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View Full Version : Can Canaural Ear Drops be used to treat inflamed / infected chin?


Cat Guy
June 14th 11, 12:44 AM
The ingredients in Canaural Ear Drops seems ideal for most types of skin
irritations like moderate to severe chin acne in cats.

Does anyone know any reason why it can't or should be used for such a
purpose?

Diethanolamine Fusidate 5 mg
Framycetin Sulphate 5 mg
Nystatin 100,000 i.u.
Prednisolone 2.5 mg

Matthew[_3_]
June 14th 11, 01:12 AM
"Cat Guy" > wrote in message ...
> The ingredients in Canaural Ear Drops seems ideal for most types of skin
> irritations like moderate to severe chin acne in cats.
>
> Does anyone know any reason why it can't or should be used for such a
> purpose?
>
> Diethanolamine Fusidate 5 mg
> Framycetin Sulphate 5 mg
> Nystatin 100,000 i.u.
> Prednisolone 2.5 mg


due to the fact that human drugs can interact with Feline anatomy to the
point or allergic reaction. Never give medicine to a cat with out a vet
approval



What does chin acne look like?
Feline chin acne is a common skin condition in cats. It can appear at any
age, any gender, it may wax and wane, or be stubbornly hard to treat. Signs
range from barely noticeable comedomes (blackheads) to severely inflamed and
draining pustules. Some cats are not seemingly bothered, and some are very
itchy and painful. Local hair loss and redness are also common.

What causes chin acne?
The short answer is "unknown cause." There are several possible contributing
factors:

a.. stress
b.. poor grooming
c.. bacterial overload (I.e. from dirty food bowls)
d.. abnormal sebum (oily substance) production
e.. contact sensitivity/dermatitis
f.. suppressed immune system
g.. concurrent infection or disease
Plastic food bowls were once considered a possible culprit for causing
feline acne (allergic or contact sensitivity), but it is now thought that
the bacterial levels found on plastic dishes may be the real problem. Using
glass, metal or ceramic dishes will help, as will frequent washing of the
dishes.

How is chin acne diagnosed?
Many times the diagnosis is by your vet's examination. Your vet will also
want to rule out other possibilities, such as mites (demodex), fungal and
bacterial infections (primary or secondary), fleas and assess general
overall health.

Testing methods include fungal and bacterial cultures, skin scrapings, and
possibly a skin biopsy in severe cases.


How is chin acne treated?
Chin acne is usually "managed" rather than cured. Home treatments include
gentle washing of the chin once or twice daily with a mild soap, benzoyl
peroxide or other cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. For pustules,
warm water compresses or tea bag compresses will help soothe and heal

Rene[_2_]
June 14th 11, 07:47 PM
IMO, I would not take the chance. Our oldest has had recurrent chin
acne, and my preferred treatment for mild acne is using Hibiclens
(http://www.hibiclens.com/) once per day.

For moderate to severe acne, contact your vet. There are topical
treatments available that work well. Use them sparingly, however--they
can be drying to skin. I usually start out applying once per day, then
taper to every other day, every third day, etc until gone.

If your cat develops a pustule, watch him/her carefully. Our oldest
developed an infection and needed antibiotics.

Rene

Cat Guy
June 16th 11, 04:00 PM
Matthew wrote:

> > The ingredients in Canaural Ear Drops seems ideal for most types
> > of skin irritations like moderate to severe chin acne in cats.
>
> due to the fact that human drugs can interact with Feline anatomy

Where did I say that Canaural is a human drug?

It's not. We have some because it was prescribed by a vet to be used on
a cat with mites and associated infection in the ear (as seen by visual
inspection).

If you do a google search for canaural, you'll see that it's only use is
for treating the ears of cats and dogs.

Cat Guy
June 16th 11, 04:03 PM
Rene wrote:

> If your cat develops a pustule, watch him/her carefully. Our oldest
> developed an infection and needed antibiotics.

We have some left-over prednisone and antibiotics for another cat we
had, so we're giving that to this cat (with the chin acne).

He's an old cat, and we give him a 5 or 7-day course of prednisone maybe
every 4 to 6 weeks and it really seems to perk him up and make his mood
better. This is also probably helping his chin acne.

I'm just wondering about the canaural, as it seems to be an ideal
topical medication for chin acne as well.

Matthew[_3_]
June 16th 11, 04:22 PM
"Cat Guy" > wrote in message ...
> Matthew wrote:
>
>> > The ingredients in Canaural Ear Drops seems ideal for most types
>> > of skin irritations like moderate to severe chin acne in cats.
>>
>> due to the fact that human drugs can interact with Feline anatomy
>
> Where did I say that Canaural is a human drug?
>
> It's not. We have some because it was prescribed by a vet to be used on
> a cat with mites and associated infection in the ear (as seen by visual
> inspection).
>
> If you do a google search for canaural, you'll see that it's only use is
> for treating the ears of cats and dogs.


