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Dick Adams
October 29th 11, 05:45 AM
My cat is 11 years old and has now started biting.
Last week, while sitting on my lap, she turned and
bit my on th wrist. Last night she bit me on the
leg.

Is this common in cats as they get older?
Is there a cure (other than hitting her) for biting?

Dick

---MIKE---
October 29th 11, 06:09 PM
This could have been a "love bite". Was it just a "nip" or did it draw
blood? Some cats get over stimulated and do that. Don't hit her unless
it was a hard, vicious bite.

---MIKE---

In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
(44� 15' N - Elevation 1580')

Dick Adams
October 29th 11, 10:08 PM
---MIKE--- > wrote:
>This could have been a "love bite". Was it just a "nip" or did it draw
>blood? Some cats get over stimulated and do that. Don't hit her unless
>it was a hard, vicious bite.

Two of the bites drew blood - That's why I am concerned.

RowwwHissssPurr
October 30th 11, 12:43 AM
(Dick Adams) wrote in news:j8hpvq$snm$2
@reader1.panix.com:

> ---MIKE--- > wrote:
>>This could have been a "love bite". Was it just a "nip" or did it draw
>>blood? Some cats get over stimulated and do that. Don't hit her unless
>>it was a hard, vicious bite.
>
> Two of the bites drew blood - That's why I am concerned.
>
>


Siamese?? Ours bite, just about hard enough to draw blood. Of course,
they were outdoor cats until we got them. They are house cats now and
loving every bit of it.

Bill Graham
October 30th 11, 08:38 AM
Dick Adams wrote:
> My cat is 11 years old and has now started biting.
> Last week, while sitting on my lap, she turned and
> bit my on th wrist. Last night she bit me on the
> leg.
>
> Is this common in cats as they get older?
> Is there a cure (other than hitting her) for biting?
>
> Dick

Sometimes cats get arthritus when they get old, and it hurts them when you
pet them or make them move in ways that you used to do when they were young,
so it is possible that this is why she bites. So, the first step is to make
sure that you aren't hurting her in some way.

Bill Graham
October 30th 11, 08:42 AM
---MIKE--- wrote:
> This could have been a "love bite". Was it just a "nip" or did it
> draw blood? Some cats get over stimulated and do that. Don't hit
> her unless it was a hard, vicious bite.
>
> ---MIKE---
>
> In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
> (44� 15' N - Elevation 1580')

All of my cats lived somewhere else before I got them. I don't know their
histories, so I don't know if they were mistreated in the past. Some of them
bit me when I forst got them, but after a while they settled down in the lap
of luxoury that living with me is, andf they no longer bit me when I touched
them. So this is another possibility.....

Dick Adams
October 30th 11, 05:17 PM
Bill Graham > wrote:
> Dick Adams wrote:

>> My cat is 11 years old and has now started biting.
>> Last week, while sitting on my lap, she turned and
>> bit my on th wrist. Last night she bit me on the
>> leg.
>>
>> Is this common in cats as they get older?
>> Is there a cure (other than hitting her) for biting?
>>
>> Dick

>Sometimes cats get arthritus when they get old, and it hurts them when you
>pet them or make them move in ways that you used to do when they were young,
>so it is possible that this is why she bites. So, the first step is to make
>sure that you aren't hurting her in some way.

Thanks Bill, I had not considered arthitus,

Dick

Bill Graham
October 31st 11, 12:34 AM
Dick Adams wrote:
> Bill Graham > wrote:
>> Dick Adams wrote:
>
>>> My cat is 11 years old and has now started biting.
>>> Last week, while sitting on my lap, she turned and
>>> bit my on th wrist. Last night she bit me on the
>>> leg.
>>>
>>> Is this common in cats as they get older?
>>> Is there a cure (other than hitting her) for biting?
>>>
>>> Dick
>
>> Sometimes cats get arthritus when they get old, and it hurts them
>> when you pet them or make them move in ways that you used to do when
>> they were young, so it is possible that this is why she bites. So,
>> the first step is to make sure that you aren't hurting her in some
>> way.
>
> Thanks Bill, I had not considered arthitus,
>
> Dick

When we first got Sara, our farm bred cat, she would sit on our lap for a
while, and then, when she was ready to leave, would bite or scratch us and
then jump down and run. I don't know how she developed this behavior, but it
has decreased with time, and now she just jumps down and leaves without
trying to hurt us. I think that there are environmental pressures that can
affect the behavior of pets, and we don't, for the most part, know just what
these are or how they manifest themselves. In general, I have found that
patience is a great tool in stopping this kind of behavior. One thing is for
sure. I am very glad that I am not a pet psychaitrist....:^)

Rene[_2_]
October 31st 11, 05:47 PM
No, this is not common. The first thing I would do is get her checked
out by the vet to rule out a medical problem. She could be in pain and
biting may be her way of protecting herself. Get bloodwork done to
rule out any major problems.

Also, if she did draw blood--keep a close eye on that wound! Cat bites
often get infected and can lead to a serious infection.

Rene

Bill Graham
November 1st 11, 04:39 AM
Rene wrote:
> No, this is not common. The first thing I would do is get her checked
> out by the vet to rule out a medical problem. She could be in pain and
> biting may be her way of protecting herself. Get bloodwork done to
> rule out any major problems.
>
> Also, if she did draw blood--keep a close eye on that wound! Cat bites
> often get infected and can lead to a serious infection.
>
> Rene

Yes. I didn't think of that. If she's an outside cat, she could have picked
up Rabies from some wild animal, and by biting you, transfer the disease to
you. Get her checked out, and the sooner the better.

