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Joy
August 23rd 14, 12:41 AM
Hi all,

I'm new here, although I'm a long-time subscriber to rpca. I'm hoping
somebody has some suggestions to help a poor little feral kitty.

Five years ago I adopted two three-year-old littermates, a male and a
female. A few months ago the male got cancer and subsequently had to be
PTS. The female (Pickles) has been very lonely and demanding of attention.

I thought I'd get her a companion, and consulted others about this. The
consensus seemed to be that a young male would be the best fit.

About a month ago I adopted a 4-month-old neutered male from the local
shelter. When the volunteer took him out of the cage so I could pet
him, he struggled and she said, "He's still a little bit feral."

I kept him secluded for about a week. During that time he spent most of
his time hiding. Just as I was about to initiate an introduction
between the two cats, I got the results of a test showing that he had an
infection. For the next ten days I had to dig him out of his hiding
place and give him medication. Naturally, that didn't make him feel any
more comfortable about his situation. I almost never saw him unless I
was medicating him.

A few weeks ago I started spending about half an hour every day in his
room, lying on the bed, reading. and talking and singing to him.

About a week ago he was through with his medication and tested well, so
I opened the door to the room where I'd been keeping him. Once or twice
Pickles would go into that room and they'd exchange what sounded like
insults or threats, but there was never any physical contact.

At some point they apparently reached an agreement, because now Pickles
never goes into that room, and he never comes out of it. Since I opened
the door, I've seen him out from under the bed three times.

I know he's scared to death, and I'd like to let him know he doesn't
need to be scared. I'd also like him and Pickles to become friends.
Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I can accomplish either of
these things?

Joy


Joy Unlimited
Colorful Crocheted Critters
Photos at http://www.PictureTrail.com/joy9

Mack A. Damia
August 23rd 14, 12:49 AM
On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:41:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:

>Hi all,
>
>I'm new here, although I'm a long-time subscriber to rpca. I'm hoping
>somebody has some suggestions to help a poor little feral kitty.
>
>Five years ago I adopted two three-year-old littermates, a male and a
>female. A few months ago the male got cancer and subsequently had to be
>PTS. The female (Pickles) has been very lonely and demanding of attention.
>
>I thought I'd get her a companion, and consulted others about this. The
>consensus seemed to be that a young male would be the best fit.
>
>About a month ago I adopted a 4-month-old neutered male from the local
>shelter. When the volunteer took him out of the cage so I could pet
>him, he struggled and she said, "He's still a little bit feral."
>
>I kept him secluded for about a week. During that time he spent most of
>his time hiding. Just as I was about to initiate an introduction
>between the two cats, I got the results of a test showing that he had an
>infection. For the next ten days I had to dig him out of his hiding
>place and give him medication. Naturally, that didn't make him feel any
>more comfortable about his situation. I almost never saw him unless I
>was medicating him.
>
>A few weeks ago I started spending about half an hour every day in his
>room, lying on the bed, reading. and talking and singing to him.
>
>About a week ago he was through with his medication and tested well, so
>I opened the door to the room where I'd been keeping him. Once or twice
>Pickles would go into that room and they'd exchange what sounded like
>insults or threats, but there was never any physical contact.
>
>At some point they apparently reached an agreement, because now Pickles
>never goes into that room, and he never comes out of it. Since I opened
>the door, I've seen him out from under the bed three times.
>
>I know he's scared to death, and I'd like to let him know he doesn't
>need to be scared. I'd also like him and Pickles to become friends.
>Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I can accomplish either of
>these things.

Four months old seems to be a bit early to classify a cat, "feral".

My friend in San Diego found a two year-old feral cat, and she stayed
under his bed for twenty years, only coming out at night to eat and
use the box. He had another cat, too, but I don't think they bothered
with each other.

Give him time - and the opportunity to come out of hiding. I think it
is still far too early.

--

Joy
August 23rd 14, 01:35 AM
On 8/22/2014 4:49 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:41:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> I'm new here, although I'm a long-time subscriber to rpca. I'm hoping
>> somebody has some suggestions to help a poor little feral kitty.
>>
>> Five years ago I adopted two three-year-old littermates, a male and a
>> female. A few months ago the male got cancer and subsequently had to be
>> PTS. The female (Pickles) has been very lonely and demanding of attention.
>>
>> I thought I'd get her a companion, and consulted others about this. The
>> consensus seemed to be that a young male would be the best fit.
>>
>> About a month ago I adopted a 4-month-old neutered male from the local
>> shelter. When the volunteer took him out of the cage so I could pet
>> him, he struggled and she said, "He's still a little bit feral."
>>
>> I kept him secluded for about a week. During that time he spent most of
>> his time hiding. Just as I was about to initiate an introduction
>> between the two cats, I got the results of a test showing that he had an
>> infection. For the next ten days I had to dig him out of his hiding
>> place and give him medication. Naturally, that didn't make him feel any
>> more comfortable about his situation. I almost never saw him unless I
>> was medicating him.
>>
>> A few weeks ago I started spending about half an hour every day in his
>> room, lying on the bed, reading. and talking and singing to him.
>>
>> About a week ago he was through with his medication and tested well, so
>> I opened the door to the room where I'd been keeping him. Once or twice
>> Pickles would go into that room and they'd exchange what sounded like
>> insults or threats, but there was never any physical contact.
>>
>> At some point they apparently reached an agreement, because now Pickles
>> never goes into that room, and he never comes out of it. Since I opened
>> the door, I've seen him out from under the bed three times.
>>
>> I know he's scared to death, and I'd like to let him know he doesn't
>> need to be scared. I'd also like him and Pickles to become friends.
>> Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I can accomplish either of
>> these things.
>
> Four months old seems to be a bit early to classify a cat, "feral".
>
> My friend in San Diego found a two year-old feral cat, and she stayed
> under his bed for twenty years, only coming out at night to eat and
> use the box. He had another cat, too, but I don't think they bothered
> with each other.
>
> Give him time - and the opportunity to come out of hiding. I think it
> is still far too early.
>

Okay, thank you.

Joy


Joy Unlimited
Colorful Crocheted Critters
Photos at http://www.PictureTrail.com/joy9

Mack A. Damia
August 23rd 14, 01:46 AM
On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:35:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:

>On 8/22/2014 4:49 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:41:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>
>>> Hi all,
>>>
>>> I'm new here, although I'm a long-time subscriber to rpca. I'm hoping
>>> somebody has some suggestions to help a poor little feral kitty.
>>>
>>> Five years ago I adopted two three-year-old littermates, a male and a
>>> female. A few months ago the male got cancer and subsequently had to be
>>> PTS. The female (Pickles) has been very lonely and demanding of attention.
>>>
>>> I thought I'd get her a companion, and consulted others about this. The
>>> consensus seemed to be that a young male would be the best fit.
>>>
>>> About a month ago I adopted a 4-month-old neutered male from the local
>>> shelter. When the volunteer took him out of the cage so I could pet
>>> him, he struggled and she said, "He's still a little bit feral."
>>>
>>> I kept him secluded for about a week. During that time he spent most of
>>> his time hiding. Just as I was about to initiate an introduction
>>> between the two cats, I got the results of a test showing that he had an
>>> infection. For the next ten days I had to dig him out of his hiding
>>> place and give him medication. Naturally, that didn't make him feel any
>>> more comfortable about his situation. I almost never saw him unless I
>>> was medicating him.
>>>
>>> A few weeks ago I started spending about half an hour every day in his
>>> room, lying on the bed, reading. and talking and singing to him.
>>>
>>> About a week ago he was through with his medication and tested well, so
>>> I opened the door to the room where I'd been keeping him. Once or twice
>>> Pickles would go into that room and they'd exchange what sounded like
>>> insults or threats, but there was never any physical contact.
>>>
>>> At some point they apparently reached an agreement, because now Pickles
>>> never goes into that room, and he never comes out of it. Since I opened
>>> the door, I've seen him out from under the bed three times.
>>>
>>> I know he's scared to death, and I'd like to let him know he doesn't
>>> need to be scared. I'd also like him and Pickles to become friends.
>>> Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I can accomplish either of
>>> these things.
>>
>> Four months old seems to be a bit early to classify a cat, "feral".
>>
>> My friend in San Diego found a two year-old feral cat, and she stayed
>> under his bed for twenty years, only coming out at night to eat and
>> use the box. He had another cat, too, but I don't think they bothered
>> with each other.
>>
>> Give him time - and the opportunity to come out of hiding. I think it
>> is still far too early.
>>
>
>Okay, thank you.

Kindly keep us informed of what goes on, but I would give him plenty
of love and the opportunity to get to know the other cat.

Good luck!

--

John Doe[_2_]
August 23rd 14, 01:56 AM
Joy <toastie real-me.net> wrote:

> I'm new here, although I'm a long-time subscriber to rpca. I'm
> hoping somebody has some suggestions to help a poor little feral
> kitty.
>
> Five years ago I adopted two three-year-old littermates, a male
> and a female. A few months ago the male got cancer and
> subsequently had to be PTS. The female (Pickles) has been very
> lonely and demanding of attention.
>
> I thought I'd get her a companion, and consulted others about
> this. The consensus seemed to be that a young male would be the
> best fit.
>
> About a month ago I adopted a 4-month-old neutered male from the
> local shelter. When the volunteer took him out of the cage so I
> could pet him, he struggled and she said, "He's still a little
> bit feral."
>
> I kept him secluded for about a week. During that time he spent
> most of his time hiding. Just as I was about to initiate an
> introduction between the two cats, I got the results of a test
> showing that he had an infection. For the next ten days I had
> to dig him out of his hiding place and give him medication.
> Naturally, that didn't make him feel any more comfortable about
> his situation. I almost never saw him unless I was medicating
> him.
>
> A few weeks ago I started spending about half an hour every day
> in his room, lying on the bed, reading. and talking and singing
> to him.
>
> About a week ago he was through with his medication and tested
> well, so I opened the door to the room where I'd been keeping
> him. Once or twice Pickles would go into that room and they'd
> exchange what sounded like insults or threats, but there was
> never any physical contact.
>
> At some point they apparently reached an agreement, because now
> Pickles never goes into that room, and he never comes out of it.
> Since I opened the door, I've seen him out from under the bed
> three times.
>
> I know he's scared to death, and I'd like to let him know he
> doesn't need to be scared. I'd also like him and Pickles to
> become friends. Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I
> can accomplish either of these things?

I agree with the other reply. Give it some time. I think you're
lucky there isn't serious fights. If there is, clip the
aggressor's claws. Your home cat would normally be jealous. Having
some experience, I definitely wouldn't expect it to accept the
newcomer for quite a while. I would concentrate on the home cat.
The things are very much aware of who you are giving attention to.

If the new cat doesn't come out, that means it's okay where it is.
As long as it's using the litter box, you are doing well.

If you want to know what feral really is... I've had a feral
female that I took in (trapped) from the not so great outdoors in
May 2007. I had no idea. To this day, it's afraid of me. Scared to
death of other people. No touch. Still hisses at me sometimes. But
even though it's unneutered, it would rather stay here than go
back into the not so great outdoors.

I have tried singing to it, many times. But I suck at singing.
There is a mental wall between it and human beings. Recently, I
believe it has started playing with my other two cats. Probably
the most fun it's had in its otherwise miserable lifetime.

My cats get places up high and out of the way (a skyway) as you
can see on my picture page...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

Besides a place to get away from it all, a skyway helps provide
exercise. The feral spends most of its time in a loft in another
room.

They also get to hear the outside sounds thanks to an infant room
monitor (connected to a speaker for decent sound). That's nice
especially if you're gone much of the day. The calico, the newest
addition hung out by the speaker all the time when it first got
here.

Joy
August 23rd 14, 02:29 AM
On 8/22/2014 5:46 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:35:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>
>> On 8/22/2014 4:49 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:41:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>
>>>> Hi all,
>>>>
>>>> I'm new here, although I'm a long-time subscriber to rpca. I'm hoping
>>>> somebody has some suggestions to help a poor little feral kitty.
>>>>
>>>> Five years ago I adopted two three-year-old littermates, a male and a
>>>> female. A few months ago the male got cancer and subsequently had to be
>>>> PTS. The female (Pickles) has been very lonely and demanding of attention.
>>>>
>>>> I thought I'd get her a companion, and consulted others about this. The
>>>> consensus seemed to be that a young male would be the best fit.
>>>>
>>>> About a month ago I adopted a 4-month-old neutered male from the local
>>>> shelter. When the volunteer took him out of the cage so I could pet
>>>> him, he struggled and she said, "He's still a little bit feral."
>>>>
>>>> I kept him secluded for about a week. During that time he spent most of
>>>> his time hiding. Just as I was about to initiate an introduction
>>>> between the two cats, I got the results of a test showing that he had an
>>>> infection. For the next ten days I had to dig him out of his hiding
>>>> place and give him medication. Naturally, that didn't make him feel any
>>>> more comfortable about his situation. I almost never saw him unless I
>>>> was medicating him.
>>>>
>>>> A few weeks ago I started spending about half an hour every day in his
>>>> room, lying on the bed, reading. and talking and singing to him.
>>>>
>>>> About a week ago he was through with his medication and tested well, so
>>>> I opened the door to the room where I'd been keeping him. Once or twice
>>>> Pickles would go into that room and they'd exchange what sounded like
>>>> insults or threats, but there was never any physical contact.
>>>>
>>>> At some point they apparently reached an agreement, because now Pickles
>>>> never goes into that room, and he never comes out of it. Since I opened
>>>> the door, I've seen him out from under the bed three times.
>>>>
>>>> I know he's scared to death, and I'd like to let him know he doesn't
>>>> need to be scared. I'd also like him and Pickles to become friends.
>>>> Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I can accomplish either of
>>>> these things.
>>>
>>> Four months old seems to be a bit early to classify a cat, "feral".
>>>
>>> My friend in San Diego found a two year-old feral cat, and she stayed
>>> under his bed for twenty years, only coming out at night to eat and
>>> use the box. He had another cat, too, but I don't think they bothered
>>> with each other.
>>>
>>> Give him time - and the opportunity to come out of hiding. I think it
>>> is still far too early.
>>>
>>
>> Okay, thank you.
>
> Kindly keep us informed of what goes on, but I would give him plenty
> of love and the opportunity to get to know the other cat.
>
> Good luck!

Thank you. The only way I know of to give him love is to talk to him.
I can't get close enough to touch him. I've had a total of three
opportunities to pet him.

