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The Doctor
July 3rd 12, 03:51 PM
Last night our 1 yr old tabby may have choked on and then vomited
a small treat.

What needs to be for follow up?
--
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God,Queen and country!Never Satan President Republic!Beware AntiChrist rising!
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That church which changes with the times cannot also be abiding in Christ

Bill Graham
July 3rd 12, 09:33 PM
The Doctor wrote:
> Last night our 1 yr old tabby may have choked on and then vomited
> a small treat.
>
> What needs to be for follow up?

Cats can't chew. All their teeth are for tearing. So, it is best if you cut
up their food into bite sized pieces. They sometimes try to swallow stuff
that is really too large to go down smoothly.....

The Doctor
July 3rd 12, 09:39 PM
In article >,
Bill Graham > wrote:
>The Doctor wrote:
>> Last night our 1 yr old tabby may have choked on and then vomited
>> a small treat.
>>
>> What needs to be for follow up?
>
>Cats can't chew. All their teeth are for tearing. So, it is best if you cut
>up their food into bite sized pieces. They sometimes try to swallow stuff
>that is really too large to go down smoothly.....
>

I will recall that for all treats he nibbles on.
--
Member - Liberal International This is Ici
God,Queen and country!Never Satan President Republic!Beware AntiChrist rising!
http://www.fullyfollow.me/rootnl2k
That church which changes with the times cannot also be abiding in Christ

Gandalf[_2_]
July 4th 12, 07:34 AM
On Tue, 3 Jul 2012 13:33:26 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
wrote:

>The Doctor wrote:
>> Last night our 1 yr old tabby may have choked on and then vomited
>> a small treat.
>>
>> What needs to be for follow up?
>
>Cats can't chew. All their teeth are for tearing. So, it is best if you cut
>up their food into bite sized pieces. They sometimes try to swallow stuff
>that is really too large to go down smoothly.....

Hmm. My cat chews her kibble every day.

She chews on her soft treats, too.

Gandalf[_2_]
July 4th 12, 07:39 AM
On Tue, 3 Jul 2012 14:51:28 +0000 (UTC), (The
Doctor) wrote:

>Last night our 1 yr old tabby may have choked on and then vomited
>a small treat.
>
>What needs to be for follow up?

I don't think anything needs to be done, unless your cat has trouble
eating and swallowing. If the cat can eat without too much trouble, they
will be OK.

Your cat may have a bit of a sore throat, but should be fine.

Just watch him/her when they eat for a few days. If they have trouble
for more than a few days, then I would bring them to a vet; otherwise,
you don't need to do anything.

Maybe get a different kind of treat, though.

Bill Graham
July 4th 12, 08:28 PM
Gandalf wrote:
> On Tue, 3 Jul 2012 13:33:26 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
> wrote:
>
>> The Doctor wrote:
>>> Last night our 1 yr old tabby may have choked on and then vomited
>>> a small treat.
>>>
>>> What needs to be for follow up?
>>
>> Cats can't chew. All their teeth are for tearing. So, it is best if
>> you cut up their food into bite sized pieces. They sometimes try to
>> swallow stuff that is really too large to go down smoothly.....
>
> Hmm. My cat chews her kibble every day.
>
> She chews on her soft treats, too.

No, she tries to bite them into two pieces perhaps, but this isn't really
chewing. You need molars to chew properly, and cats have no molars.

Bill Graham
July 4th 12, 08:32 PM
Gandalf wrote:
> On Tue, 3 Jul 2012 14:51:28 +0000 (UTC), (The
> Doctor) wrote:
>
>> Last night our 1 yr old tabby may have choked on and then vomited
>> a small treat.
>>
>> What needs to be for follow up?
>
> I don't think anything needs to be done, unless your cat has trouble
> eating and swallowing. If the cat can eat without too much trouble,
> they will be OK.
>
> Your cat may have a bit of a sore throat, but should be fine.
>
> Just watch him/her when they eat for a few days. If they have trouble
> for more than a few days, then I would bring them to a vet; otherwise,
> you don't need to do anything.
>
> Maybe get a different kind of treat, though.

We have an old one, with no teeth at all.... We try to feed him just the
ground up stuff, or wet food that is shredded into very small pieces to make
it as easy for him as possible..... You can also pour warm chicken broth on
the kibbles and make a kind of mash for them to eat. They like this, but try
to find a broth that isn't too salty.....

Wayne Mitchell
July 5th 12, 02:39 AM
"Bill Graham" > wrote:

> We have an old one, with no teeth at all.... We try to feed
> him just the ground up stuff, or wet food that is shredded
> into very small pieces to make it as easy for him as
> possible..... You can also pour warm chicken broth on the
> kibbles and make a kind of mash for them to eat. They like
> this, but try to find a broth that isn't too salty.....

I have an 18-yr-old who has three canines and one premolar left. He
has no trouble eating kibble and considers it an affront if I try to
feed him kibble that has been adulterated in any way.
--

Wayne M.

Wayne Mitchell
July 5th 12, 02:42 AM
"Bill Graham" > wrote:

> No, she tries to bite them into two pieces perhaps, but
> this isn't really chewing. You need molars to chew
> properly, and cats have no molars.

You're right as to function, but wrong as to nomenclature. Although a
carnivore has no grinding teeth, its rear teeth are still properly
designated as premolars and molars.
--

Wayne M.

Bill Graham
July 6th 12, 12:11 AM
Wayne Mitchell wrote:
> "Bill Graham" > wrote:
>
>> No, she tries to bite them into two pieces perhaps, but
>> this isn't really chewing. You need molars to chew
>> properly, and cats have no molars.
>
> You're right as to function, but wrong as to nomenclature. Although a
> carnivore has no grinding teeth, its rear teeth are still properly
> designated as premolars and molars.

Yes... Old cats frequently lose many of their teeth. And, since they are
very good at hiding their suffering, they must suffer greatly. We had one
who developed mouth cancer, and by the time she stopped eating, it was way
too late for us to do anything about it, so we had to put her down. We now
have one who is about 17 years old, and he is missing most of his
teeth...( The vet pulled all the bad ones about 10 years ago) But he will
eat anything we cut up for him, since he started out life as a feral cat and
was accustomed to robbing garbage cans and eating dog kibbles the first few
years of his life.