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reilloc
September 4th 13, 02:48 PM
Advise, please: my long-haired cat, who's got a personality more
suspicious than a mother/father-in-law (take your choice) and a hair
trigger when it comes to any sudden noise (and when the trigger trips
the creature turns into a buzz saw that must get away) has significant
matting of his coat. By these things, I'm intending to communicate that
it's hard to hold him down for long and when you do, if there's any
unexpected sound from anywhere in or around the house, he'll start to
take off and go through you to get away. So, I'm wanting to, maybe,
sedate him a little--or a lot, if that's what it takes, since he's
clawed furrows through my arms before--so I can cut this matting out,
brush him and start fresh.

Any suggestions as to how to approach this?

Thanks,

LNC

buglady[_2_]
September 4th 13, 03:47 PM
On 9/4/2013 9:48 AM, reilloc wrote:
So, I'm wanting to, maybe,
> sedate him a little--or a lot, if that's what it takes, since he's
> clawed furrows through my arms before--so I can cut this matting out,
> brush him and start fresh.
>
> Any suggestions as to how to approach this?

.........There's lots of nonstandard things you could try. Bach Flower
Essences (try Rescue Remedy), valerian, homeopathy, Feliway, add some
extra B vitamins to cat food.

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/pic/article.cfm?aid=730

I wouldn't try catnip as a distraction if your cat is one of those who
goes bonkers on it and gets aggressive.

There's actually Thundershirts for cats, though I don't know if they
work or not.

Valerian - supposed to be anxiety reducing but some cats go gaga over it
which won't be what you want:
http://www.catniptoys.com/pages/Valerian-FAQ.html

Homeopathy: Homeopet Anxiety Relief (this works on a storm phobic dog
of mine)

A compliation of natural remedies:
http://cats.about.com/od/stressanxietyincats/tp/NaturalRemedies.htm

And there's this clothespin technique called Clipnosis! Trick would be
to find clips that aren't too strong so they would hold but not hurt:
http://vet.osu.edu/cvm/clipnosis-technique-can-calm-cats-vets-office-and-home

There's conventional vet drugs which would knock your cat out. Some of
them have nasty side effects. Consult with your vet about these. Might
be worth it to knock him out ONCE to take care of mats, then institute
some kind of calming aid and commence with training.

...........Once you get the mats out you need to try training this cat,
if the fear is not a metabolic response to something wrong in the body.
It will take a lot of time. Touch cat - treat - rinse and repeat. Use
treats the cat really likes and ONLY gets when this training is going
on. Talk softly to cat throughout. Cats also do respond to clicker
training.

Good luck!

buglady
take out the dog before replying

reilloc
September 4th 13, 05:30 PM
On 9/4/2013 9:47 AM, buglady wrote:
> On 9/4/2013 9:48 AM, reilloc wrote:
> So, I'm wanting to, maybe,
>> sedate him a little--or a lot, if that's what it takes, since he's
>> clawed furrows through my arms before--so I can cut this matting out,
>> brush him and start fresh.
>>
>> Any suggestions as to how to approach this?
>
> ........There's lots of nonstandard things you could try. Bach Flower
> Essences (try Rescue Remedy), valerian, homeopathy, Feliway, add some
> extra B vitamins to cat food.
>
> http://www.drsfostersmith.com/pic/article.cfm?aid=730
>
> I wouldn't try catnip as a distraction if your cat is one of those who
> goes bonkers on it and gets aggressive.
>
> There's actually Thundershirts for cats, though I don't know if they
> work or not.
>
> Valerian - supposed to be anxiety reducing but some cats go gaga over it
> which won't be what you want:
> http://www.catniptoys.com/pages/Valerian-FAQ.html
>
> Homeopathy: Homeopet Anxiety Relief (this works on a storm phobic dog
> of mine)
>
> A compliation of natural remedies:
> http://cats.about.com/od/stressanxietyincats/tp/NaturalRemedies.htm
>
> And there's this clothespin technique called Clipnosis! Trick would be
> to find clips that aren't too strong so they would hold but not hurt:
> http://vet.osu.edu/cvm/clipnosis-technique-can-calm-cats-vets-office-and-home
>
>
> There's conventional vet drugs which would knock your cat out. Some of
> them have nasty side effects. Consult with your vet about these. Might
> be worth it to knock him out ONCE to take care of mats, then institute
> some kind of calming aid and commence with training.
>
> ..........Once you get the mats out you need to try training this cat,
> if the fear is not a metabolic response to something wrong in the body.
> It will take a lot of time. Touch cat - treat - rinse and repeat. Use
> treats the cat really likes and ONLY gets when this training is going
> on. Talk softly to cat throughout. Cats also do respond to clicker
> training.
>
> Good luck!
>
> buglady
> take out the dog before replying
>

