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Pon o
October 11th 12, 10:11 PM
Hi,
I've never posted here before. Thought someone might have at least an
idea for a long-term solution.

There must be 30 - 40 feral cats/kittens in one city block, crying,
fighting, getting killed in traffic, caught in trees, injured, sick,
etc. etc.

I understand that this is a growing problem throughout many states.

I've phoned & spoke with with the local SPCA, cat rescues, the DEC, city
animal control. The list could go on almost endlessly.

I'd like to be part of the solution but don't know where to find ideas.
Does anybody have thoughts on this?
TIA,
Pon

Bill Graham
October 12th 12, 12:44 AM
Pon o wrote:
> Hi,
> I've never posted here before. Thought someone might have at least an
> idea for a long-term solution.
>
> There must be 30 - 40 feral cats/kittens in one city block, crying,
> fighting, getting killed in traffic, caught in trees, injured, sick,
> etc. etc.
>
> I understand that this is a growing problem throughout many states.
>
> I've phoned & spoke with with the local SPCA, cat rescues, the DEC,
> city animal control. The list could go on almost endlessly.
>
> I'd like to be part of the solution but don't know where to find
> ideas. Does anybody have thoughts on this?
> TIA,
> Pon

Yes. Trap, neuter, and release is one "solution". At least, a partial
solution. You can help either by donating money to organizations who do
this, or catch your own feral cat, have him/her neutered, and release him
back where you caught him. (when we do this, we usually end up owning
another cat)

Pon o
October 12th 12, 03:35 AM
>"Trap, neuter, and release is one
> "solution". At least, a partial solution.
> You can help either by donating money
> to organizations who do this, or catch
> your own feral cat, have him/her
> neutered, and release him back where
> you caught him. (when we do this, we
> usually end up owning another cat)."
Ok, thanks! That's what one local cat org. is doing. But they rely on
private donations since there is no legislation/no funding, concerning
domestic cats, feral or not, in the state of NY (& other states as
well).

For all their good intentions, this expensive neuter/release program is
a drop in the bucket. Donations are scarce; cats' lifespans are short
because of disease, traffic, starvation. frigid winters, & this
summer--drought! It's heartbreaking to see what these animals go
through.

So I guess there is no good & lasting solution?

Do you expect this to be a growing problem in the future? I don't
remember feral cats being a problem until a few yrs. ago.
Thanks,
- Pon

(PeteCresswell)
October 12th 12, 02:40 PM
Per Pon o:
>Do you expect this to be a growing problem in the future? I don't
>remember feral cats being a problem until a few yrs. ago.

Maybe it's a local predator/prey balance thing.

I have no clue what preys on cats except for foxes.

Having said that, we used to have a lot more cats around here
until a family of foxes moved in to the area (as evidenced by
security camera videos). Now the cat population seems pretty
much restricted to cats whose owners keep them in at night.

Even during the day, we see the occasional fox prowling around...
and we always have a door or two open so our cat has a fallback
position.
--
Pete Cresswell

Bill Graham
October 12th 12, 10:27 PM
Pon o wrote:
>> "Trap, neuter, and release is one
>> "solution". At least, a partial solution.
>> You can help either by donating money
>> to organizations who do this, or catch
>> your own feral cat, have him/her
>> neutered, and release him back where
>> you caught him. (when we do this, we
>> usually end up owning another cat)."
> Ok, thanks! That's what one local cat org. is doing. But they rely on
> private donations since there is no legislation/no funding, concerning
> domestic cats, feral or not, in the state of NY (& other states as
> well).
>
> For all their good intentions, this expensive neuter/release program
> is a drop in the bucket. Donations are scarce; cats' lifespans are
> short because of disease, traffic, starvation. frigid winters, & this
> summer--drought! It's heartbreaking to see what these animals go
> through.
>
> So I guess there is no good & lasting solution?
>
> Do you expect this to be a growing problem in the future? I don't
> remember feral cats being a problem until a few yrs. ago.
> Thanks,
> - Pon

Well, like our human population the cats population grows too. I find it
more rewarding to take in my own stray cat, feed him and house him for the
Winter, and then get him neutered as soon as I can. There may be many in the
neighborhood, but usually only one shows up at my door every year or so, and
my wife and I casn handle this. We even liik forward to them showing us for
food every few days. One thing is for sure, The government isn't interested.
Feral cats don't vote....:^) They would rather take your tax dollars and
give them to some terrorist country in the Mideast who hates our guts.....

