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Clara Semps[_2_]
November 11th 12, 05:34 PM
My oldest furbaby, Furby, is going to be 11 in February. For the last
6-7 months he's been having problems that the vet can't seem to
resolve. He gets a short hacking cough, like he's got an allergy or
post-nasal drip. This triggers his gag reflex and he throws up. The doc
started him on "allergy" shots but they just don't seem to work. He's
not retaining the calories or nutrition he needs and is getting
skinnier and skinnier.

I'm really worried about him. The vet did tests and says he can't find
anything wrong. Nothing wrong with his thyroid, etc.

Now, he's always had "drippy eye". I have the same thing and it's
because of my sinuses. Could that just be getting worse and now his
sinuses are dripping inside, causing him the hacking cough that
triggers his gag reflex? Poor baby can''s seem to keep his food down
for long.

Any ideas on how can I stop it? Is there a decongestant for cats? The
vet's at a loss and I can't afford any more visits for awhille anyway.

CS

Mack A. Damia
November 11th 12, 05:45 PM
On Sun, 11 Nov 2012 12:34:19 -0500, Clara Semps
> wrote:

>My oldest furbaby, Furby, is going to be 11 in February. For the last
>6-7 months he's been having problems that the vet can't seem to
>resolve. He gets a short hacking cough, like he's got an allergy or
>post-nasal drip. This triggers his gag reflex and he throws up. The doc
>started him on "allergy" shots but they just don't seem to work. He's
>not retaining the calories or nutrition he needs and is getting
>skinnier and skinnier.
>
>I'm really worried about him. The vet did tests and says he can't find
>anything wrong. Nothing wrong with his thyroid, etc.
>
>Now, he's always had "drippy eye". I have the same thing and it's
>because of my sinuses. Could that just be getting worse and now his
>sinuses are dripping inside, causing him the hacking cough that
>triggers his gag reflex? Poor baby can''s seem to keep his food down
>for long.
>
>Any ideas on how can I stop it? Is there a decongestant for cats? The
>vet's at a loss and I can't afford any more visits for awhille anyway.

Think about the time six or seven months ago when this first started.
Did you start using something new? A cleaner, polish, bug spray,
anything? Think very carefully.

--

Matthew[_3_]
November 12th 12, 02:31 AM
"Clara Semps" > wrote in message
...
> My oldest furbaby, Furby, is going to be 11 in February. For the last
> 6-7 months he's been having problems that the vet can't seem to
> resolve. He gets a short hacking cough, like he's got an allergy or
> post-nasal drip. This triggers his gag reflex and he throws up. The doc
> started him on "allergy" shots but they just don't seem to work. He's
> not retaining the calories or nutrition he needs and is getting
> skinnier and skinnier.
>
> I'm really worried about him. The vet did tests and says he can't find
> anything wrong. Nothing wrong with his thyroid, etc.
>
> Now, he's always had "drippy eye". I have the same thing and it's
> because of my sinuses. Could that just be getting worse and now his
> sinuses are dripping inside, causing him the hacking cough that
> triggers his gag reflex? Poor baby can''s seem to keep his food down
> for long.
>
> Any ideas on how can I stop it? Is there a decongestant for cats? The
> vet's at a loss and I can't afford any more visits for awhille anyway.
>
> CS

has the vet ruled out a food allergy

November 12th 12, 02:49 PM
Has your vet done a chest x-ray to check for asthma? Our oldest will cough and sometimes puke (usually foam or liquid, rarely food) from the asthma. If this is the case, a broncho-diolator (sp) or low-dose steroids will help. We use the broncho-diolator, a pill, as needed.

There are human allergy medications that cats can take, such as Chlor-trimeton and Benadryl. Ask your vet about the dosage.

Also, I'd strongly suggest looking around your household to see what might be triggering a reaction. For instance, I no longer use Pine Sol or any floor cleaner other than vinegar or castile soap. Air fresheners, Febreeze, scented laundry detergent, etc can all cause an allergic reaction.

What kind of food do you feed him? I'd suggest a grain-free wet diet.

Clara Semps[_2_]
November 12th 12, 04:51 PM
A new cat! Jacksie, a 5 month old calico, joined our household. That
was the only change and yes, th coughing started right about the time
she showed up. And Furby hates her. LOL Poor thing. She only wants
someone to play with.


In article >, Mack A. Damia
> wrote:

> On Sun, 11 Nov 2012 12:34:19 -0500, Clara Semps
> > wrote:
>
> >My oldest furbaby, Furby, is going to be 11 in February. For the last
> >6-7 months he's been having problems that the vet can't seem to
> >resolve. He gets a short hacking cough, like he's got an allergy or
> >post-nasal drip. This triggers his gag reflex and he throws up. The doc
> >started him on "allergy" shots but they just don't seem to work. He's
> >not retaining the calories or nutrition he needs and is getting
> >skinnier and skinnier.
> >
> >I'm really worried about him. The vet did tests and says he can't find
> >anything wrong. Nothing wrong with his thyroid, etc.
> >
> >Now, he's always had "drippy eye". I have the same thing and it's
> >because of my sinuses. Could that just be getting worse and now his
> >sinuses are dripping inside, causing him the hacking cough that
> >triggers his gag reflex? Poor baby can''s seem to keep his food down
> >for long.
> >
> >Any ideas on how can I stop it? Is there a decongestant for cats? The
> >vet's at a loss and I can't afford any more visits for awhille anyway.
>
> Think about the time six or seven months ago when this first started.
> Did you start using something new? A cleaner, polish, bug spray,
> anything? Think very carefully.

Clara Semps[_2_]
November 12th 12, 05:00 PM
In article >,
> wrote:

> Has your vet done a chest x-ray to check for asthma? Our oldest will cough
> and sometimes puke (usually foam or liquid, rarely food) from the asthma. If
> this is the case, a broncho-diolator (sp) or low-dose steroids will help. We
> use the broncho-diolator, a pill, as needed.
>
> There are human allergy medications that cats can take, such as
> Chlor-trimeton and Benadryl. Ask your vet about the dosage.
>
> Also, I'd strongly suggest looking around your household to see what might be
> triggering a reaction. For instance, I no longer use Pine Sol or any floor
> cleaner other than vinegar or castile soap. Air fresheners, Febreeze, scented
> laundry detergent, etc can all cause an allergic reaction.
>
> What kind of food do you feed him? I'd suggest a grain-free wet diet.
>

Food hasn't changed. Nothing in the household has changed, except the
addition of another cat. I can't afford the cost of x-rays so no, the
vet hasn't done one. But this is a definite post-nasal drip similar to
my own which has worsened as I've gotten older. However I, as a human,
can figure out how to expectorate. Poor Furby can't and it makes him
throw up.

