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View Full Version : Cats as mousers: nature or nurture?


Brian Link[_2_]
February 9th 12, 04:10 AM
For the first time in the 12+ years we've lived here, we've got mice
coming indoors. We've got a 16 year-old moggie adopted from a farm cat
litter, and a 9 year-old F7 Bengal, both males.

They've slain two mice so far (we found the carcasses on the kitchen
floor), but we've seen a few more and witnessed the cats hunting them.
The Bengal is the most energetic and enthusiastic, but the most
clumsy. The moggie is patient, precise and determined.

I read somewhere that female cats are the main hunters, and that only
when they've been properly taught by their mothers. Also that male
cats will hunt mice for food when feral.

They both seem pretty interested in the mice we've seen, but don't
deliver killing blows, thus allowing the mice to escape.

So, any hope that our two cats will figure out how to cleanly dispatch
a mouse? I suspect that the corpses we found were probably scared to
death, or inadvertantly killed by play. My guess is that the Bengal is
thrilled that we somehow bought him the BEST CAT TOY EVER!!

Thanks for any ideas.

BLink

chaniarts[_2_]
February 9th 12, 06:57 PM
On 2/8/2012 9:10 PM, Brian Link wrote:
> For the first time in the 12+ years we've lived here, we've got mice
> coming indoors. We've got a 16 year-old moggie adopted from a farm cat
> litter, and a 9 year-old F7 Bengal, both males.
>
> They've slain two mice so far (we found the carcasses on the kitchen
> floor), but we've seen a few more and witnessed the cats hunting them.
> The Bengal is the most energetic and enthusiastic, but the most
> clumsy. The moggie is patient, precise and determined.
>
> I read somewhere that female cats are the main hunters, and that only
> when they've been properly taught by their mothers. Also that male
> cats will hunt mice for food when feral.
>
> They both seem pretty interested in the mice we've seen, but don't
> deliver killing blows, thus allowing the mice to escape.
>
> So, any hope that our two cats will figure out how to cleanly dispatch
> a mouse? I suspect that the corpses we found were probably scared to
> death, or inadvertantly killed by play. My guess is that the Bengal is
> thrilled that we somehow bought him the BEST CAT TOY EVER!!
>
> Thanks for any ideas.
>
> BLink

probably because they're toying with it rather than dispatching them.

perhaps if they were hungrier? a friend that has an outdoor cat near the
desert commented that during the winter, the cat lays around and eats
inside food, but during the summer when there's more plentiful outdoor
prey, he eats almost no indoor food but concentrates on pack rats and
desert rabbits.

dgk
February 9th 12, 08:48 PM
On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 22:10:25 -0600, Brian Link .>
wrote:

>For the first time in the 12+ years we've lived here, we've got mice
>coming indoors. We've got a 16 year-old moggie adopted from a farm cat
>litter, and a 9 year-old F7 Bengal, both males.
>
>They've slain two mice so far (we found the carcasses on the kitchen
>floor), but we've seen a few more and witnessed the cats hunting them.
>The Bengal is the most energetic and enthusiastic, but the most
>clumsy. The moggie is patient, precise and determined.
>
>I read somewhere that female cats are the main hunters, and that only
>when they've been properly taught by their mothers. Also that male
>cats will hunt mice for food when feral.
>
>They both seem pretty interested in the mice we've seen, but don't
>deliver killing blows, thus allowing the mice to escape.
>
>So, any hope that our two cats will figure out how to cleanly dispatch
>a mouse? I suspect that the corpses we found were probably scared to
>death, or inadvertantly killed by play. My guess is that the Bengal is
>thrilled that we somehow bought him the BEST CAT TOY EVER!!
>
>Thanks for any ideas.
>
>BLink

I've only had a mouse three times in 16 years but my cats seem
hardwired to do them in. I did manage to rescue two of them before
they were killed and sent them on their way (outside).

My one girl does seem to be the best at tackling them but I did pick
her up off the street so she might have learned out there.

