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Dom
July 11th 12, 03:54 PM
It's all in the subject title. To give you a feel for things, my cat
will beg (cry, poke at me, search the trash for food) as soon as I get
home. I give him a 3oz can of gravy-lovers food, and a bowl of hard
food, and he licks up all the gravy in the first and takes a nibble
from the second, then comes back and cries, pokes and searches,
again. If I give him more, he repeats the pattern. He leaves all the
food in the bowl, but still wants more.

He is now up to 14 lbs, and I refuse to give him more until his late
night feeding, but this goes on all day AND NIGHT. He wakes me at
least 3 times a night. I can't see why he wants more food when he
leaves so much behind.

What do I do? I'm really frantic about this.

(PeteCresswell)
July 11th 12, 04:09 PM
Per Dom:
>He is now up to 14 lbs, and I refuse to give him more until his late
>night feeding, but this goes on all day AND NIGHT. He wakes me at
>least 3 times a night. I can't see why he wants more food when he
>leaves so much behind.

Ours has strong likes/dislikes food-wise. The wrong brand
and/or the wrong flavor and it won't touch the stuff. I'm
guessing that even though two brands may say they're the same
thing, the contents may be very different in terms of flavor,
quality, freshness... or whatever.

Anyhow, it has us trained to buy the right stuff and give the
wrong stuff to our #1 daughter whose barn cats aren't so picky
if/when we make a mistake shopping.

But that does not address the overeating thing.

Neither does this, but I'll throw it in: at night, we lock ours
in the downstairs rec room where it can stay there or go into the
garage and/or crawl space. Improves the quality of our sleep
significantly.
--
Pete Cresswell

Dom
July 11th 12, 04:24 PM
On Jul 11, 11:09*am, "(PeteCresswell)" > wrote:
> Per Dom:
>
> >He is now up to 14 lbs, and I refuse to give him more until his late
> >night feeding, but this goes on all day AND NIGHT. *He wakes me at
> >least 3 times a night. *I can't see why he wants more food when he
> >leaves so much behind.
>
> Ours has strong likes/dislikes food-wise. * The wrong brand
> and/or the wrong flavor and it won't touch the stuff. *I'm
> guessing that even though two brands may say they're the same
> thing, the contents may be very different in terms of flavor,
> quality, freshness... or whatever.
>
> Anyhow, it has us trained to buy the right stuff and give the
> wrong stuff to our #1 daughter whose barn cats aren't so picky
> if/when we make a mistake shopping.
>
> But that does not address the overeating thing.
>
> Neither does this, but I'll throw it in: at night, we lock ours
> in the downstairs rec room where it can stay there or go into the
> garage and/or crawl space. * Improves the quality of our sleep
> significantly.
> --
> Pete Cresswell

Can you suggest any brands? I use only fancy feast, but for him I get
Gravy Lovers Fancy Feast, since he licks the gravy.

Matthew[_3_]
July 11th 12, 04:36 PM
"Dom" > wrote in message
...
On Jul 11, 11:09 am, "(PeteCresswell)" > wrote:
> Per Dom:
>
> >He is now up to 14 lbs, and I refuse to give him more until his late
> >night feeding, but this goes on all day AND NIGHT. He wakes me at
> >least 3 times a night. I can't see why he wants more food when he
> >leaves so much behind.
>
> Ours has strong likes/dislikes food-wise. The wrong brand
> and/or the wrong flavor and it won't touch the stuff. I'm
> guessing that even though two brands may say they're the same
> thing, the contents may be very different in terms of flavor,
> quality, freshness... or whatever.
>
> Anyhow, it has us trained to buy the right stuff and give the
> wrong stuff to our #1 daughter whose barn cats aren't so picky
> if/when we make a mistake shopping.
>
> But that does not address the overeating thing.
>
> Neither does this, but I'll throw it in: at night, we lock ours
> in the downstairs rec room where it can stay there or go into the
> garage and/or crawl space. Improves the quality of our sleep
> significantly.
> --
> Pete Cresswell

Can you suggest any brands? I use only fancy feast, but for him I get
Gravy Lovers Fancy Feast, since he licks the gravy.