I'll ask the bet about some sort of decongestant though. Perhaps
that'll help.

CS

Clara Semps[_2_]
November 12th 12, 05:02 PM
In article m>,
Matthew > wrote:

> "Clara Semps" > wrote in message
> ...
> > My oldest furbaby, Furby, is going to be 11 in February. For the last
> > 6-7 months he's been having problems that the vet can't seem to
> > resolve. He gets a short hacking cough, like he's got an allergy or
> > post-nasal drip. This triggers his gag reflex and he throws up. The doc
> > started him on "allergy" shots but they just don't seem to work. He's
> > not retaining the calories or nutrition he needs and is getting
> > skinnier and skinnier.
> >
> > I'm really worried about him. The vet did tests and says he can't find
> > anything wrong. Nothing wrong with his thyroid, etc.
> >
> > Now, he's always had "drippy eye". I have the same thing and it's
> > because of my sinuses. Could that just be getting worse and now his
> > sinuses are dripping inside, causing him the hacking cough that
> > triggers his gag reflex? Poor baby can''s seem to keep his food down
> > for long.
> >
> > Any ideas on how can I stop it? Is there a decongestant for cats? The
> > vet's at a loss and I can't afford any more visits for awhille anyway.
> >
> > CS
>
> has the vet ruled out a food allergy

I can't afford allergy testing. Or x-rays, or a sonogram, or oher
testing. The doc gave him allergy shots. Didn't work. Now I'm thinking
it's just a post nasal drip and I need to find a decongestant.

Mack A. Damia
November 12th 12, 05:28 PM
I have been reading that the stress of introducing another cat into
the household can trigger allergic-like reactions, so that may be the
source of your problem. I get the idea from what you write that they
don't like each other. I don't know what to tell you, but I hope this
information helps you.


On Mon, 12 Nov 2012 11:51:29 -0500, Clara Semps
> wrote:

>A new cat! Jacksie, a 5 month old calico, joined our household. That
>was the only change and yes, th coughing started right about the time
>she showed up. And Furby hates her. LOL Poor thing. She only wants
>someone to play with.
>
>
>In article >, Mack A. Damia
> wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 11 Nov 2012 12:34:19 -0500, Clara Semps
>> > wrote:
>>
>> >My oldest furbaby, Furby, is going to be 11 in February. For the last
>> >6-7 months he's been having problems that the vet can't seem to
>> >resolve. He gets a short hacking cough, like he's got an allergy or
>> >post-nasal drip. This triggers his gag reflex and he throws up. The doc
>> >started him on "allergy" shots but they just don't seem to work. He's
>> >not retaining the calories or nutrition he needs and is getting
>> >skinnier and skinnier.
>> >
>> >I'm really worried about him. The vet did tests and says he can't find
>> >anything wrong. Nothing wrong with his thyroid, etc.
>> >
>> >Now, he's always had "drippy eye". I have the same thing and it's
>> >because of my sinuses. Could that just be getting worse and now his
>> >sinuses are dripping inside, causing him the hacking cough that
>> >triggers his gag reflex? Poor baby can''s seem to keep his food down
>> >for long.
>> >
>> >Any ideas on how can I stop it? Is there a decongestant for cats? The
>> >vet's at a loss and I can't afford any more visits for awhille anyway.
>>
>> Think about the time six or seven months ago when this first started.
>> Did you start using something new? A cleaner, polish, bug spray,
>> anything? Think very carefully.

November 12th 12, 07:28 PM
> > has the vet ruled out a food allergy
>
>
>
> I can't afford allergy testing. Or x-rays, or a sonogram, or oher
>
> testing. The doc gave him allergy shots. Didn't work. Now I'm thinking
>
> it's just a post nasal drip and I need to find a decongestant.

AFAIK, there isn't allergy testing like people get. Usually vets try an elimination diet of sorts, removing the most common allergens first--like grains (especially corn and wheat). Or by trying a different kind of protein source (like duck instead of chicken). In his case, it's certainly worth a try.

The drugs I suggested are antihistimines only, not decongestants. I would not use a human decongestant without consulting your vet first.

Clara Semps[_2_]
November 15th 12, 04:12 AM
Well, JAcksie loves Furby but she is a kitten and all she wnts to do is
play. Furby lost his best bud, Chaplin, and is older, and all he wants
to do is relax.

But yeah, I'm pretty sure that was the trigger. But whether it's stress
or an actual allergic reaction, he still gets the hacking cough and I
don't know what to do. He's losing weight with all the throwing up. :(


In article >, Mack A. Damia
> wrote:

> I have been reading that the stress of introducing another cat into
> the household can trigger allergic-like reactions, so that may be the
> source of your problem. I get the idea from what you write that they
> don't like each other. I don't know what to tell you, but I hope this
> information helps you.

Clara Semps[_2_]
November 15th 12, 04:16 AM
The vet said I could try half a Benadryl, ever 6 hours but I can't get
the pill down his throat. He's already bitten me twice. I tried
crushing it and putting it in his food, but he won't fall for that
either. Entirely too wily a kitty if you ask me. So I'm again stuck.
Wish there were a liquid version of this with flavors cats like.

For now, I just have to keep him calm after he eats so he can digest
his food. It helps.



In article >,
> wrote:

> > > has the vet ruled out a food allergy
> >
> >
> >
> > I can't afford allergy testing. Or x-rays, or a sonogram, or oher
> >
> > testing. The doc gave him allergy shots. Didn't work. Now I'm thinking
> >
> > it's just a post nasal drip and I need to find a decongestant.
>
> AFAIK, there isn't allergy testing like people get. Usually vets try an
> elimination diet of sorts, removing the most common allergens first--like
> grains (especially corn and wheat). Or by trying a different kind of protein
> source (like duck instead of chicken). In his case, it's certainly worth a
> try.
>
> The drugs I suggested are antihistimines only, not decongestants. I would
> not use a human decongestant without consulting your vet first.

