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KeksMom
July 8th 11, 07:14 PM
My twelve year old cat, Kek, has been struggling with some kind of upper respiratory problem since February. We have previously had diagnoses of bronchitis, a simple cold, a bacterial infection, and a collapsed trachea. None of these has been medically confrimed and no medications seem to help with the exception of steriods, which only seem to make her feel better for 2-3 days.

Things got really bad mid-May and she stopped eating. We syringe fed her for a month and then put in an esophogeal feeding tube that we have been using for the past two and a half weeks. We have also relocated to a new state in the past week and I took her to a new vet this morning. He did x-rays and believes that she has a tumor in her left sinus passage. She also seems to be having vision issues on that side. (Since the beginning that has been the side with all the symptoms: the runny nose, watery eye, and dirty ear.) He says that one option is to biposy the mass, which will require removing a piece of bone from her face which is relatively risky in itself. The vet said that he is more than willing to do this, but seemed to allude that hospice care was a more preferable option. My husband and I agree with this. But here is where we aren't su Should we go ahead and put her to sleep now, or try another round of steriods?

Before our move, Kek was still showing signs of enjoying life: sunning herself, coming to us for love and attention. But since the move (last week), she hasn't been herself. She has completely lost her spark. She seems completely uninterested in everything. Sometimes she meow-growls when I pick her up or try to pet her. And she has been going to the bathroom everywhere but her litter box (although I have caught her sleeping in it). My husband thinks that it is time and that giving her another round of steriods is just prolonging the inevitable. I think that another round of steriods might give her a couple more good days.

Any thoughts or advice are welcome.

cshenk
July 8th 11, 11:32 PM
KeksMom wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav:

>
> My twelve year old cat, Kek, has been struggling with some kind of
> upper respiratory problem since February. We have previously had
> diagnoses of bronchitis, a simple cold, a bacterial infection, and a
> collapsed trachea. None of these has been medically confrimed and no
> medications seem to help with the exception of steriods, which only
> seem to make her feel better for 2-3 days.
>
> Things got really bad mid-May and she stopped eating. We syringe fed
> her for a month and then put in an esophogeal feeding tube that we
> have been using for the past two and a half weeks. We have also
> relocated to a new state in the past week and I took her to a new vet
> this morning. He did x-rays and believes that she has a tumor in her
> left sinus passage. She also seems to be having vision issues on that
> side. (Since the beginning that has been the side with all the
> symptoms: the runny nose, watery eye, and dirty ear.) He says that
> one option is to biposy the mass, which will require removing a piece
> of bone from her face which is relatively risky in itself. The vet
> said that he is more than willing to do this, but seemed to allude
> that hospice care was a more preferable option. My husband and I
> agree with this. But here is where we aren't su Should we go ahead
> and put her to sleep now, or try another round of steriods?
>
> Before our move, Kek was still showing signs of enjoying life: sunning
> herself, coming to us for love and attention. But since the move (last
> week), she hasn't been herself. She has completely lost her spark. She
> seems completely uninterested in everything. Sometimes she meow-growls
> when I pick her up or try to pet her. And she has been going to the
> bathroom everywhere but her litter box (although I have caught her
> sleeping in it). My husband thinks that it is time and that giving her
> another round of steriods is just prolonging the inevitable. I think
> that another round of steriods might give her a couple more good
> days.
>
> Any thoughts or advice are welcome.

I am so sorry to hear this.

It is always sad when a loved pet is in travail, but it seems you've
done all that is reasonable and beyond what some would do with the
feeding tube.

I am sure your vet did many tests already on liver and kidney function
as well as any possible infections of the bladder etc.

I hate to say it but have a long talk with your vet. It sounds like it
is time to assist her over the bridge. Waiting too long may make *you*
feel better those extra days, but will haunt you forever after. You
aren't being selfish to wish her a few good days, but there may not be
any.

Let us know how it goes for you ok?