Thanks. I think I'll study the clipnosis sites and maybe Homeopet.
Regarding training this cat, I love this cat and he loves me--as much as
he's able to love anything. He's been this skittish since birth while
the others in his litter weren't. I contend it's a personality quirk and
that's just the way he is. I don't really know that I'd want him any
other way.

LNC

Mack A. Damia
September 4th 13, 05:56 PM
On Wed, 04 Sep 2013 11:30:58 -0500, reilloc > wrote:

>On 9/4/2013 9:47 AM, buglady wrote:
>> On 9/4/2013 9:48 AM, reilloc wrote:
>> So, I'm wanting to, maybe,
>>> sedate him a little--or a lot, if that's what it takes, since he's
>>> clawed furrows through my arms before--so I can cut this matting out,
>>> brush him and start fresh.
>>>
>>> Any suggestions as to how to approach this?
>>
>> ........There's lots of nonstandard things you could try. Bach Flower
>> Essences (try Rescue Remedy), valerian, homeopathy, Feliway, add some
>> extra B vitamins to cat food.
>>
>> http://www.drsfostersmith.com/pic/article.cfm?aid=730
>>
>> I wouldn't try catnip as a distraction if your cat is one of those who
>> goes bonkers on it and gets aggressive.
>>
>> There's actually Thundershirts for cats, though I don't know if they
>> work or not.
>>
>> Valerian - supposed to be anxiety reducing but some cats go gaga over it
>> which won't be what you want:
>> http://www.catniptoys.com/pages/Valerian-FAQ.html
>>
>> Homeopathy: Homeopet Anxiety Relief (this works on a storm phobic dog
>> of mine)
>>
>> A compliation of natural remedies:
>> http://cats.about.com/od/stressanxietyincats/tp/NaturalRemedies.htm
>>
>> And there's this clothespin technique called Clipnosis! Trick would be
>> to find clips that aren't too strong so they would hold but not hurt:
>> http://vet.osu.edu/cvm/clipnosis-technique-can-calm-cats-vets-office-and-home
>>
>>
>> There's conventional vet drugs which would knock your cat out. Some of
>> them have nasty side effects. Consult with your vet about these. Might
>> be worth it to knock him out ONCE to take care of mats, then institute
>> some kind of calming aid and commence with training.
>>
>> ..........Once you get the mats out you need to try training this cat,
>> if the fear is not a metabolic response to something wrong in the body.
>> It will take a lot of time. Touch cat - treat - rinse and repeat. Use
>> treats the cat really likes and ONLY gets when this training is going
>> on. Talk softly to cat throughout. Cats also do respond to clicker
>> training.
>>
>> Good luck!
>>
>> buglady
>> take out the dog before replying
>>
>
>Thanks. I think I'll study the clipnosis sites and maybe Homeopet.
>Regarding training this cat, I love this cat and he loves me--as much as
>he's able to love anything. He's been this skittish since birth while
>the others in his litter weren't. I contend it's a personality quirk and
>that's just the way he is. I don't really know that I'd want him any
>other way.