Brian Link[_2_]
February 10th 12, 12:29 AM
On Thu, 09 Feb 2012 15:48:45 -0500, dgk > wrote:

>On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 22:10:25 -0600, Brian Link .>
>wrote:
>
>>For the first time in the 12+ years we've lived here, we've got mice
>>coming indoors. We've got a 16 year-old moggie adopted from a farm cat
>>litter, and a 9 year-old F7 Bengal, both males.
>>
>>They've slain two mice so far (we found the carcasses on the kitchen
>>floor), but we've seen a few more and witnessed the cats hunting them.
>>The Bengal is the most energetic and enthusiastic, but the most
>>clumsy. The moggie is patient, precise and determined.
>>
>>I read somewhere that female cats are the main hunters, and that only
>>when they've been properly taught by their mothers. Also that male
>>cats will hunt mice for food when feral.
>>
>>They both seem pretty interested in the mice we've seen, but don't
>>deliver killing blows, thus allowing the mice to escape.
>>
>>So, any hope that our two cats will figure out how to cleanly dispatch
>>a mouse? I suspect that the corpses we found were probably scared to
>>death, or inadvertantly killed by play. My guess is that the Bengal is
>>thrilled that we somehow bought him the BEST CAT TOY EVER!!
>>
>>Thanks for any ideas.
>>
>>BLink
>
>I've only had a mouse three times in 16 years but my cats seem
>hardwired to do them in. I did manage to rescue two of them before
>they were killed and sent them on their way (outside).
>
>My one girl does seem to be the best at tackling them but I did pick
>her up off the street so she might have learned out there.

We were all for them killing the critters, until one night when they
grabbed one and it looked absolutely pitiful, rearing up, running
around in panicked circles. My wife was in tears, and decided that we
should try to save them if we can.

Well, luckily one of my jobs in college was working for a scientist
doing field-mouse studies. Occasionally one of the rascals would get
loose, and I developed a good strategy for grabbing them (with a
gardening glove on). I've managed to catch 2 and toss them outside
before the cats could savage them.

BLink

Brian Link[_2_]
February 10th 12, 01:14 AM
On Thu, 09 Feb 2012 15:48:45 -0500, dgk > wrote:

>On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 22:10:25 -0600, Brian Link .>
>wrote:
>
>>For the first time in the 12+ years we've lived here, we've got mice
>>coming indoors. We've got a 16 year-old moggie adopted from a farm cat
>>litter, and a 9 year-old F7 Bengal, both males.
>>
>>They've slain two mice so far (we found the carcasses on the kitchen
>>floor), but we've seen a few more and witnessed the cats hunting them.
>>The Bengal is the most energetic and enthusiastic, but the most
>>clumsy. The moggie is patient, precise and determined.
>>
>>I read somewhere that female cats are the main hunters, and that only
>>when they've been properly taught by their mothers. Also that male
>>cats will hunt mice for food when feral.
>>
>>They both seem pretty interested in the mice we've seen, but don't
>>deliver killing blows, thus allowing the mice to escape.
>>
>>So, any hope that our two cats will figure out how to cleanly dispatch
>>a mouse? I suspect that the corpses we found were probably scared to
>>death, or inadvertantly killed by play. My guess is that the Bengal is
>>thrilled that we somehow bought him the BEST CAT TOY EVER!!
>>
>>Thanks for any ideas.
>>
>>BLink
>
>I've only had a mouse three times in 16 years but my cats seem
>hardwired to do them in. I did manage to rescue two of them before
>they were killed and sent them on their way (outside).
>
>My one girl does seem to be the best at tackling them but I did pick
>her up off the street so she might have learned out there.

Just after I posted my first response, Louis managed to grab a mouse
under the stove. This time I heard a definite "CRUNCH!", and there was
blood. Managed to grab it and toss it outside. Now he's ****ed at me
for getting rid of his toy..

BLink

(PeteCresswell)
February 10th 12, 01:42 AM
Per Brian Link:
>Just after I posted my first response, Louis managed to grab a mouse
>under the stove. This time I heard a definite "CRUNCH!", and there was
>blood. Managed to grab it and toss it outside. Now he's ****ed at me
>for getting rid of his toy..

I keep hearing stories about other people's cats killing things
and bringing them home to be placed at one's feet.

Ours gets 'hold of something and I can't even get near it. It
kind of hunkers down, glares at me with this "Yer not gonna get
*this* one sucker..." look, and darts off with the prey in it's
mouth.