--

Michael Lane
July 9th 11, 03:46 PM
She may be missing the home place + other things.DO NOT PUT HER DOWN,
GIVE HER TIME , PLEASE



michael lane
n Tennessee
































**
**

cshenk
July 9th 11, 07:17 PM
Michael Lane wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav:

> She may be missing the home place + other things.DO NOT PUT HER DOWN,
> GIVE HER TIME , PLEASE

Did you miss that her condition is so bad, they had to install a
feeding tube even before the move?

There is a time and a place to let go. From all that has been posted,
my advice is to talk to the vet about it. This is a medical issues cat
before the move. She may be suffering badly and faltering on
'presenting a stiff upper lip' about it at last.

I wish Michael well and his lady cat.

Bill Graham
July 10th 11, 11:20 PM
cshenk wrote:
> Michael Lane wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav:
>
>> She may be missing the home place + other things.DO NOT PUT HER DOWN,
>> GIVE HER TIME , PLEASE
>
> Did you miss that her condition is so bad, they had to install a
> feeding tube even before the move?
>
> There is a time and a place to let go. From all that has been posted,
> my advice is to talk to the vet about it. This is a medical issues
> cat before the move. She may be suffering badly and faltering on
> 'presenting a stiff upper lip' about it at last.
>
> I wish Michael well and his lady cat.

I too, wish him well. It is very sad to see a cat suffer. By the way, today,
a dog that I almost nefver see because he lives several houses away, down
the block, came into my house. (The whether is nice, and I had the front
door open. He paid no attention to me, but sniffed over the whole street
level floor of my house, and then went out and lay down on the front door
mat for about 10 minutes, and then went back hjome. My B-K died on that
front door mat last month on the 10th. I knew immediately what he was doing.
He had traced B-K back home, and was wondering where he was. He sniffed over
the house looking for him, found his smell was strongest on the doormat;
Stayed there for a while, and then left. I wish I could have told him what
happened to his friend, and that he would never be back, but I couldn't.
Perhaps he could tell from the smell that B-K died there. I will never know.
I don't know how much animals understand about death. But I accepted that
dog's actions as a memorial for my beloved cat.

MLB[_4_]
July 11th 11, 12:01 AM
On 07/10/2011 04:20 PM, Bill Graham wrote:
> cshenk wrote:
>> Michael Lane wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav:
>>
>>> She may be missing the home place + other things.DO NOT PUT HER DOWN,
>>> GIVE HER TIME , PLEASE
>>
>> Did you miss that her condition is so bad, they had to install a
>> feeding tube even before the move?
>>
>> There is a time and a place to let go. From all that has been posted,
>> my advice is to talk to the vet about it. This is a medical issues
>> cat before the move. She may be suffering badly and faltering on
>> 'presenting a stiff upper lip' about it at last.
>>
>> I wish Michael well and his lady cat.
>
> I too, wish him well. It is very sad to see a cat suffer. By the way,
> today, a dog that I almost nefver see because he lives several houses
> away, down the block, came into my house. (The whether is nice, and I
> had the front door open. He paid no attention to me, but sniffed over
> the whole street level floor of my house, and then went out and lay down
> on the front door mat for about 10 minutes, and then went back hjome. My
> B-K died on that front door mat last month on the 10th. I knew
> immediately what he was doing. He had traced B-K back home, and was
> wondering where he was. He sniffed over the house looking for him, found
> his smell was strongest on the doormat; Stayed there for a while, and
> then left. I wish I could have told him what happened to his friend, and
> that he would never be back, but I couldn't. Perhaps he could tell from
> the smell that B-K died there. I will never know. I don't know how much
> animals understand about death. But I accepted that dog's actions as a
> memorial for my beloved cat.