Dom you may want to try some of the cheap stuff not on a permanent basis
but the more stinker it is the more my furballs love it. I only use the
same as you 99% of the time since I have a gravy eater also


Also how much play time do you have with them You need to wear them out on
a schedule. Also there are times when I am so exhausted that I do close my
bedroom door which is seldom. If you have to close them out of the door and
if they keep scratching at the door a good training item is keep them away
from a closed door is a blow dryer in a remote control

(PeteCresswell)
July 11th 12, 05:52 PM
Per Dom:
>Can you suggest any brands? I use only fancy feast, but for him I get
>Gravy Lovers Fancy Feast, since he licks the gravy.

We use Fancy Feast too.

But my take is that it's a cat-by-cat thing and, in your place, I
would buy a can of this, a can of that, a bag of this, a bag of
that (i.e. wet and dry) and see what goes down and what does not.

Also, internationally-acclaimed animal behaviorist that I am (NOT
!!!!) I was thinking maybe the food craving thing could actually
attention craving.

I bought a cat brush a few years ago: wire bristles on one side,
plastic on the other.

In the beginning, I'd lose blood if I even tried to brush it.

Gradually, it has become habituated to brushing and my technique
has been modified as I perceive improvement for the cat.

We are now to the point that when I'm in the rec room trying to
get work done on the PC, the cat is continually bugging me (loud,
plaintive meows) to brush it and it seems to *really* enjoy the
process.

If I had saved all the hair I've combed out of this thing, I
could probably find some back-to-basics type that spins their own
yarn and have a cat-hair sweater made.... -)

3-4 sessions, and it backs off... but I have to wonder if
attention isn't at the root of it all and maybe chasing a laser
pointer would be just as effective.
--
Pete Cresswell

Dom
July 11th 12, 06:36 PM
On Jul 11, 12:52*pm, "(PeteCresswell)" > wrote:
> Per Dom:
>
> >Can you suggest any brands? *I use only fancy feast, but for him I get
> >Gravy Lovers Fancy Feast, since he licks the gravy.
>
> We use Fancy Feast too.
>
> But my take is that it's a cat-by-cat thing and, in your place, I
> would buy a can of this, a can of that, a bag of this, a bag of
> that (i.e. wet and dry) and see what goes down and what does not.
>
> Also, internationally-acclaimed animal behaviorist that I am (NOT
> !!!!) I was thinking maybe the food craving thing could actually
> attention craving.
>
> I bought a cat brush a few years ago: wire bristles on one side,
> plastic on the other.
>
> In the beginning, I'd lose blood if I even tried to brush it.
>
> Gradually, it has become habituated to brushing and my technique
> has been modified as I perceive improvement for the cat.
>
> We are now to the point that when I'm in the rec room trying to
> get work done on the PC, the cat is continually bugging me (loud,
> plaintive meows) to brush it and it seems to *really* enjoy the
> process.
>
> If I had saved all the hair I've combed out of this thing, I
> could probably find some back-to-basics type that spins their own
> yarn and have a cat-hair sweater made.... -)
>
> 3-4 sessions, and it backs off... but I have to wonder if
> attention isn't at the root of it all and maybe chasing a laser
> pointer would be just as effective.
> --
> Pete Cresswell

Well, I've noticed one thing. When I lie on the sofa, and let him
assume his favorite position (on my chest) he stops his crying. And
he HATES it when I'm at the computer, like he's competing. So maybe
you're right.

Thanks, Pete and Mathew. Gives me something to work with.