Matthew[_3_]
November 15th 12, 12:35 PM
pill pockets
"Clara Semps" > wrote in message
...
> The vet said I could try half a Benadryl, ever 6 hours but I can't get
> the pill down his throat. He's already bitten me twice. I tried
> crushing it and putting it in his food, but he won't fall for that
> either. Entirely too wily a kitty if you ask me. So I'm again stuck.
> Wish there were a liquid version of this with flavors cats like.
>
> For now, I just have to keep him calm after he eats so he can digest
> his food. It helps.
>
>
>
> In article >,
> > wrote:
>
>> > > has the vet ruled out a food allergy
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > I can't afford allergy testing. Or x-rays, or a sonogram, or oher
>> >
>> > testing. The doc gave him allergy shots. Didn't work. Now I'm thinking
>> >
>> > it's just a post nasal drip and I need to find a decongestant.
>>
>> AFAIK, there isn't allergy testing like people get. Usually vets try an
>> elimination diet of sorts, removing the most common allergens first--like
>> grains (especially corn and wheat). Or by trying a different kind of
>> protein
>> source (like duck instead of chicken). In his case, it's certainly worth
>> a
>> try.
>>
>> The drugs I suggested are antihistimines only, not decongestants. I
>> would
>> not use a human decongestant without consulting your vet first.

chaniarts[_2_]
November 15th 12, 05:33 PM
On 11/14/2012 9:16 PM, Clara Semps wrote:
> The vet said I could try half a Benadryl, ever 6 hours but I can't get
> the pill down his throat. He's already bitten me twice. I tried
> crushing it and putting it in his food, but he won't fall for that
> either. Entirely too wily a kitty if you ask me. So I'm again stuck.
> Wish there were a liquid version of this with flavors cats like.

they make children's benadryl in liquid formula, but it's pretty sweet
and has a strong taste. you can also get it compounded into liquids like
fish/liver/chicken/beef oils at compounding drugstores, but they just
grind up the pills and add it to the base. you could do the same thing.
try tuna oil.

> For now, I just have to keep him calm after he eats so he can digest
> his food. It helps.
>
>
>
> In article >,
> > wrote:
>
>>>> has the vet ruled out a food allergy
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I can't afford allergy testing. Or x-rays, or a sonogram, or oher
>>>
>>> testing. The doc gave him allergy shots. Didn't work. Now I'm thinking
>>>
>>> it's just a post nasal drip and I need to find a decongestant.
>>
>> AFAIK, there isn't allergy testing like people get. Usually vets try an
>> elimination diet of sorts, removing the most common allergens first--like
>> grains (especially corn and wheat). Or by trying a different kind of protein
>> source (like duck instead of chicken). In his case, it's certainly worth a
>> try.
>>
>> The drugs I suggested are antihistimines only, not decongestants. I would
>> not use a human decongestant without consulting your vet first.

Mack A. Damia
November 15th 12, 06:29 PM
On Wed, 14 Nov 2012 23:16:51 -0500, Clara Semps
> wrote:

>The vet said I could try half a Benadryl, ever 6 hours but I can't get
>the pill down his throat. He's already bitten me twice. I tried
>crushing it and putting it in his food, but he won't fall for that
>either. Entirely too wily a kitty if you ask me. So I'm again stuck.
>Wish there were a liquid version of this with flavors cats like.
>
>For now, I just have to keep him calm after he eats so he can digest
>his food. It helps.

Do you have anyone who can help you?

My longhairs were pretty docile, I guess - this is thirty years ago or
more - but I used to cradle them, force their mouths open with one
hand and toss a pill into the back of their throats. Have some water
or milk on hand for a drink. Maybe you've tried this.

--

Bill Graham
November 16th 12, 06:04 AM
Clara Semps wrote:
> The vet said I could try half a Benadryl, ever 6 hours but I can't get
> the pill down his throat. He's already bitten me twice. I tried
> crushing it and putting it in his food, but he won't fall for that
> either. Entirely too wily a kitty if you ask me. So I'm again stuck.
> Wish there were a liquid version of this with flavors cats like.
>
> For now, I just have to keep him calm after he eats so he can digest
> his food. It helps.
>
>
>
> In article >,
> > wrote:
>
>>>> has the vet ruled out a food allergy
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I can't afford allergy testing. Or x-rays, or a sonogram, or oher
>>>
>>> testing. The doc gave him allergy shots. Didn't work. Now I'm
>>> thinking
>>>
>>> it's just a post nasal drip and I need to find a decongestant.
>>
>> AFAIK, there isn't allergy testing like people get. Usually vets try
>> an elimination diet of sorts, removing the most common allergens
>> first--like grains (especially corn and wheat). Or by trying a
>> different kind of protein source (like duck instead of chicken). In
>> his case, it's certainly worth a try.
>>
>> The drugs I suggested are antihistimines only, not decongestants. I
>> would not use a human decongestant without consulting your vet first.

Make your own liquit version by dissolving it in chicken broth, and pour
just a little bit on each can of cat food you give him. With a little
experimentation, you can probsably find a combo he will eat, especvially
when he gets real hungry......

November 16th 12, 02:34 PM
The trouble with Benadryl is that it is _very_ bitter, and with the small size you need, you have to cut the tablet. You could try a Pill Pocket as suggested, or try coating the cut end with butter or margarine. You could also crush it into a small amount of tuna juice.

Chaniarts suggested the liquid children's, but I found that even harder to use than a pill.

chaniarts[_2_]
November 16th 12, 05:26 PM
On 11/16/2012 7:34 AM, wrote:
> The trouble with Benadryl is that it is _very_ bitter, and with the small size you need, you have to cut the tablet. You could try a Pill Pocket as suggested, or try coating the cut end with butter or margarine. You could also crush it into a small amount of tuna juice.
>
> Chaniarts suggested the liquid children's, but I found that even harder to use than a pill.
>

i have to give one of my cats prozac daily, which is also pretty bitter.
either it's a 1/2 pill, or liquid. i've found that the liquid is easier,
since you can squirt it down pretty far, and it won't come back up. a
1/2 pill is harder to get further down with fingers, and i sometimes
find the pill back in his bowl, eaten around.

i usually leave the liquid for my pet sitter, because he's 23lbs and a
moving ball of teeth and claws when it's pill time, and she's a little
90lb 75 y.o. lady who's pretty scared of him.

Kathryne
December 27th 12, 10:08 PM
Try hyper-thyroid problems, at that age it causes weight loss and eventual stroke or death (yes there is medication for it), house plants especially verigated in color, try a diet that has no grain and pure meat like: Natural Balance Duck Pea, dry and wet (dry food may cause vomiting).
Hop this works.

Matthew[_3_]
December 28th 12, 03:00 AM
"Kathryne" > wrote in message
...
>
> she sometimes mows her hair, this has been going on for a year
>
>
>
>
> --
> Kathryne

is this under the chin?

Gandalf[_4_]
December 29th 12, 04:49 AM
On Thu, 27 Dec 2012 22:00:25 -0500, "Matthew"
> wrote:

>
>"Kathryne" > wrote in message
...
>>
>> she sometimes mows her hair, this has been going on for a year
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Kathryne
>
>is this under the chin?
>
Yes, it sounds like feline acne, though I have no idea what 'she
sometimes mows her hair' means.

Feline acne is most commonly found on a cat's chin, thoigh just like
people, I'm sure it can occour elsewhere.

More information would be a big help.

Clara Semps[_2_]
February 4th 13, 07:26 AM
Thought I'd give you an update on poor Furby's nasal condition. It
hasn't improved at all but he actually seems to be practicing a
meditation technique to keep his stomach calm (I kid you not) and
hasn't thrown up in weeks.

