signs include bloody diarrhea, lethargy, inappetance, and
> loss of fear of humans. Raccoons do not develop clinical disease when
> exposed to canine parvovirus. Diagnosis is based upon
> histopathologic lesions of necrotizing enteritis and identification
> of the virus by fluorescent antibody testing. The most common
> method in which raccoons acquire pseudorabies virus infection is via
> the ingestion of virus-infected pig carcasses.
>
> An important parasitic disease of raccoons is toxoplasmosis, which is
> a protozoal disease caused by Toxoplasmagondii.
>
> Felines are the definitive host for T. gondii, and they excrete
> potentially infective oocysts in their feces. Toxoplasmosis in
> raccoons is commonly associated with immunosuppression from canine
> distemper virus infection. Necrotizing encephalitis and pneumonitis
> are frequent lesions associated with toxoplasmosis.
>
> Another parasite of importance in raccoons is Baylisascarisprocyonis,
> which is an intestinal roundworm of raccoons. Baylisascaris is a known
> cause of cerebral nematodiasis and ocular and visceral larval migrans
> in domestic and non-domestic animals, and humans. Transmission
> commonly occurs through the ingestion of infective eggs, which
> results in aberrant migration in hosts other than raccoons.
>
> - by Jim Raymond, DVM
>
> - edited by M. Randy White, DVM, PhD

My wife and I feed raccoons on our back porch. (we live on the edge of town)
Is there anything we could put in their food (dog kibbles) that would cure
these parasites? They don't really like the dog food, but if they are very
hungry, they will reluctantly eat it rather than starving to death. They
liked it to begin with, but over the years, they have grown tired of it.

I read an article in Scientific American many years ago that recommended
that we (human beings) stop trying to kill rats and instead try to cure
their diseases and keep them healthy. The author's argument was basically
that people have been trying to kill them now for several hundred years and
we are still very unsuccessful at it. If we cured their diseases, they would
be much less of a threat to us.

dgk
May 13th 11, 02:54 PM
On Fri, 13 May 2011 00:52:29 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
wrote:

>> On Thu, 12 May 2011 08:44:04 -0400, dgk > wrote:
....
>>
>> Another parasite of importance in raccoons is Baylisascarisprocyonis,
>> which is an intestinal roundworm of raccoons. Baylisascaris is a known
>> cause of cerebral nematodiasis and ocular and visceral larval migrans
>> in domestic and non-domestic animals, and humans. Transmission
>> commonly occurs through the ingestion of infective eggs, which
>> results in aberrant migration in hosts other than raccoons.
>>
>> - by Jim Raymond, DVM
>>
>> - edited by M. Randy White, DVM, PhD
>
>My wife and I feed raccoons on our back porch. (we live on the edge of town)
>Is there anything we could put in their food (dog kibbles) that would cure
>these parasites? They don't really like the dog food, but if they are very
>hungry, they will reluctantly eat it rather than starving to death. They
>liked it to begin with, but over the years, they have grown tired of it.
>
>I read an article in Scientific American many years ago that recommended
>that we (human beings) stop trying to kill rats and instead try to cure
>their diseases and keep them healthy. The author's argument was basically
>that people have been trying to kill them now for several hundred years and
>we are still very unsuccessful at it. If we cured their diseases, they would
>be much less of a threat to us.

I don't know if we can vaccinate all the rats in NYC; that would be
quite a chore. Even doing it through food (and that won't work for
many diseases) would be a monumental task.

I do like raccoons though, even knowing that they're disease vectors.
I once took a series of pictures from my bedroom of a child raccoon
stuck on a neighbor's awning, and the mother coming to show it how to
get down. I would have thought that was instinctive, but it sure
looked like the child had no idea how to climb down.

I do not want them in my yard however. oPossums I'm more used to
seeing back there.