Dom

MLB[_4_]
July 11th 12, 11:33 PM
On 07/11/2012 08:54 AM, Dom wrote:
> It's all in the subject title. To give you a feel for things, my cat
> will beg (cry, poke at me, search the trash for food) as soon as I get
> home. I give him a 3oz can of gravy-lovers food, and a bowl of hard
> food, and he licks up all the gravy in the first and takes a nibble
> from the second, then comes back and cries, pokes and searches,
> again. If I give him more, he repeats the pattern. He leaves all the
> food in the bowl, but still wants more.
>
> He is now up to 14 lbs, and I refuse to give him more until his late
> night feeding, but this goes on all day AND NIGHT. He wakes me at
> least 3 times a night. I can't see why he wants more food when he
> leaves so much behind.
>
> What do I do? I'm really frantic about this.



A visit to TED is in order for a thyroid check. Best wishes. MLB

Bill Graham
July 12th 12, 05:38 AM
Dom wrote:
> It's all in the subject title. To give you a feel for things, my cat
> will beg (cry, poke at me, search the trash for food) as soon as I get
> home. I give him a 3oz can of gravy-lovers food, and a bowl of hard
> food, and he licks up all the gravy in the first and takes a nibble
> from the second, then comes back and cries, pokes and searches,
> again. If I give him more, he repeats the pattern. He leaves all the
> food in the bowl, but still wants more.
>
> He is now up to 14 lbs, and I refuse to give him more until his late
> night feeding, but this goes on all day AND NIGHT. He wakes me at
> least 3 times a night. I can't see why he wants more food when he
> leaves so much behind.
>
> What do I do? I'm really frantic about this.

If he's your only cat, and an indoor cat, then don't feed him for a day or
two until he's really hungry, and then just geve him a little bit so he will
eat it all before you give him any more. In my case, I have one who weighs
about 30 lbs, and stuffs himself to the point of throwing up. but I keep
putside cats and I have five of them, so they all share an infinite supply
of kibbles plus they eat each others food when its first eater walks away
from it. so I don't know how to keep "Biggie" from eating.

Bill Graham
July 12th 12, 05:44 AM
Dom wrote:
>> If I had saved all the hair I've combed out of this thing, I
>> could probably find some back-to-basics type that spins their own
>> yarn and have a cat-hair sweater made.... -)


I used to know a lady who did that with her two Belgian Sheppards. She saved
up the hair she got from brushing them, and sent it off to some guy who
could spin it into wool, and then she knitted herself a sweater out of
it..... It looked pretty good, too.....

FragSinatra
July 12th 12, 04:37 PM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in
:

>
> If he's your only cat, and an indoor cat, then don't feed him for a
> day or two until he's really hungry, and then just geve him a little
> bit so he will eat it all before you give him any more. In my case, I
> have one who weighs about 30 lbs, and stuffs himself to the point of
> throwing up. but I keep putside cats and I have five of them, so they
> all share an infinite supply of kibbles plus they eat each others food
> when its first eater walks away from it. so I don't know how to keep
> "Biggie" from eating.
>


A 30 lb. cat! That's a big cat!

--- Posted via news://freenews.netfront.net/ - Complaints to ---

Bill Graham
July 12th 12, 10:44 PM
FragSinatra wrote:
> "Bill Graham" > wrote in
> :
>
>>
>> If he's your only cat, and an indoor cat, then don't feed him for a
>> day or two until he's really hungry, and then just geve him a little
>> bit so he will eat it all before you give him any more. In my case, I
>> have one who weighs about 30 lbs, and stuffs himself to the point of
>> throwing up. but I keep putside cats and I have five of them, so they
>> all share an infinite supply of kibbles plus they eat each others
>> food when its first eater walks away from it. so I don't know how to
>> keep "Biggie" from eating.
>>
>
>
> A 30 lb. cat! That's a big cat!

Yes. Well, to be fair, he is much heavier boned than my other cats, so I
think he is a different breed. I would say that his ideal weight is around
20 pounds, so he is like 50% overweight. My other cats weigh between 6 and
10 pounds. He is big, but a very gentile cat and doesn't throw his weight
around with the other cats......