Bill Graham
October 12th 12, 10:33 PM
(PeteCresswell) wrote:
> Per Pon o:
>> Do you expect this to be a growing problem in the future? I don't
>> remember feral cats being a problem until a few yrs. ago.
>
> Maybe it's a local predator/prey balance thing.
>
> I have no clue what preys on cats except for foxes.
Owls, Eagles, Ospreys, Teen aged boys, automobiles, people who use Round-Up
on their weeds, coyotes, Stray dogs, Other cats, various cat diseases (like
FIV) Poisoned mice, rats, snails and other critters, Poisonous snakes (in
some locals) And probably several other things that I haven't thought of
yet. Oh... the "teen aged boys"... Some of them are in their forties and
fifties, and just like to use cats for their target proctice.....

Bill Graham
October 12th 12, 11:12 PM
Bill Graham wrote:
> (PeteCresswell) wrote:
>> Per Pon o:
>>> Do you expect this to be a growing problem in the future? I don't
>>> remember feral cats being a problem until a few yrs. ago.
>>
>> Maybe it's a local predator/prey balance thing.
>>
>> I have no clue what preys on cats except for foxes.
> Owls, Eagles, Ospreys, Teen aged boys, automobiles, people who use
> Round-Up on their weeds, coyotes, Stray dogs, Other cats, various cat
> diseases (like FIV) Poisoned mice, rats, snails and other critters,
> Poisonous snakes (in some locals) And probably several other things
> that I haven't thought of yet. Oh... the "teen aged boys"... Some of
> them are in their forties and fifties, and just like to use cats for
> their target proctice.....

I forgot other hazards such as enclosed places like auto trunks. and
sometimes cars don't kill cats by running them down, but their fan belts
kill them on start up in the morning.....

Bill Graham
October 12th 12, 11:46 PM
Bill Graham wrote:
> Bill Graham wrote:
>> (PeteCresswell) wrote:
>>> Per Pon o:
>>>> Do you expect this to be a growing problem in the future? I don't
>>>> remember feral cats being a problem until a few yrs. ago.

When I was about 15, back in 1950, I worked as a bus boy in a restaurant
in Lynbrook, Long Island, New Your. The diwhwsher would take out the
garbage, and spill a lot of it on the ground, which the feral cats wold eat.
In a year, there would be hundreds of cats waiting for Jack to take out the
garbage. Mrs Frazer, who owned the3 restaurant would call the ASPCA who
would come and trap these cats every year and put (I presume) them to sleep.
Then Jack would start working on next years batch....... So, feral cats have
always been a problem, to someone, somewhere....

Pon o
October 13th 12, 07:43 AM
Hi Pete,
Thanks for replying to my post.

I live in the city so there is no natural predator for these cats except
cars, famine, disease, injury, weather....

The neighborhood is rodent free, I believe, so the cats are preying on
songbirds for one.

I hate it when I find a pile of red feathers & know another cardinal has
become a cat's dinner..

I feel for the plight of the cats but realistically don't see any
practical solution.

I've just joined a Yahoo Group on Feral Cats where I might get some
ideas.
Thanks again,
- Pon

Pon o
October 13th 12, 08:04 AM
Bill,
>"One thing is for sure, The government
> isn't interested. Feral cats don't
> vote....:^) They would rather take your
> tax dollars and give them to some
> terrorist country in the Mideast who
> hates our guts....."