Bill Graham
May 13th 11, 08:41 PM
dgk wrote:
> On Fri, 13 May 2011 00:52:29 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
> wrote:
>
>>> On Thu, 12 May 2011 08:44:04 -0400, dgk > wrote:
> ...
>>>
>>> Another parasite of importance in raccoons is
>>> Baylisascarisprocyonis, which is an intestinal roundworm of
>>> raccoons. Baylisascaris is a known cause of cerebral nematodiasis
>>> and ocular and visceral larval migrans in domestic and non-domestic
>>> animals, and humans. Transmission commonly occurs through the
>>> ingestion of infective eggs, which results in aberrant migration in
>>> hosts other than raccoons.
>>>
>>> - by Jim Raymond, DVM
>>>
>>> - edited by M. Randy White, DVM, PhD
>>
>> My wife and I feed raccoons on our back porch. (we live on the edge
>> of town) Is there anything we could put in their food (dog kibbles)
>> that would cure these parasites? They don't really like the dog
>> food, but if they are very hungry, they will reluctantly eat it
>> rather than starving to death. They liked it to begin with, but over
>> the years, they have grown tired of it.
>>
>> I read an article in Scientific American many years ago that
>> recommended that we (human beings) stop trying to kill rats and
>> instead try to cure their diseases and keep them healthy. The
>> author's argument was basically that people have been trying to kill
>> them now for several hundred years and we are still very
>> unsuccessful at it. If we cured their diseases, they would be much
>> less of a threat to us.
>
> I don't know if we can vaccinate all the rats in NYC; that would be
> quite a chore. Even doing it through food (and that won't work for
> many diseases) would be a monumental task.
>
> I do like raccoons though, even knowing that they're disease vectors.
> I once took a series of pictures from my bedroom of a child raccoon
> stuck on a neighbor's awning, and the mother coming to show it how to
> get down. I would have thought that was instinctive, but it sure
> looked like the child had no idea how to climb down.
>
> I do not want them in my yard however. oPossums I'm more used to
> seeing back there.

Yes. We also have a couple of possums that eat the dog kibbles. They are
very strange animals. Personality minus.... They seemed to be blind when we
first saw them. Turning on the light didn't affect their behavior at all.
But trying to open the sliding glass door, even with the slightest sound
that I couldn't hear, would send them running away in a panic. Now, they are
a lot tamer, and no longer run, but they are a lot dumber than raccoons.....

at
May 13th 11, 11:15 PM
On Fri, 13 May 2011 00:52:29 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
wrote:

>> On Thu, 12 May 2011 08:44:04 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>
>>> On Thu, 12 May 2011 07:21:05 -0400, "Nitesbane"
>>> > wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> <Gandalf ingold1234 (at) yahoo (dot) com (Gandalf)> wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>>> On Wed, 11 May 2011 08:56:36 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> On 8 May 2011 17:51:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Gandalf ingold1234(at)yahoo(dot)com (Gandalf) wrote in
>>>>>>> :
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> On 7 May 2011 17:32:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I try
>>>>>>>>> not to cough or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless. So
>>>>>>>>> far, evidently no harm done. Or what about her lying on my
>>>>>>>>> chest and, once in a great while, sneezing in my face? I
>>>>>>>>> suspect our viruses are not compatible. At least the common
>>>>>>>>> ones like those I mentioned.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Relatively few human diseases can be contracted by cats.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Rabies, which can infect almost all mammals, is one of them.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Some internal parasites can infect humans and cats, but the
>>>>>>>> risk is usually for the human to catch it from their cat, not
>>>>>>>> the other way around.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Don't worry about common human illness: you can't 'give' them
>>>>>>>> to you cat.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Thank you for being so concerned about the well being of your
>>>>>>>> cat.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> One thing that does have a big impact on your cat's well being
>>>>>>>> is if you keep your cats indoors.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> There are may perils for your cat outdoors, from being hit by
>>>>>>>> cars, to dogs and other cats. Perhaps the biggest risk factor
>>>>>>>> is other humans, who may do something very bad to your cat.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I know there are many people who believe that cats should be
>>>>>>>> let out of doors regularly, but the fact remains that most cats
>>>>>>>> are very content living indoors, and they are far less likely
>>>>>>>> to be injured, or contract an illness from another cat.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> This has been studied extensively, and it is irrefutable:
>>>>>>>> indoor cats tend to live longer, healthier lives.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Yes, she's strictly an inside cat. I've had cats some 50 years
>>>>>>> now and they've always been inside-cats.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I'd like it if I was an inside-human too, but haven't figured
>>>>>>> out how to arrange it on my income.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I fenced in my little backyard so the cats can't get out and I let
>>>>>> them out there even in the winter. They don't stay out long in the
>>>>>> winter though, but in summer I just leave the back door open and
>>>>>> they wander in and out all day long. As long as I'm home, of
>>>>>> course.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Having a completely fenced in yard eliminates most, but not all,
>>>>> risks for cats. You still have to be concerned about fleas, and
>>>>> insect borne illness/parasites, such as heartworm.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Coyotes can also be a problem in some areas, even if your yard is
>>>> completely fenced in.
>>>>
>>>
>>> In NYC we do get possums and raccoons, but not coyotes. Although I do
>>> believe that some do wander in from the north; they get noticed
>>> pretty quickly.
>>
>> There is a pretty large population of raccoons where I live.
>>
>> There is a large creek a few blocks away, (in Europe, it would
>> probably be called a small river) which empties into the Mississippi
>> River, about a mile away.
>>
>> The raccoons live along the banks of both, and use the storm drains
>> like their own private subway system.
>>
>> While raccoons are interesting to watch, from a distance, they are
>> mostly traveling bags of disease and pestilence.
>>
>> If it was legal,and safe, I would shoot every single one I see.
>>
>>
>> Common Infectious Diseases of Raccoons
>>
>> Raccoons are susceptible to a large number of different infectious
>> agents including bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Several of these
>> infectious diseases are zoonotic. Veterinarians are faced with the
>> diagnosis and treatment of wildlife including raccoons and need to be
>> able to make the correct diagnosis as well as educate clients on the
>> potential hazards associated with exposure to raccoons.
>>
>> Leptospirosis is a common bacterial disease in raccoons caused by a
>> number of different species of Leptospira. Trans-mission is thought
>> to occur via urine contamination of feed and water. Antemortem
>> diagnosis is based upon serology and dark field examination of urine.
>> Histopathologic examination and fluorescent antibody testing of liver
>> and kidney are two postmortem procedures that can be done to help
>> further aid the diagnosis of leptospirosis. Other natural bacterial
>> infections reported in raccoons are
>> listeriosis,yersiniosis,pasteurellosis, and tularemia.
>>
>> Viral diseases of raccoons include rabies, canine distemper, raccoon
>> parvoviralenteritis, infectious canine hepatitis, and pseudorabies.
>> Rabies is a zoonotic disease that is endemic in raccoon populations in
>> Pennsylvania and New England. In recent years, there has been a shift
>> of rabies infected raccoons westward into Ohio (see Diagnostic Forum
>> Vol. 8, No 2, 1997).
>>
>> Canine distemper virus infection is probably the most common viral
>> disease in raccoons. The clinical signs, and gross and histopathologic
>> lesions in raccoons are similar to distemper in dogs. Neurologic signs
>> due to distemper virus infection in raccoons are virtually
>> indistinguishable from rabies induced neurologic disease.
>>
>> Diagnosis is based upon histopathologic lesions in brain, lung,
>> spleen, and small intestine. Intranuclear and
>> intracytoplasmicinclusion bodies can be visualized in many cells
>> including epithelial cells in the respiratory epithelium, gastric
>> mucosa, and transitional epithelium lining the renal pelvis and
>> urinary bladder. The best tissues for fluorescent antibody testing
>> and virus isolation of canine distemper virus are lung, brain,
>> stomach, small intestine, kidney, and urinary bladder.
>>
>> Parvoviral enteritis in raccoons is due to a unique raccoon parvovirus
>> that is most antigenically similar to feline parvovirus.
>> Clinical signs include bloody diarrhea, lethargy, inappetance, and
>> loss of fear of humans. Raccoons do not develop clinical disease when
>> exposed to canine parvovirus. Diagnosis is based upon
>> histopathologic lesions of necrotizing enteritis and identification
>> of the virus by fluorescent antibody testing. The most common
>> method in which raccoons acquire pseudorabies virus infection is via
>> the ingestion of virus-infected pig carcasses.
>>
>> An important parasitic disease of raccoons is toxoplasmosis, which is
>> a protozoal disease caused by Toxoplasmagondii.
>>
>> Felines are the definitive host for T. gondii, and they excrete
>> potentially infective oocysts in their feces. Toxoplasmosis in
>> raccoons is commonly associated with immunosuppression from canine
>> distemper virus infection. Necrotizing encephalitis and pneumonitis
>> are frequent lesions associated with toxoplasmosis.
>>
>> Another parasite of importance in raccoons is Baylisascarisprocyonis,
>> which is an intestinal roundworm of raccoons. Baylisascaris is a known
>> cause of cerebral nematodiasis and ocular and visceral larval migrans
>> in domestic and non-domestic animals, and humans. Transmission
>> commonly occurs through the ingestion of infective eggs, which
>> results in aberrant migration in hosts other than raccoons.
>>
>> - by Jim Raymond, DVM
>>
>> - edited by M. Randy White, DVM, PhD
>
>My wife and I feed raccoons on our back porch. (we live on the edge of town)
>Is there anything we could put in their food (dog kibbles) that would cure
>these parasites? They don't really like the dog food, but if they are very
>hungry, they will reluctantly eat it rather than starving to death. They
>liked it to begin with, but over the years, they have grown tired of it.
>
>I read an article in Scientific American many years ago that recommended
>that we (human beings) stop trying to kill rats and instead try to cure
>their diseases and keep them healthy. The author's argument was basically
>that people have been trying to kill them now for several hundred years and
>we are still very unsuccessful at it. If we cured their diseases, they would
>be much less of a threat to us.