1) When the volunteer took him out of the cage and he was struggling wildly

2) When I took him to the vet. After the basic exam, the vet and her
assistant left the room while he was still lying on the table. He was
frozen in place and trembling. I did pet him and talk soothingly to
him, but it didn't seem to make any difference.

3) One of the times I gave him his medicine I had to dig him out of a
tight corner. I was afraid of getting scratched, so I threw a towel
over him, wrapped him in it and took him onto the bed to give him the
meds. Afterward I unwrapped him and he just laid there, so I petted him
for a while. He appeared to be too scared to move.

Since he spends all his time (when not eating or using the box) under
the bed, I'd get down on the floor and talk to him. However, I'm 78
years old and I don't think I could get up if I ever got down there.

The door is open, except when I leave the house and at night. I figure
if the door is closed at night he might lie on the bed rather than under
it. I want them to get acquainted, but I want to be around when it
happens, in case of any problems.

Thanks again. I need all the luck I can get.

Joy

--
Joy Unlimited
Colorful Crocheted Critters
Photos at http://www.PictureTrail.com/joy9

Joy
August 23rd 14, 02:32 AM
On 8/22/2014 5:56 PM, John Doe wrote:
> Joy <toastie real-me.net> wrote:
>
>> I'm new here, although I'm a long-time subscriber to rpca. I'm
>> hoping somebody has some suggestions to help a poor little feral
>> kitty.
>>
>> Five years ago I adopted two three-year-old littermates, a male
>> and a female. A few months ago the male got cancer and
>> subsequently had to be PTS. The female (Pickles) has been very
>> lonely and demanding of attention.
>>
>> I thought I'd get her a companion, and consulted others about
>> this. The consensus seemed to be that a young male would be the
>> best fit.
>>
>> About a month ago I adopted a 4-month-old neutered male from the
>> local shelter. When the volunteer took him out of the cage so I
>> could pet him, he struggled and she said, "He's still a little
>> bit feral."
>>
>> I kept him secluded for about a week. During that time he spent
>> most of his time hiding. Just as I was about to initiate an
>> introduction between the two cats, I got the results of a test
>> showing that he had an infection. For the next ten days I had
>> to dig him out of his hiding place and give him medication.
>> Naturally, that didn't make him feel any more comfortable about
>> his situation. I almost never saw him unless I was medicating
>> him.
>>
>> A few weeks ago I started spending about half an hour every day
>> in his room, lying on the bed, reading. and talking and singing
>> to him.
>>
>> About a week ago he was through with his medication and tested
>> well, so I opened the door to the room where I'd been keeping
>> him. Once or twice Pickles would go into that room and they'd
>> exchange what sounded like insults or threats, but there was
>> never any physical contact.
>>
>> At some point they apparently reached an agreement, because now
>> Pickles never goes into that room, and he never comes out of it.
>> Since I opened the door, I've seen him out from under the bed
>> three times.
>>
>> I know he's scared to death, and I'd like to let him know he
>> doesn't need to be scared. I'd also like him and Pickles to
>> become friends. Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I
>> can accomplish either of these things?
>
> I agree with the other reply. Give it some time. I think you're
> lucky there isn't serious fights. If there is, clip the
> aggressor's claws. Your home cat would normally be jealous. Having
> some experience, I definitely wouldn't expect it to accept the
> newcomer for quite a while. I would concentrate on the home cat.
> The things are very much aware of who you are giving attention to.
>
> If the new cat doesn't come out, that means it's okay where it is.
> As long as it's using the litter box, you are doing well.
>
> If you want to know what feral really is... I've had a feral
> female that I took in (trapped) from the not so great outdoors in
> May 2007. I had no idea. To this day, it's afraid of me. Scared to
> death of other people. No touch. Still hisses at me sometimes. But
> even though it's unneutered, it would rather stay here than go
> back into the not so great outdoors.
>
> I have tried singing to it, many times. But I suck at singing.
> There is a mental wall between it and human beings. Recently, I
> believe it has started playing with my other two cats. Probably
> the most fun it's had in its otherwise miserable lifetime.
>
> My cats get places up high and out of the way (a skyway) as you
> can see on my picture page...
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
>
> Besides a place to get away from it all, a skyway helps provide
> exercise. The feral spends most of its time in a loft in another
> room.
>
> They also get to hear the outside sounds thanks to an infant room
> monitor (connected to a speaker for decent sound). That's nice
> especially if you're gone much of the day. The calico, the newest
> addition hung out by the speaker all the time when it first got
> here.
>

Wow, you really go all out for your cats! That's great.

I'm no good at singing either, but I do it anyway, just to get him used
to my voice.

Yes, I'm giving Pickles lots of attention. I just hope we reach a time
when the new one isn't scared all the time.

Joy

--
Joy Unlimited
Colorful Crocheted Critters
Photos at http://www.PictureTrail.com/joy9

Mack A. Damia
August 23rd 14, 03:28 AM
On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 18:29:45 -0700, Joy > wrote:

>On 8/22/2014 5:46 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:35:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>
>>> On 8/22/2014 4:49 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:41:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Hi all,
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm new here, although I'm a long-time subscriber to rpca. I'm hoping
>>>>> somebody has some suggestions to help a poor little feral kitty.
>>>>>
>>>>> Five years ago I adopted two three-year-old littermates, a male and a
>>>>> female. A few months ago the male got cancer and subsequently had to be
>>>>> PTS. The female (Pickles) has been very lonely and demanding of attention.
>>>>>
>>>>> I thought I'd get her a companion, and consulted others about this. The
>>>>> consensus seemed to be that a young male would be the best fit.
>>>>>
>>>>> About a month ago I adopted a 4-month-old neutered male from the local
>>>>> shelter. When the volunteer took him out of the cage so I could pet
>>>>> him, he struggled and she said, "He's still a little bit feral."
>>>>>
>>>>> I kept him secluded for about a week. During that time he spent most of
>>>>> his time hiding. Just as I was about to initiate an introduction
>>>>> between the two cats, I got the results of a test showing that he had an
>>>>> infection. For the next ten days I had to dig him out of his hiding
>>>>> place and give him medication. Naturally, that didn't make him feel any
>>>>> more comfortable about his situation. I almost never saw him unless I
>>>>> was medicating him.
>>>>>
>>>>> A few weeks ago I started spending about half an hour every day in his
>>>>> room, lying on the bed, reading. and talking and singing to him.
>>>>>
>>>>> About a week ago he was through with his medication and tested well, so
>>>>> I opened the door to the room where I'd been keeping him. Once or twice
>>>>> Pickles would go into that room and they'd exchange what sounded like
>>>>> insults or threats, but there was never any physical contact.
>>>>>
>>>>> At some point they apparently reached an agreement, because now Pickles
>>>>> never goes into that room, and he never comes out of it. Since I opened
>>>>> the door, I've seen him out from under the bed three times.
>>>>>
>>>>> I know he's scared to death, and I'd like to let him know he doesn't
>>>>> need to be scared. I'd also like him and Pickles to become friends.
>>>>> Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I can accomplish either of
>>>>> these things.
>>>>
>>>> Four months old seems to be a bit early to classify a cat, "feral".
>>>>
>>>> My friend in San Diego found a two year-old feral cat, and she stayed
>>>> under his bed for twenty years, only coming out at night to eat and
>>>> use the box. He had another cat, too, but I don't think they bothered
>>>> with each other.
>>>>
>>>> Give him time - and the opportunity to come out of hiding. I think it
>>>> is still far too early.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Okay, thank you.
>>
>> Kindly keep us informed of what goes on, but I would give him plenty
>> of love and the opportunity to get to know the other cat.
>>
>> Good luck!
>
>Thank you. The only way I know of to give him love is to talk to him.
>I can't get close enough to touch him. I've had a total of three
>opportunities to pet him.
>
>1) When the volunteer took him out of the cage and he was struggling wildly
>
>2) When I took him to the vet. After the basic exam, the vet and her
>assistant left the room while he was still lying on the table. He was
>frozen in place and trembling. I did pet him and talk soothingly to
>him, but it didn't seem to make any difference.
>
>3) One of the times I gave him his medicine I had to dig him out of a
>tight corner. I was afraid of getting scratched, so I threw a towel
>over him, wrapped him in it and took him onto the bed to give him the
>meds. Afterward I unwrapped him and he just laid there, so I petted him
>for a while. He appeared to be too scared to move.
>
>Since he spends all his time (when not eating or using the box) under
>the bed, I'd get down on the floor and talk to him. However, I'm 78
>years old and I don't think I could get up if I ever got down there.
>
>The door is open, except when I leave the house and at night. I figure
>if the door is closed at night he might lie on the bed rather than under
>it. I want them to get acquainted, but I want to be around when it
>happens, in case of any problems.
>
>Thanks again. I need all the luck I can get.

