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Thumper
August 14th 11, 04:29 PM
Recentlly I had to re-home my male cat due to moving. I found a home for
him, but the owner said that he would hide away and only come out at night
to eat. Wasn't very affectionate, which is unusual for him . Would growl if
any one went near him and he had a very bad habit of toileting everywhere
else apart from his litter tray. She only had him a few weeks and other
people I spoke to about this said that she'd not given him time to settle
into a new home, but she decided to rehome him again. I found another home
for him, a friend of mine took him in. We thought he'd like it there better
as my friend has another cat too, a female and it would be compay.
Unfortunately up until only a few days ago he's been very good on the
toileting side, but my friends now finding toilet mess not only in the
litter tray but around the home, particularly in the kids bedrooms. He's
treated really well and the family love him. We are all bewildered by this.
Has any one got any idea's on this one. Thanks.

barb
August 14th 11, 05:24 PM
Has he been taken to a vet for a check-up? This could be a sign of a medial
issue.

Barb

barb
August 14th 11, 05:29 PM
Sorry, misspelled, should be "medical issue", not "medial issue".

Barb

KenK
August 14th 11, 06:57 PM
"Thumper" > wrote in
:

> Recentlly I had to re-home my male cat due to moving. I found a home
> for him, but the owner said that he would hide away and only come out
> at night to eat. Wasn't very affectionate, which is unusual for him .
> Would growl if any one went near him and he had a very bad habit of
> toileting everywhere else apart from his litter tray. She only had him
> a few weeks and other people I spoke to about this said that she'd not
> given him time to settle into a new home, but she decided to rehome
> him again. I found another home for him, a friend of mine took him
> in. We thought he'd like it there better as my friend has another cat
> too, a female and it would be compay. Unfortunately up until only a
> few days ago he's been very good on the toileting side, but my friends
> now finding toilet mess not only in the litter tray but around the
> home, particularly in the kids bedrooms. He's treated really well and
> the family love him. We are all bewildered by this. Has any one got
> any idea's on this one. Thanks.
>

The litter the same as he had been using when you had him?

I switched brands and types long long ago with my first cats and they
stopped using the tray too.




--
"Experience is something you don't get until
just after you need it." Steven Wright

Bill Graham
August 14th 11, 07:35 PM
Thumper wrote:
> Recentlly I had to re-home my male cat due to moving. I found a home
> for him, but the owner said that he would hide away and only come out
> at night to eat. Wasn't very affectionate, which is unusual for him .
> Would growl if any one went near him and he had a very bad habit of
> toileting everywhere else apart from his litter tray. She only had
> him a few weeks and other people I spoke to about this said that
> she'd not given him time to settle into a new home, but she decided
> to rehome him again. I found another home for him, a friend of mine
> took him in. We thought he'd like it there better as my friend has
> another cat too, a female and it would be compay. Unfortunately up
> until only a few days ago he's been very good on the toileting side,
> but my friends now finding toilet mess not only in the litter tray
> but around the home, particularly in the kids bedrooms. He's treated
> really well and the family love him. We are all bewildered by this.
> Has any one got any idea's on this one. Thanks.

Yes. Cats, like people, become attached to their family and are emotionally
hurt when they are abandoned, and/or given away to someone else. You would
act the same way had your mother and father given you away to some stranger
when you were young. As a matter of fact, most of the people on death row in
our prisons were given away by their parents, and/or grew up with no love or
permanent attachments. You should have introduced your cat to the other
family slowly. Had them come over to your place and meet him several times,
and make friends with him by feeding him for a while, until he was
comfortable around them, aqnd brought him to their house to visit several
times before forcing him to live there.

Bill Graham
August 14th 11, 07:42 PM
Bill Graham wrote:
> Thumper wrote:
>> Recentlly I had to re-home my male cat due to moving. I found a home
>> for him, but the owner said that he would hide away and only come out
>> at night to eat. Wasn't very affectionate, which is unusual for him .
>> Would growl if any one went near him and he had a very bad habit of
>> toileting everywhere else apart from his litter tray. She only had
>> him a few weeks and other people I spoke to about this said that
>> she'd not given him time to settle into a new home, but she decided
>> to rehome him again. I found another home for him, a friend of mine
>> took him in. We thought he'd like it there better as my friend has
>> another cat too, a female and it would be compay. Unfortunately up
>> until only a few days ago he's been very good on the toileting side,
>> but my friends now finding toilet mess not only in the litter tray
>> but around the home, particularly in the kids bedrooms. He's treated
>> really well and the family love him. We are all bewildered by this.
>> Has any one got any idea's on this one. Thanks.
>
> Yes. Cats, like people, become attached to their family and are
> emotionally hurt when they are abandoned, and/or given away to
> someone else. You would act the same way had your mother and father
> given you away to some stranger when you were young. As a matter of
> fact, most of the people on death row in our prisons were given away
> by their parents, and/or grew up with no love or permanent
> attachments. You should have introduced your cat to the other family
> slowly. Had them come over to your place and meet him several times,
> and make friends with him by feeding him for a while, until he was
> comfortable around them, aqnd brought him to their house to visit
> several times before forcing him to live there.