There is nothing you can do to 'cure' the MANY diseases that these
raccoons carry.

Keep in mind, their feces carry many of these parasites and other
infectious agents. If you have any cats and/or dogs, you are putting
them at tremendous risk, by encouraging the raccoons to come to your
house and yard.

You put yourself at risk, as well. It's like feeding rats that carry
bubonic plague, and just hoping you don't contract it.

Don't walk barefoot in your yard.

And stop feeding them. Now.

Bill Graham
May 15th 11, 08:53 AM
> On Fri, 13 May 2011 00:52:29 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
> wrote:
>
>>> On Thu, 12 May 2011 08:44:04 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>>
>>>> On Thu, 12 May 2011 07:21:05 -0400, "Nitesbane"
>>>> > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> <Gandalf ingold1234 (at) yahoo (dot) com (Gandalf)> wrote in
>>>>> message ...
>>>>>> On Wed, 11 May 2011 08:56:36 -0400, dgk >
>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On 8 May 2011 17:51:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Gandalf ingold1234(at)yahoo(dot)com (Gandalf) wrote in
>>>>>>>> :
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> On 7 May 2011 17:32:18 GMT, KenK > wrote:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> I've often wondered if my cat can get my cold, flu, etc. I
>>>>>>>>>> try not to cough or sneeze at her but am sometimes careless.
>>>>>>>>>> So far, evidently no harm done. Or what about her lying on my
>>>>>>>>>> chest and, once in a great while, sneezing in my face? I
>>>>>>>>>> suspect our viruses are not compatible. At least the common
>>>>>>>>>> ones like those I mentioned.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Relatively few human diseases can be contracted by cats.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Rabies, which can infect almost all mammals, is one of them.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Some internal parasites can infect humans and cats, but the
>>>>>>>>> risk is usually for the human to catch it from their cat, not
>>>>>>>>> the other way around.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Don't worry about common human illness: you can't 'give' them
>>>>>>>>> to you cat.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Thank you for being so concerned about the well being of your
>>>>>>>>> cat.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> One thing that does have a big impact on your cat's well being
>>>>>>>>> is if you keep your cats indoors.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> There are may perils for your cat outdoors, from being hit by
>>>>>>>>> cars, to dogs and other cats. Perhaps the biggest risk factor
>>>>>>>>> is other humans, who may do something very bad to your cat.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> I know there are many people who believe that cats should be
>>>>>>>>> let out of doors regularly, but the fact remains that most
>>>>>>>>> cats are very content living indoors, and they are far less
>>>>>>>>> likely to be injured, or contract an illness from another cat.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> This has been studied extensively, and it is irrefutable:
>>>>>>>>> indoor cats tend to live longer, healthier lives.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Yes, she's strictly an inside cat. I've had cats some 50 years
>>>>>>>> now and they've always been inside-cats.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I'd like it if I was an inside-human too, but haven't figured
>>>>>>>> out how to arrange it on my income.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I fenced in my little backyard so the cats can't get out and I
>>>>>>> let them out there even in the winter. They don't stay out long
>>>>>>> in the winter though, but in summer I just leave the back door
>>>>>>> open and they wander in and out all day long. As long as I'm
>>>>>>> home, of course.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Having a completely fenced in yard eliminates most, but not all,
>>>>>> risks for cats. You still have to be concerned about fleas, and
>>>>>> insect borne illness/parasites, such as heartworm.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Coyotes can also be a problem in some areas, even if your yard is
>>>>> completely fenced in.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> In NYC we do get possums and raccoons, but not coyotes. Although I
>>>> do believe that some do wander in from the north; they get noticed
>>>> pretty quickly.
>>>
>>> There is a pretty large population of raccoons where I live.
>>>
>>> There is a large creek a few blocks away, (in Europe, it would
>>> probably be called a small river) which empties into the Mississippi
>>> River, about a mile away.
>>>
>>> The raccoons live along the banks of both, and use the storm drains
>>> like their own private subway system.
>>>
>>> While raccoons are interesting to watch, from a distance, they are
>>> mostly traveling bags of disease and pestilence.
>>>
>>> If it was legal,and safe, I would shoot every single one I see.
>>>
>>>
>>> Common Infectious Diseases of Raccoons
>>>