That is a sad little story. MLB

cshenk
July 11th 11, 09:16 PM
Bill Graham wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav:

> cshenk wrote:
> > Michael Lane wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav:
> >
> > > She may be missing the home place + other things.DO NOT PUT HER
> > > DOWN, GIVE HER TIME , PLEASE
> >
> > Did you miss that her condition is so bad, they had to install a
> > feeding tube even before the move?
> >
> > There is a time and a place to let go. From all that has been
> > posted, my advice is to talk to the vet about it. This is a
> > medical issues cat before the move. She may be suffering badly and
> > faltering on 'presenting a stiff upper lip' about it at last.
> >
> > I wish Michael well and his lady cat.
>
> I too, wish him well. It is very sad to see a cat suffer. By the way,
> today, a dog that I almost nefver see because he lives several houses
> away, down the block, came into my house. (The whether is nice, and I
> had the front door open. He paid no attention to me, but sniffed over
> the whole street level floor of my house, and then went out and lay
> down on the front door mat for about 10 minutes, and then went back
> hjome. My B-K died on that front door mat last month on the 10th. I
> knew immediately what he was doing. He had traced B-K back home, and
> was wondering where he was. He sniffed over the house looking for
> him, found his smell was strongest on the doormat; Stayed there for a
> while, and then left. I wish I could have told him what happened to
> his friend, and that he would never be back, but I couldn't. Perhaps
> he could tell from the smell that B-K died there. I will never know.
> I don't know how much animals understand about death. But I accepted
> that dog's actions as a memorial for my beloved cat.

Sorry to hear that your little 4foot has passed on. I lost 'Unca
Sammy' less than a year ago. His brave heart was a joy. He came to us
age 17 (dog, very elderly, similar to a 28 year old cat I imagine).

His passing was peaceful and we were to the vets several times with him
as he started to fail. He was in no pain other than his normal
arhtritis he'd had for close to 10 years (tramadol tucked in a
fingerling fish 3 times a day made him feel fine).

Smile, I am an odd one. I rescue elderly medical issues pets to a
final home. Dogs and cats. I have 1 cat and 2 dogs now. They will
probably be here for many years though Aunti Mabel (dog) came to us age
14 just this past Thanksgiving. Extremely healthy for her age, my vet
says she's the oldest currently at her practice and looks like she's
another 3 years of love and lickifications in her.

--

Bill Graham
July 13th 11, 08:58 PM
cshenk wrote:
> Bill Graham wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav:
>
>> cshenk wrote:
>>> Michael Lane wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav:
>>>
>>>> She may be missing the home place + other things.DO NOT PUT HER
>>>> DOWN, GIVE HER TIME , PLEASE
>>>
>>> Did you miss that her condition is so bad, they had to install a
>>> feeding tube even before the move?
>>>
>>> There is a time and a place to let go. From all that has been
>>> posted, my advice is to talk to the vet about it. This is a
>>> medical issues cat before the move. She may be suffering badly and
>>> faltering on 'presenting a stiff upper lip' about it at last.
>>>
>>> I wish Michael well and his lady cat.
>>
>> I too, wish him well. It is very sad to see a cat suffer. By the way,
>> today, a dog that I almost nefver see because he lives several houses
>> away, down the block, came into my house. (The whether is nice, and I
>> had the front door open. He paid no attention to me, but sniffed over
>> the whole street level floor of my house, and then went out and lay
>> down on the front door mat for about 10 minutes, and then went back
>> hjome. My B-K died on that front door mat last month on the 10th. I
>> knew immediately what he was doing. He had traced B-K back home, and
>> was wondering where he was. He sniffed over the house looking for
>> him, found his smell was strongest on the doormat; Stayed there for a
>> while, and then left. I wish I could have told him what happened to
>> his friend, and that he would never be back, but I couldn't. Perhaps
>> he could tell from the smell that B-K died there. I will never know.
>> I don't know how much animals understand about death. But I accepted
>> that dog's actions as a memorial for my beloved cat.
>
> Sorry to hear that your little 4foot has passed on. I lost 'Unca
> Sammy' less than a year ago. His brave heart was a joy. He came to
> us age 17 (dog, very elderly, similar to a 28 year old cat I imagine).
>
> His passing was peaceful and we were to the vets several times with
> him as he started to fail. He was in no pain other than his normal
> arhtritis he'd had for close to 10 years (tramadol tucked in a
> fingerling fish 3 times a day made him feel fine).
>
> Smile, I am an odd one. I rescue elderly medical issues pets to a
> final home. Dogs and cats. I have 1 cat and 2 dogs now. They will
> probably be here for many years though Aunti Mabel (dog) came to us
> age 14 just this past Thanksgiving. Extremely healthy for her age,
> my vet says she's the oldest currently at her practice and looks like
> she's another 3 years of love and lickifications in her.