LOL! Good one!

I was bitten by a feral kitten several yrs ago, trying to get it out
from under my car. Two days later my finger turned a lovely shade of
purple & swelled double size. When I developed a fever, I went to the ER
& was put on an antibiotic IV drip for 3 days, followed by 14 days of
mega antibiotics. I had the early stage of sepsis.

They wanted to do surgery on the finger (index) because it had infected
with a "felon" (some kind of infection). I declined, & have since had no
sensation in that finger, joint to tip.

I rescued a feral kitten from a tree the other day after it cried from
morning 'til dusk. I held my breath as it hissed & tried to bite.

Point of this long story.... I don't want to get too close to the feral
population. Still want to help tho.
- Pon

Pon o
October 13th 12, 08:13 AM
We do have the occasional hawk in the city. Rare to see a stray dog due
to strict leash laws. Didn't know Roundup was a threat but even I'm
choking when the lawn companies come round spraying those chemicals.

Poisoned rats would be dangerous (not sure we have a rat problem).
I could tell horror stories about the "teen age boys".

But what's this about snails????
- Pon

Pon o
October 13th 12, 08:34 AM
Fan belts- I think of that every time I get into the car. Have to look
under it too, esp. as the weather gets cold!

The dogs have had to get a lepto booster (2 shots/yr. now) because of
increased risk. Wonder if cats can contract West NIle from birds they've
brought down.

This is the 1st yr. my dogs have had fleas in 8 yrs, prob. because the
yard is constantly reinfested by the cats.

Ok, I'm just thinking out loud... Wonder if after TNR they're just as
likely to perpetuate these particular problems.
Thank you all!

I've got research to do before I punk down a big hunk of change on traps
for the TNR.
- Pon

Bill Graham
October 14th 12, 03:28 AM
Pon o wrote:
> We do have the occasional hawk in the city. Rare to see a stray dog
> due to strict leash laws. Didn't know Roundup was a threat but even
> I'm choking when the lawn companies come round spraying those
> chemicals.
>
> Poisoned rats would be dangerous (not sure we have a rat problem).
> I could tell horror stories about the "teen age boys".
>
> But what's this about snails????
> - Pon

Cats will eat snails.... Especially hungry feral cats. - They will eat
anything thet moves. Snails are frequently poisoned by zealous gardiners....
So, anything that is poisoned and moves is a hazard to cats. And people. I
had a friend who ate garden snails. He would put them in a terrariam for a
week or more first, and feed them cornmeal to make sure they weren't
poisoned before he killed them, cleaned them, and ate them. They are a lot
of work, but they sure are good... (when you put that much butter and garlic
on anything, it tasts good)

Bill Graham
October 14th 12, 03:31 AM
Pon o wrote:
> Fan belts- I think of that every time I get into the car. Have to
> look under it too, esp. as the weather gets cold!
>
> The dogs have had to get a lepto booster (2 shots/yr. now) because of
> increased risk. Wonder if cats can contract West NIle from birds
> they've brought down.
>
> This is the 1st yr. my dogs have had fleas in 8 yrs, prob. because the
> yard is constantly reinfested by the cats.
>
> Ok, I'm just thinking out loud... Wonder if after TNR they're just as
> likely to perpetuate these particular problems.
> Thank you all!
>
> I've got research to do before I punk down a big hunk of change on
> traps for the TNR.
> - Pon

I've been told that cat fleas and dog fleas are different,and one won't
bother with the other. I know that cat fleas are very small.... They are
difficult to see with the naked eye.

October 15th 12, 03:29 PM
>
> I've got research to do before I punk down a big hunk of change on traps
>
> for the TNR.
>

Pon, you should not have to buy traps if you don't want to. I trapped and got a neighborhood feral spayed this spring, and borrowed a trap from the local humane society. I had to put down a deposit of $40, which I got back after returning it.