Also, get him a few special toys - even a rolled up sock or a cloth
mousie. You could try a good grade of catnip, too - maybe after a
while, but talking to him regularly in a soft, quiet and loving voice
ought to bring him around eventually. Sit on the bed if you can't get
down; I can appreciate what a problem that can be, and my thoughts are
with you on that chore!

I think he will accept you before he accepts the other cat, but just
hang in there.

--

Joy
August 23rd 14, 06:34 AM
On 8/22/2014 7:28 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 18:29:45 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>
>> On 8/22/2014 5:46 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:35:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 8/22/2014 4:49 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:41:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Hi all,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I'm new here, although I'm a long-time subscriber to rpca. I'm hoping
>>>>>> somebody has some suggestions to help a poor little feral kitty.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Five years ago I adopted two three-year-old littermates, a male and a
>>>>>> female. A few months ago the male got cancer and subsequently had to be
>>>>>> PTS. The female (Pickles) has been very lonely and demanding of attention.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I thought I'd get her a companion, and consulted others about this. The
>>>>>> consensus seemed to be that a young male would be the best fit.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> About a month ago I adopted a 4-month-old neutered male from the local
>>>>>> shelter. When the volunteer took him out of the cage so I could pet
>>>>>> him, he struggled and she said, "He's still a little bit feral."
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I kept him secluded for about a week. During that time he spent most of
>>>>>> his time hiding. Just as I was about to initiate an introduction
>>>>>> between the two cats, I got the results of a test showing that he had an
>>>>>> infection. For the next ten days I had to dig him out of his hiding
>>>>>> place and give him medication. Naturally, that didn't make him feel any
>>>>>> more comfortable about his situation. I almost never saw him unless I
>>>>>> was medicating him.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> A few weeks ago I started spending about half an hour every day in his
>>>>>> room, lying on the bed, reading. and talking and singing to him.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> About a week ago he was through with his medication and tested well, so
>>>>>> I opened the door to the room where I'd been keeping him. Once or twice
>>>>>> Pickles would go into that room and they'd exchange what sounded like
>>>>>> insults or threats, but there was never any physical contact.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> At some point they apparently reached an agreement, because now Pickles
>>>>>> never goes into that room, and he never comes out of it. Since I opened
>>>>>> the door, I've seen him out from under the bed three times.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I know he's scared to death, and I'd like to let him know he doesn't
>>>>>> need to be scared. I'd also like him and Pickles to become friends.
>>>>>> Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I can accomplish either of
>>>>>> these things.
>>>>>
>>>>> Four months old seems to be a bit early to classify a cat, "feral".
>>>>>
>>>>> My friend in San Diego found a two year-old feral cat, and she stayed
>>>>> under his bed for twenty years, only coming out at night to eat and
>>>>> use the box. He had another cat, too, but I don't think they bothered
>>>>> with each other.
>>>>>
>>>>> Give him time - and the opportunity to come out of hiding. I think it
>>>>> is still far too early.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Okay, thank you.
>>>
>>> Kindly keep us informed of what goes on, but I would give him plenty
>>> of love and the opportunity to get to know the other cat.
>>>
>>> Good luck!
>>
>> Thank you. The only way I know of to give him love is to talk to him.
>> I can't get close enough to touch him. I've had a total of three
>> opportunities to pet him.
>>
>> 1) When the volunteer took him out of the cage and he was struggling wildly
>>
>> 2) When I took him to the vet. After the basic exam, the vet and her
>> assistant left the room while he was still lying on the table. He was
>> frozen in place and trembling. I did pet him and talk soothingly to
>> him, but it didn't seem to make any difference.
>>
>> 3) One of the times I gave him his medicine I had to dig him out of a
>> tight corner. I was afraid of getting scratched, so I threw a towel
>> over him, wrapped him in it and took him onto the bed to give him the
>> meds. Afterward I unwrapped him and he just laid there, so I petted him
>> for a while. He appeared to be too scared to move.
>>
>> Since he spends all his time (when not eating or using the box) under
>> the bed, I'd get down on the floor and talk to him. However, I'm 78
>> years old and I don't think I could get up if I ever got down there.
>>
>> The door is open, except when I leave the house and at night. I figure
>> if the door is closed at night he might lie on the bed rather than under
>> it. I want them to get acquainted, but I want to be around when it
>> happens, in case of any problems.
>>
>> Thanks again. I need all the luck I can get.
>
> Also, get him a few special toys - even a rolled up sock or a cloth
> mousie. You could try a good grade of catnip, too - maybe after a
> while, but talking to him regularly in a soft, quiet and loving voice
> ought to bring him around eventually. Sit on the bed if you can't get
> down; I can appreciate what a problem that can be, and my thoughts are
> with you on that chore!
>
> I think he will accept you before he accepts the other cat, but just
> hang in there.
>

Thank you. I appreciate both the encouragement and the advice. I'm
certainly not going to give up on him.