That is a wonderful thing you do for the animals. The older I get, the more
I wish that I could have done the same kind of thing. But most people, like
me, are too concerned with themselves,and their other hobbies. I am still
trying to decide if I should get another cat. I already have four others,
and there will never be another cat like B-K, so I don't think I will. I
used to wish that he would die before me, because I didn't want him to think
that I had left without taking him with me. Now, I am sorry that I wished
for that. - Be careful what you wish for......

dgk
July 14th 11, 04:25 PM
On Wed, 13 Jul 2011 12:58:38 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
wrote:

>cshenk wrote:
>> Bill Graham wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav:
>>
>>> cshenk wrote:
>>>> Michael Lane wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav:
>>>>
>>>>> She may be missing the home place + other things.DO NOT PUT HER
>>>>> DOWN, GIVE HER TIME , PLEASE
>>>>
>>>> Did you miss that her condition is so bad, they had to install a
>>>> feeding tube even before the move?
>>>>
>>>> There is a time and a place to let go. From all that has been
>>>> posted, my advice is to talk to the vet about it. This is a
>>>> medical issues cat before the move. She may be suffering badly and
>>>> faltering on 'presenting a stiff upper lip' about it at last.
>>>>
>>>> I wish Michael well and his lady cat.
>>>
>>> I too, wish him well. It is very sad to see a cat suffer. By the way,
>>> today, a dog that I almost nefver see because he lives several houses
>>> away, down the block, came into my house. (The whether is nice, and I
>>> had the front door open. He paid no attention to me, but sniffed over
>>> the whole street level floor of my house, and then went out and lay
>>> down on the front door mat for about 10 minutes, and then went back
>>> hjome. My B-K died on that front door mat last month on the 10th. I
>>> knew immediately what he was doing. He had traced B-K back home, and
>>> was wondering where he was. He sniffed over the house looking for
>>> him, found his smell was strongest on the doormat; Stayed there for a
>>> while, and then left. I wish I could have told him what happened to
>>> his friend, and that he would never be back, but I couldn't. Perhaps
>>> he could tell from the smell that B-K died there. I will never know.
>>> I don't know how much animals understand about death. But I accepted
>>> that dog's actions as a memorial for my beloved cat.
>>
>> Sorry to hear that your little 4foot has passed on. I lost 'Unca
>> Sammy' less than a year ago. His brave heart was a joy. He came to
>> us age 17 (dog, very elderly, similar to a 28 year old cat I imagine).
>>
>> His passing was peaceful and we were to the vets several times with
>> him as he started to fail. He was in no pain other than his normal
>> arhtritis he'd had for close to 10 years (tramadol tucked in a
>> fingerling fish 3 times a day made him feel fine).
>>
>> Smile, I am an odd one. I rescue elderly medical issues pets to a
>> final home. Dogs and cats. I have 1 cat and 2 dogs now. They will
>> probably be here for many years though Aunti Mabel (dog) came to us
>> age 14 just this past Thanksgiving. Extremely healthy for her age,
>> my vet says she's the oldest currently at her practice and looks like
>> she's another 3 years of love and lickifications in her.
>
>That is a wonderful thing you do for the animals. The older I get, the more
>I wish that I could have done the same kind of thing. But most people, like
>me, are too concerned with themselves,and their other hobbies. I am still
>trying to decide if I should get another cat. I already have four others,
>and there will never be another cat like B-K, so I don't think I will. I
>used to wish that he would die before me, because I didn't want him to think
>that I had left without taking him with me. Now, I am sorry that I wished
>for that. - Be careful what you wish for......