I've tried ALL of your suggestions, from the pill pocket (turns up his
nose at it even without a pill inside) to a seafood mix with the
crushed pill (yuck, ptooey), to liquid using an injector (moreon his
face than down his throat) to trying to put the pill down his throat
with the pill injector. The last gifted me with several rather deep
bites on my thumb and my roomie has some nice gashes on his arms from
our attempts. <sigh>

He's gained a little bit of weight now that he's not throwing up as
much but still just a miserable kitty as he sits here on my dining room
chairs (now covered with towels) and drips. I've taken to calling him
Booger Boy. :) He seems to like it and while he's no where near as well
as he should be or I'd like him, he's gained a little weight back and
is hanging with me more often, though I've taken to walking around
with a nappy on my shoulder. ROTFL

I do love this guy. He's my mama's boy and actually lets me wipe his
eyes and nose now. Such a baby.

Jacksie, the holy terror aka the Brat, is another pleasure to have
round the house when she's not torturing Furby. But I feel sorry for
her because the only one who plays with her is me and I don't have the
time every day. Poor thing. She's now taken to curling up against my
butt in the morning so she can have some fun first thing when i wake.
LOL

Anyway, there's the update. Hope you all had a really Happy Holiday and
a wonderful New Year! Sorry for the delay but it's been busy.

CS


In article >, Clara Semps
> wrote:

> Well, JAcksie loves Furby but she is a kitten and all she wnts to do is
> play. Furby lost his best bud, Chaplin, and is older, and all he wants
> to do is relax.
>
> But yeah, I'm pretty sure that was the trigger. But whether it's stress
> or an actual allergic reaction, he still gets the hacking cough and I
> don't know what to do. He's losing weight with all the throwing up. :(
>
>
> In article >, Mack A. Damia
> > wrote:
>
> > I have been reading that the stress of introducing another cat into
> > the household can trigger allergic-like reactions, so that may be the
> > source of your problem. I get the idea from what you write that they
> > don't like each other. I don't know what to tell you, but I hope this
> > information helps you.

IBen Getiner[_3_]
February 4th 13, 11:43 AM
On Feb 4, 2:26*am, Clara Semps > wrote:
> Thought I'd give you an update on poor Furby's nasal condition. It
> hasn't improved at all but he actually seems to be practicing a
> meditation technique to keep his stomach calm (I kid you not) and
> hasn't thrown up in weeks.
>
> I've tried ALL of your suggestions, from the pill pocket (turns up his
> nose at it even without a pill inside) to a seafood mix with the
> crushed pill (yuck, ptooey), to liquid using an injector (moreon his
> face than down his throat) to trying to put the pill down his throat
> with the pill injector. The last gifted me with several rather deep
> bites on my thumb and my roomie has some nice gashes on his arms from
> our attempts. <sigh>
>
> He's gained a little bit of weight now that he's not throwing up as
> much but still just a miserable kitty as he sits here on my dining room
> chairs (now covered with towels) and drips. I've taken to calling him
> Booger Boy. :) He seems to like it and while he's no where near as well
> as he should be or I'd like him, he's gained a little weight back and
> is *hanging with me more often, though I've taken to walking around
> with a nappy on my shoulder. ROTFL
>
> I do love this guy. He's my mama's boy and actually lets me wipe his
> eyes and nose now. Such a baby.
>
> Jacksie, the holy terror aka the Brat, is another pleasure to have
> round the house when she's not torturing Furby. But I feel sorry for
> her because the only one who plays with her is me and I don't have the
> time every day. Poor thing. She's now taken to curling up against my
> butt in the morning so she can have some fun first thing when i wake.
> LOL
>
> Anyway, there's the update. Hope you all had a really Happy Holiday and
> a wonderful New Year! Sorry for the delay but it's been busy.
>
> CS
>
> In article >, Clara Semps
>
>
>
> > wrote:
> > Well, JAcksie loves Furby but she is a kitten and all she wnts to do is
> > play. Furby lost his best bud, Chaplin, and is older, and all he wants
> > to do is relax.
>
> > But yeah, I'm pretty sure that was the trigger. But whether it's stress
> > or an actual allergic reaction, he still gets the hacking cough and I
> > don't know what to do. He's losing weight with all the throwing up. :(
>
> > In article >, Mack A. Damia
> > > wrote:
>
> > > I have been reading that the stress of introducing another cat into
> > > the household can trigger allergic-like reactions, so that may be the
> > > source of your problem. *I get the idea from what you write that they
> > > don't like each other. *I don't know what to tell you, but I hope this
> > > information helps you.

You can remedy the "gashing" problem simply by utilizing a modern
medical technique called 'declawing'. Don't let the nut-cases in here
try to make you feel guilty about it. It's often necessary so peace
and harmony can exist between pet and pet owner. Our cats have all
been put thru the procedure, and none of them are the worst for wear.
Seriously, there has not been one single problem. They all act just
like they did before, but no more "gashing" now. Especially to our
leatherette bean-bag chairs and expensive stereo speakers. And itís
not as expensive as you might think. A small price to pay to protect
the important things in your life.


IBen

IBen Getiner[_3_]
February 4th 13, 11:48 AM
On Feb 4, 2:26*am, Clara Semps > wrote:
> Thought I'd give you an update on poor Furby's nasal condition. It
> hasn't improved at all but he actually seems to be practicing a
> meditation technique to keep his stomach calm (I kid you not) and
> hasn't thrown up in weeks.
>
> I've tried ALL of your suggestions, from the pill pocket (turns up his
> nose at it even without a pill inside) to a seafood mix with the
> crushed pill (yuck, ptooey), to liquid using an injector (moreon his
> face than down his throat) to trying to put the pill down his throat
> with the pill injector. The last gifted me with several rather deep
> bites on my thumb and my roomie has some nice gashes on his arms from
> our attempts. <sigh>
>
> He's gained a little bit of weight now that he's not throwing up as
> much but still just a miserable kitty as he sits here on my dining room
> chairs (now covered with towels) and drips. I've taken to calling him
> Booger Boy. :) He seems to like it and while he's no where near as well
> as he should be or I'd like him, he's gained a little weight back and
> is *hanging with me more often, though I've taken to walking around
> with a nappy on my shoulder. ROTFL
>
> I do love this guy. He's my mama's boy and actually lets me wipe his
> eyes and nose now. Such a baby.
>
> Jacksie, the holy terror aka the Brat, is another pleasure to have
> round the house when she's not torturing Furby. But I feel sorry for
> her because the only one who plays with her is me and I don't have the
> time every day. Poor thing. She's now taken to curling up against my
> butt in the morning so she can have some fun first thing when i wake.
> LOL
>
> Anyway, there's the update. Hope you all had a really Happy Holiday and
> a wonderful New Year! Sorry for the delay but it's been busy.
>
> CS
>
> In article >, Clara Semps
>
>
>
> > wrote:
> > Well, JAcksie loves Furby but she is a kitten and all she wnts to do is
> > play. Furby lost his best bud, Chaplin, and is older, and all he wants
> > to do is relax.
>
> > But yeah, I'm pretty sure that was the trigger. But whether it's stress
> > or an actual allergic reaction, he still gets the hacking cough and I
> > don't know what to do. He's losing weight with all the throwing up. :(
>
> > In article >, Mack A. Damia
> > > wrote:
>
> > > I have been reading that the stress of introducing another cat into
> > > the household can trigger allergic-like reactions, so that may be the
> > > source of your problem. *I get the idea from what you write that they
> > > don't like each other. *I don't know what to tell you, but I hope this
> > > information helps you.