FragSinatra
July 13th 12, 06:05 AM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in
:

> FragSinatra wrote:
>> "Bill Graham" > wrote in
>> :
>>
>>>
>>> If he's your only cat, and an indoor cat, then don't feed him for a
>>> day or two until he's really hungry, and then just geve him a little
>>> bit so he will eat it all before you give him any more. In my case,
>>> I have one who weighs about 30 lbs, and stuffs himself to the point
>>> of throwing up. but I keep putside cats and I have five of them, so
>>> they all share an infinite supply of kibbles plus they eat each
>>> others food when its first eater walks away from it. so I don't know
>>> how to keep "Biggie" from eating.
>>>
>>
>>
>> A 30 lb. cat! That's a big cat!
>
> Yes. Well, to be fair, he is much heavier boned than my other cats, so
> I think he is a different breed. I would say that his ideal weight is
> around 20 pounds, so he is like 50% overweight. My other cats weigh
> between 6 and 10 pounds. He is big, but a very gentile cat and doesn't
> throw his weight around with the other cats......
>
>

It's a good thing he's a gentile cat. I wouldn't want to see him mad
and I definitely wouldn't want to be the one to try to give him
medicine, put him in a cat cage or give him a bath.

I'm guessing such a big cat isn't very lithe is he?

--- Posted via news://freenews.netfront.net/ - Complaints to ---

Kelly Greene[_4_]
July 13th 12, 04:42 PM
"Dom" > wrote in message
...
If I give him more, he repeats the pattern. He leaves all the
> food in the bowl, but still wants more.

This sounds like it can be boredom. The begging gives him something to do
and it gets your attention.

Kelly Greene[_4_]
July 13th 12, 04:50 PM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in message
...
>
> If he's your only cat, and an indoor cat, then don't feed him for a day or
> two until he's really hungry, and then just geve him a little bit so he
> will eat it all before you give him any more. In my case, I have one who
> weighs about 30 lbs, and stuffs himself to the point of throwing up......

This is an extremely obese cat on his way to some disease or other and a
shorter lifespan. Even an adult Maine Coon shouldn't weigh this much.
Kibble is loaded with fattening carbohydrates cats should not have. Why not
switch them to something healthier like canned cat food? Two excellent
sites:

http://www.catnutrition.org/
http://www.catinfo.org/


but I keep
> putside cats and I have five of them, so they all share an infinite supply
> of kibbles plus they eat each others food when its first eater walks away
> from it. so I don't know how to keep "Biggie" from eating.

Try getting rid of the kibble and feed them canned food. It's not that
expensive.

Bill Graham
July 13th 12, 11:37 PM
"FragSinatra" > wrote in message
. ..
> "Bill Graham" > wrote in
> :
>
>> FragSinatra wrote:
>>> "Bill Graham" > wrote in
>>> :
>>>
>>>>
>>>> If he's your only cat, and an indoor cat, then don't feed him for a
>>>> day or two until he's really hungry, and then just geve him a little
>>>> bit so he will eat it all before you give him any more. In my case,
>>>> I have one who weighs about 30 lbs, and stuffs himself to the point
>>>> of throwing up. but I keep putside cats and I have five of them, so
>>>> they all share an infinite supply of kibbles plus they eat each
>>>> others food when its first eater walks away from it. so I don't know
>>>> how to keep "Biggie" from eating.
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> A 30 lb. cat! That's a big cat!
>>
>> Yes. Well, to be fair, he is much heavier boned than my other cats, so
>> I think he is a different breed. I would say that his ideal weight is
>> around 20 pounds, so he is like 50% overweight. My other cats weigh
>> between 6 and 10 pounds. He is big, but a very gentile cat and doesn't
>> throw his weight around with the other cats......
>>
>>
>
> It's a good thing he's a gentile cat. I wouldn't want to see him mad
> and I definitely wouldn't want to be the one to try to give him
> medicine, put him in a cat cage or give him a bath.
>
> I'm guessing such a big cat isn't very lithe is he?