Every so often I find a long-dead mouse, vole, or chipmunk. Ours
seems to like to eat the legs and tails off - hopefully after the
thing is dead...
--
Pete Cresswell

dgk
February 10th 12, 03:37 PM
On Thu, 09 Feb 2012 20:42:20 -0500, "(PeteCresswell)" >
wrote:

>Per Brian Link:
>>Just after I posted my first response, Louis managed to grab a mouse
>>under the stove. This time I heard a definite "CRUNCH!", and there was
>>blood. Managed to grab it and toss it outside. Now he's ****ed at me
>>for getting rid of his toy..
>
>I keep hearing stories about other people's cats killing things
>and bringing them home to be placed at one's feet.
>
>Ours gets 'hold of something and I can't even get near it. It
>kind of hunkers down, glares at me with this "Yer not gonna get
>*this* one sucker..." look, and darts off with the prey in it's
>mouth.
>
>Every so often I find a long-dead mouse, vole, or chipmunk. Ours
>seems to like to eat the legs and tails off - hopefully after the
>thing is dead...

I let me cats go out into the (fenced in) backyard when I'm around.
During the summer they rarely catch anything, but during winter I have
a bird feeder and a (heated) birdbath so there are zillions of birds
back there. On the weekends I do let the cats out but I try to arrange
it so the birdseed runs out first. Still, sometimes the cats are back
there when the birds are feeding. I bang something to frighten them
away as the cats head out the door, but then it's up to them.

Espy is the best at nailing a bird. He hunkers down under a naked
azelea and tries his best to stay still, and he's good at it. He does
better if he's the only cat back there because the others move around
a lot and scare the birds away. He'll sit still for an hour waiting
for a bird to come too close.

So two or three times during the winter I'll see Espy with a bird in
his mouth. I try to get it away while it's still viable but sometimes
it's too late.

Still, I go through 40 lbs of seed a week and change the water in the
bath every third day so the birds still come out way ahead.

Brian Link[_2_]
February 11th 12, 01:07 AM
On Fri, 10 Feb 2012 10:37:48 -0500, dgk > wrote:

>On Thu, 09 Feb 2012 20:42:20 -0500, "(PeteCresswell)" >
>wrote:
>
>>Per Brian Link:
>>>Just after I posted my first response, Louis managed to grab a mouse
>>>under the stove. This time I heard a definite "CRUNCH!", and there was
>>>blood. Managed to grab it and toss it outside. Now he's ****ed at me
>>>for getting rid of his toy..
>>
>>I keep hearing stories about other people's cats killing things
>>and bringing them home to be placed at one's feet.
>>
>>Ours gets 'hold of something and I can't even get near it. It
>>kind of hunkers down, glares at me with this "Yer not gonna get
>>*this* one sucker..." look, and darts off with the prey in it's
>>mouth.
>>
>>Every so often I find a long-dead mouse, vole, or chipmunk. Ours
>>seems to like to eat the legs and tails off - hopefully after the
>>thing is dead...
>
>I let me cats go out into the (fenced in) backyard when I'm around.
>During the summer they rarely catch anything, but during winter I have
>a bird feeder and a (heated) birdbath so there are zillions of birds
>back there. On the weekends I do let the cats out but I try to arrange
>it so the birdseed runs out first. Still, sometimes the cats are back
>there when the birds are feeding. I bang something to frighten them
>away as the cats head out the door, but then it's up to them.
>
>Espy is the best at nailing a bird. He hunkers down under a naked
>azelea and tries his best to stay still, and he's good at it. He does
>better if he's the only cat back there because the others move around
>a lot and scare the birds away. He'll sit still for an hour waiting
>for a bird to come too close.
>
>So two or three times during the winter I'll see Espy with a bird in
>his mouth. I try to get it away while it's still viable but sometimes
>it's too late.
>
>Still, I go through 40 lbs of seed a week and change the water in the
>bath every third day so the birds still come out way ahead.

Thanks for this - I remember that I was involved with birder groups
when I was last active on Usenet. The birders would holler about cats
eating songbirds, and the cat folks would holler "THAT'S WHAT CATS DO!
GET OVER IT!".

Still, I'm not a fan of letting cats outside. Tiger prolly couldn't
have made it to a ripe old age if he'd been an outside cat. Saw the
neighbor's cat get plowed down in the street a couple years ago.
Nobody should ever have to see that, cat-lover or not. He was just out
for his evening constitutional, and a car came roaring through. How
many tears have been shed for a cat eaten by dogs, or run over by some
dude driving too fast?