Clair.... Here is a link describing the procedure that I spoke of in
my previous posting. It really is the best way to go, assuming that
you want to be in control of the situation and not let it be in
control of you. : )

http://www.petdr.com/declawdesc.htm



IBen

dgk
February 4th 13, 03:42 PM
On Mon, 4 Feb 2013 03:48:12 -0800 (PST), IBen Getiner
> wrote:

>On Feb 4, 2:26*am, Clara Semps > wrote:
>> Thought I'd give you an update on poor Furby's nasal condition. It
>> hasn't improved at all but he actually seems to be practicing a
>> meditation technique to keep his stomach calm (I kid you not) and
>> hasn't thrown up in weeks.
>>
>> I've tried ALL of your suggestions, from the pill pocket (turns up his
>> nose at it even without a pill inside) to a seafood mix with the
>> crushed pill (yuck, ptooey), to liquid using an injector (moreon his
>> face than down his throat) to trying to put the pill down his throat
>> with the pill injector. The last gifted me with several rather deep
>> bites on my thumb and my roomie has some nice gashes on his arms from
>> our attempts. <sigh>
>>
>> He's gained a little bit of weight now that he's not throwing up as
>> much but still just a miserable kitty as he sits here on my dining room
>> chairs (now covered with towels) and drips. I've taken to calling him
>> Booger Boy. :) He seems to like it and while he's no where near as well
>> as he should be or I'd like him, he's gained a little weight back and
>> is *hanging with me more often, though I've taken to walking around
>> with a nappy on my shoulder. ROTFL
>>
>> I do love this guy. He's my mama's boy and actually lets me wipe his
>> eyes and nose now. Such a baby.
>>
>> Jacksie, the holy terror aka the Brat, is another pleasure to have
>> round the house when she's not torturing Furby. But I feel sorry for
>> her because the only one who plays with her is me and I don't have the
>> time every day. Poor thing. She's now taken to curling up against my
>> butt in the morning so she can have some fun first thing when i wake.
>> LOL
>>
>> Anyway, there's the update. Hope you all had a really Happy Holiday and
>> a wonderful New Year! Sorry for the delay but it's been busy.
>> > > information helps you.
>
>Clair.... Here is a link describing the procedure that I spoke of in
>my previous posting. It really is the best way to go, assuming that
>you want to be in control of the situation and not let it be in
>control of you. : )
>
>http://www.petdr.com/declawdesc.htm
>
>
>
>IBen


Many of us know cats that had problems after having half of their
fingers amputated. I had one cat that had been "declawed" and he was
never really happy, could never follow the other cats on the cat trees
or any of the high places they like to go. And he was a big biter, and
none of my other cats do that.

I've never had problems with any of my cats scratching furiture. I
provide plenty of scratching materials and they love those. Once in a
while I do end up with a scratch, but that's a small price to pay for
leaving the cat as it was created.

Clara Semps[_2_]
February 5th 13, 12:50 AM
Actually, ever since my first cat, and much ruined furniture regardless
of the huge cat tree I had and all my efforts, all my cats have always
been front declawed. I like my furniture in one piece, thank you, not
shreds. I won't take off their back claws though. The simple reason
being that if they get out, and I have had cats run out of the house,
they at least have the defense of being able to climb a tree.

CS

In article
>,
IBen Getiner > wrote:

>
> You can remedy the "gashing" problem simply by utilizing a modern
> medical technique called 'declawing'. Don't let the nut-cases in here
> try to make you feel guilty about it. It's often necessary so peace
> and harmony can exist between pet and pet owner. Our cats have all
> been put thru the procedure, and none of them are the worst for wear.
> Seriously, there has not been one single problem. They all act just
> like they did before, but no more "gashing" now. Especially to our
> leatherette bean-bag chairs and expensive stereo speakers. And itís
> not as expensive as you might think. A small price to pay to protect
> the important things in your life.
>
>
> IBen

IBen Getiner[_3_]
February 5th 13, 05:24 AM
On Feb 4, 10:42*am, dgk > wrote:
> On Mon, 4 Feb 2013 03:48:12 -0800 (PST),IBenGetiner
>
>
>
>
>
> > wrote:
> >On Feb 4, 2:26*am, Clara Semps > wrote:
> >> Thought I'd give you an update on poor Furby's nasal condition. It
> >> hasn't improved at all but he actually seems to be practicing a
> >> meditation technique to keep his stomach calm (I kid you not) and
> >> hasn't thrown up in weeks.
>
> >> I've tried ALL of your suggestions, from the pill pocket (turns up his
> >> nose at it even without a pill inside) to a seafood mix with the
> >> crushed pill (yuck, ptooey), to liquid using an injector (moreon his
> >> face than down his throat) to trying to put the pill down his throat
> >> with the pill injector. The last gifted me with several rather deep
> >> bites on my thumb and my roomie has some nice gashes on his arms from
> >> our attempts. <sigh>
>
> >> He's gained a little bit of weight now that he's not throwing up as
> >> much but still just a miserable kitty as he sits here on my dining room
> >> chairs (now covered with towels) and drips. I've taken to calling him
> >> Booger Boy. :) He seems to like it and while he's no where near as well
> >> as he should be or I'd like him, he's gained a little weight back and
> >> is *hanging with me more often, though I've taken to walking around
> >> with a nappy on my shoulder. ROTFL
>
> >> I do love this guy. He's my mama's boy and actually lets me wipe his
> >> eyes and nose now. Such a baby.
>
> >> Jacksie, the holy terror aka the Brat, is another pleasure to have
> >> round the house when she's not torturing Furby. But I feel sorry for
> >> her because the only one who plays with her is me and I don't have the
> >> time every day. Poor thing. She's now taken to curling up against my
> >> butt in the morning so she can have some fun first thing when i wake.
> >> LOL
>
> >> Anyway, there's the update. Hope you all had a really Happy Holiday and
> >> a wonderful New Year! Sorry for the delay but it's been busy.
> >> > > information helps you.
>
> >Clair.... Here is a link describing the procedure that I spoke of in
> >my previous posting. It really is the best way to go, assuming that
> >you want to be in control of the situation and not let it be in
> >control of you. : )
>
> >http://www.petdr.com/declawdesc.htm
>
> >IBen
>
> Many of us know cats that had problems after having half of their
> fingers amputated. I had one cat that had been "declawed" and he was
> never really happy, could never follow the other cats on the cat trees
> or any of the high places they like to go. And he was a big biter, and
> none of my other cats do that.
>
> I've never had problems with any of my cats scratching furiture. I
> provide plenty of scratching materials and they love those. Once in a
> while I do end up with a scratch, but that's a small price to pay for
> leaving the cat as it was created.