He is pretty normal for his age (about 10) Since my B-K died, all of my cats
are pretty old. I got, "Tiger" from a friend who is going RV'ing for the
next couple of years and needed a place to put his cat. He makes a big
"thump" when he jumps off a table onto our hardwood floors, so I leave
padded rug remnants around for him and the other cats to use.....

Bill Graham
July 13th 12, 11:41 PM
"Kelly Greene" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Dom" > wrote in message
> ...
> If I give him more, he repeats the pattern. He leaves all the
>> food in the bowl, but still wants more.
>
> This sounds like it can be boredom. The begging gives him something to do
> and it gets your attention.

Yes. Try brushing him, or playing with him.... Anything but feeding him.

Bill Graham
July 13th 12, 11:49 PM
"Kelly Greene" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Bill Graham" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> If he's your only cat, and an indoor cat, then don't feed him for a day
>> or two until he's really hungry, and then just geve him a little bit so
>> he will eat it all before you give him any more. In my case, I have one
>> who weighs about 30 lbs, and stuffs himself to the point of throwing
>> up......
>
> This is an extremely obese cat on his way to some disease or other and a
> shorter lifespan. Even an adult Maine Coon shouldn't weigh this much.
> Kibble is loaded with fattening carbohydrates cats should not have. Why
> not switch them to something healthier like canned cat food? Two
> excellent sites:
>
> http://www.catnutrition.org/
> http://www.catinfo.org/
>
>
> but I keep
>> putside cats and I have five of them, so they all share an infinite
>> supply of kibbles plus they eat each others food when its first eater
>> walks away from it. so I don't know how to keep "Biggie" from eating.
>
> Try getting rid of the kibble and feed them canned food. It's not that
> expensive.
>
>

That's true.. It's not the cost, but it is very convenient. The kibbles
don't go bad after a few hours like the wet food does. Also, a couple of my
cats won't eat anything else but kibbles. They come from all different
backgrounds. One was feral, and he eats people garbage when ever he can get
it. (they all tend to eat what they were raised on, I think) Now we are
feeding a new cat who showed up at our door about a month ago. He was skinny
as a rail and ate two cans of cat food before leaving. I think he belongs
down the block somewhere, and my guess is that his owners leave his food
down where their dog can get at it, and so the cat was starving to death.
Now he is filled out, but he still shows up every day a couple of times just
to eat. He really likes canned food.....

August 6th 12, 11:12 PM
Canned food doesn't have to be expensive. The amount recommended on the can is quite a bit higher than what cats actually need, according to educated veterinary professionals like Dr. Pierson on her non-commercial site Catinfo.org.

If you continue to feed kibble, it will likely lead to diabetes and urinary blockages. We rescued a diabetic cat to prevent him from being killed, and believe me, you want to PREVENT these problems as it's MUCH easier and less expensive than veterinary treatment. (YOU need to learn about this stuff so you can advocate for your cat as vets are generally NOT educated about feline nutrition. Both Dr. Pierson and my cat vet agree with that fact.)

Canned food does NOT go bad in a few hours! Most people leave the food down for 12 hours, but when feeding a reduced amount the cats usually eat it all within 30 minutes.

Kibble will lead to higher vet bills, so it will NOT save you money in the long run. Even with expensive kibble, it's like you are paying for steak but really ending up with high-carb meatloaf.

August 6th 12, 11:16 PM
It's important to get your cat tested, but I STRONGLY recommend reviewing the lab work with someone who can interpret the results and help you decide how to treat and feed your cat. I found a super awesome vet tech with decades of experience who is offering that service and will even speak with your vet if you like. She can help diabetic cats get off insulin and help people get their fat cats to lose weight safely WITHOUT using expensive prescription diets. See www.MeganTheCatLady.com - Megan is AWESOME and provides great info links there too.

MaryL[_2_]
August 7th 12, 12:25 AM
"Dom" wrote in message
...