BLink

Bill Graham
February 11th 12, 06:04 AM
dgk wrote:
> On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 22:10:25 -0600, Brian Link .>
> wrote:
>
>> For the first time in the 12+ years we've lived here, we've got mice
>> coming indoors. We've got a 16 year-old moggie adopted from a farm
>> cat litter, and a 9 year-old F7 Bengal, both males.
>>
>> They've slain two mice so far (we found the carcasses on the kitchen
>> floor), but we've seen a few more and witnessed the cats hunting
>> them. The Bengal is the most energetic and enthusiastic, but the most
>> clumsy. The moggie is patient, precise and determined.
>>
>> I read somewhere that female cats are the main hunters, and that only
>> when they've been properly taught by their mothers. Also that male
>> cats will hunt mice for food when feral.
>>
>> They both seem pretty interested in the mice we've seen, but don't
>> deliver killing blows, thus allowing the mice to escape.
>>
>> So, any hope that our two cats will figure out how to cleanly
>> dispatch a mouse? I suspect that the corpses we found were probably
>> scared to death, or inadvertantly killed by play. My guess is that
>> the Bengal is thrilled that we somehow bought him the BEST CAT TOY
>> EVER!!
>>
>> Thanks for any ideas.
>>
>> BLink
>
> I've only had a mouse three times in 16 years but my cats seem
> hardwired to do them in. I did manage to rescue two of them before
> they were killed and sent them on their way (outside).
>
> My one girl does seem to be the best at tackling them but I did pick
> her up off the street so she might have learned out there.

My, "B-K" brought a chipmonk in last year, and he lived under our stove for
the whole Winter. All the cats tried to get him but easily the fastest thing
on four feet is a chipmonk.... they didn't have a chance. We fed and watered
him all Winter, and when the weather warmed up, I left the sliding glass
door open a crack at night and after a few days, he "escaped"., by then, the
cats had accepted him as another pet, and were unconcerned.....

Brian Link[_2_]
February 11th 12, 11:52 PM
On Fri, 10 Feb 2012 22:04:52 -0800, "Bill Graham" >
wrote:

>dgk wrote:
>> On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 22:10:25 -0600, Brian Link .>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> For the first time in the 12+ years we've lived here, we've got mice
>>> coming indoors. We've got a 16 year-old moggie adopted from a farm
>>> cat litter, and a 9 year-old F7 Bengal, both males.
>>>
>>> They've slain two mice so far (we found the carcasses on the kitchen
>>> floor), but we've seen a few more and witnessed the cats hunting
>>> them. The Bengal is the most energetic and enthusiastic, but the most
>>> clumsy. The moggie is patient, precise and determined.
>>>
>>> I read somewhere that female cats are the main hunters, and that only
>>> when they've been properly taught by their mothers. Also that male
>>> cats will hunt mice for food when feral.
>>>
>>> They both seem pretty interested in the mice we've seen, but don't
>>> deliver killing blows, thus allowing the mice to escape.
>>>
>>> So, any hope that our two cats will figure out how to cleanly
>>> dispatch a mouse? I suspect that the corpses we found were probably
>>> scared to death, or inadvertantly killed by play. My guess is that
>>> the Bengal is thrilled that we somehow bought him the BEST CAT TOY
>>> EVER!!
>>>
>>> Thanks for any ideas.
>>>
>>> BLink
>>
>> I've only had a mouse three times in 16 years but my cats seem
>> hardwired to do them in. I did manage to rescue two of them before
>> they were killed and sent them on their way (outside).
>>
>> My one girl does seem to be the best at tackling them but I did pick
>> her up off the street so she might have learned out there.
>
>My, "B-K" brought a chipmonk in last year, and he lived under our stove for
>the whole Winter. All the cats tried to get him but easily the fastest thing
>on four feet is a chipmonk.... they didn't have a chance. We fed and watered
>him all Winter, and when the weather warmed up, I left the sliding glass
>door open a crack at night and after a few days, he "escaped"., by then, the
>cats had accepted him as another pet, and were unconcerned.....

I know. We've always said Tiger is our cat, and Louis is Tiger's cat.
Now Louis has a pet/pets too. He just has to learn how not to break
them.