So you're saying that he became a biter due to that little
operation....??! I defy you to prove it. Our cat was a biter BEFORE he
had those needless bothersome knives removed. Just FYI. Declawing
produces NONE of the issues that you blame on it. Our boys have never
been happier, and they exhibit no ill effects at all. It's all IN YOUR
HEAD. You're against the procedure because you subscribe to the
mindset of "let the cat run wild and do as he pleases". To people like
you RULES and the word "NO" are forbidden territory. Why don't you
just admit it instead of trying to twist this poor ignorant womanís
mind? Be a big time saver in the long run (since I have forever and a
day to make my point).

IBen

IBen Getiner[_3_]
February 5th 13, 05:35 AM
On Feb 4, 7:50*pm, Clara Semps > wrote:
> Actually, ever since my first cat, and much ruined furniture regardless
> of the huge cat tree I had and all my efforts, all my cats have always
> been front declawed. I like my furniture in one piece, thank you, not
> shreds. I won't take off their back claws though. The simple reason
> being that if they get out, and I have had cats run out of the house,
> they at least have the defense of being able to climb a tree.
>
> CS
>
> In article
> >,
>
>
>
> > wrote:
>
> > You can remedy the "gashing" problem simply by utilizing a modern
> > medical technique called 'declawing'. Don't let the nut-cases in here
> > try to make you feel guilty about it. It's often necessary so peace
> > and harmony can exist between pet and pet owner. Our cats have all
> > been put thru the procedure, and none of them are the worst for wear.
> > Seriously, there has not been one single problem. They all act just
> > like they did before, but no more "gashing" now. Especially to our
> > leatherette bean-bag chairs and expensive stereo speakers. And itís
> > not as expensive as you might think. A small price to pay to protect
> > the important things in your life.
>
> >IBen

Yes, Clair... The wife and I are just like you. We only did it to
protect our home. The way we looked at it, it was a small price for
them to pay in order to live in a warm and safe environment free from
constant hunger, the elements and the constant threat of predators.
And they kept their rear claws until the leatherette furniture came
along. We probably would have chosen something else, but they were
doing so well after the surgery that we could see no reason not to
just go ahead and have the rear ones removed, too.
I see after reading your post, that you are not ignorant at all.
Being around these lunatics in here for the last few years can make
one feel that the entire world has come off its trolley, Iím here to
tell you! Keep up the good work. Seems that youíre doing fine to me.


IBen

Bill Graham
February 5th 13, 07:29 AM
dgk wrote:
> On Mon, 4 Feb 2013 03:48:12 -0800 (PST), IBen Getiner
> > wrote:
>
>> On Feb 4, 2:26 am, Clara Semps > wrote:
>>> Thought I'd give you an update on poor Furby's nasal condition. It
>>> hasn't improved at all but he actually seems to be practicing a
>>> meditation technique to keep his stomach calm (I kid you not) and
>>> hasn't thrown up in weeks.
>>>
>>> I've tried ALL of your suggestions, from the pill pocket (turns up
>>> his nose at it even without a pill inside) to a seafood mix with the
>>> crushed pill (yuck, ptooey), to liquid using an injector (moreon his
>>> face than down his throat) to trying to put the pill down his throat
>>> with the pill injector. The last gifted me with several rather deep
>>> bites on my thumb and my roomie has some nice gashes on his arms
>>> from our attempts. <sigh>
>>>
>>> He's gained a little bit of weight now that he's not throwing up as
>>> much but still just a miserable kitty as he sits here on my dining
>>> room chairs (now covered with towels) and drips. I've taken to
>>> calling him Booger Boy. :) He seems to like it and while he's no
>>> where near as well as he should be or I'd like him, he's gained a
>>> little weight back and is hanging with me more often, though I've
>>> taken to walking around with a nappy on my shoulder. ROTFL
>>>
>>> I do love this guy. He's my mama's boy and actually lets me wipe his
>>> eyes and nose now. Such a baby.
>>>
>>> Jacksie, the holy terror aka the Brat, is another pleasure to have
>>> round the house when she's not torturing Furby. But I feel sorry for
>>> her because the only one who plays with her is me and I don't have
>>> the time every day. Poor thing. She's now taken to curling up
>>> against my butt in the morning so she can have some fun first thing
>>> when i wake. LOL
>>>
>>> Anyway, there's the update. Hope you all had a really Happy Holiday
>>> and a wonderful New Year! Sorry for the delay but it's been busy.
>>>>> information helps you.
>>
>> Clair.... Here is a link describing the procedure that I spoke of in
>> my previous posting. It really is the best way to go, assuming that
>> you want to be in control of the situation and not let it be in
>> control of you. : )
>>
>> http://www.petdr.com/declawdesc.htm
>>
>>
>>
>> IBen
>
>
> Many of us know cats that had problems after having half of their
> fingers amputated. I had one cat that had been "declawed" and he was
> never really happy, could never follow the other cats on the cat trees
> or any of the high places they like to go. And he was a big biter, and
> none of my other cats do that.
>
> I've never had problems with any of my cats scratching furiture. I
> provide plenty of scratching materials and they love those. Once in a
> while I do end up with a scratch, but that's a small price to pay for
> leaving the cat as it was created.

Yes. If one of my cars takes a fancy to a piece of furniture that I like, I
hang a piece of carpet over the place where he/she likes to scratch, and
that saves the piece.