Either ending is no good, but I worry greatly about what will happen
to my cats when I die. I'd best get that Will done.

cshenk
July 15th 11, 12:50 AM
Bill Graham wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav:

> cshenk wrote:
> > Bill Graham wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav:
> >
> > > cshenk wrote:
> > > > Michael Lane wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav:
> > > >
> > > > > She may be missing the home place + other things.DO NOT PUT
> > > > > HER DOWN, GIVE HER TIME , PLEASE
> > > >
> > > > Did you miss that her condition is so bad, they had to install a
> > > > feeding tube even before the move?
> > > >
> > > > There is a time and a place to let go. From all that has been
> > > > posted, my advice is to talk to the vet about it. This is a
> > > > medical issues cat before the move. She may be suffering badly
> > > > and faltering on 'presenting a stiff upper lip' about it at
> > > > last.
> > > >
> > > > I wish Michael well and his lady cat.
> > >
> > > I too, wish him well. It is very sad to see a cat suffer. By the
> > > way, today, a dog that I almost nefver see because he lives
> > > several houses away, down the block, came into my house. (The
> > > whether is nice, and I had the front door open. He paid no
> > > attention to me, but sniffed over the whole street level floor of
> > > my house, and then went out and lay down on the front door mat
> > > for about 10 minutes, and then went back hjome. My B-K died on
> > > that front door mat last month on the 10th. I knew immediately
> > > what he was doing. He had traced B-K back home, and was wondering
> > > where he was. He sniffed over the house looking for him, found
> > > his smell was strongest on the doormat; Stayed there for a while,
> > > and then left. I wish I could have told him what happened to his
> > > friend, and that he would never be back, but I couldn't. Perhaps
> > > he could tell from the smell that B-K died there. I will never
> > > know. I don't know how much animals understand about death. But
> > > I accepted that dog's actions as a memorial for my beloved cat.
> >
> > Sorry to hear that your little 4foot has passed on. I lost 'Unca
> > Sammy' less than a year ago. His brave heart was a joy. He came to
> > us age 17 (dog, very elderly, similar to a 28 year old cat I
> > imagine).
> >
> > His passing was peaceful and we were to the vets several times with
> > him as he started to fail. He was in no pain other than his normal
> > arhtritis he'd had for close to 10 years (tramadol tucked in a
> > fingerling fish 3 times a day made him feel fine).
> >
> > Smile, I am an odd one. I rescue elderly medical issues pets to a
> > final home. Dogs and cats. I have 1 cat and 2 dogs now. They will
> > probably be here for many years though Aunti Mabel (dog) came to us
> > age 14 just this past Thanksgiving. Extremely healthy for her age,
> > my vet says she's the oldest currently at her practice and looks
> > like she's another 3 years of love and lickifications in her.
>
> That is a wonderful thing you do for the animals. The older I get,
> the more I wish that I could have done the same kind of thing. But
> most people, like me, are too concerned with themselves,and their
> other hobbies. I am still trying to decide if I should get another
> cat. I already have four others, and there will never be another cat
> like B-K, so I don't think I will. I used to wish that he would die
> before me, because I didn't want him to think that I had left without
> taking him with me. Now, I am sorry that I wished for that. - Be
> careful what you wish for......

Love you well my friend.

With 4 cats currently, I would not add a 5th just as you say.

I have a cat who selected us. She's got all sorts of social issues
with other cats (true feral, lived wild apparently 6 years). As long
as she lives, I can not add a cat to this house. I made that choice
knowingly and am good with it. She has a personality quirk from some
distant past that makes her love dogs.

Daisy-chan is the exception here among the current 4foots. She has no
medical issues and wasn't that old when we got her.