BLink

Bill Graham
February 16th 12, 12:48 AM
Brian Link wrote:
> On Fri, 10 Feb 2012 22:04:52 -0800, "Bill Graham" >
> wrote:
>
>> dgk wrote:
>>> On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 22:10:25 -0600, Brian Link .>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> For the first time in the 12+ years we've lived here, we've got
>>>> mice coming indoors. We've got a 16 year-old moggie adopted from a
>>>> farm cat litter, and a 9 year-old F7 Bengal, both males.
>>>>
>>>> They've slain two mice so far (we found the carcasses on the
>>>> kitchen floor), but we've seen a few more and witnessed the cats
>>>> hunting them. The Bengal is the most energetic and enthusiastic,
>>>> but the most clumsy. The moggie is patient, precise and determined.
>>>>
>>>> I read somewhere that female cats are the main hunters, and that
>>>> only when they've been properly taught by their mothers. Also that
>>>> male cats will hunt mice for food when feral.
>>>>
>>>> They both seem pretty interested in the mice we've seen, but don't
>>>> deliver killing blows, thus allowing the mice to escape.
>>>>
>>>> So, any hope that our two cats will figure out how to cleanly
>>>> dispatch a mouse? I suspect that the corpses we found were probably
>>>> scared to death, or inadvertantly killed by play. My guess is that
>>>> the Bengal is thrilled that we somehow bought him the BEST CAT TOY
>>>> EVER!!
>>>>
>>>> Thanks for any ideas.
>>>>
>>>> BLink
>>>
>>> I've only had a mouse three times in 16 years but my cats seem
>>> hardwired to do them in. I did manage to rescue two of them before
>>> they were killed and sent them on their way (outside).
>>>
>>> My one girl does seem to be the best at tackling them but I did pick
>>> her up off the street so she might have learned out there.
>>
>> My, "B-K" brought a chipmonk in last year, and he lived under our
>> stove for the whole Winter. All the cats tried to get him but easily
>> the fastest thing on four feet is a chipmonk.... they didn't have a
>> chance. We fed and watered him all Winter, and when the weather
>> warmed up, I left the sliding glass door open a crack at night and
>> after a few days, he "escaped"., by then, the cats had accepted him
>> as another pet, and were unconcerned.....
>
> I know. We've always said Tiger is our cat, and Louis is Tiger's cat.
> Now Louis has a pet/pets too. He just has to learn how not to break
> them.
>
> BLink

We used to have one that ate ants.... She was a real winner! She would lap
them up right back to whatever hole/crack in the wall they were coming from.
She kept the ants out of our kitchen for many years until her death about 8
years ago.

dgk
February 16th 12, 06:36 PM
On Fri, 10 Feb 2012 19:07:57 -0600, Brian Link .>
wrote:

>On Fri, 10 Feb 2012 10:37:48 -0500, dgk > wrote:
....
>>
>>Still, I go through 40 lbs of seed a week and change the water in the
>>bath every third day so the birds still come out way ahead.
>
>Thanks for this - I remember that I was involved with birder groups
>when I was last active on Usenet. The birders would holler about cats
>eating songbirds, and the cat folks would holler "THAT'S WHAT CATS DO!
>GET OVER IT!".
>
>Still, I'm not a fan of letting cats outside. Tiger prolly couldn't
>have made it to a ripe old age if he'd been an outside cat. Saw the
>neighbor's cat get plowed down in the street a couple years ago.
>Nobody should ever have to see that, cat-lover or not. He was just out
>for his evening constitutional, and a car came roaring through. How
>many tears have been shed for a cat eaten by dogs, or run over by some
>dude driving too fast?
>
>BLink

Ah, I tend to agree, which is why the backyard is fenced in. The cats
probably could get out if they really tried but it's designed not to
let them do that. The fencing curves in at the top so they really
can't climb over. The only way out would be to climb one of the trees
and jump over but they don't, or at least haven't done that. And I
have little tracking devices on their collars (loc8tor) so I can find
them if they do get out. Useful for finding them inside the house as
well.

Scooter actually does have out privileges since I took him off the
street about 18 months ago. The few times he asks to go out the front
and visit his old friends generally ends about five minutes later as
he comes racing back. He knows where the soft life is.

dgk
February 16th 12, 06:39 PM
On Fri, 10 Feb 2012 22:04:52 -0800, "Bill Graham" >
wrote:

>dgk wrote:
>> On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 22:10:25 -0600, Brian Link .>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> For the first time in the 12+ years we've lived here, we've got mice
>>> coming indoors. We've got a 16 year-old moggie adopted from a farm
>>> cat litter, and a 9 year-old F7 Bengal, both males.
>>>
>>> They've slain two mice so far (we found the carcasses on the kitchen
>>> floor), but we've seen a few more and witnessed the cats hunting
>>> them. The Bengal is the most energetic and enthusiastic, but the most
>>> clumsy. The moggie is patient, precise and determined.
>>>
>>> I read somewhere that female cats are the main hunters, and that only
>>> when they've been properly taught by their mothers. Also that male
>>> cats will hunt mice for food when feral.
>>>
>>> They both seem pretty interested in the mice we've seen, but don't
>>> deliver killing blows, thus allowing the mice to escape.
>>>
>>> So, any hope that our two cats will figure out how to cleanly
>>> dispatch a mouse? I suspect that the corpses we found were probably
>>> scared to death, or inadvertantly killed by play. My guess is that
>>> the Bengal is thrilled that we somehow bought him the BEST CAT TOY
>>> EVER!!
>>>
>>> Thanks for any ideas.
>>>
>>> BLink
>>
>> I've only had a mouse three times in 16 years but my cats seem
>> hardwired to do them in. I did manage to rescue two of them before
>> they were killed and sent them on their way (outside).
>>
>> My one girl does seem to be the best at tackling them but I did pick
>> her up off the street so she might have learned out there.
>
>My, "B-K" brought a chipmonk in last year, and he lived under our stove for
>the whole Winter. All the cats tried to get him but easily the fastest thing
>on four feet is a chipmonk.... they didn't have a chance. We fed and watered
>him all Winter, and when the weather warmed up, I left the sliding glass
>door open a crack at night and after a few days, he "escaped"., by then, the
>cats had accepted him as another pet, and were unconcerned.....

That's hysterical. One summer I found a dead squirrel in the basement.
Blood on his chest and smack in the middle of the floor. One of the
cats must have done him in and left him there. In the summer the back
door is open and they can come and go as they please so I have no idea
who did the deed.

Bill Graham
February 17th 12, 03:11 AM
dgk wrote:
> On Fri, 10 Feb 2012 19:07:57 -0600, Brian Link .>
> wrote:
>
>> On Fri, 10 Feb 2012 10:37:48 -0500, dgk > wrote:
>> ...
>>>
>>> Still, I go through 40 lbs of seed a week and change the water in
>>> the bath every third day so the birds still come out way ahead.
>>
>> Thanks for this - I remember that I was involved with birder groups
>> when I was last active on Usenet. The birders would holler about cats
>> eating songbirds, and the cat folks would holler "THAT'S WHAT CATS
>> DO! GET OVER IT!".
>>
>> Still, I'm not a fan of letting cats outside. Tiger prolly couldn't
>> have made it to a ripe old age if he'd been an outside cat. Saw the
>> neighbor's cat get plowed down in the street a couple years ago.
>> Nobody should ever have to see that, cat-lover or not. He was just
>> out for his evening constitutional, and a car came roaring through.
>> How many tears have been shed for a cat eaten by dogs, or run over
>> by some dude driving too fast?
>>
>> BLink
>
> Ah, I tend to agree, which is why the backyard is fenced in. The cats
> probably could get out if they really tried but it's designed not to
> let them do that. The fencing curves in at the top so they really
> can't climb over. The only way out would be to climb one of the trees
> and jump over but they don't, or at least haven't done that. And I
> have little tracking devices on their collars (loc8tor) so I can find
> them if they do get out. Useful for finding them inside the house as
> well.
>
> Scooter actually does have out privileges since I took him off the
> street about 18 months ago. The few times he asks to go out the front
> and visit his old friends generally ends about five minutes later as
> he comes racing back. He knows where the soft life is.

Yes. My five outside cats seldom leave the property. One came from across
the street, and she sometimes goes back there to visit. I lost one from a
neighbors weed killer last Summer, but in the past 15 years, he's the only
one harmed in any way from being allowed to roam the neighborhood. Once cats
know they can go wherever they want, they are usually content to stay at
home.

