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October 26th 13, 04:08 PM
My white cat has developed a darkening of her nose (see other post). I'm told white cats are prone to skin cancer.

I never let her outside but she does lay in a sunny window in the morning for hours. The window is a double, with a storm window on the outside. Doesn't that block the dangerous sun rays or could this be the problem?

John Doe
October 26th 13, 08:05 PM
jblatz2 gmail.com wrote:

> My white cat has developed a darkening of her nose (see other
> post). I'm told white cats are prone to skin cancer.
>
> I never let her outside but she does lay in a sunny window in
> the morning for hours. The window is a double, with a storm
> window on the outside. Doesn't that block the dangerous sun
> rays or could this be the problem?

My hard-core feral looks almost like an albino, not white fur, but
you can see her skin is pinkish. Yours is a good question IMO but
somehow I doubt you'll find much information on the subject. My
skin (and eyes) is sensitive to the sun. And it never forgets.
Doesn't matter how long you stay out of the sun after you've had
too much. It's a cumulative thing though, so getting out of the
sun does help avoid further damage.

In case you haven't heard... Cats enjoy the outside sounds. Buy an
infant/baby room monitor and put the transmitter outside (out of
the rain). If you can, hook the receiver up to half decent
speakers (but the crummy built-in speaker would be better than
nothing).

Good luck and have fun.

buglady[_2_]
October 27th 13, 12:55 AM
On 10/26/2013 11:08 AM, wrote:
> My white cat has developed a darkening of her nose (see other post). I'm told white cats are prone to skin cancer.

.................OK, I was wrong, not melanoma, probably white cats are
more prone to squamous cell carcinoma:
http://www.oncolink.org/experts/article.cfm/aid/2451/id/1238/c/102
http://www.vcahospitals.com/main/pet-health-information/article/animal-health/skin-squamous-cell-carcinoma-in-cats/652
http://www.petplace.com/cats/skin-cancer-in-cats/page1.aspx
http://www.lbah.com/word/squamous-cell-carcinoma-scc/

...........I didn't stop to read all above links. I trust oncolink,
petplace and lbah as good websites. Unfortunately I'd already tossed
all the emails dealing with my neighbor's cancer cat.

> I never let her outside but she does lay in a sunny window in the morning for hours. The window is a double,
with a storm window on the outside. Doesn't that block the dangerous
sun rays or could this be the problem?

.............. Unless treated, glass doesn't prevent all bad UV rays from
entering the house no matter how many layers there are. You can get
transparent window shades that block UV.

http://www.petmd.com/cat/conditions/cancer/c_ct_squamous_cell_carcinoma_skin?page=2
"...you might consider placing a window shade or reflector over the
glass to block UV rays."

http://www.skincancer.org/prevention/are-you-at-risk/sun-hazards-in-your-car

This is just an example. I Googled window shades that block UV
http://www.northsolarscreen.com/html/koolvue.shtml

Good luck with your kitty.

buglady
take out the dog before replying

Bill Graham
October 27th 13, 01:57 AM
wrote:
> My white cat has developed a darkening of her nose (see other post).
> I'm told white cats are prone to skin cancer.
>
> I never let her outside but she does lay in a sunny window in the
> morning for hours. The window is a double, with a storm window on
> the outside. Doesn't that block the dangerous sun rays or could this
> be the problem?

Two layers of glass should block most of the UV, but you can buy special
glass that is made just to do that. Contack the manufacturer to find out if
yours are UV blockers.

IBen Getiner[_3_]
November 22nd 13, 08:17 AM
On Saturday, October 26, 2013 11:08:17 AM UTC-4, wrote:
> My white cat has developed a darkening of her nose (see other post). I'm told white cats are prone to skin cancer.
>
>
>
> I never let her outside but she does lay in a sunny window in the morning for hours. The window is a double, with a storm window on the outside. Doesn't that block the dangerous sun rays or could this be the problem?

It could be the beginning of a malignant melanoma, you know...


IBen Getiner