Bill Graham
February 5th 13, 07:40 AM
Clara Semps wrote:
> Actually, ever since my first cat, and much ruined furniture
> regardless of the huge cat tree I had and all my efforts, all my cats
> have always been front declawed. I like my furniture in one piece,
> thank you, not shreds. I won't take off their back claws though. The
> simple reason being that if they get out, and I have had cats run out
> of the house, they at least have the defense of being able to climb a
> tree.
>
> CS

My cats are all outside cats. They were that way before I got 'em, and I
didn;t try to change 'em. I generally keep cheap furniture for that reason.
but ZI do have a very good quality dresser that my mother refinishede many
years ago, and I have to protect it with carpets. Fortunately, It has a
marble top, so I can put carpet under the marble that hangs down over where
the cats like to sharpen their claws and protect it from them. I am thinking
of getting a piano though, so I am interested in figuring out some way of
protecting it. Perhaps if I sneak up on them and play some complicated
chords FFF, it will discourage them....:^)

dgk
February 6th 13, 08:58 PM
On Mon, 4 Feb 2013 21:24:47 -0800 (PST), IBen Getiner
> wrote:

>On Feb 4, 10:42*am, dgk > wrote:
>> On Mon, 4 Feb 2013 03:48:12 -0800 (PST),IBenGetiner
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > wrote:
>> >On Feb 4, 2:26*am, Clara Semps > wrote:
>> >> Thought I'd give you an update on poor Furby's nasal condition. It
>> >> hasn't improved at all but he actually seems to be practicing a
>> >> meditation technique to keep his stomach calm (I kid you not) and
>> >> hasn't thrown up in weeks.
>>
>> >> I've tried ALL of your suggestions, from the pill pocket (turns up his
>> >> nose at it even without a pill inside) to a seafood mix with the
>> >> crushed pill (yuck, ptooey), to liquid using an injector (moreon his
>> >> face than down his throat) to trying to put the pill down his throat
>> >> with the pill injector. The last gifted me with several rather deep
>> >> bites on my thumb and my roomie has some nice gashes on his arms from
>> >> our attempts. <sigh>
>>
>> >> He's gained a little bit of weight now that he's not throwing up as
>> >> much but still just a miserable kitty as he sits here on my dining room
>> >> chairs (now covered with towels) and drips. I've taken to calling him
>> >> Booger Boy. :) He seems to like it and while he's no where near as well
>> >> as he should be or I'd like him, he's gained a little weight back and
>> >> is *hanging with me more often, though I've taken to walking around
>> >> with a nappy on my shoulder. ROTFL
>>
>> >> I do love this guy. He's my mama's boy and actually lets me wipe his
>> >> eyes and nose now. Such a baby.
>>
>> >> Jacksie, the holy terror aka the Brat, is another pleasure to have
>> >> round the house when she's not torturing Furby. But I feel sorry for
>> >> her because the only one who plays with her is me and I don't have the
>> >> time every day. Poor thing. She's now taken to curling up against my
>> >> butt in the morning so she can have some fun first thing when i wake.
>> >> LOL
>>
>> >> Anyway, there's the update. Hope you all had a really Happy Holiday and
>> >> a wonderful New Year! Sorry for the delay but it's been busy.
>> >> > > information helps you.
>>
>> >Clair.... Here is a link describing the procedure that I spoke of in
>> >my previous posting. It really is the best way to go, assuming that
>> >you want to be in control of the situation and not let it be in
>> >control of you. : )
>>
>> >http://www.petdr.com/declawdesc.htm
>>
>> >IBen
>>
>> Many of us know cats that had problems after having half of their
>> fingers amputated. I had one cat that had been "declawed" and he was
>> never really happy, could never follow the other cats on the cat trees
>> or any of the high places they like to go. And he was a big biter, and
>> none of my other cats do that.
>>
>> I've never had problems with any of my cats scratching furiture. I
>> provide plenty of scratching materials and they love those. Once in a
>> while I do end up with a scratch, but that's a small price to pay for
>> leaving the cat as it was created.
>
>So you're saying that he became a biter due to that little
>operation....??! I defy you to prove it. Our cat was a biter BEFORE he
>had those needless bothersome knives removed. Just FYI. Declawing
>produces NONE of the issues that you blame on it. Our boys have never
>been happier, and they exhibit no ill effects at all. It's all IN YOUR
>HEAD. You're against the procedure because you subscribe to the
>mindset of "let the cat run wild and do as he pleases". To people like
>you RULES and the word "NO" are forbidden territory. Why don't you
>just admit it instead of trying to twist this poor ignorant womanís
>mind? Be a big time saver in the long run (since I have forever and a
>day to make my point).
>
> IBen


Anecdotal evidence is always difficult to prove. But the cats balance
is all on those paws, and amputating the entire first half of their
fingers is going to ruin it. Not just removal of the nail. They cut
off the entire finger beyond the knuckle. How would you like that done
to you?

Jesse
February 6th 13, 09:55 PM
On 2013-02-05 05:24:47 +0000, IBen Getiner said:

> On Feb 4, 10:42¬*am, dgk > wrote:
>> On Mon, 4 Feb 2013 03:48:12 -0800 (PST),IBenGetiner
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > wrote:
>>> On Feb 4, 2:26¬*am, Clara Semps > wrote:
>>>> Thought I'd give you an update on poor Furby's nasal condition. It
>>>> hasn't improved at all but he actually seems to be practicing a
>>>> meditation technique to keep his stomach calm (I kid you not) and
>>>> hasn't thrown up in weeks.
>>
>>>> I've tried ALL of your suggestions, from the pill pocket (turns up his
>>>> nose at it even without a pill inside) to a seafood mix with the
>>>> crushed pill (yuck, ptooey), to liquid using an injector (moreon his
>>>> face than down his throat) to trying to put the pill down his throat
>>>> with the pill injector. The last gifted me with several rather deep
>>>> bites on my thumb and my roomie has some nice gashes on his arms from
>>>> our attempts. <sigh>
>>
>>>> He's gained a little bit of weight now that he's not throwing up as
>>>> much but still just a miserable kitty as he sits here on my dining room
>>>> chairs (now covered with towels) and drips. I've taken to calling him
>>>> Booger Boy. :) He seems to like it and while he's no where near as well
>>>> as he should be or I'd like him, he's gained a little weight back and
>>>> is ¬*hanging with me more often, though I've taken to walking around
>>>> with a nappy on my shoulder. ROTFL
>>
>>>> I do love this guy. He's my mama's boy and actually lets me wipe his
>>>> eyes and nose now. Such a baby.
>>
>>>> Jacksie, the holy terror aka the Brat, is another pleasure to have
>>>> round the house when she's not torturing Furby. But I feel sorry for
>>>> her because the only one who plays with her is me and I don't have the
>>>> time every day. Poor thing. She's now taken to curling up against my
>>>> butt in the morning so she can have some fun first thing when i wake.
>>>> LOL
>>
>>>> Anyway, there's the update. Hope you all had a really Happy Holiday and
>>>> a wonderful New Year! Sorry for the delay but it's been busy.
>>>>>> information helps you.
>>
>>> Clair.... Here is a link describing the procedure that I spoke of in
>>> my previous posting. It really is the best way to go, assuming that
>>> you want to be in control of the situation and not let it be in
>>> control of you. : )
>>
>>> http://www.petdr.com/declawdesc.htm
>>
>>> IBen
>>
>> Many of us know cats that had problems after having half of their
>> fingers amputated. I had one cat that had been "declawed" and he was
>> never really happy, could never follow the other cats on the cat trees
>> or any of the high places they like to go. And he was a big biter, and
>> none of my other cats do that.
>>
>> I've never had problems with any of my cats scratching furiture. I
>> provide plenty of scratching materials and they love those. Once in a
>> while I do end up with a scratch, but that's a small price to pay for
>> leaving the cat as it was created.
>
> So you're saying that he became a biter due to that little
> operation....??! I defy you to prove it. Our cat was a biter BEFORE he
> had those needless bothersome knives removed. Just FYI. Declawing
> produces NONE of the issues that you blame on it. Our boys have never
> been happier, and they exhibit no ill effects at all. It's all IN YOUR
> HEAD. You're against the procedure because you subscribe to the
> mindset of "let the cat run wild and do as he pleases". To people like
> you RULES and the word "NO" are forbidden territory. Why don't you
> just admit it instead of trying to twist this poor ignorant woman’s
> mind? Be a big time saver in the long run (since I have forever and a
> day to make my point).
>
> IBen