Bill Graham
February 17th 12, 03:20 AM
dgk wrote:
> On Fri, 10 Feb 2012 22:04:52 -0800, "Bill Graham" >
> wrote:
>
>> dgk wrote:
>>> On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 22:10:25 -0600, Brian Link .>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> For the first time in the 12+ years we've lived here, we've got
>>>> mice coming indoors. We've got a 16 year-old moggie adopted from a
>>>> farm cat litter, and a 9 year-old F7 Bengal, both males.
>>>>
>>>> They've slain two mice so far (we found the carcasses on the
>>>> kitchen floor), but we've seen a few more and witnessed the cats
>>>> hunting them. The Bengal is the most energetic and enthusiastic,
>>>> but the most clumsy. The moggie is patient, precise and determined.
>>>>
>>>> I read somewhere that female cats are the main hunters, and that
>>>> only when they've been properly taught by their mothers. Also that
>>>> male cats will hunt mice for food when feral.
>>>>
>>>> They both seem pretty interested in the mice we've seen, but don't
>>>> deliver killing blows, thus allowing the mice to escape.
>>>>
>>>> So, any hope that our two cats will figure out how to cleanly
>>>> dispatch a mouse? I suspect that the corpses we found were probably
>>>> scared to death, or inadvertantly killed by play. My guess is that
>>>> the Bengal is thrilled that we somehow bought him the BEST CAT TOY
>>>> EVER!!
>>>>
>>>> Thanks for any ideas.
>>>>
>>>> BLink
>>>
>>> I've only had a mouse three times in 16 years but my cats seem
>>> hardwired to do them in. I did manage to rescue two of them before
>>> they were killed and sent them on their way (outside).
>>>
>>> My one girl does seem to be the best at tackling them but I did pick
>>> her up off the street so she might have learned out there.
>>
>> My, "B-K" brought a chipmonk in last year, and he lived under our
>> stove for the whole Winter. All the cats tried to get him but easily
>> the fastest thing on four feet is a chipmonk.... they didn't have a
>> chance. We fed and watered him all Winter, and when the weather
>> warmed up, I left the sliding glass door open a crack at night and
>> after a few days, he "escaped"., by then, the cats had accepted him
>> as another pet, and were unconcerned.....
>
> That's hysterical. One summer I found a dead squirrel in the basement.
> Blood on his chest and smack in the middle of the floor. One of the
> cats must have done him in and left him there. In the summer the back
> door is open and they can come and go as they please so I have no idea
> who did the deed.

The guys that used to live across the street from me had a cat that would
kill birds, eat them, and then leave their feet on her owners pillow. He
didn't know whether she thought the feet were the best part, or was just
proud of her accomplishment. My, "B-K" would bring mice, voles, and snakes
into the house just to play with them, but didn't eat them. After a while,
they would usually escape back outside. We have one cat that won't hurt
anything. I saw a baby squirril walk over her while she was sleeping on the
rear deck about three years ago. She paid no attention to it at all.

mickrio
February 18th 12, 11:05 AM
I read somewhere that female cats are the main hunters, and that only
when they've been properly taught by their mothers. Also that male
cats will hunt mice for food when feral.
_______
Pua (http://www.theattractionforums.com/) | pick up artist (http://www.theattractionforums.com/) | Dating Coach (http://www.theattractionforums.com/)

T[_4_]
February 25th 12, 04:33 PM
In article >, weg9
@comcast.net says...
>
> dgk wrote:
> > On Fri, 10 Feb 2012 22:04:52 -0800, "Bill Graham" >
> > wrote:
> >
> >> dgk wrote:
> >>> On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 22:10:25 -0600, Brian Link .>
> >>> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> For the first time in the 12+ years we've lived here, we've got
> >>>> mice coming indoors. We've got a 16 year-old moggie adopted from a
> >>>> farm cat litter, and a 9 year-old F7 Bengal, both males.
> >>>>
> >>>> They've slain two mice so far (we found the carcasses on the
> >>>> kitchen floor), but we've seen a few more and witnessed the cats
> >>>> hunting them. The Bengal is the most energetic and enthusiastic,
> >>>> but the most clumsy. The moggie is patient, precise and determined.
> >>>>
> >>>> I read somewhere that female cats are the main hunters, and that
> >>>> only when they've been properly taught by their mothers. Also that
> >>>> male cats will hunt mice for food when feral.
> >>>>
> >>>> They both seem pretty interested in the mice we've seen, but don't
> >>>> deliver killing blows, thus allowing the mice to escape.
> >>>>
> >>>> So, any hope that our two cats will figure out how to cleanly
> >>>> dispatch a mouse? I suspect that the corpses we found were probably
> >>>> scared to death, or inadvertantly killed by play. My guess is that
> >>>> the Bengal is thrilled that we somehow bought him the BEST CAT TOY
> >>>> EVER!!
> >>>>
> >>>> Thanks for any ideas.
> >>>>
> >>>> BLink
> >>>
> >>> I've only had a mouse three times in 16 years but my cats seem
> >>> hardwired to do them in. I did manage to rescue two of them before
> >>> they were killed and sent them on their way (outside).
> >>>
> >>> My one girl does seem to be the best at tackling them but I did pick
> >>> her up off the street so she might have learned out there.
> >>
> >> My, "B-K" brought a chipmonk in last year, and he lived under our
> >> stove for the whole Winter. All the cats tried to get him but easily
> >> the fastest thing on four feet is a chipmonk.... they didn't have a
> >> chance. We fed and watered him all Winter, and when the weather
> >> warmed up, I left the sliding glass door open a crack at night and
> >> after a few days, he "escaped"., by then, the cats had accepted him
> >> as another pet, and were unconcerned.....
> >
> > That's hysterical. One summer I found a dead squirrel in the basement.
> > Blood on his chest and smack in the middle of the floor. One of the
> > cats must have done him in and left him there. In the summer the back
> > door is open and they can come and go as they please so I have no idea
> > who did the deed.
>
> The guys that used to live across the street from me had a cat that would
> kill birds, eat them, and then leave their feet on her owners pillow. He
> didn't know whether she thought the feet were the best part, or was just
> proud of her accomplishment. My, "B-K" would bring mice, voles, and snakes
> into the house just to play with them, but didn't eat them. After a while,
> they would usually escape back outside. We have one cat that won't hurt
> anything. I saw a baby squirril walk over her while she was sleeping on the
> rear deck about three years ago. She paid no attention to it at all.