Sylvia M[_3_]
November 1st 11, 05:21 AM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in message
...
> Rene wrote:
>> No, this is not common. The first thing I would do is get her checked
>> out by the vet to rule out a medical problem. She could be in pain
>> and
>> biting may be her way of protecting herself. Get bloodwork done to
>> rule out any major problems.
>>
>> Also, if she did draw blood--keep a close eye on that wound! Cat
>> bites
>> often get infected and can lead to a serious infection.
>>
>> Rene
>
> Yes. I didn't think of that. If she's an outside cat, she could have
> picked up Rabies from some wild animal, and by biting you, transfer
> the disease to you. Get her checked out, and the sooner the better.
Also 'cat bite fever' can be very serious,
kept a neighbor in the hospital for several weeks!

I was wondering if there are 'good' ways to discourage biting, given no
health issues?
Sylvia M.

Bill Graham
November 1st 11, 06:38 AM
Sylvia M wrote:
> "Bill Graham" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Rene wrote:
>>> No, this is not common. The first thing I would do is get her
>>> checked out by the vet to rule out a medical problem. She could be
>>> in pain and
>>> biting may be her way of protecting herself. Get bloodwork done to
>>> rule out any major problems.
>>>
>>> Also, if she did draw blood--keep a close eye on that wound! Cat
>>> bites
>>> often get infected and can lead to a serious infection.
>>>
>>> Rene
>>
>> Yes. I didn't think of that. If she's an outside cat, she could have
>> picked up Rabies from some wild animal, and by biting you, transfer
>> the disease to you. Get her checked out, and the sooner the better.
> Also 'cat bite fever' can be very serious,
> kept a neighbor in the hospital for several weeks!
>
> I was wondering if there are 'good' ways to discourage biting, given
> no health issues?
> Sylvia M.

I don't know, but my cats seem to respond to my shouting at them and
(sometimes) throwing a small pillow at them. Cats are pretty mood sensitive.
Mine know when I am displeased by the tone of my voice. I do think that when
they bite you, they know that you are going to be displeased. You don't have
to shout or give them any indication. When Sara used to bite me, she would
run away immediately afterward.....:^)

dgk
November 1st 11, 01:34 PM
On Sun, 30 Oct 2011 17:17:01 +0000 (UTC), (Dick
Adams) wrote:

>Bill Graham > wrote:
>> Dick Adams wrote:
>
>>> My cat is 11 years old and has now started biting.
>>> Last week, while sitting on my lap, she turned and
>>> bit my on th wrist. Last night she bit me on the
>>> leg.
>>>
>>> Is this common in cats as they get older?
>>> Is there a cure (other than hitting her) for biting?
>>>
>>> Dick
>
>>Sometimes cats get arthritus when they get old, and it hurts them when you
>>pet them or make them move in ways that you used to do when they were young,
>>so it is possible that this is why she bites. So, the first step is to make
>>sure that you aren't hurting her in some way.
>
>Thanks Bill, I had not considered arthitus,
>
>Dick


Off to the vet for a checkup I'd say. Any change in behavior among my
brood means a trip to the vet, just to rule out any health related
cause.

Rene[_2_]
November 2nd 11, 05:16 PM
> I was wondering if there are 'good' ways to discourage biting, given no
> health issues?
> Sylvia M.

When ours were younger and bit when they were playing too hard, I'd
yell "ow!" loudly. That usually startled them enough to stop.

(PeteCresswell)
November 2nd 11, 09:01 PM
Per Sylvia M:
>I was wondering if there are 'good' ways to discourage biting, given no
>health issues?

In the words of my granddaughter when she was about 4 years old
(in a demented tone of voice): "We'll teach kitty how to
*fly*..."

Seriously, though, the two admonitions I've heard are:

- Immediately withdraw all attention

- Make a sound that shows you have been hurt
--
PeteCresswell

chaniarts[_2_]
November 2nd 11, 09:23 PM
On 11/2/2011 2:01 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
> Per Sylvia M:
>> I was wondering if there are 'good' ways to discourage biting, given no
>> health issues?
>
> In the words of my granddaughter when she was about 4 years old
> (in a demented tone of voice): "We'll teach kitty how to
> *fly*..."
>
> Seriously, though, the two admonitions I've heard are:
>
> - Immediately withdraw all attention
>
> - Make a sound that shows you have been hurt

shortly after i got one of my foster cats, he tried to bite me. i picked
him up, bit him (gently) in the nape, growled and shook my head a bit,
like a mother cat would do to a kitten. he hasn't tried to bite me since
(7 years now).

(PeteCresswell)
November 3rd 11, 12:09 AM
Per chaniarts:
>shortly after i got one of my foster cats, he tried to bite me. i picked
>him up, bit him (gently) in the nape, growled and shook my head a bit,
>like a mother cat would do to a kitten. he hasn't tried to bite me since
>(7 years now).

Sounds logical, but I get scared just thinking about that with
our cat - as in being blinded in both eyes and facially
disfigured....
--
PeteCresswell

adiposestem
November 4th 11, 02:17 AM
It only shows that your cat is growing up...