Joy

--
Joy Unlimited
Colorful Crocheted Critters
Photos at http://www.PictureTrail.com/joy9

Mack A. Damia
August 23rd 14, 05:00 PM
On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 22:34:30 -0700, Joy > wrote:

>On 8/22/2014 7:28 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 18:29:45 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>
>>> On 8/22/2014 5:46 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:35:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On 8/22/2014 4:49 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>>>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:41:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Hi all,
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I'm new here, although I'm a long-time subscriber to rpca. I'm hoping
>>>>>>> somebody has some suggestions to help a poor little feral kitty.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Five years ago I adopted two three-year-old littermates, a male and a
>>>>>>> female. A few months ago the male got cancer and subsequently had to be
>>>>>>> PTS. The female (Pickles) has been very lonely and demanding of attention.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I thought I'd get her a companion, and consulted others about this. The
>>>>>>> consensus seemed to be that a young male would be the best fit.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> About a month ago I adopted a 4-month-old neutered male from the local
>>>>>>> shelter. When the volunteer took him out of the cage so I could pet
>>>>>>> him, he struggled and she said, "He's still a little bit feral."
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I kept him secluded for about a week. During that time he spent most of
>>>>>>> his time hiding. Just as I was about to initiate an introduction
>>>>>>> between the two cats, I got the results of a test showing that he had an
>>>>>>> infection. For the next ten days I had to dig him out of his hiding
>>>>>>> place and give him medication. Naturally, that didn't make him feel any
>>>>>>> more comfortable about his situation. I almost never saw him unless I
>>>>>>> was medicating him.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> A few weeks ago I started spending about half an hour every day in his
>>>>>>> room, lying on the bed, reading. and talking and singing to him.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> About a week ago he was through with his medication and tested well, so
>>>>>>> I opened the door to the room where I'd been keeping him. Once or twice
>>>>>>> Pickles would go into that room and they'd exchange what sounded like
>>>>>>> insults or threats, but there was never any physical contact.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> At some point they apparently reached an agreement, because now Pickles
>>>>>>> never goes into that room, and he never comes out of it. Since I opened
>>>>>>> the door, I've seen him out from under the bed three times.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I know he's scared to death, and I'd like to let him know he doesn't
>>>>>>> need to be scared. I'd also like him and Pickles to become friends.
>>>>>>> Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I can accomplish either of
>>>>>>> these things.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Four months old seems to be a bit early to classify a cat, "feral".
>>>>>>
>>>>>> My friend in San Diego found a two year-old feral cat, and she stayed
>>>>>> under his bed for twenty years, only coming out at night to eat and
>>>>>> use the box. He had another cat, too, but I don't think they bothered
>>>>>> with each other.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Give him time - and the opportunity to come out of hiding. I think it
>>>>>> is still far too early.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Okay, thank you.
>>>>
>>>> Kindly keep us informed of what goes on, but I would give him plenty
>>>> of love and the opportunity to get to know the other cat.
>>>>
>>>> Good luck!
>>>
>>> Thank you. The only way I know of to give him love is to talk to him.
>>> I can't get close enough to touch him. I've had a total of three
>>> opportunities to pet him.
>>>
>>> 1) When the volunteer took him out of the cage and he was struggling wildly
>>>
>>> 2) When I took him to the vet. After the basic exam, the vet and her
>>> assistant left the room while he was still lying on the table. He was
>>> frozen in place and trembling. I did pet him and talk soothingly to
>>> him, but it didn't seem to make any difference.
>>>
>>> 3) One of the times I gave him his medicine I had to dig him out of a
>>> tight corner. I was afraid of getting scratched, so I threw a towel
>>> over him, wrapped him in it and took him onto the bed to give him the
>>> meds. Afterward I unwrapped him and he just laid there, so I petted him
>>> for a while. He appeared to be too scared to move.
>>>
>>> Since he spends all his time (when not eating or using the box) under
>>> the bed, I'd get down on the floor and talk to him. However, I'm 78
>>> years old and I don't think I could get up if I ever got down there.
>>>
>>> The door is open, except when I leave the house and at night. I figure
>>> if the door is closed at night he might lie on the bed rather than under
>>> it. I want them to get acquainted, but I want to be around when it
>>> happens, in case of any problems.
>>>
>>> Thanks again. I need all the luck I can get.
>>
>> Also, get him a few special toys - even a rolled up sock or a cloth
>> mousie. You could try a good grade of catnip, too - maybe after a
>> while, but talking to him regularly in a soft, quiet and loving voice
>> ought to bring him around eventually. Sit on the bed if you can't get
>> down; I can appreciate what a problem that can be, and my thoughts are
>> with you on that chore!
>>
>> I think he will accept you before he accepts the other cat, but just
>> hang in there.
>>
>
>Thank you. I appreciate both the encouragement and the advice. I'm
>certainly not going to give up on him.

What have you named him? I am probably telling you something that you
already know, but choose a name that is easy for him to learn and
recognize. Use the hard vowels

I have two. I named my first "Pookie" after the Soupy Sales puppet,
and I named my second "Bubba" I thought she was a he, but when I
discovered the truth with the vets help, I kept the name. Very easy
for them both to recognize.

Bubba on the left; Pookie on the right. Photo taken a while ago.
Bubba has grown. She's a hoot!

http://www.4shared.com/photo/PragoICEba/bubba_and_pookie.html

--

Joy
August 23rd 14, 07:10 PM
On 8/23/2014 9:00 AM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 22:34:30 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>
>> On 8/22/2014 7:28 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 18:29:45 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 8/22/2014 5:46 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:35:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> On 8/22/2014 4:49 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>>>>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:41:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Hi all,
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I'm new here, although I'm a long-time subscriber to rpca. I'm hoping
>>>>>>>> somebody has some suggestions to help a poor little feral kitty.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Five years ago I adopted two three-year-old littermates, a male and a
>>>>>>>> female. A few months ago the male got cancer and subsequently had to be
>>>>>>>> PTS. The female (Pickles) has been very lonely and demanding of attention.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I thought I'd get her a companion, and consulted others about this. The
>>>>>>>> consensus seemed to be that a young male would be the best fit.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> About a month ago I adopted a 4-month-old neutered male from the local
>>>>>>>> shelter. When the volunteer took him out of the cage so I could pet
>>>>>>>> him, he struggled and she said, "He's still a little bit feral."
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I kept him secluded for about a week. During that time he spent most of
>>>>>>>> his time hiding. Just as I was about to initiate an introduction
>>>>>>>> between the two cats, I got the results of a test showing that he had an
>>>>>>>> infection. For the next ten days I had to dig him out of his hiding
>>>>>>>> place and give him medication. Naturally, that didn't make him feel any
>>>>>>>> more comfortable about his situation. I almost never saw him unless I
>>>>>>>> was medicating him.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> A few weeks ago I started spending about half an hour every day in his
>>>>>>>> room, lying on the bed, reading. and talking and singing to him.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> About a week ago he was through with his medication and tested well, so
>>>>>>>> I opened the door to the room where I'd been keeping him. Once or twice
>>>>>>>> Pickles would go into that room and they'd exchange what sounded like
>>>>>>>> insults or threats, but there was never any physical contact.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> At some point they apparently reached an agreement, because now Pickles
>>>>>>>> never goes into that room, and he never comes out of it. Since I opened
>>>>>>>> the door, I've seen him out from under the bed three times.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I know he's scared to death, and I'd like to let him know he doesn't
>>>>>>>> need to be scared. I'd also like him and Pickles to become friends.
>>>>>>>> Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I can accomplish either of
>>>>>>>> these things.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Four months old seems to be a bit early to classify a cat, "feral".
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> My friend in San Diego found a two year-old feral cat, and she stayed
>>>>>>> under his bed for twenty years, only coming out at night to eat and
>>>>>>> use the box. He had another cat, too, but I don't think they bothered
>>>>>>> with each other.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Give him time - and the opportunity to come out of hiding. I think it
>>>>>>> is still far too early.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Okay, thank you.
>>>>>
>>>>> Kindly keep us informed of what goes on, but I would give him plenty
>>>>> of love and the opportunity to get to know the other cat.
>>>>>
>>>>> Good luck!
>>>>
>>>> Thank you. The only way I know of to give him love is to talk to him.
>>>> I can't get close enough to touch him. I've had a total of three
>>>> opportunities to pet him.
>>>>
>>>> 1) When the volunteer took him out of the cage and he was struggling wildly
>>>>
>>>> 2) When I took him to the vet. After the basic exam, the vet and her
>>>> assistant left the room while he was still lying on the table. He was
>>>> frozen in place and trembling. I did pet him and talk soothingly to
>>>> him, but it didn't seem to make any difference.
>>>>
>>>> 3) One of the times I gave him his medicine I had to dig him out of a
>>>> tight corner. I was afraid of getting scratched, so I threw a towel
>>>> over him, wrapped him in it and took him onto the bed to give him the
>>>> meds. Afterward I unwrapped him and he just laid there, so I petted him
>>>> for a while. He appeared to be too scared to move.
>>>>
>>>> Since he spends all his time (when not eating or using the box) under
>>>> the bed, I'd get down on the floor and talk to him. However, I'm 78
>>>> years old and I don't think I could get up if I ever got down there.
>>>>
>>>> The door is open, except when I leave the house and at night. I figure
>>>> if the door is closed at night he might lie on the bed rather than under
>>>> it. I want them to get acquainted, but I want to be around when it
>>>> happens, in case of any problems.
>>>>
>>>> Thanks again. I need all the luck I can get.
>>>
>>> Also, get him a few special toys - even a rolled up sock or a cloth
>>> mousie. You could try a good grade of catnip, too - maybe after a
>>> while, but talking to him regularly in a soft, quiet and loving voice
>>> ought to bring him around eventually. Sit on the bed if you can't get
>>> down; I can appreciate what a problem that can be, and my thoughts are
>>> with you on that chore!
>>>
>>> I think he will accept you before he accepts the other cat, but just
>>> hang in there.
>>>
>>
>> Thank you. I appreciate both the encouragement and the advice. I'm
>> certainly not going to give up on him.
>
> What have you named him? I am probably telling you something that you
> already know, but choose a name that is easy for him to learn and
> recognize. Use the hard vowels
>
> I have two. I named my first "Pookie" after the Soupy Sales puppet,
> and I named my second "Bubba" I thought she was a he, but when I
> discovered the truth with the vets help, I kept the name. Very easy
> for them both to recognize.
>
> Bubba on the left; Pookie on the right. Photo taken a while ago.
> Bubba has grown. She's a hoot!
>
> http://www.4shared.com/photo/PragoICEba/bubba_and_pookie.html