One of the cats to grace us with her presence was a 6.5lb black tabby
named Emily. She came to us as a six week old kitten and the Keyron was
dubbed as the cat person for Emily.

That little cat was the absolute BEST mouser we've ever had. But there
was one habit that puzzled us. She'd capture a mouse, gut it, and stash
it in the house. We'd smell something but could never find the source.

Then the 'gift' phase started. Keyron would go to put on a shoe and find
a dead, desicated mouse in the shoe! We'd find them layid on the couch,
any place Keyron frequented.

We realized that when Emily was a kitten we'd get her those toy catnip
stuffed mice. And she'd dig the catnip out when playing with the stuffed
toy.

MaryL[_2_]
February 25th 12, 08:06 PM
"chaniarts" wrote in message ...

On 2/8/2012 9:10 PM, Brian Link wrote:
> For the first time in the 12+ years we've lived here, we've got mice
> coming indoors. We've got a 16 year-old moggie adopted from a farm cat
> litter, and a 9 year-old F7 Bengal, both males.
>
> They've slain two mice so far (we found the carcasses on the kitchen
> floor), but we've seen a few more and witnessed the cats hunting them.
> The Bengal is the most energetic and enthusiastic, but the most
> clumsy. The moggie is patient, precise and determined.
>
> I read somewhere that female cats are the main hunters, and that only
> when they've been properly taught by their mothers. Also that male
> cats will hunt mice for food when feral.
>
> They both seem pretty interested in the mice we've seen, but don't
> deliver killing blows, thus allowing the mice to escape.
>
> So, any hope that our two cats will figure out how to cleanly dispatch
> a mouse? I suspect that the corpses we found were probably scared to
> death, or inadvertantly killed by play. My guess is that the Bengal is
> thrilled that we somehow bought him the BEST CAT TOY EVER!!
>
> Thanks for any ideas.
>
> BLink

probably because they're toying with it rather than dispatching them.

perhaps if they were hungrier? a friend that has an outdoor cat near the
desert commented that during the winter, the cat lays around and eats
inside food, but during the summer when there's more plentiful outdoor
prey, he eats almost no indoor food but concentrates on pack rats and
desert rabbits.

<<<<<>>>>>

Some cats are good mousers, some only play with them, and some cats do not
pay any attention. It does not seem to have anything to do with hunger. My
grandfather was a farmer and had lots of barn/farm cats. They were well-fed
and got lots of attention. He always said that cats should be well treated
and that it was "ingrained" in many of them to hunt mice. He even thought
that healthy, well-fed cats were more likely to catch mice than "hungry"
cats. It certainly worked well for him. When I was visiting my parents
years ago with one of my cats (Amber - RB), I saw her literally throwing a
mouse across the room, then chase after it and throw it the other direction.
It was a game for her, and the poor little mouse was terrified. I was
trying to think how to intervene and get the mouse outside when Amber
suddenly flipped the mouse up in the air--and it landed in a wastebasket!!
That gave me the opportunity to grab the wastebasket and release the mouse
outdoors. My parents lived in a frame house (well over 100 years old at
that time), and I worked on making it as "mouse proof" as possible. Over a
period of time, I went through the entire house, from basement to second
floor, and pushed steel wool into every crack and crevice I could find and
especially around water pipes. That also seemed to work because mice
stopped getting into the house. I had read somewhere that steel wool is one
of the few things that rodents cannot chew through.

MaryL