You're a complete idiot and have little valuable medical and
psychiatric knowledge about felines if you think declawing them is an
acceptable way to control unwanted behavior.

Any vet will tell you it is common place for a feline to begin biting
much more after being declawed. Their claws are their first line of
defense and without them they often feel even more helpless and become
fearful much easier. Naturally they're going to bite instead, this is
just plain common sense.

Newsflash: Cats have claws and they need to scratch things. This is natural.

If you're having problems with your cat destroying items then either
you are not an effective and responsible pet owner, or you should not
have cats.

If you have any reason at all that is not medical to remove a cats toes
then YOU SHOULD NOT HAVE A CAT.

You have forever and a day to make your point because you have no life,
maybe this is why you obsess over controlling your cats natural
behaviors? Do you need a job? I bet you do.

Jesse

Clara Semps
February 13th 13, 11:35 PM
On 2013-02-06 20:58:38 +0000, dgk > said:

>
> Anecdotal evidence is always difficult to prove. But the cats balance
> is all on those paws, and amputating the entire first half of their
> fingers is going to ruin it. Not just removal of the nail. They cut
> off the entire finger beyond the knuckle. How would you like that done
> to you?

I really don't like arguing with people. There are both good and bad
reasons for declawing and not declawing. However, you cannot prove any
of it to those who have alternate experience.

Tell my cats they can't balance, leap or teleport to the highest points
in my house. It's all I can do to keep them off the kitchen counters.
They seem no worse for the wear, though I'll admit, I don't think I'd
declaw a cat that was older than a year. The younger the better as it
seems to make for a very easy adjustment. At least in my experience
with the cats I've had over the years.

Clara

Clara Semps
February 13th 13, 11:44 PM
On 2013-02-06 21:55:11 +0000, Jesse > said:
>
> You're a complete idiot and have little valuable medical and
> psychiatric knowledge about felines if you think declawing them is an
> acceptable way to control unwanted behavior.
>
> <snipped for brevity>

Jesse,

Please don't let this conversation decline to personal insults. You
will never change anyone's mind by calling them names. I've read many
different thesis, theories, dissertations and articles about declawing.
There are many vets who would refute what you say, else why would they
do it. Not all vets are out just for the money.

Regardless, sinking to attacking the opposition doesn't help your
cause. You are both entitled to your beliefs. This is a controversy
that has been going on for years with FACTS on both sides, both
anecdotal and clinical. Just agree to disagree. No one is forcing you
to declaw your cats and probably never could. Believe me, you can't
force anyone to NOT declaw their cat if they want to, so why bother?

Clara

Bill Graham
February 13th 13, 11:57 PM
Clara Semps wrote:
> On 2013-02-06 20:58:38 +0000, dgk > said:
>
>>
>> Anecdotal evidence is always difficult to prove. But the cats balance
>> is all on those paws, and amputating the entire first half of their
>> fingers is going to ruin it. Not just removal of the nail. They cut
>> off the entire finger beyond the knuckle. How would you like that
>> done to you?
>
> I really don't like arguing with people. There are both good and bad
> reasons for declawing and not declawing. However, you cannot prove any
> of it to those who have alternate experience.
>
> Tell my cats they can't balance, leap or teleport to the highest
> points in my house. It's all I can do to keep them off the kitchen
> counters. They seem no worse for the wear, though I'll admit, I don't
> think I'd declaw a cat that was older than a year. The younger the
> better as it seems to make for a very easy adjustment. At least in my
> experience with the cats I've had over the years.
>
> Clara

In my case, I keep "outside" cats. Declawing is out of the question. It
would be the exuivalent of the government taking my guns away from me, so I
would have to remain huddled in my house, hiding under my bed, afraid to go
anywhere, or do anything.....

Bill Graham
February 14th 13, 12:07 AM
Clara Semps wrote:
> On 2013-02-06 21:55:11 +0000, Jesse
> > said:
>>
>> You're a complete idiot and have little valuable medical and
>> psychiatric knowledge about felines if you think declawing them is an
>> acceptable way to control unwanted behavior.
>>
>> <snipped for brevity>
>
> Jesse,
>
> Please don't let this conversation decline to personal insults. You
> will never change anyone's mind by calling them names. I've read many
> different thesis, theories, dissertations and articles about
> declawing. There are many vets who would refute what you say, else
> why would they do it. Not all vets are out just for the money.
>
> Regardless, sinking to attacking the opposition doesn't help your
> cause. You are both entitled to your beliefs. This is a controversy
> that has been going on for years with FACTS on both sides, both
> anecdotal and clinical. Just agree to disagree. No one is forcing you
> to declaw your cats and probably never could. Believe me, you can't
> force anyone to NOT declaw their cat if they want to, so why bother?
>
> Clara

Bingo! If you keep indoor cats, and have a house full of valuable antique
furniture, then there is no intrinsic reason why you should not declaw them,
But by the same token, don't tell me that I should not keep outside cats. I
cater to those cats who were feral, or raised to live and love outside. They
come to me as abandoned strays, looking for a little love and care, and a
free meal now and then. Not to be put into my jail. When I take one in, I
know he/she is going to cost me a bundle for shots, and neutering, and cat
food for life. And all I ask for this is the pleasure of knowing that they
are protected from a hostile world. I wasn't the one who created them to be
tortured by cold and hunger every year. It was an unfeeling God who does
that. I am just trying to undo some of "His work".....

Timo J Keranen
March 1st 13, 10:16 AM
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