--

Jo Wolf
July 16th 11, 07:07 AM
I'm a now and then lurker. It's been over 20 years since I've had a
cat.... and I miss their quirky "catness". I do breed rescue with
dogs.... and I teach dog obedience, so I sometimes have to deal with
end-of-pet-life issues with owners. The biggest and only instruction I
give an owner on the subject of "is it time?" is to try to be objective
when answering the following question:

Are you keeping this animal alive for yourself, or because you have
honest reason to believe that the animal's quality of life is likely to
improve to the degree that it is not suffering in any way
(psychologically as well as physically), and it is essentially able to
maintain the basic life functions By Itself.... food and water intake,
management of bodily wastes, interaction within the pack (dogs)/family
(cats), basic mobility? (This is for owners with animals that are aged
and in failing health.... not solely with temperment/aggressiveness
issues of "mental health" causing major liability problems.) If you are
keeping the animal alive for yourself, then it is "time". If the rest
of the question has some "iffies" or some negatives, it's time for that
long conversation with your vet, and some prayer. But unless I feel
that keeping the pet alive is essentially a form of abuse of the pet, I
never flatly say that the time has come.

In the case of this old sweetie using the entire house as a latrine, the
move is probably "at fault", if "fault" can be assigned. Even I know
that many cats just don't adjust to new homes instantly, even with the
same family and household furnishings. Given his state of health,
confining him to a certain area of the home may be kinder at this
point.... and will simplify the sanitation issue, if not solve it.
because his litter box will be easier and quicker to find. I was
surprised that none of you cat owners addressed that. But if he's been
a "clean" cat for many years and now isn't, doesn't that demonstrate one
more heartbreaking area where he just can't maintain his quality of
life?

I hope the higher being that you trust in guides you to the right answer
for you and the old dearie soon. Hugs.

It's never an easy decision to send a pet on ahead, and the hole always
remains in the heart, which is the perfect place to bury that pet, once
a decision to release a pet is carried out.

Jo

cshenk
July 16th 11, 08:17 PM
Jo Wolf wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav:

> I'm a now and then lurker. It's been over 20 years since I've had a
> cat.... and I miss their quirky "catness". I do breed rescue with
> dogs.... and I teach dog obedience, so I sometimes have to deal with
> end-of-pet-life issues with owners. The biggest and only instruction
> I give an owner on the subject of "is it time?" is to try to be
> objective when answering the following question:
>
> Are you keeping this animal alive for yourself, or because you have
> honest reason to believe that the animal's quality of life is likely
> to improve to the degree that it is not suffering in any way
> (psychologically as well as physically), and it is essentially able to
> maintain the basic life functions By Itself.... food and water intake,
> management of bodily wastes, interaction within the pack (dogs)/family
> (cats), basic mobility? (This is for owners with animals that are
> aged and in failing health.... not solely with
> temperment/aggressiveness issues of "mental health" causing major
> liability problems.) If you are keeping the animal alive for
> yourself, then it is "time". If the rest of the question has some
> "iffies" or some negatives, it's time for that long conversation with
> your vet, and some prayer. But unless I feel that keeping the pet
> alive is essentially a form of abuse of the pet, I never flatly say
> that the time has come.
>
> In the case of this old sweetie using the entire house as a latrine,
> the move is probably "at fault", if "fault" can be assigned. Even I
> know that many cats just don't adjust to new homes instantly, even
> with the same family and household furnishings. Given his state of
> health, confining him to a certain area of the home may be kinder at
> this point.... and will simplify the sanitation issue, if not solve
> it. because his litter box will be easier and quicker to find. I was
> surprised that none of you cat owners addressed that. But if he's
> been a "clean" cat for many years and now isn't, doesn't that
> demonstrate one more heartbreaking area where he just can't maintain
> his quality of life?
>
> I hope the higher being that you trust in guides you to the right
> answer for you and the old dearie soon. Hugs.
>
> It's never an easy decision to send a pet on ahead, and the hole
> always remains in the heart, which is the perfect place to bury that
> pet, once a decision to release a pet is carried out.
>
> Jo

Hi Jo! The reason why confining the cat to one room didnt come up is
it works better with dogs but not so much so with cats. They become
either isolated from the family behind a closed door or you have to put
in interior screen doors.