Is there a special treat he loves? Try to associate the grooming with
the special treat - start off slowly and speak softly to him.

--

buglady[_2_]
September 4th 13, 07:05 PM
On 9/4/2013 12:30 PM, reilloc wrote:

> Regarding training this cat, I love this cat and he loves me--as much as
> he's able to love anything. He's been this skittish since birth while
> the others in his litter weren't. I contend it's a personality quirk and
> that's just the way he is. I don't really know that I'd want him any
> other way.

............Yeah, but think about what it would be like to live life so
afraid. I had a live in the house feral. She made it til about 18 yrs.
It wasn't until her last days that I could actually pick her up.
Before that just reaching over her would cause her eyes to widen, she'd
freeze, then run off. I felt really bad for her having to live like
that. At the end of her life I started to wonder if she had poor
eyesight her whole life, which made her so skittish.

buglady
take out the dog before replying

Bill Graham
September 4th 13, 08:26 PM
reilloc wrote:
> Advise, please: my long-haired cat, who's got a personality more
> suspicious than a mother/father-in-law (take your choice) and a hair
> trigger when it comes to any sudden noise (and when the trigger trips
> the creature turns into a buzz saw that must get away) has significant
> matting of his coat. By these things, I'm intending to communicate
> that it's hard to hold him down for long and when you do, if there's
> any unexpected sound from anywhere in or around the house, he'll
> start to take off and go through you to get away. So, I'm wanting to,
> maybe, sedate him a little--or a lot, if that's what it takes, since
> he's clawed furrows through my arms before--so I can cut this matting
> out, brush him and start fresh.
>
> Any suggestions as to how to approach this?
>
> Thanks,
>
> LNC

We got a long haired cat from my music teacher who had a hazelnut farm, and
never let the cat inside, because her husband was allergic to it. It wass a
small female with very matted hair, and a very nasty personality. After a
few months, my wife took an electric clipoper to her, and cut all the mats
out. Much to her surprise, the cat stood still for this. Well, her
personality changed completely. She bacame the happiest cat in the house,
and asfter her hair grew back in, it never matted again! We still can't
understand it.....

Mack A. Damia
September 4th 13, 08:33 PM
On Wed, 4 Sep 2013 12:26:02 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
wrote:

>reilloc wrote:
>> Advise, please: my long-haired cat, who's got a personality more
>> suspicious than a mother/father-in-law (take your choice) and a hair
>> trigger when it comes to any sudden noise (and when the trigger trips
>> the creature turns into a buzz saw that must get away) has significant
>> matting of his coat. By these things, I'm intending to communicate
>> that it's hard to hold him down for long and when you do, if there's
>> any unexpected sound from anywhere in or around the house, he'll
>> start to take off and go through you to get away. So, I'm wanting to,
>> maybe, sedate him a little--or a lot, if that's what it takes, since
>> he's clawed furrows through my arms before--so I can cut this matting
>> out, brush him and start fresh.
>>
>> Any suggestions as to how to approach this?
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> LNC
>
>We got a long haired cat from my music teacher who had a hazelnut farm, and
>never let the cat inside, because her husband was allergic to it. It wass a
>small female with very matted hair, and a very nasty personality. After a
>few months, my wife took an electric clipoper to her, and cut all the mats
>out. Much to her surprise, the cat stood still for this. Well, her
>personality changed completely. She bacame the happiest cat in the house,
>and asfter her hair grew back in, it never matted again! We still can't
>understand it.....

Long-hairs are very unhappy with matted hair; I guess they don't feel
clean. You should have seen the state of the Himalayan I picked up.
Feces in the matted hair. He became a wonderful cat with a great
personality. He would jump up onto the kitchen counter and talk to
me. When he got the final urethral blockage that killed him, I cried
like a baby. Sir Percy Cat.