He came with a name. It was a funny thing, really. The sign on his
cage said his name was Wallace. However, when the paperwork was done,
his name showed as Koala Bear. I checked to make sure it was the same
cat, and it was. Apparently whoever wrote the sign didn't see the name
in writing, and misheard.

What makes it so funny is that I am an Aussiephile. A native
Californian, I've been to Australia six times and love it more every
time. One of the reasons I wanted to go in the first place was to hold
a koala. I did, and it was even better than I had expected. So
naturally, I wasn't about to change his name. Well, that's not quite
true. I dropped the "Bear", since koalas aren't bears. I often call
him "Koala boy".

Your two are adorable.

Joy

--
Joy Unlimited
Colorful Crocheted Critters
Photos at http://www.PictureTrail.com/joy9

Joy
August 23rd 14, 10:45 PM
On 8/23/2014 1:37 PM, Judith Latham wrote:
> In article >, Joy >
> wrote:
>> Hi all,
>
>> I'm new here, although I'm a long-time subscriber to rpca. I'm hoping
>> somebody has some suggestions to help a poor little feral kitty.
>
>> Five years ago I adopted two three-year-old littermates, a male and a
>> female. A few months ago the male got cancer and subsequently had to be
>> PTS. The female (Pickles) has been very lonely and demanding of
>> attention.
>
>> I thought I'd get her a companion, and consulted others about this. The
>> consensus seemed to be that a young male would be the best fit.
>
>> About a month ago I adopted a 4-month-old neutered male from the local
>> shelter. When the volunteer took him out of the cage so I could pet
>> him, he struggled and she said, "He's still a little bit feral."
>
>> I kept him secluded for about a week. During that time he spent most of
>> his time hiding. Just as I was about to initiate an introduction
>> between the two cats, I got the results of a test showing that he had an
>> infection. For the next ten days I had to dig him out of his hiding
>> place and give him medication. Naturally, that didn't make him feel any
>> more comfortable about his situation. I almost never saw him unless I
>> was medicating him.
>
>> A few weeks ago I started spending about half an hour every day in his
>> room, lying on the bed, reading. and talking and singing to him.
>
>> About a week ago he was through with his medication and tested well, so
>> I opened the door to the room where I'd been keeping him. Once or twice
>> Pickles would go into that room and they'd exchange what sounded like
>> insults or threats, but there was never any physical contact.
>
>> At some point they apparently reached an agreement, because now Pickles
>> never goes into that room, and he never comes out of it. Since I opened
>> the door, I've seen him out from under the bed three times.
>
>> I know he's scared to death, and I'd like to let him know he doesn't
>> need to be scared. I'd also like him and Pickles to become friends.
>> Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I can accomplish either of
>> these things?
>
>> Joy
>
>
>> Joy Unlimited
>> Colorful Crocheted Critters
>> Photos at http://www.PictureTrail.com/joy9
>
>
>
> I'm sure he will settle in. It's good that Pickles and Koala have reached
> some sort of agreement and it's not agreesive, that might easily change as
> they get used to each other. Koala has had a traumatic time in the last
> few weeks, he needs to sort out his new environment and housemates in his
> own way.
>
> I think that what you're doing is absolutely right. I know it seems a long
> haul but he's worth it.
>
>
> Judith

Thank you.

Today when I went in to spend half an hour with him, I spread some
blankets on the floor and lay down there. I had a hard time getting up,
but I managed. His reaction was to scoot as far away from me as he
could get.

Joy


--
Joy Unlimited
Colorful Crocheted Critters
Photos at http://www.PictureTrail.com/joy9

Mack A. Damia
August 23rd 14, 11:28 PM
On Sat, 23 Aug 2014 11:10:10 -0700, Joy > wrote:

>On 8/23/2014 9:00 AM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 22:34:30 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>
>>> On 8/22/2014 7:28 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 18:29:45 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On 8/22/2014 5:46 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>>>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:35:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On 8/22/2014 4:49 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>>>>>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:41:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Hi all,
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> I'm new here, although I'm a long-time subscriber to rpca. I'm hoping
>>>>>>>>> somebody has some suggestions to help a poor little feral kitty.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Five years ago I adopted two three-year-old littermates, a male and a
>>>>>>>>> female. A few months ago the male got cancer and subsequently had to be
>>>>>>>>> PTS. The female (Pickles) has been very lonely and demanding of attention.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> I thought I'd get her a companion, and consulted others about this. The
>>>>>>>>> consensus seemed to be that a young male would be the best fit.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> About a month ago I adopted a 4-month-old neutered male from the local
>>>>>>>>> shelter. When the volunteer took him out of the cage so I could pet
>>>>>>>>> him, he struggled and she said, "He's still a little bit feral."
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> I kept him secluded for about a week. During that time he spent most of
>>>>>>>>> his time hiding. Just as I was about to initiate an introduction
>>>>>>>>> between the two cats, I got the results of a test showing that he had an
>>>>>>>>> infection. For the next ten days I had to dig him out of his hiding
>>>>>>>>> place and give him medication. Naturally, that didn't make him feel any
>>>>>>>>> more comfortable about his situation. I almost never saw him unless I
>>>>>>>>> was medicating him.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> A few weeks ago I started spending about half an hour every day in his
>>>>>>>>> room, lying on the bed, reading. and talking and singing to him.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> About a week ago he was through with his medication and tested well, so
>>>>>>>>> I opened the door to the room where I'd been keeping him. Once or twice
>>>>>>>>> Pickles would go into that room and they'd exchange what sounded like
>>>>>>>>> insults or threats, but there was never any physical contact.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> At some point they apparently reached an agreement, because now Pickles
>>>>>>>>> never goes into that room, and he never comes out of it. Since I opened
>>>>>>>>> the door, I've seen him out from under the bed three times.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> I know he's scared to death, and I'd like to let him know he doesn't
>>>>>>>>> need to be scared. I'd also like him and Pickles to become friends.
>>>>>>>>> Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I can accomplish either of
>>>>>>>>> these things.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Four months old seems to be a bit early to classify a cat, "feral".
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> My friend in San Diego found a two year-old feral cat, and she stayed
>>>>>>>> under his bed for twenty years, only coming out at night to eat and
>>>>>>>> use the box. He had another cat, too, but I don't think they bothered
>>>>>>>> with each other.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Give him time - and the opportunity to come out of hiding. I think it
>>>>>>>> is still far too early.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Okay, thank you.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Kindly keep us informed of what goes on, but I would give him plenty
>>>>>> of love and the opportunity to get to know the other cat.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Good luck!
>>>>>
>>>>> Thank you. The only way I know of to give him love is to talk to him.
>>>>> I can't get close enough to touch him. I've had a total of three
>>>>> opportunities to pet him.
>>>>>
>>>>> 1) When the volunteer took him out of the cage and he was struggling wildly
>>>>>
>>>>> 2) When I took him to the vet. After the basic exam, the vet and her
>>>>> assistant left the room while he was still lying on the table. He was
>>>>> frozen in place and trembling. I did pet him and talk soothingly to
>>>>> him, but it didn't seem to make any difference.
>>>>>
>>>>> 3) One of the times I gave him his medicine I had to dig him out of a
>>>>> tight corner. I was afraid of getting scratched, so I threw a towel
>>>>> over him, wrapped him in it and took him onto the bed to give him the
>>>>> meds. Afterward I unwrapped him and he just laid there, so I petted him
>>>>> for a while. He appeared to be too scared to move.
>>>>>
>>>>> Since he spends all his time (when not eating or using the box) under
>>>>> the bed, I'd get down on the floor and talk to him. However, I'm 78
>>>>> years old and I don't think I could get up if I ever got down there.
>>>>>
>>>>> The door is open, except when I leave the house and at night. I figure
>>>>> if the door is closed at night he might lie on the bed rather than under
>>>>> it. I want them to get acquainted, but I want to be around when it
>>>>> happens, in case of any problems.
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks again. I need all the luck I can get.
>>>>
>>>> Also, get him a few special toys - even a rolled up sock or a cloth
>>>> mousie. You could try a good grade of catnip, too - maybe after a
>>>> while, but talking to him regularly in a soft, quiet and loving voice
>>>> ought to bring him around eventually. Sit on the bed if you can't get
>>>> down; I can appreciate what a problem that can be, and my thoughts are
>>>> with you on that chore!
>>>>
>>>> I think he will accept you before he accepts the other cat, but just
>>>> hang in there.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Thank you. I appreciate both the encouragement and the advice. I'm
>>> certainly not going to give up on him.
>>
>> What have you named him? I am probably telling you something that you
>> already know, but choose a name that is easy for him to learn and
>> recognize. Use the hard vowels
>>
>> I have two. I named my first "Pookie" after the Soupy Sales puppet,
>> and I named my second "Bubba" I thought she was a he, but when I
>> discovered the truth with the vets help, I kept the name. Very easy
>> for them both to recognize.
>>
>> Bubba on the left; Pookie on the right. Photo taken a while ago.
>> Bubba has grown. She's a hoot!
>>
>> http://www.4shared.com/photo/PragoICEba/bubba_and_pookie.html
>
>He came with a name. It was a funny thing, really. The sign on his
>cage said his name was Wallace. However, when the paperwork was done,
>his name showed as Koala Bear. I checked to make sure it was the same
>cat, and it was. Apparently whoever wrote the sign didn't see the name
>in writing, and misheard.
>
>What makes it so funny is that I am an Aussiephile. A native
>Californian, I've been to Australia six times and love it more every
>time. One of the reasons I wanted to go in the first place was to hold
>a koala. I did, and it was even better than I had expected. So
>naturally, I wasn't about to change his name. Well, that's not quite
>true. I dropped the "Bear", since koalas aren't bears. I often call
>him "Koala boy".
>
>Your two are adorable.

Our family hails from England; we emigrated to Pennsylvania in the
mid-1950s. I am retired and live near Ensenada, Baja, Mexico - about
sixty miles south of the border at San Ysidro. The two children -
brother and sister - of my cousin who still lives in England emigrated
to Australia several years ago - near the Melbourne area, I think. I
would love to visit them but find traveling stressful. My neighbor is
the Pacific Ocean; my home is on the beach. I have a million dollar
view from my second-floor living room. Why would I want to leave?

Pookie may have a bit of feral in her. Somebody dropped a box of
kittens off in our community circa January, 2011. How Pookie made it
onto my enclosed porch was a miracle - but she certainly chose the
right house.

Bubba came about a year later via my housekeeper. I thought Pookie
needed a playmate, so Alma brought him from a neighbor's home in Valle
de Guadalupe. They are a bit jealous of each other when it comes to
my attention, and Bubba is the quicker of the two. They just had one
of their stare-offs, and Bubba ran towards Pookie, jumped on her back
and disappeared. I have had some good laughs with both of them
playing.

Yes, Bubba is a "Valley Girl", fer sure.