--

dgk
July 19th 11, 02:46 PM
On Sat, 16 Jul 2011 02:07:35 -0400, (Jo Wolf) wrote:

>I'm a now and then lurker. It's been over 20 years since I've had a
>cat.... and I miss their quirky "catness". I do breed rescue with
>dogs.... and I teach dog obedience, so I sometimes have to deal with
>end-of-pet-life issues with owners. The biggest and only instruction I
>give an owner on the subject of "is it time?" is to try to be objective
>when answering the following question:
>
>Are you keeping this animal alive for yourself, or because you have
>honest reason to believe that the animal's quality of life is likely to
>improve to the degree that it is not suffering in any way
>(psychologically as well as physically), and it is essentially able to
>maintain the basic life functions By Itself.... food and water intake,
>management of bodily wastes, interaction within the pack (dogs)/family
>(cats), basic mobility? (This is for owners with animals that are aged
>and in failing health.... not solely with temperment/aggressiveness
>issues of "mental health" causing major liability problems.) If you are
>keeping the animal alive for yourself, then it is "time". If the rest
>of the question has some "iffies" or some negatives, it's time for that
>long conversation with your vet, and some prayer. But unless I feel
>that keeping the pet alive is essentially a form of abuse of the pet, I
>never flatly say that the time has come.
>
>In the case of this old sweetie using the entire house as a latrine, the
>move is probably "at fault", if "fault" can be assigned. Even I know
>that many cats just don't adjust to new homes instantly, even with the
>same family and household furnishings. Given his state of health,
>confining him to a certain area of the home may be kinder at this
>point.... and will simplify the sanitation issue, if not solve it.
>because his litter box will be easier and quicker to find. I was
>surprised that none of you cat owners addressed that. But if he's been
>a "clean" cat for many years and now isn't, doesn't that demonstrate one
>more heartbreaking area where he just can't maintain his quality of
>life?
>
>I hope the higher being that you trust in guides you to the right answer
>for you and the old dearie soon. Hugs.
>
>It's never an easy decision to send a pet on ahead, and the hole always
>remains in the heart, which is the perfect place to bury that pet, once
>a decision to release a pet is carried out.
>
>Jo


One issue (not in this case) is when the cat is indeed healthy enough
to have a decent quality of life but is peeing and pooping all over
causing huge problems for the humans. I had a cat that was on the way
out, but still enjoyed life. But, she simply leaked from her anus.
Wherever she sat for more than a few minutes, a little brown spot
appeared. Not her fault, just some sort of colitis.

So, we put covers over the pillows, the bed, the couch, and any other
place that couldn't easily be cleaned often. And we kept that cat for
several months until she was too sick to continue living and the vet
said to put her to sleep.

Cat diapers are an option but cats don't seem to do well with them
from what I recall.

Kelly Greene[_4_]
August 1st 11, 12:16 AM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>
> Either ending is no good, but I worry greatly about what will happen
> to my cats when I die. I'd best get that Will done.

I worry too but there is no one, and no place to place my cats with where
they can be taken care of from my estate. What do you plan to have done to,
or with, your cats when you die?

dgk
August 1st 11, 02:05 PM
On Sun, 31 Jul 2011 18:16:26 -0500, "Kelly Greene"
> wrote:

>
>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>>
>> Either ending is no good, but I worry greatly about what will happen
>> to my cats when I die. I'd best get that Will done.
>
>I worry too but there is no one, and no place to place my cats with where
>they can be taken care of from my estate. What do you plan to have done to,
>or with, your cats when you die?

My plan is to pass enough money with the cats to get them homes. I
don't know how to verify that the cats are actually taken care of
though.