--

Bill Graham
September 4th 13, 08:33 PM
buglady wrote:
> On 9/4/2013 12:30 PM, reilloc wrote:
>
>> Regarding training this cat, I love this cat and he loves me--as
>> much as he's able to love anything. He's been this skittish since
>> birth while the others in his litter weren't. I contend it's a
>> personality quirk and that's just the way he is. I don't really know
>> that I'd want him any other way.
>
> ...........Yeah, but think about what it would be like to live life so
> afraid. I had a live in the house feral. She made it til about 18
> yrs. It wasn't until her last days that I could actually pick her
> up. Before that just reaching over her would cause her eyes to widen,
> she'd freeze, then run off. I felt really bad for her having to live
> like that. At the end of her life I started to wonder if she had poor
> eyesight her whole life, which made her so skittish.
>
> buglady
> take out the dog before replying

We've had a few cats that started out like that, but my wife cures them by
picking them up every chance she gets. She won't let them get away with
being fed without putting in some, "love time". Pretty soon they learn to
put up with it. (They may never actually like it, but they learn to put up
with it)

Bill Graham
September 4th 13, 08:46 PM
Mack A. Damia wrote:
> On Wed, 4 Sep 2013 12:26:02 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
> wrote:
>
>> reilloc wrote:
>>> Advise, please: my long-haired cat, who's got a personality more
>>> suspicious than a mother/father-in-law (take your choice) and a hair
>>> trigger when it comes to any sudden noise (and when the trigger
>>> trips the creature turns into a buzz saw that must get away) has
>>> significant matting of his coat. By these things, I'm intending to
>>> communicate that it's hard to hold him down for long and when you
>>> do, if there's any unexpected sound from anywhere in or around the
>>> house, he'll start to take off and go through you to get away. So,
>>> I'm wanting to, maybe, sedate him a little--or a lot, if that's
>>> what it takes, since he's clawed furrows through my arms before--so
>>> I can cut this matting out, brush him and start fresh.
>>>
>>> Any suggestions as to how to approach this?
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>>
>>> LNC
>>
>> We got a long haired cat from my music teacher who had a hazelnut
>> farm, and never let the cat inside, because her husband was allergic
>> to it. It wass a small female with very matted hair, and a very
>> nasty personality. After a few months, my wife took an electric
>> clipoper to her, and cut all the mats out. Much to her surprise, the
>> cat stood still for this. Well, her personality changed completely.
>> She bacame the happiest cat in the house, and asfter her hair grew
>> back in, it never matted again! We still can't understand it.....
>
> Long-hairs are very unhappy with matted hair; I guess they don't feel
> clean. You should have seen the state of the Himalayan I picked up.
> Feces in the matted hair. He became a wonderful cat with a great
> personality. He would jump up onto the kitchen counter and talk to
> me. When he got the final urethral blockage that killed him, I cried
> like a baby. Sir Percy Cat.

Yes. I know what you mean. I cried when my B-K doies, too. I found him in a
Burger King parking lot when he was about one year old. He had a wonderful,
gregarious personality. He knew all the neighvbors and would sneak into
their houses in the middle of the night if they left a window open like four
inches or more, and ve there waiting for them when they got up in the
morning. Even the dogs in the neighborhood were his friends. Somehow, he got
into some weed killer, and died when he was 7-1/2 years old. So, I only knew
him for 6-1/2 yearws. But I fell in love with him right away, and I still
cry when I think of him.
Exactly one month after B-K died, a strange dog that I had never seen before
came sniffing down the block, and came up onto my front porch. He looked
through the open door at me, (It was a warm sunny day) asnd much to my
surprise, he came in the house. After eyening me to make sure I wasn't
hostile to him, he proceeded to search all over my house. Then he went back
outsied to the front doormat, (which was B-K's favorite sleeping spot) and
lay down for about 10 minutes. Then he got up and left, and I have never
seen him again. I was amazed that he could track B-K back to his home one
month after he died. Dogs have truely wonderful noses.
I will never forget that cat. He was the light of my life.....

buglady[_2_]
September 5th 13, 01:56 PM
On 9/4/2013 3:46 PM, Bill Graham wrote:

> I will never forget that cat. He was the light of my life.....

