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View Full Version : Re: IAMS vs Whiskas?


dgk
June 8th 11, 01:56 PM
On Tue, 7 Jun 2011 08:50:47 -0700 (PDT), Lord_Alex
> wrote:

>Hello all, I'm new to the group and somewhat new to raising cats (I
>had cats as a kid 10 years ago).
>
>At the end of April I decided my house was too empty, so I went to the
>local animal shelter and adopted two cats - a 6 month old female
>shorthair (Xerxes) and a 2 year old male Persian ragdoll with super
>fluffy long hair (Caesar). Spayed and neutered and they get along
>great together.
>
>Well after the first bag of food which the vet gave me, we switched to
>Whiskas Meaty Selections. Both of them LOVE this stuff and everything
>was normal.
>They loved it so much and ate so often that I thought maybe the
>Whiskas was like kitty junk-food. Feeling guilty, when the Whiskas ran
>out I switched to IAMS ProActive Health with Chicken (IAMS is
>"premium", correct?). I think they only eat this stuff because they're
>hungry, it's only been a week. Caesar will sniff the bowl of food and
>then proceed to "bury" it by going through the scratching motions on
>the floor and walls. They have rubber claw covers so I'm not too
>concerned with the scratching.
>
>Within a day after switching to the IAMS food Caesar had diarrhea (BTW
>not cool for a cat with his coat) but it only lasted 3 days. He still
>tries to bury that food every time he walks by, but will eat it
>reluctantly.
>Xerxes on the other hand has started showing signs of a urinary
>infection - I'm finding puddles. (Caesar likes to go outside, puddles
>have shown up while he's out). Her litter box quickly took on an
>incredibly powerful odor of ammonia, the kind of smell that can cut
>glass and curls your teeth.
>
>So last night I bought the Whiskas again and switched litter (it was
>corn based, now it's recycled paper pellets). They both seemed VERY
>happy about the change, ate ALL the food and promptly took turns using
>the litter box. I'll find out later today if Xerxes left another
>surprise, I'm really hoping she just didn't want to melt her skin
>using the smelly litter.
>
>What do you guys think? Did the switch to IAMS annoy my cats or did it
>actually cause problems?

D) None of the above.

And if they have urinary issues, get the cat to a vet to rule out a
medial reason like an infection.

http://catinfo.org/

Don't feed them dry food except as a treat. It's easy for you and
mostly bad for them. Wet food is smelly and has to be disposed of
fairly quickly and is generally a PITA to deal with. It's also what
they should be eating. So what's more important, your convenience or
their health?

More expensive food does tend to be better. Supermarket brands like
Friskees and 9-Lives (and yes, IAMS which once was a good brand) are
pretty much junk but many cats do ok with them. My four cats mostly
eat Weruba, BFF, or something PETCO sells called Soulistic. That's
because one of my cats really only likes the very liquidy stuff and
those brands have lots of liquidy food.

Other good brands are Wellness, Merrick, Blue Buffalo, etc. The stuff
you find in good pet stores.

What you can afford is important. If you can't afford Weruva or the
others, get the 9Lives and Friskees. But get them off dry food or
you'll probably make up the difference in vet bills sooner or later.

at
June 8th 11, 11:56 PM
On Wed, 08 Jun 2011 08:56:11 -0400, dgk > wrote:

>On Tue, 7 Jun 2011 08:50:47 -0700 (PDT), Lord_Alex
> wrote:
>
>>Hello all, I'm new to the group and somewhat new to raising cats (I
>>had cats as a kid 10 years ago).
>>
>>At the end of April I decided my house was too empty, so I went to the
>>local animal shelter and adopted two cats - a 6 month old female
>>shorthair (Xerxes) and a 2 year old male Persian ragdoll with super
>>fluffy long hair (Caesar). Spayed and neutered and they get along
>>great together.
>>
>>Well after the first bag of food which the vet gave me, we switched to
>>Whiskas Meaty Selections. Both of them LOVE this stuff and everything
>>was normal.
>>They loved it so much and ate so often that I thought maybe the
>>Whiskas was like kitty junk-food. Feeling guilty, when the Whiskas ran
>>out I switched to IAMS ProActive Health with Chicken (IAMS is
>>"premium", correct?). I think they only eat this stuff because they're
>>hungry, it's only been a week. Caesar will sniff the bowl of food and
>>then proceed to "bury" it by going through the scratching motions on
>>the floor and walls. They have rubber claw covers so I'm not too
>>concerned with the scratching.
>>
>>Within a day after switching to the IAMS food Caesar had diarrhea (BTW
>>not cool for a cat with his coat) but it only lasted 3 days. He still
>>tries to bury that food every time he walks by, but will eat it
>>reluctantly.
>>Xerxes on the other hand has started showing signs of a urinary
>>infection - I'm finding puddles. (Caesar likes to go outside, puddles
>>have shown up while he's out). Her litter box quickly took on an
>>incredibly powerful odor of ammonia, the kind of smell that can cut
>>glass and curls your teeth.
>>
>>So last night I bought the Whiskas again and switched litter (it was
>>corn based, now it's recycled paper pellets). They both seemed VERY
>>happy about the change, ate ALL the food and promptly took turns using
>>the litter box. I'll find out later today if Xerxes left another
>>surprise, I'm really hoping she just didn't want to melt her skin
>>using the smelly litter.
>>
>>What do you guys think? Did the switch to IAMS annoy my cats or did it
>>actually cause problems?
>
>D) None of the above.
>
>And if they have urinary issues, get the cat to a vet to rule out a
>medial reason like an infection.
>
>http://catinfo.org/
>
>Don't feed them dry food except as a treat. It's easy for you and
>mostly bad for them. Wet food is smelly and has to be disposed of
>fairly quickly and is generally a PITA to deal with. It's also what
>they should be eating. So what's more important, your convenience or
>their health?
>
>More expensive food does tend to be better. Supermarket brands like
>Friskees and 9-Lives (and yes, IAMS which once was a good brand) are
>pretty much junk but many cats do ok with them. My four cats mostly
>eat Weruba, BFF, or something PETCO sells called Soulistic. That's
>because one of my cats really only likes the very liquidy stuff and
>those brands have lots of liquidy food.
>
>Other good brands are Wellness, Merrick, Blue Buffalo, etc. The stuff
>you find in good pet stores.
>
>What you can afford is important. If you can't afford Weruva or the
>others, get the 9Lives and Friskees. But get them off dry food or
>you'll probably make up the difference in vet bills sooner or later.


See my response, further down.

And: BITE ME!!!

dgk
June 9th 11, 01:39 PM
On Wed, 08 Jun 2011 22:56:09 GMT, Gandalf ingold1234(AT)yahoo(DOT)com
(Gandalf) wrote:

>On Wed, 08 Jun 2011 08:56:11 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>
>>On Tue, 7 Jun 2011 08:50:47 -0700 (PDT), Lord_Alex
> wrote:
>>
>>>Hello all, I'm new to the group and somewhat new to raising cats (I
>>>had cats as a kid 10 years ago).
>>>
>>>At the end of April I decided my house was too empty, so I went to the
>>>local animal shelter and adopted two cats - a 6 month old female
>>>shorthair (Xerxes) and a 2 year old male Persian ragdoll with super
>>>fluffy long hair (Caesar). Spayed and neutered and they get along
>>>great together.
>>>
>>>Well after the first bag of food which the vet gave me, we switched to
>>>Whiskas Meaty Selections. Both of them LOVE this stuff and everything
>>>was normal.
>>>They loved it so much and ate so often that I thought maybe the
>>>Whiskas was like kitty junk-food. Feeling guilty, when the Whiskas ran
>>>out I switched to IAMS ProActive Health with Chicken (IAMS is
>>>"premium", correct?). I think they only eat this stuff because they're
>>>hungry, it's only been a week. Caesar will sniff the bowl of food and
>>>then proceed to "bury" it by going through the scratching motions on
>>>the floor and walls. They have rubber claw covers so I'm not too
>>>concerned with the scratching.
>>>
>>>Within a day after switching to the IAMS food Caesar had diarrhea (BTW
>>>not cool for a cat with his coat) but it only lasted 3 days. He still
>>>tries to bury that food every time he walks by, but will eat it
>>>reluctantly.
>>>Xerxes on the other hand has started showing signs of a urinary
>>>infection - I'm finding puddles. (Caesar likes to go outside, puddles
>>>have shown up while he's out). Her litter box quickly took on an
>>>incredibly powerful odor of ammonia, the kind of smell that can cut
>>>glass and curls your teeth.
>>>
>>>So last night I bought the Whiskas again and switched litter (it was
>>>corn based, now it's recycled paper pellets). They both seemed VERY
>>>happy about the change, ate ALL the food and promptly took turns using
>>>the litter box. I'll find out later today if Xerxes left another
>>>surprise, I'm really hoping she just didn't want to melt her skin
>>>using the smelly litter.
>>>
>>>What do you guys think? Did the switch to IAMS annoy my cats or did it
>>>actually cause problems?
>>
>>D) None of the above.
>>
>>And if they have urinary issues, get the cat to a vet to rule out a
>>medial reason like an infection.
>>
>>http://catinfo.org/
>>
>>Don't feed them dry food except as a treat. It's easy for you and
>>mostly bad for them. Wet food is smelly and has to be disposed of
>>fairly quickly and is generally a PITA to deal with. It's also what
>>they should be eating. So what's more important, your convenience or
>>their health?
>>
>>More expensive food does tend to be better. Supermarket brands like
>>Friskees and 9-Lives (and yes, IAMS which once was a good brand) are
>>pretty much junk but many cats do ok with them. My four cats mostly
>>eat Weruba, BFF, or something PETCO sells called Soulistic. That's
>>because one of my cats really only likes the very liquidy stuff and
>>those brands have lots of liquidy food.
>>
>>Other good brands are Wellness, Merrick, Blue Buffalo, etc. The stuff
>>you find in good pet stores.
>>
>>What you can afford is important. If you can't afford Weruva or the
>>others, get the 9Lives and Friskees. But get them off dry food or
>>you'll probably make up the difference in vet bills sooner or later.
>
>
>See my response, further down.
>
>And: BITE ME!!!


Yes, some cats do fine eating dry food all their lives. But that is
anecdotal, not any kind of evidence. Vets, who deal with lots and lots
of cats, say to use wet food. Did you bother reading the link and
seeing whether the information makes sense?

at
June 9th 11, 11:55 PM
On Thu, 09 Jun 2011 08:39:06 -0400, dgk > wrote:

>On Wed, 08 Jun 2011 22:56:09 GMT, Gandalf ingold1234(AT)yahoo(DOT)com
>(Gandalf) wrote:
>
>>On Wed, 08 Jun 2011 08:56:11 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>
>>>On Tue, 7 Jun 2011 08:50:47 -0700 (PDT), Lord_Alex
> wrote:
>>>
>>>>Hello all, I'm new to the group and somewhat new to raising cats (I
>>>>had cats as a kid 10 years ago).
>>>>
>>>>At the end of April I decided my house was too empty, so I went to the
>>>>local animal shelter and adopted two cats - a 6 month old female
>>>>shorthair (Xerxes) and a 2 year old male Persian ragdoll with super
>>>>fluffy long hair (Caesar). Spayed and neutered and they get along
>>>>great together.
>>>>
>>>>Well after the first bag of food which the vet gave me, we switched to
>>>>Whiskas Meaty Selections. Both of them LOVE this stuff and everything
>>>>was normal.
>>>>They loved it so much and ate so often that I thought maybe the
>>>>Whiskas was like kitty junk-food. Feeling guilty, when the Whiskas ran
>>>>out I switched to IAMS ProActive Health with Chicken (IAMS is
>>>>"premium", correct?). I think they only eat this stuff because they're
>>>>hungry, it's only been a week. Caesar will sniff the bowl of food and
>>>>then proceed to "bury" it by going through the scratching motions on
>>>>the floor and walls. They have rubber claw covers so I'm not too
>>>>concerned with the scratching.
>>>>
>>>>Within a day after switching to the IAMS food Caesar had diarrhea (BTW
>>>>not cool for a cat with his coat) but it only lasted 3 days. He still
>>>>tries to bury that food every time he walks by, but will eat it
>>>>reluctantly.
>>>>Xerxes on the other hand has started showing signs of a urinary
>>>>infection - I'm finding puddles. (Caesar likes to go outside, puddles
>>>>have shown up while he's out). Her litter box quickly took on an
>>>>incredibly powerful odor of ammonia, the kind of smell that can cut
>>>>glass and curls your teeth.
>>>>
>>>>So last night I bought the Whiskas again and switched litter (it was
>>>>corn based, now it's recycled paper pellets). They both seemed VERY
>>>>happy about the change, ate ALL the food and promptly took turns using
>>>>the litter box. I'll find out later today if Xerxes left another
>>>>surprise, I'm really hoping she just didn't want to melt her skin
>>>>using the smelly litter.
>>>>
>>>>What do you guys think? Did the switch to IAMS annoy my cats or did it
>>>>actually cause problems?
>>>
>>>D) None of the above.
>>>
>>>And if they have urinary issues, get the cat to a vet to rule out a
>>>medial reason like an infection.
>>>
>>>http://catinfo.org/
>>>
>>>Don't feed them dry food except as a treat. It's easy for you and
>>>mostly bad for them. Wet food is smelly and has to be disposed of
>>>fairly quickly and is generally a PITA to deal with. It's also what
>>>they should be eating. So what's more important, your convenience or
>>>their health?
>>>
>>>More expensive food does tend to be better. Supermarket brands like
>>>Friskees and 9-Lives (and yes, IAMS which once was a good brand) are
>>>pretty much junk but many cats do ok with them. My four cats mostly
>>>eat Weruba, BFF, or something PETCO sells called Soulistic. That's
>>>because one of my cats really only likes the very liquidy stuff and
>>>those brands have lots of liquidy food.
>>>
>>>Other good brands are Wellness, Merrick, Blue Buffalo, etc. The stuff
>>>you find in good pet stores.
>>>
>>>What you can afford is important. If you can't afford Weruva or the
>>>others, get the 9Lives and Friskees. But get them off dry food or
>>>you'll probably make up the difference in vet bills sooner or later.
>>
>>
>>See my response, further down.
>>
>>And: BITE ME!!!
>
>
>Yes, some cats do fine eating dry food all their lives. But that is
>anecdotal, not any kind of evidence. Vets, who deal with lots and lots
>of cats, say to use wet food. Did you bother reading the link and
>seeing whether the information makes sense?

**** NO.

I listen to MY veterinarian.

Wayne Mitchell
June 10th 11, 01:46 AM
dgk > wrote:

>Yes, some cats do fine eating dry food all their lives. But that is
>anecdotal, not any kind of evidence. Vets, who deal with lots and lots
>of cats, say to use wet food.

Some vets may say that; others will say the opposite. Neither group
will have any scientific basis for their recommendation. It's *all*
anecdotal.
--

Wayne M.

dgk
June 10th 11, 02:46 PM
On Thu, 09 Jun 2011 22:55:34 GMT, Gandalf ingold1234(AT)yahoo(DOT)com
(Gandalf) wrote:

>On Thu, 09 Jun 2011 08:39:06 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>
>>On Wed, 08 Jun 2011 22:56:09 GMT, Gandalf ingold1234(AT)yahoo(DOT)com
>>(Gandalf) wrote:
>>
>>>On Wed, 08 Jun 2011 08:56:11 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>>
>>>>On Tue, 7 Jun 2011 08:50:47 -0700 (PDT), Lord_Alex
> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>Hello all, I'm new to the group and somewhat new to raising cats (I
>>>>>had cats as a kid 10 years ago).
>>>>>
>>>>>At the end of April I decided my house was too empty, so I went to the
>>>>>local animal shelter and adopted two cats - a 6 month old female
>>>>>shorthair (Xerxes) and a 2 year old male Persian ragdoll with super
>>>>>fluffy long hair (Caesar). Spayed and neutered and they get along
>>>>>great together.
>>>>>
>>>>>Well after the first bag of food which the vet gave me, we switched to
>>>>>Whiskas Meaty Selections. Both of them LOVE this stuff and everything
>>>>>was normal.
>>>>>They loved it so much and ate so often that I thought maybe the
>>>>>Whiskas was like kitty junk-food. Feeling guilty, when the Whiskas ran
>>>>>out I switched to IAMS ProActive Health with Chicken (IAMS is
>>>>>"premium", correct?). I think they only eat this stuff because they're
>>>>>hungry, it's only been a week. Caesar will sniff the bowl of food and
>>>>>then proceed to "bury" it by going through the scratching motions on
>>>>>the floor and walls. They have rubber claw covers so I'm not too
>>>>>concerned with the scratching.
>>>>>
>>>>>Within a day after switching to the IAMS food Caesar had diarrhea (BTW
>>>>>not cool for a cat with his coat) but it only lasted 3 days. He still
>>>>>tries to bury that food every time he walks by, but will eat it
>>>>>reluctantly.
>>>>>Xerxes on the other hand has started showing signs of a urinary
>>>>>infection - I'm finding puddles. (Caesar likes to go outside, puddles
>>>>>have shown up while he's out). Her litter box quickly took on an
>>>>>incredibly powerful odor of ammonia, the kind of smell that can cut
>>>>>glass and curls your teeth.
>>>>>
>>>>>So last night I bought the Whiskas again and switched litter (it was
>>>>>corn based, now it's recycled paper pellets). They both seemed VERY
>>>>>happy about the change, ate ALL the food and promptly took turns using
>>>>>the litter box. I'll find out later today if Xerxes left another
>>>>>surprise, I'm really hoping she just didn't want to melt her skin
>>>>>using the smelly litter.
>>>>>
>>>>>What do you guys think? Did the switch to IAMS annoy my cats or did it
>>>>>actually cause problems?
>>>>
>>>>D) None of the above.
>>>>
>>>>And if they have urinary issues, get the cat to a vet to rule out a
>>>>medial reason like an infection.
>>>>
>>>>http://catinfo.org/
>>>>
>>>>Don't feed them dry food except as a treat. It's easy for you and
>>>>mostly bad for them. Wet food is smelly and has to be disposed of
>>>>fairly quickly and is generally a PITA to deal with. It's also what
>>>>they should be eating. So what's more important, your convenience or
>>>>their health?
>>>>
>>>>More expensive food does tend to be better. Supermarket brands like
>>>>Friskees and 9-Lives (and yes, IAMS which once was a good brand) are
>>>>pretty much junk but many cats do ok with them. My four cats mostly
>>>>eat Weruba, BFF, or something PETCO sells called Soulistic. That's
>>>>because one of my cats really only likes the very liquidy stuff and
>>>>those brands have lots of liquidy food.
>>>>
>>>>Other good brands are Wellness, Merrick, Blue Buffalo, etc. The stuff
>>>>you find in good pet stores.
>>>>
>>>>What you can afford is important. If you can't afford Weruva or the
>>>>others, get the 9Lives and Friskees. But get them off dry food or
>>>>you'll probably make up the difference in vet bills sooner or later.
>>>
>>>
>>>See my response, further down.
>>>
>>>And: BITE ME!!!
>>
>>
>>Yes, some cats do fine eating dry food all their lives. But that is
>>anecdotal, not any kind of evidence. Vets, who deal with lots and lots
>>of cats, say to use wet food. Did you bother reading the link and
>>seeing whether the information makes sense?
>
>**** NO.
>
>I listen to MY veterinarian.