I am sorry you had the terrible experience with your finger! However, if you use a live trap and cover it with a blanket when transporting, you won't need to touch the cats at all.

Thank you for wanting to help.
Rene

Kraut / Larry Stark
October 15th 12, 04:03 PM
On Mon, 15 Oct 2012 07:29:04 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

>
>>
>> I've got research to do before I punk down a big hunk of change on traps
>>
>> for the TNR.
>>
>
>Pon, you should not have to buy traps if you don't want to. I trapped and got a neighborhood feral spayed this spring, and borrowed a trap from the local humane society. I had to put down a deposit of $40, which I got back after returning it.
>
>I am sorry you had the terrible experience with your finger! However, if you use a live trap and cover it with a blanket when transporting, you won't need to touch the cats at all.
>
>Thank you for wanting to help.
>Rene


Most livetraps I have used / seen have a plate under / around the
handle so you can not get bit.

dgk
October 15th 12, 05:51 PM
On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 19:31:52 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
wrote:

>Pon o wrote:
>> Fan belts- I think of that every time I get into the car. Have to
>> look under it too, esp. as the weather gets cold!
>>
>> The dogs have had to get a lepto booster (2 shots/yr. now) because of
>> increased risk. Wonder if cats can contract West NIle from birds
>> they've brought down.
>>
>> This is the 1st yr. my dogs have had fleas in 8 yrs, prob. because the
>> yard is constantly reinfested by the cats.
>>
>> Ok, I'm just thinking out loud... Wonder if after TNR they're just as
>> likely to perpetuate these particular problems.
>> Thank you all!
>>
>> I've got research to do before I punk down a big hunk of change on
>> traps for the TNR.
>> - Pon
>
>I've been told that cat fleas and dog fleas are different,and one won't
>bother with the other. I know that cat fleas are very small.... They are
>difficult to see with the naked eye.


It's been a very bad flea year here in the east coast. My cats had
fleas though it looks like I might have wiped them out. We haven't had
fleas in over 16 years - I know because that's when I bought the house
and we haven't had them since I moved in.

After TNR the cats won't roam as far so they are less likely to pick
them up. Plus you can give them the flea treatment while you have them
either trapped or under sedation so they can start out clean.

dberrycat
October 18th 12, 08:56 PM
There is a national group called Alley Cat Allies. Their headquarters
is in Maryland, but they have people all over the country to advise
and help with feral cats. Here is the URL of their FAQ

http://www.alleycat.org/page.aspx?pid=924

In the FAQ:
You can also find local help with our Feral Friends Network. Request a
list of Feral Friends in your area using our Email Assistance Form.
The Feral Friends Network is a nationwide database of individuals,
organizations, and veterinarians who can provide guidance about Trap-
Neuter-Return, borrowing equipment, and obtaining affordable neuter
services for feral cats.

That form is at http://www.alleycat.org/page.aspx?pid=444

They don't come out and solve the problem, but they can help, advise,
and give guidance on what the best thing to do and may be able to
connect with someone in your area who has experience. They are TNR
(Trap, Neuter, Release) Advocates and have a lot of information about
spay/neuter clinics around the country.

I hope this is of some help.

Debbie


On Oct 11, 5:25*pm, (Pon o) wrote:
> Hi,
> I've never posted here before. Thought someone might have at least an
> idea for a long-term solution.
>
> There must be 30 - 40 feral cats/kittens in one city block, crying,
> fighting, getting killed in traffic, caught in trees, injured, sick,
> etc. etc.
>
> I understand that this is a growing problem throughout many states.
>
> I've phoned & spoke with with the local SPCA, cat rescues, the DEC, city
> animal control. The list could go on almost endlessly.
>
> I'd like to be part of the solution but don't know where to find ideas.
> Does anybody have thoughts on this?
> TIA,
> Pon

dgk
October 19th 12, 02:19 PM
On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 22:35:17 -0400, (Pon o)
wrote:

>>"Trap, neuter, and release is one
>> "solution". At least, a partial solution.
>> You can help either by donating money
>> to organizations who do this, or catch
>> your own feral cat, have him/her
>> neutered, and release him back where
>> you caught him. (when we do this, we
>> usually end up owning another cat)."
>Ok, thanks! That's what one local cat org. is doing. But they rely on
>private donations since there is no legislation/no funding, concerning
>domestic cats, feral or not, in the state of NY (& other states as
>well).
>
>For all their good intentions, this expensive neuter/release program is
>a drop in the bucket. Donations are scarce; cats' lifespans are short
>because of disease, traffic, starvation. frigid winters, & this
>summer--drought! It's heartbreaking to see what these animals go
>through.
>
>So I guess there is no good & lasting solution?
>
>Do you expect this to be a growing problem in the future? I don't
>remember feral cats being a problem until a few yrs. ago.
>Thanks,
>- Pon

Oh, if you're in New York City get in touch with Neighborhood Cats
(www.neighborhoodcats.org). They have classes in how to do TNR (I'm a
graduate) and it helps a lot to know the ins and outs. Someone in my
neighborhood asked me how to deal with the cats, I told her to take
the class, and she just did around 15 cats on her block. Pretty
amazing work. Once you take the class, the ASPCA will do the neutering
for free, otherwise it's $100 per cat.

But it still does look like a growing problem even though TNR is a
good solution. I think a lot of cats got dumped when folks were losing
their homes and it seems to have upped the population. There sure are
a lot of cats around though.

Mack A. Damia
October 19th 12, 03:56 PM
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 09:19:39 -0400, dgk > wrote:

>On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 22:35:17 -0400, (Pon o)
>wrote:
>
>>>"Trap, neuter, and release is one
>>> "solution". At least, a partial solution.
>>> You can help either by donating money
>>> to organizations who do this, or catch
>>> your own feral cat, have him/her
>>> neutered, and release him back where
>>> you caught him. (when we do this, we
>>> usually end up owning another cat)."
>>Ok, thanks! That's what one local cat org. is doing. But they rely on
>>private donations since there is no legislation/no funding, concerning
>>domestic cats, feral or not, in the state of NY (& other states as
>>well).
>>
>>For all their good intentions, this expensive neuter/release program is
>>a drop in the bucket. Donations are scarce; cats' lifespans are short
>>because of disease, traffic, starvation. frigid winters, & this
>>summer--drought! It's heartbreaking to see what these animals go
>>through.
>>
>>So I guess there is no good & lasting solution?
>>
>>Do you expect this to be a growing problem in the future? I don't
>>remember feral cats being a problem until a few yrs. ago.
>>Thanks,
>>- Pon
>
>Oh, if you're in New York City get in touch with Neighborhood Cats
>(www.neighborhoodcats.org). They have classes in how to do TNR (I'm a
>graduate) and it helps a lot to know the ins and outs. Someone in my
>neighborhood asked me how to deal with the cats, I told her to take
>the class, and she just did around 15 cats on her block. Pretty
>amazing work. Once you take the class, the ASPCA will do the neutering
>for free, otherwise it's $100 per cat.
>
>But it still does look like a growing problem even though TNR is a
>good solution. I think a lot of cats got dumped when folks were losing
>their homes and it seems to have upped the population. There sure are
>a lot of cats around though.


http://tinyurl.com/8k7l4cd

--

dgk
October 22nd 12, 06:32 PM
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 07:56:26 -0700, Mack A. Damia
> wrote:

>On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 09:19:39 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>
>>On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 22:35:17 -0400, (Pon o)
>>wrote:
>>
>>>>"Trap, neuter, and release is one
>>>> "solution". At least, a partial solution.
>>>> You can help either by donating money
>>>> to organizations who do this, or catch
>>>> your own feral cat, have him/her
>>>> neutered, and release him back where
>>>> you caught him. (when we do this, we
>>>> usually end up owning another cat)."
>>>Ok, thanks! That's what one local cat org. is doing. But they rely on
>>>private donations since there is no legislation/no funding, concerning
>>>domestic cats, feral or not, in the state of NY (& other states as
>>>well).
>>>
>>>For all their good intentions, this expensive neuter/release program is
>>>a drop in the bucket. Donations are scarce; cats' lifespans are short
>>>because of disease, traffic, starvation. frigid winters, & this
>>>summer--drought! It's heartbreaking to see what these animals go
>>>through.
>>>
>>>So I guess there is no good & lasting solution?
>>>
>>>Do you expect this to be a growing problem in the future? I don't
>>>remember feral cats being a problem until a few yrs. ago.
>>>Thanks,
>>>- Pon
>>
>>Oh, if you're in New York City get in touch with Neighborhood Cats
>>(www.neighborhoodcats.org). They have classes in how to do TNR (I'm a
>>graduate) and it helps a lot to know the ins and outs. Someone in my
>>neighborhood asked me how to deal with the cats, I told her to take
>>the class, and she just did around 15 cats on her block. Pretty
>>amazing work. Once you take the class, the ASPCA will do the neutering
>>for free, otherwise it's $100 per cat.
>>
>>But it still does look like a growing problem even though TNR is a
>>good solution. I think a lot of cats got dumped when folks were losing
>>their homes and it seems to have upped the population. There sure are
>>a lot of cats around though.
>
>
>http://tinyurl.com/8k7l4cd

Yes, that would be me. Hopefully I can get to the carrier.

Bill Graham
October 23rd 12, 06:28 AM
dgk wrote:
> On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 07:56:26 -0700, Mack A. Damia
> > wrote:
>
>> On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 09:19:39 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>
>>> On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 22:35:17 -0400, (Pon o)
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>>> "Trap, neuter, and release is one
>>>>> "solution". At least, a partial solution.
>>>>> You can help either by donating money
>>>>> to organizations who do this, or catch
>>>>> your own feral cat, have him/her
>>>>> neutered, and release him back where
>>>>> you caught him. (when we do this, we
>>>>> usually end up owning another cat)."
>>>> Ok, thanks! That's what one local cat org. is doing. But they rely
>>>> on private donations since there is no legislation/no funding,
>>>> concerning domestic cats, feral or not, in the state of NY (&
>>>> other states as well).
>>>>
>>>> For all their good intentions, this expensive neuter/release
>>>> program is a drop in the bucket. Donations are scarce; cats'
>>>> lifespans are short because of disease, traffic, starvation.
>>>> frigid winters, & this summer--drought! It's heartbreaking to see
>>>> what these animals go through.
>>>>
>>>> So I guess there is no good & lasting solution?
>>>>
>>>> Do you expect this to be a growing problem in the future? I don't
>>>> remember feral cats being a problem until a few yrs. ago.
>>>> Thanks,
>>>> - Pon
>>>
>>> Oh, if you're in New York City get in touch with Neighborhood Cats
>>> (www.neighborhoodcats.org). They have classes in how to do TNR (I'm
>>> a graduate) and it helps a lot to know the ins and outs. Someone in
>>> my neighborhood asked me how to deal with the cats, I told her to
>>> take the class, and she just did around 15 cats on her block. Pretty
>>> amazing work. Once you take the class, the ASPCA will do the
>>> neutering for free, otherwise it's $100 per cat.
>>>
>>> But it still does look like a growing problem even though TNR is a
>>> good solution. I think a lot of cats got dumped when folks were
>>> losing their homes and it seems to have upped the population. There
>>> sure are a lot of cats around though.
>>
>>
>> http://tinyurl.com/8k7l4cd
>
> Yes, that would be me. Hopefully I can get to the carrier.

I wonder if the drugs you need for neutering the cats are easily available?
I would be surprised if they are in todays druggie society.....