What a great story Bill!
That dog was an emissary making sure you hadn't forgotten your cat!

buglady
take out the dog before replying

Bill Graham
September 5th 13, 11:11 PM
buglady wrote:
> On 9/4/2013 3:46 PM, Bill Graham wrote:
>
>> I will never forget that cat. He was the light of my life.....
>
> What a great story Bill!
> That dog was an emissary making sure you hadn't forgotten your cat!

Yes. I didn't know why he was there untill he lay down on the front door
mat. It was B-K's favorite place to spend the night in the Summertime. It
was also where he lay when he died a month before. The dog lay there with
his head between his front paws, pressed against the doormat, and then I
knew for sure why he was there. He was grieving for his friend. I know how
he felt. - I grieve for him too......

I could call B-K with a dog whistle. When the roving vet came to give B-K
his shots, all I would have to do was blow that dog whistle, and in a few
minutes, B-K would come running down the block, and I would pick him up and
hand him to the vet. What a wonderful cat he was......

John Doe[_2_]
May 14th 17, 02:12 AM
This is the troll bashing me for coming up with a neat
solution to a serious problem. Here it is talking about its
cat and "sedating him a lot, if that's what it takes".

Somebody needs to investigate its computer, to look for drug
searches.

--
reilloc <reilloc gmail.com> wrote:

> Path: eternal-september.org!news.eternal-september.org!news.eternal-september.org!.POSTED!not-for-mail
> From: reilloc <reilloc gmail.com>
> Newsgroups: rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> Subject: Coat matting
> Date: Wed, 04 Sep 2013 08:48:45 -0500
> Organization: A noiseless patient Spider
> Lines: 17
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>
> Advise, please: my long-haired cat, who's got a personality more
> suspicious than a mother/father-in-law (take your choice) and a hair
> trigger when it comes to any sudden noise (and when the trigger trips
> the creature turns into a buzz saw that must get away) has significant
> matting of his coat. By these things, I'm intending to communicate that
> it's hard to hold him down for long and when you do, if there's any
> unexpected sound from anywhere in or around the house, he'll start to
> take off and go through you to get away. So, I'm wanting to, maybe,
> sedate him a little--or a lot, if that's what it takes, since he's
> clawed furrows through my arms before--so I can cut this matting out,
> brush him and start fresh.
>
> Any suggestions as to how to approach this?
>
> Thanks,
>
> LNC
>

June 27th 17, 05:54 PM
Let me start by stating our now-deceased 18 pound Maine Coon, Boswell, used to shed in clumps, requiring a tranquilizer and near-shaving to cure. He would not tolerate more than light brushing even when mat free. Then, our vet lent us one of these:

https://3tailer.com/mg-ergonomic-dematting-tool-9-blade?gclid=Cj0KEQjwhMjKBRDjxb31j-aesI4BEiQA7ivN-MNuLO7B8udkv36WmNEUEBjNiES2rwIhwGDvtRhfOwYaAlWP8P8 HAQ


And I bought a pair of these:

https://www.webstaurantstore.com/san-jamar-824tm-24-terry-oven-mitts-pack/167824TM.html?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=GoogleShopping&gclid=Cj0KEQjwhMjKBRDjxb31j-aesI4BEiQA7ivN-Hw9eJotdT1tsIxPd-9k6Ht7IiIPGNhLGcbmLaxxxYAaAjL78P8HAQ

Which allowed two things. First, more frequent, lighter brushings, so fewer mats to remove. And, second, the cat could 'fight back' without damage, which to him was very satisfying.

Sadly we lost him at 16 to cancer. But the incumbents now are also long-hairs but have been trained since kittens to tolerate, in one case enjoy, brushing. But the oven-mitt does prevent excessive emotional reaction damage, no injury or stress on the cat or the servant doing the brushing.