Ok here is a fact DID YOUR VET TELL YOU TO USE IT If not than DON'T

Rene[_2_]
June 16th 11, 04:52 PM
> We have some left-over prednisone and antibiotics for another cat we
> had, so we're giving that to this cat (with the chin acne).
>
> He's an old cat, and we give him a 5 or 7-day course of prednisone maybe
> every 4 to 6 weeks and it really seems to perk him up and make his mood
> better. *This is also probably helping his chin acne.
>
> I'm just wondering about the canaural, as it seems to be an ideal
> topical medication for chin acne as well.

You're giving this cat regular prednisone for chin acne, or something
else? I'm not a fan of using pred on cats unless it's absolutely
necessary, and then for the shortest duration possible. IMO I would
use the Hibiclens a couple of times a week as a preventative and not
use the pred.

Please call your vet and ask about the canaural before using it,
especially if this is an older cat.

Rene

Phil P.
June 17th 11, 07:47 AM
"Cat Guy" > wrote in message ...

>
> We have some left-over prednisone and antibiotics for another cat we
> had, so we're giving that to this cat (with the chin acne).
>
> He's an old cat, and we give him a 5 or 7-day course of prednisone maybe
> every 4 to 6 weeks and it really seems to perk him up and make his mood
> better. This is also probably helping his chin acne.

First of all, you shouldn't be giving your cat predisone for chin acne- or
anything else without consulting a vet first. Its not helping his chin
acne. More importantly, prednisone should *never* be discontinued abruptly -
the doses should be tapered. Prednisone suppresses the
hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and can cause adrenal insufficiency that
could lead to death if the cat is stressed. If your cat's on prednisone
now - ask your vet how to taper your cat off the prednisone. I doubt he'll
charge you.



> I'm just wondering about the canaural, as it seems to be an ideal
> topical medication for chin acne as well.

Forget about canaural - its likely to cause more problems than the acne
itself.

Cats have a lot of sebaceous glands in their chin - that's what they use to
mark. Sometimes, the ducts become plugged. Uses warm damp (Epsom salt)
compresses to help open up the ducts and draw out sebum and bacteria. Clean
the chin with a phytosphingosine antimicrobial shampoo - (I recommend Douxo
Chlorhexidine PS Shampoo) followed by a topical (Douxo Seborrhea Spot On is
an excellent choice). If there's no infection, keep the chin and area around
the mouth clean with just plain warm water or warm saline.

jmc[_4_]
June 18th 11, 03:32 AM
On 6/17/11 12:47 AM, Phil P. wrote:
> "Cat > wrote in message ...
>
>>
>> We have some left-over prednisone and antibiotics for another cat we
>> had, so we're giving that to this cat (with the chin acne).
>>
>> He's an old cat, and we give him a 5 or 7-day course of prednisone maybe
>> every 4 to 6 weeks and it really seems to perk him up and make his mood
>> better. This is also probably helping his chin acne.
>
> First of all, you shouldn't be giving your cat predisone for chin acne- or
> anything else without consulting a vet first. Its not helping his chin
> acne. More importantly, prednisone should *never* be discontinued abruptly -
> the doses should be tapered. Prednisone suppresses the
> hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and can cause adrenal insufficiency that
> could lead to death if the cat is stressed. If your cat's on prednisone
> now - ask your vet how to taper your cat off the prednisone. I doubt he'll
> charge you.
>
>
>
>> I'm just wondering about the canaural, as it seems to be an ideal
>> topical medication for chin acne as well.
>
> Forget about canaural - its likely to cause more problems than the acne
> itself.
>
> Cats have a lot of sebaceous glands in their chin - that's what they use to
> mark. Sometimes, the ducts become plugged. Uses warm damp (Epsom salt)
> compresses to help open up the ducts and draw out sebum and bacteria. Clean
> the chin with a phytosphingosine antimicrobial shampoo - (I recommend Douxo
> Chlorhexidine PS Shampoo) followed by a topical (Douxo Seborrhea Spot On is
> an excellent choice). If there's no infection, keep the chin and area around
> the mouth clean with just plain warm water or warm saline.
>
>
>
>

In addition to Phil's excellent advice, if your cat's food and water
bowls are plastic, consider changing to metal or ceramic. I heard this
advice years ago when Meep was having an acne problem, and for whatever
reason, it worked, her acne cleared up.

jmc

MaryL[_2_]
June 19th 11, 05:11 PM
"Cat Guy" wrote in message ...

Rene wrote:

> If your cat develops a pustule, watch him/her carefully. Our oldest
> developed an infection and needed antibiotics.

We have some left-over prednisone and antibiotics for another cat we
had, so we're giving that to this cat (with the chin acne).

He's an old cat, and we give him a 5 or 7-day course of prednisone maybe
every 4 to 6 weeks and it really seems to perk him up and make his mood
better. This is also probably helping his chin acne.

I'm just wondering about the canaural, as it seems to be an ideal
topical medication for chin acne as well.

- - - - - - - - - - -
No, no, no!

First, prednisone should not be used casually. It has both short-term and
long-term side effects, so it should only be used under direction of a vet
for very specific conditions. Second, prednisolone is preferred for cats
(not prednisone). Prednisone is converted to prednisolone in a cat's liver,
but research indicates that cats may be unable to effectively convert
prednisone to prednisolone.

MaryL