Kelley Greene
December 5th 12, 08:58 PM
"Pon o" > wrote in message
...
> Ok, thanks! That's what one local cat org. is doing. But they rely on
> private donations since there is no legislation/no funding, concerning
> domestic cats, feral or not, in the state of NY (& other states as
> well).

Where in NY are you talking about? Upstate, the Island or the city?

>
> For all their good intentions, this expensive neuter/release program is
> a drop in the bucket. Donations are scarce; cats' lifespans are short
> because of disease, traffic, starvation. frigid winters, & this
> summer--drought! It's heartbreaking to see what these animals go
> through.
>
> So I guess there is no good & lasting solution?

No there isn't since there is no way to stop people from abandoning their
cats for whatever reason they have, and others for allowing their cats to
roam and breed instead of spaying/neutering them. I remember the suffering
of the stray cats in Brooklyn. Very sad. Some people would toss leftovers
out the windows to the yards and starving cats below. At the time I was too
young to do anything for them.

> Do you expect this to be a growing problem in the future? I don't
> remember feral cats being a problem until a few yrs. ago.
> Thanks,
> - Pon

Since I no longer live in NY I for one can't comment.......

Kelley Greene
December 5th 12, 09:16 PM
"(PeteCresswell)" > wrote in message
...
>
> I have no clue what preys on cats except for foxes.
>

Where I live in TN it's not just fox that keep feral cats under control, but
also coyotes, large hawks by day and owls by night. Roaming dogs pick a few
off before someone shoots the dogs. One neighbor is a sharp-shooter so
loose dogs don't last long here. People put out poison for cats and other
critters they consider pests or vermin. People shoot cats for the hell of
it. Anyone who loves their cats here keeps them indoors or have safe
outdoor enclosures for them as we do. Ours is small but the cats can still
get time outside to sun themselves and enjoy the fresh air.

Kelley Greene
December 5th 12, 09:34 PM
----- Original Message -----
From: "Bill Graham" >
Newsgroups: rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 4:12 PM
Subject: Re: Feral cat problem


> Bill Graham wrote:
>
> I forgot other hazards such as enclosed places like auto trunks. and
> sometimes cars don't kill cats by running them down, but their fan belts
> kill them on start up in the morning.....

Or leave them crippled on the road after running them over. We found a 6 or
7 wk old kitten dragging itself across the road to town using it's front
legs. We scooped her up and ran her to our vet who couldn't save her. She
was in agony with a crushed leg, torn rectun and partly crushed pelvis. I
still see her little face looking up at me from the container we put her in
to take her to the vet... and tears are running down my face remembering
her.... :*(

Kelley Greene
December 5th 12, 10:10 PM
"Pon o" > wrote in message
...
>
> I rescued a feral kitten from a tree the other day after it cried from
> morning 'til dusk. I held my breath as it hissed & tried to bite.

Wear heavy gloves like those who work for the SPCA wear. :)

(PeteCresswell)
December 6th 12, 12:45 AM
Per Kelley Greene:
>Where I live in TN it's not just fox that keep feral cats under control...

Where I live (Philadelphia PA, USA suburbs...) the foxes even
keep domestic cats under control. Our neighbors have a cat door
through which their cats come and go at all hours. They have
been through at least a half-dozen cats since we've had our one
cat.
--
Pete Cresswell

Mack A. Damia
December 6th 12, 09:38 PM
On Wed, 5 Dec 2012 14:58:38 -0600, "Kelley Greene"
> wrote:

>No there isn't since there is no way to stop people from abandoning their
>cats for whatever reason they have, and others for allowing their cats to
>roam and breed instead of spaying/neutering them. I remember the suffering
>of the stray cats in Brooklyn. Very sad. Some people would toss leftovers
>out the windows to the yards and starving cats below. At the time I was too
>young to do anything for them.

Where did you live in Brooklyn? I lived on the corner of Church and
MacDonald Avenues above the F train stop in Kensington back in the
1980s.

I never remember seeing a cat in Brooklyn!

--