>>> Raccoons are susceptible to a large number of different infectious
>>> agents including bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Several of these
>>> infectious diseases are zoonotic. Veterinarians are faced with the
>>> diagnosis and treatment of wildlife including raccoons and need to
>>> be able to make the correct diagnosis as well as educate clients on
>>> the potential hazards associated with exposure to raccoons.
>>>
>>> Leptospirosis is a common bacterial disease in raccoons caused by a
>>> number of different species of Leptospira. Trans-mission is
>>> thought to occur via urine contamination of feed and water.
>>> Antemortem diagnosis is based upon serology and dark field
>>> examination of urine. Histopathologic examination and fluorescent
>>> antibody testing of liver and kidney are two postmortem procedures
>>> that can be done to help further aid the diagnosis of
>>> leptospirosis. Other natural bacterial infections reported in
>>> raccoons are listeriosis,yersiniosis,pasteurellosis, and
>>> tularemia.
>>>
>>> Viral diseases of raccoons include rabies, canine distemper, raccoon
>>> parvoviralenteritis, infectious canine hepatitis, and pseudorabies.
>>> Rabies is a zoonotic disease that is endemic in raccoon populations
>>> in Pennsylvania and New England. In recent years, there has been a
>>> shift of rabies infected raccoons westward into Ohio (see
>>> Diagnostic Forum Vol. 8, No 2, 1997).
>>>
>>> Canine distemper virus infection is probably the most common viral
>>> disease in raccoons. The clinical signs, and gross and
>>> histopathologic lesions in raccoons are similar to distemper in
>>> dogs. Neurologic signs due to distemper virus infection in raccoons
>>> are virtually indistinguishable from rabies induced neurologic
>>> disease.
>>>
>>> Diagnosis is based upon histopathologic lesions in brain, lung,
>>> spleen, and small intestine. Intranuclear and
>>> intracytoplasmicinclusion bodies can be visualized in many cells
>>> including epithelial cells in the respiratory epithelium, gastric
>>> mucosa, and transitional epithelium lining the renal pelvis and
>>> urinary bladder. The best tissues for fluorescent antibody testing
>>> and virus isolation of canine distemper virus are lung, brain,
>>> stomach, small intestine, kidney, and urinary bladder.
>>>
>>> Parvoviral enteritis in raccoons is due to a unique raccoon
>>> parvovirus that is most antigenically similar to feline
>>> parvovirus. Clinical signs include bloody diarrhea, lethargy,
>>> inappetance, and loss of fear of humans. Raccoons do not develop
>>> clinical disease when exposed to canine parvovirus. Diagnosis is
>>> based upon histopathologic lesions of necrotizing enteritis and
>>> identification of the virus by fluorescent antibody testing. The
>>> most common method in which raccoons acquire pseudorabies virus
>>> infection is via the ingestion of virus-infected pig carcasses.
>>>
>>> An important parasitic disease of raccoons is toxoplasmosis, which
>>> is a protozoal disease caused by Toxoplasmagondii.
>>>
>>> Felines are the definitive host for T. gondii, and they excrete
>>> potentially infective oocysts in their feces. Toxoplasmosis in
>>> raccoons is commonly associated with immunosuppression from canine
>>> distemper virus infection. Necrotizing encephalitis and pneumonitis
>>> are frequent lesions associated with toxoplasmosis.
>>>
>>> Another parasite of importance in raccoons is
>>> Baylisascarisprocyonis, which is an intestinal roundworm of
>>> raccoons. Baylisascaris is a known cause of cerebral nematodiasis
>>> and ocular and visceral larval migrans in domestic and non-domestic
>>> animals, and humans. Transmission commonly occurs through the
>>> ingestion of infective eggs, which results in aberrant migration in
>>> hosts other than raccoons.
>>>
>>> - by Jim Raymond, DVM
>>>
>>> - edited by M. Randy White, DVM, PhD
>>
>> My wife and I feed raccoons on our back porch. (we live on the edge
>> of town) Is there anything we could put in their food (dog kibbles)
>> that would cure these parasites? They don't really like the dog
>> food, but if they are very hungry, they will reluctantly eat it
>> rather than starving to death. They liked it to begin with, but over
>> the years, they have grown tired of it.
>>
>> I read an article in Scientific American many years ago that
>> recommended that we (human beings) stop trying to kill rats and
>> instead try to cure their diseases and keep them healthy. The
>> author's argument was basically that people have been trying to kill
>> them now for several hundred years and we are still very
>> unsuccessful at it. If we cured their diseases, they would be much
>> less of a threat to us.
>
>
> There is nothing you can do to 'cure' the MANY diseases that these
> raccoons carry.
>
> Keep in mind, their feces carry many of these parasites and other
> infectious agents. If you have any cats and/or dogs, you are putting
> them at tremendous risk, by encouraging the raccoons to come to your
> house and yard.
>
> You put yourself at risk, as well. It's like feeding rats that carry
> bubonic plague, and just hoping you don't contract it.
>
> Don't walk barefoot in your yard.
>
> And stop feeding them. Now.