Your vet recommends dry food? That is sort of unusual. Do read the
link though rather than just reject it unseen.

dgk
June 10th 11, 02:50 PM
On Thu, 09 Jun 2011 20:46:17 -0400, Wayne Mitchell
> wrote:

> dgk > wrote:
>
>>Yes, some cats do fine eating dry food all their lives. But that is
>>anecdotal, not any kind of evidence. Vets, who deal with lots and lots
>>of cats, say to use wet food.
>
>Some vets may say that; others will say the opposite. Neither group
>will have any scientific basis for their recommendation. It's *all*
>anecdotal.

It should be easy. Vets see lots of cats. Find out what the cats are
fed and what types of problems they have. Puff, instant study.

I generally think that animals (including us) should eat what we
evolved to eat. Since I'm not going to give my cats fresh rodents, I'm
going with what is closest.

Damn, this probably means that I can't eat at Taco Bell.

Wayne Mitchell
June 10th 11, 06:25 PM
dgk > wrote:

>It should be easy. Vets see lots of cats. Find out what the cats are
>fed and what types of problems they have. Puff, instant study.

But vets don't keep the necessary records for such a study, and will
only begin to do so if they are paid. So first we have to find someone
who is willing to fund the study. And it will have to be someone with
deep pockets because the study will not only have to be many years long,
it will also have to be very large in order to produce statistically
significant differences. Any differences are likely to be pretty
marginal.
--

Wayne M.

at
June 11th 11, 02:58 AM
On Thu, 09 Jun 2011 20:46:17 -0400, Wayne Mitchell
> wrote:

> dgk > wrote:
>
>>Yes, some cats do fine eating dry food all their lives. But that is
>>anecdotal, not any kind of evidence. Vets, who deal with lots and lots
>>of cats, say to use wet food.
>
>Some vets may say that; others will say the opposite. Neither group
>will have any scientific basis for their recommendation. It's *all*
>anecdotal.


Ding Ding Ding: we HAVE a winner!

There has NEVER BEEN a SCIENTIFICALLY CONTROLLED comparison of dry vs.
canned cat food.

It would require a LOT of cats (hundreds), for their ENTIRE lifetime.

Nobody is EVER going to pay for such a scientifically controlled study.

So the 'canned food zealots' point to 'articles', written by PROPONENTS
of canned cat food, that contain NO SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE WHATSOEVER as
their 'proof'.

If it wasn't so pathetic, it would be amusing.

at
June 11th 11, 03:05 AM
On Fri, 10 Jun 2011 09:50:53 -0400, dgk > wrote:

>On Thu, 09 Jun 2011 20:46:17 -0400, Wayne Mitchell
> wrote:
>
>> dgk > wrote:
>>
>>>Yes, some cats do fine eating dry food all their lives. But that is
>>>anecdotal, not any kind of evidence. Vets, who deal with lots and lots
>>>of cats, say to use wet food.
>>
>>Some vets may say that; others will say the opposite. Neither group
>>will have any scientific basis for their recommendation. It's *all*
>>anecdotal.
>
>It should be easy. Vets see lots of cats. Find out what the cats are
>fed and what types of problems they have. Puff, instant study.

Limited number of cats, and NOT scientifically controlled. Therefore,
totally worthless.

Look up 'scientifically controlled study'.

You REALLY need to read up on it, as OBVIOUSLY, you have not the
slightest CONCEPT of what makes a study valid, from a scientific
standpoint.

>
>I generally think that animals (including us) should eat what we
>evolved to eat. Since I'm not going to give my cats fresh rodents, I'm
>going with what is closest.
>
>Damn, this probably means that I can't eat at Taco Bell.

dgk
June 13th 11, 04:20 PM
On Sat, 11 Jun 2011 01:58:19 GMT, Gandalf ingold1234(AT)yahoo(DOT)com
(Gandalf) wrote:

>On Thu, 09 Jun 2011 20:46:17 -0400, Wayne Mitchell
> wrote:
>
>> dgk > wrote:
>>
>>>Yes, some cats do fine eating dry food all their lives. But that is
>>>anecdotal, not any kind of evidence. Vets, who deal with lots and lots
>>>of cats, say to use wet food.
>>
>>Some vets may say that; others will say the opposite. Neither group
>>will have any scientific basis for their recommendation. It's *all*
>>anecdotal.
>
>
>Ding Ding Ding: we HAVE a winner!
>
>There has NEVER BEEN a SCIENTIFICALLY CONTROLLED comparison of dry vs.
>canned cat food.
>
>It would require a LOT of cats (hundreds), for their ENTIRE lifetime.
>
>Nobody is EVER going to pay for such a scientifically controlled study.
>
>So the 'canned food zealots' point to 'articles', written by PROPONENTS
>of canned cat food, that contain NO SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE WHATSOEVER as
>their 'proof'.
>
>If it wasn't so pathetic, it would be amusing.

After Espy had a (very expensive) urinary blockage, the discharge
instructions said very clearly, NO DRY FOOD. These are the specialty
vets, all specialists in various areas. They see a lot of cats and
take very thorough histories. I think they might have some insight
into what contributes to various illnesses.

So, I follow their advice.

Phil P.
June 14th 11, 08:35 PM
"Wayne Mitchell" > wrote in message
...
> dgk > wrote:
>
> >Yes, some cats do fine eating dry food all their lives. But that is
> >anecdotal, not any kind of evidence. Vets, who deal with lots and lots
> >of cats, say to use wet food.
>
> Some vets may say that; others will say the opposite. Neither group
> will have any scientific basis for their recommendation. It's *all*
> anecdotal.
> --

Actually, there was a study that associated feline interstitial cystitis
with dry food:


J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997 Jan 1;210(1):46-50

Clinical evaluation of cats with nonobstructive urinary tract diseases.


Buffington CA, Chew DJ, Kendall MS, Scrivani PV, Thompson SB, Blaisdell JL,
Woodworth BE

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine,
Ohio State University, Columbus 43210, USA.

"OBJECTIVE: To identify the underlying cause of clinical signs in cats with
nonobstructive diseases of the bladder and urethra.

DESIGN: Prospective case series.

SAMPLE POPULATION: 109 cats examined by the urology service of The Ohio
State University's veterinary teaching hospital because of stranguria,
hematuria, pollakiuria, or urination in inappropriate locations.

PROCEDURE: History was obtained and a CBC, serum biochemical
analyses, serologic tests for FeLV and feline immunodeficiency virus,
urinalysis, bacterial culture of urine, and contrast radiography or
urethrocystoscopy (females only) were performed.

RESULTS: 16 cats had cystic calculi: 8 had struvite uroliths, 7 had calcium
oxalate uroliths, and 1 had a urolith of unknown composition in conjunction
with an anatomic defect. Anatomic defects, including diverticulae, urethral
strictures, and a malpositioned urethra, were identified in 12 cats. A
urinary tract infection was identified in 1 cat, and neoplasia was diagnosed
in 2. One of the cats with neoplasia also had a struvite urolith. The
remaining 80 cats did not have an
anatomic defect, urolith, or tumor. Ten of these cats also did not have
radiographic orcystoscopic abnormalities and were presumed to have a
behavioral disorder. The remaining 70 cats had radiographic or cystoscopic
abnormalities, and idiopathic cystitis was diagnosed. In 14 of the cats
with
idiopathic cystitis, results of a urinalysis were normal. Cats with
idiopathic cystitis were significantly more likely to eat dry food
exclusively (59%) than were cats in the general population (19%).

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Results suggest that idiopathic cystitis occurs
commonly in cats with stranguria, hematuria, pollakiuria, or inappropriate
elimination and is associated with consumption of dry foods. Contrast
radiography or cystoscopy is necessary for differentiating idiopathic
cystitis from behavioral disorders in some cats."

As with diabetes, dry food may not cause feline interstitial cystitis, but
it could unmask or aggravate the disorder in cats that are predisposed to
it - as certainly seems to be the case with Meep.