--

Joy
August 24th 14, 12:02 AM
On 8/23/2014 3:28 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
> On Sat, 23 Aug 2014 11:10:10 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>
>> On 8/23/2014 9:00 AM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 22:34:30 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 8/22/2014 7:28 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 18:29:45 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> On 8/22/2014 5:46 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>>>>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:35:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> On 8/22/2014 4:49 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>>>>>>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:41:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Hi all,
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> I'm new here, although I'm a long-time subscriber to rpca. I'm hoping
>>>>>>>>>> somebody has some suggestions to help a poor little feral kitty.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Five years ago I adopted two three-year-old littermates, a male and a
>>>>>>>>>> female. A few months ago the male got cancer and subsequently had to be
>>>>>>>>>> PTS. The female (Pickles) has been very lonely and demanding of attention.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> I thought I'd get her a companion, and consulted others about this. The
>>>>>>>>>> consensus seemed to be that a young male would be the best fit.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> About a month ago I adopted a 4-month-old neutered male from the local
>>>>>>>>>> shelter. When the volunteer took him out of the cage so I could pet
>>>>>>>>>> him, he struggled and she said, "He's still a little bit feral."
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> I kept him secluded for about a week. During that time he spent most of
>>>>>>>>>> his time hiding. Just as I was about to initiate an introduction
>>>>>>>>>> between the two cats, I got the results of a test showing that he had an
>>>>>>>>>> infection. For the next ten days I had to dig him out of his hiding
>>>>>>>>>> place and give him medication. Naturally, that didn't make him feel any
>>>>>>>>>> more comfortable about his situation. I almost never saw him unless I
>>>>>>>>>> was medicating him.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> A few weeks ago I started spending about half an hour every day in his
>>>>>>>>>> room, lying on the bed, reading. and talking and singing to him.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> About a week ago he was through with his medication and tested well, so
>>>>>>>>>> I opened the door to the room where I'd been keeping him. Once or twice
>>>>>>>>>> Pickles would go into that room and they'd exchange what sounded like
>>>>>>>>>> insults or threats, but there was never any physical contact.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> At some point they apparently reached an agreement, because now Pickles
>>>>>>>>>> never goes into that room, and he never comes out of it. Since I opened
>>>>>>>>>> the door, I've seen him out from under the bed three times.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> I know he's scared to death, and I'd like to let him know he doesn't
>>>>>>>>>> need to be scared. I'd also like him and Pickles to become friends.
>>>>>>>>>> Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I can accomplish either of
>>>>>>>>>> these things.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Four months old seems to be a bit early to classify a cat, "feral".
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> My friend in San Diego found a two year-old feral cat, and she stayed
>>>>>>>>> under his bed for twenty years, only coming out at night to eat and
>>>>>>>>> use the box. He had another cat, too, but I don't think they bothered
>>>>>>>>> with each other.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Give him time - and the opportunity to come out of hiding. I think it
>>>>>>>>> is still far too early.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Okay, thank you.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Kindly keep us informed of what goes on, but I would give him plenty
>>>>>>> of love and the opportunity to get to know the other cat.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Good luck!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thank you. The only way I know of to give him love is to talk to him.
>>>>>> I can't get close enough to touch him. I've had a total of three
>>>>>> opportunities to pet him.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 1) When the volunteer took him out of the cage and he was struggling wildly
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 2) When I took him to the vet. After the basic exam, the vet and her
>>>>>> assistant left the room while he was still lying on the table. He was
>>>>>> frozen in place and trembling. I did pet him and talk soothingly to
>>>>>> him, but it didn't seem to make any difference.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 3) One of the times I gave him his medicine I had to dig him out of a
>>>>>> tight corner. I was afraid of getting scratched, so I threw a towel
>>>>>> over him, wrapped him in it and took him onto the bed to give him the
>>>>>> meds. Afterward I unwrapped him and he just laid there, so I petted him
>>>>>> for a while. He appeared to be too scared to move.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Since he spends all his time (when not eating or using the box) under
>>>>>> the bed, I'd get down on the floor and talk to him. However, I'm 78
>>>>>> years old and I don't think I could get up if I ever got down there.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The door is open, except when I leave the house and at night. I figure
>>>>>> if the door is closed at night he might lie on the bed rather than under
>>>>>> it. I want them to get acquainted, but I want to be around when it
>>>>>> happens, in case of any problems.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thanks again. I need all the luck I can get.
>>>>>
>>>>> Also, get him a few special toys - even a rolled up sock or a cloth
>>>>> mousie. You could try a good grade of catnip, too - maybe after a
>>>>> while, but talking to him regularly in a soft, quiet and loving voice
>>>>> ought to bring him around eventually. Sit on the bed if you can't get
>>>>> down; I can appreciate what a problem that can be, and my thoughts are
>>>>> with you on that chore!
>>>>>
>>>>> I think he will accept you before he accepts the other cat, but just
>>>>> hang in there.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Thank you. I appreciate both the encouragement and the advice. I'm
>>>> certainly not going to give up on him.
>>>
>>> What have you named him? I am probably telling you something that you
>>> already know, but choose a name that is easy for him to learn and
>>> recognize. Use the hard vowels
>>>
>>> I have two. I named my first "Pookie" after the Soupy Sales puppet,
>>> and I named my second "Bubba" I thought she was a he, but when I
>>> discovered the truth with the vets help, I kept the name. Very easy
>>> for them both to recognize.
>>>
>>> Bubba on the left; Pookie on the right. Photo taken a while ago.
>>> Bubba has grown. She's a hoot!
>>>
>>> http://www.4shared.com/photo/PragoICEba/bubba_and_pookie.html
>>
>> He came with a name. It was a funny thing, really. The sign on his
>> cage said his name was Wallace. However, when the paperwork was done,
>> his name showed as Koala Bear. I checked to make sure it was the same
>> cat, and it was. Apparently whoever wrote the sign didn't see the name
>> in writing, and misheard.
>>
>> What makes it so funny is that I am an Aussiephile. A native
>> Californian, I've been to Australia six times and love it more every
>> time. One of the reasons I wanted to go in the first place was to hold
>> a koala. I did, and it was even better than I had expected. So
>> naturally, I wasn't about to change his name. Well, that's not quite
>> true. I dropped the "Bear", since koalas aren't bears. I often call
>> him "Koala boy".
>>
>> Your two are adorable.
>
> Our family hails from England; we emigrated to Pennsylvania in the
> mid-1950s. I am retired and live near Ensenada, Baja, Mexico - about
> sixty miles south of the border at San Ysidro. The two children -
> brother and sister - of my cousin who still lives in England emigrated
> to Australia several years ago - near the Melbourne area, I think. I
> would love to visit them but find traveling stressful. My neighbor is
> the Pacific Ocean; my home is on the beach. I have a million dollar
> view from my second-floor living room. Why would I want to leave?

Well, if you have no desire to hold a koala, or to have kangaroos eating
out of your hand, or to see a spectacular sunset on Uluru (better known
as Ayers Rock), I guess you wouldn't. The Aussies have some spectacular
beaches, too, and the people are wonderful.
>
> Pookie may have a bit of feral in her. Somebody dropped a box of
> kittens off in our community circa January, 2011. How Pookie made it
> onto my enclosed porch was a miracle - but she certainly chose the
> right house.
>
> Bubba came about a year later via my housekeeper. I thought Pookie
> needed a playmate, so Alma brought him from a neighbor's home in Valle
> de Guadalupe. They are a bit jealous of each other when it comes to
> my attention, and Bubba is the quicker of the two. They just had one
> of their stare-offs, and Bubba ran towards Pookie, jumped on her back
> and disappeared. I have had some good laughs with both of them
> playing.
>
> Yes, Bubba is a "Valley Girl", fer sure.

;-)


--
Joy Unlimited
Colorful Crocheted Critters
Photos at http://www.PictureTrail.com/joy9

Christina Websell
August 31st 14, 12:35 AM
"Mack A. Damia" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 18:29:45 -0700, Joy > wrote:
>
>>On 8/22/2014 5:46 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>> On Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:35:37 -0700, Joy > wrote:

No I did
we don't know yet. Mac A Demia is no-one I know and doesn't add anything
to the group so into the killfile it goes.

buglady[_2_]
September 4th 14, 11:53 AM
Oh My Gosh!
You broke my irony meter!

buglady
take out the dog before replying

On 8/30/2014 7:35 PM, Christina Websell wrote:

> No I did
> we don't know yet. Mac A Demia is no-one I know and doesn't add anything
> to the group so into the killfile it goes.
>
>