It's all in the subject title. To give you a feel for things, my cat
will beg (cry, poke at me, search the trash for food) as soon as I get
home. I give him a 3oz can of gravy-lovers food, and a bowl of hard
food, and he licks up all the gravy in the first and takes a nibble
from the second, then comes back and cries, pokes and searches,
again. If I give him more, he repeats the pattern. He leaves all the
food in the bowl, but still wants more.

He is now up to 14 lbs, and I refuse to give him more until his late
night feeding, but this goes on all day AND NIGHT. He wakes me at
least 3 times a night. I can't see why he wants more food when he
leaves so much behind.

What do I do? I'm really frantic about this.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Has she been checked by a vet? If not, that is the first thing you should
do. In particular, I would want evaluation for possible thyroid problem or
diabetes and possibly even pancreas. If everything checks out normal, stop
feeding her when she cries (as difficult as that may be). Instead, put her
on a schedule of feeding twice a day, 12 hours apart or as close to that as
possible. Stop feeding dry food and move to *quality* canned food (not food
with gravy where she will lick the gravy but leave everything else). I use
Wellness canned food. Be sure to use *grains free* canned food. Cats are
obligate carnivores and cannot digest plant material.

MaryL

(PeteCresswell)
August 7th 12, 02:13 AM
Per MaryL:
>He is now up to 14 lbs, and I refuse to give him more until his late
>night feeding, but this goes on all day AND NIGHT. He wakes me at
>least 3 times a night. I can't see why he wants more food when he
>leaves so much behind.
>
>What do I do? I'm really frantic about this.

This is just a stab in the dark from somebody who knows next to
nothing....

Having said that... I'd try the hypothesis that
attention/stimulation is what it really craves - and food just
happens to be the familiar choice.

How about buying one of those pet grooming brushes with the steel
bristles on one side and regular bristles on the other and
starting a little brushing routine?

Mine has removable combs that are handy for getting the hair out
of the bristles.

With our cat, we'd loose blood if we tried to touch it with that
brush 3 years ago. Very slowly over time, it has acclimated to
it and now aggressively seeks being brushed - as in meowing
loudly until it's done. It seems to *really* enjoy it.

Ours gets locked in the rec room at night - and we sleep a lot
better...

--
Pete Cresswell

August 8th 12, 07:51 AM
I agree with everything MaryL has written, but it's essential to educate yourself about why the canned food is so important (see www.catinfo.org and www.catnutrition.org).

After consulting with vet tech Megan (www.MegantheCatLady.com), she advised that Wellness or other grain-free AND FISH-FREE canned food is not that expensive if you're only feeding two or two and a half ounces every 12 hours. Switching to canned is usually easy (if transitioning from dry food, only leave the dry food down for 30 minutes, and add a little bit of canned to it, then pick up all food until 12 hours later).

The majority of vets are not well-educated about cats or feline nutrition, so YOU will probably have advocate on behalf of your cat. If you get your cat tested, she is able to consult with you about the results to help you.

Megan also posts more info about how much canned food to feed on the Main Street Vet site: See "Cat feeding spreadsheet (Excel)", http://www.msvets.com/FelineDMDownloads.html

"This spreadsheet provides the calculation of your cat's food requirement according to its weight and body condition."

August 8th 12, 07:58 AM
The vet should also check for dental problems as that can affect so many things and how cats behave. Anne writes about her "Really Big Wakeup Call on feline oral health" here: http://www.catnutrition.org/periodontal-disease.html

"The odds are higher than most of us care to believe that kitty has periodontal disease (PD). According to the detailed paper that board-certified veterinary dentist Dr. Thomas Chamberlain shares with his clients, approximately 85 percent of cats and dogs have PD by the age of two."

MaryL[_2_]
August 8th 12, 09:19 PM
wrote in message
...

Canned food doesn't have to be expensive. The amount recommended on the can
is quite a bit higher than what cats actually need, according to educated
veterinary professionals like Dr. Pierson on her non-commercial site
Catinfo.org.