Sorry. I can't do that. I feed anything (or anyone) who is hungry. You can
think of it as my religion. by telling me to not feed the racoons, you are
telling me to worship some other God. I have been feeding them for about 13
years now. At one time, shortly after I started feeding them, we would have
as many as twenty racoons gathered together on my baack porch in the early
evening after sundown. Today, they are tired of the dog kibbles, and we only
get thre3e or four every night. I purposely feed them the cheapest kibbles,
and don't vary the brand so they are tired of eating them, and will only do
so when they have no other choice. But I refuse to not feed them. I also
provide them with a bucket of fresh water because racoons like to dip their
food in water when they eat. My five cats have been living in close
proximity to the racoons for 13 years and they haven't caught anything from
them yet. For one thing, the racoons live in the trees in my back yard, and
don't compete with the cats for either food or living space. The cats don't
climb in the trees, and the racoons don't go near the cats, either. I see no
conflict between the two species. If I could cre any potential diseases the
racoons might have, I would do so, but if I can't, at least I can make sure
that they don't starve to death.

Bill Graham
May 15th 11, 09:05 AM
Bill Graham wrote:
If I could cre any potential
> diseases the racoons might have, I would do so, but if I can't, at
> least I can make sure that they don't starve to death.

We also feed squirrls, birds and anything else that eats the kibbles or corn
and peanuts that the food contains. One of our cats brought in a chipmonk a
couple of months ago, and today Chipper is living beneath our kitchen stove
and living off of squirrl food. As soon as the weather warms up, I will trap
him and let him go in the back yard again, but I suspect that he will come
back in the house, because he likes living here. The cats sense that he is
a pet, (because we feed him) and they leave him alone.