Kelly Greene[_4_]
August 5th 11, 12:27 AM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 31 Jul 2011 18:16:26 -0500, "Kelly Greene"
> > wrote:
>
>>
>>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>>>
>>> Either ending is no good, but I worry greatly about what will happen
>>> to my cats when I die. I'd best get that Will done.
>>
>>I worry too but there is no one, and no place to place my cats with where
>>they can be taken care of from my estate. What do you plan to have done
>>to,
>>or with, your cats when you die?
>
> My plan is to pass enough money with the cats to get them homes. I
> don't know how to verify that the cats are actually taken care of
> though.

That is my problem also. I can leave them my estate... but who makes sure
they're cared for until they die of natural causes/old age? :*(

Malcom \Mal\ Reynolds
August 5th 11, 04:49 AM
In article >,
"Kelly Greene" > wrote:

> "dgk" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On Sun, 31 Jul 2011 18:16:26 -0500, "Kelly Greene"
> > > wrote:
> >
> >>
> >>"dgk" > wrote in message
> ...
> >>>
> >>> Either ending is no good, but I worry greatly about what will happen
> >>> to my cats when I die. I'd best get that Will done.
> >>
> >>I worry too but there is no one, and no place to place my cats with where
> >>they can be taken care of from my estate. What do you plan to have done
> >>to,
> >>or with, your cats when you die?
> >
> > My plan is to pass enough money with the cats to get them homes. I
> > don't know how to verify that the cats are actually taken care of
> > though.
>
> That is my problem also. I can leave them my estate... but who makes sure
> they're cared for until they die of natural causes/old age? :*(

It is my understanding that in fact you cannot leave your estate to animals. You
can leave it to an organization like your local shelter with the caveat that it
be used to maintain your animals in a manner that you describe.

Of course, it's best to have a lawyer draw up the paperwork

Bill Graham
August 5th 11, 07:32 AM
Malcom "Mal" Reynolds wrote:
> In article >,
> "Kelly Greene" > wrote:
>
>> "dgk" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> On Sun, 31 Jul 2011 18:16:26 -0500, "Kelly Greene"
>>> > wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> "dgk" > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>>>
>>>>> Either ending is no good, but I worry greatly about what will
>>>>> happen to my cats when I die. I'd best get that Will done.
>>>>
>>>> I worry too but there is no one, and no place to place my cats
>>>> with where they can be taken care of from my estate. What do you
>>>> plan to have done to,
>>>> or with, your cats when you die?
>>>
>>> My plan is to pass enough money with the cats to get them homes. I
>>> don't know how to verify that the cats are actually taken care of
>>> though.
>>
>> That is my problem also. I can leave them my estate... but who makes
>> sure they're cared for until they die of natural causes/old age?
>> :*(
>
> It is my understanding that in fact you cannot leave your estate to
> animals. You can leave it to an organization like your local shelter
> with the caveat that it be used to maintain your animals in a manner
> that you describe.
>
> Of course, it's best to have a lawyer draw up the paperwork

Yes. We have a local "cat coalition" group here that places cats in good
homes. You can leave them enough money to do that for your cats without
having to give them your whole estate. they place a lot of cats in homes
every month, and maintain a booth at our local Saturday Market where people
can see the cats and decide which ones they like/want.

barb
August 8th 11, 03:13 PM
Since she seemed to be enjoying life before the move, I'd give the steroids
a shot.

Barb

Kelly Greene[_4_]
August 30th 11, 08:10 AM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in message
...
>
> Yes. We have a local "cat coalition" group here that places cats in good
> homes. You can leave them enough money to do that for your cats without
> having to give them your whole estate. they place a lot of cats in homes
> every month, and maintain a booth at our local Saturday Market where
> people can see the cats and decide which ones they like/want.

I've looked into something like that here in middle TN but find nothing but
cat rescue groups that come and go. They run out of cash and close their
doors. I wish I could find one that's been around for years and will likely
be around for many more years.