If you continue to feed kibble, it will likely lead to diabetes and urinary
blockages. We rescued a diabetic cat to prevent him from being killed, and
believe me, you want to PREVENT these problems as it's MUCH easier and less
expensive than veterinary treatment. (YOU need to learn about this stuff so
you can advocate for your cat as vets are generally NOT educated about
feline nutrition. Both Dr. Pierson and my cat vet agree with that fact.)

Canned food does NOT go bad in a few hours! Most people leave the food down
for 12 hours, but when feeding a reduced amount the cats usually eat it all
within 30 minutes.

Kibble will lead to higher vet bills, so it will NOT save you money in the
long run. Even with expensive kibble, it's like you are paying for steak but
really ending up with high-carb meatloaf.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Agreed. When I switched from kibble to canned (primarily Wellness but also
some EVO), I found that the cost was less than expected because my cats
maintain their weight on less canned than expected. Premium canned food
without grains is more dense (my word - probably not the best description of
the nutrition I am trying to describe) than poor quality food, and they
simply do not need as much. I think people would soon have fat cats if they
followed the instructions found on most cat food. I have found that I need
to leave canned food out for longer than 30 minutes for my cats, but they
will soon reappear to eat some more.

Cats that are fed kibble are more prone to diabetes and UTI. This certainly
does not mean that this will happen to *all* cats fed on kibble, but there
is a clear relationship. I have even heard people claim that dry food is
"good" for a cat's teeth. One response to this that I heard from a cat
expert was, "Would you feed your children pretzels to help their teeth?"
Cats do not even chew, as people do. They tear and bite and "crunch" on
hard objects.

MaryL

Bill Graham
August 9th 12, 08:10 AM
MaryL wrote:
> wrote in message
> ...
>
> Canned food doesn't have to be expensive. The amount recommended on
> the can is quite a bit higher than what cats actually need, according
> to educated veterinary professionals like Dr. Pierson on her
> non-commercial site Catinfo.org.
>
> If you continue to feed kibble, it will likely lead to diabetes and
> urinary blockages. We rescued a diabetic cat to prevent him from
> being killed, and believe me, you want to PREVENT these problems as
> it's MUCH easier and less expensive than veterinary treatment. (YOU
> need to learn about this stuff so you can advocate for your cat as
> vets are generally NOT educated about feline nutrition. Both Dr.
> Pierson and my cat vet agree with that fact.)
> Canned food does NOT go bad in a few hours! Most people leave the
> food down for 12 hours, but when feeding a reduced amount the cats
> usually eat it all within 30 minutes.
>
> Kibble will lead to higher vet bills, so it will NOT save you money
> in the long run. Even with expensive kibble, it's like you are paying
> for steak but really ending up with high-carb meatloaf.
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Agreed. When I switched from kibble to canned (primarily Wellness
> but also some EVO), I found that the cost was less than expected
> because my cats maintain their weight on less canned than expected.
> Premium canned food without grains is more dense (my word - probably
> not the best description of the nutrition I am trying to describe)
> than poor quality food, and they simply do not need as much. I think
> people would soon have fat cats if they followed the instructions
> found on most cat food. I have found that I need to leave canned
> food out for longer than 30 minutes for my cats, but they will soon
> reappear to eat some more.
> Cats that are fed kibble are more prone to diabetes and UTI. This
> certainly does not mean that this will happen to *all* cats fed on
> kibble, but there is a clear relationship. I have even heard people
> claim that dry food is "good" for a cat's teeth. One response to
> this that I heard from a cat expert was, "Would you feed your
> children pretzels to help their teeth?" Cats do not even chew, as
> people do. They tear and bite and "crunch" on hard objects.
>
> MaryL

The advantage of kibbles is that they are dry, so they last
indefinitely.....(a week or more) I don't see why you couldn't do the same
thing with the canned food by simply drying it out. My cats always have a
fresh water supply, so they could eat the dried food and then drink as much
as they please. If the canned food is good for them then dried canned food
would also be good.... Right? IOW, one might ask, "Why is there any
difference between dried food and canned food?" Perhaps I will buy a dryer
and dry my own cat food.