Now, you might be able to help the situation by good follow-up treatment.
Try going over there and sitting with your cat on your lap for twenty or
thirty minutes every day, or as often as you can. Let the cat know that you
are still alive, and still love him. Perhaps he will come to understand that
for some reason, you can't keep him in your home with you.

Thumper
August 15th 11, 03:26 PM
"Barb" > wrote in message
...
> Has he been taken to a vet for a check-up? This could be a sign of a
> medial issue.
>
I think that may be a good idea just to be on the safe side.

Thumper
August 15th 11, 03:32 PM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in message
...
> Thumper wrote:
>> Recentlly I had to re-home my male cat due to moving. I found a home
>> for him, but the owner said that he would hide away and only come out
>> at night to eat. Wasn't very affectionate, which is unusual for him .
>> Would growl if any one went near him and he had a very bad habit of
>> toileting everywhere else apart from his litter tray. She only had
>> him a few weeks and other people I spoke to about this said that
>> she'd not given him time to settle into a new home, but she decided
>> to rehome him again. I found another home for him, a friend of mine
>> took him in. We thought he'd like it there better as my friend has
>> another cat too, a female and it would be compay. Unfortunately up
>> until only a few days ago he's been very good on the toileting side,
>> but my friends now finding toilet mess not only in the litter tray
>> but around the home, particularly in the kids bedrooms. He's treated
>> really well and the family love him. We are all bewildered by this.
>> Has any one got any idea's on this one. Thanks.
>
> Yes. Cats, like people, become attached to their family and are
> emotionally hurt when they are abandoned, and/or given away to someone
> else. You would act the same way had your mother and father given you away
> to some stranger when you were young. As a matter of fact, most of the
> people on death row in our prisons were given away by their parents,
> and/or grew up with no love or permanent attachments. You should have
> introduced your cat to the other family slowly. Had them come over to your
> place and meet him several times, and make friends with him by feeding him
> for a while, until he was comfortable around them, aqnd brought him to
> their house to visit several times before forcing him to live there.
My friends other cat was also one that needed quick rehoming and that has
settled without a problem. Both cats get on well.

I know in an ideal situation you should take months introducing the cat to
new surroundings but that just wasn't possible in my case.

Thumper
August 15th 11, 03:34 PM
"KenK" > wrote in message
...
> "Thumper" > wrote in
> :
>
>> Recentlly I had to re-home my male cat due to moving. I found a home
>> for him, but the owner said that he would hide away and only come out
>> at night to eat. Wasn't very affectionate, which is unusual for him .
>> Would growl if any one went near him and he had a very bad habit of
>> toileting everywhere else apart from his litter tray. She only had him
>> a few weeks and other people I spoke to about this said that she'd not
>> given him time to settle into a new home, but she decided to rehome
>> him again. I found another home for him, a friend of mine took him
>> in. We thought he'd like it there better as my friend has another cat
>> too, a female and it would be compay. Unfortunately up until only a
>> few days ago he's been very good on the toileting side, but my friends
>> now finding toilet mess not only in the litter tray but around the
>> home, particularly in the kids bedrooms. He's treated really well and
>> the family love him. We are all bewildered by this. Has any one got
>> any idea's on this one. Thanks.
>>
>
> The litter the same as he had been using when you had him?
>
> I switched brands and types long long ago with my first cats and they
> stopped using the tray too.
>
That's never had an affect on him before. At home he used different litter
trays and had a variety of food brands.

Bohgosity BumaskiL
December 20th 11, 11:41 AM
I hav one that requires litter changes weekly. That seems to keep her
from ****ing on the wall, instead of in the tray. A time wuz when she
would tolerate every other week, and she would politely indicate when
she could smell it: She would **** in the bathtub, instead. I use plain
clay. I haven't tested whether this cat would prefer silica or wood
chips. I would never use the clumping stuff; too much maintenance for me.

All I can think of doing is increasing the frequency of litter changes.

Bohgosity BumaskiL
December 20th 11, 11:47 AM
Maybe going to your cat's new home with some string will help. I know
it's a very boring game for people, but the dancing string trick can
keep my cat entertained for ...I don't know. I've never done it for more
than ten minutes.

mickrio
February 18th 12, 10:48 AM
We thought he'd like it there better
as my friend has another cat too, a female and it would be compay.
Unfortunately up until only a few days ago he's been very good on the
toileting side, but my friends now finding toilet mess not only in the
litter tray but around the home, particularly in the kids bedrooms.
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