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John Doe[_2_]
December 16th 14, 12:18 AM
I was thinking of ways to keep it warm during the winter. You know, boxes
or whatever. I bought an electric blanket and it hasn't left the area since
that day. The weather hardly gets below freezing, so I'm hoping for a cold
night :) I think it will work at least down to 0F. One night was about 30
and it was no problem. Since then, I put it in a larger box that is only
half covered. It's kind of paranoid, like half feral, it cringes when it's
petted but it enjoys having its head scratched. So if it gets near zero it
will probably move into that covered half of the box. Still on the electric
blanket, that should keep it warm and cozy. Since the electric blanket is
folded up, it generates concentrated heat and must be left on the lowest
settings. As with all of their bedding, clean paper towels are used like
sheets.





--
Since it's kept outside, of course it's neutered.

dgk
December 17th 14, 01:56 PM
On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 00:18:14 +0000 (UTC), John Doe
> wrote:

>I was thinking of ways to keep it warm during the winter. You know, boxes
>or whatever. I bought an electric blanket and it hasn't left the area since
>that day. The weather hardly gets below freezing, so I'm hoping for a cold
>night :) I think it will work at least down to 0F. One night was about 30
>and it was no problem. Since then, I put it in a larger box that is only
>half covered. It's kind of paranoid, like half feral, it cringes when it's
>petted but it enjoys having its head scratched. So if it gets near zero it
>will probably move into that covered half of the box. Still on the electric
>blanket, that should keep it warm and cozy. Since the electric blanket is
>folded up, it generates concentrated heat and must be left on the lowest
>settings. As with all of their bedding, clean paper towels are used like
>sheets.

I made a home out of a styrofoam box with those cheap stick-um tiles
to keep them from scratching through the styrofoam. I also installed a
heated pad designed for outdoor use by cats, something like this:

http://www.amazon.com/3093-Extreme-Weather-Kitty-Fleece/dp/B0009YWJRE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418823885&sr=8-1&keywords=pet+heating+pad+outdoor

Sorry if that URL breaks but just look for "pet heating pad outdoor".
I put lots of straw in the house and change that yearly. I don't
recommend blankets because they get fleas and such. This looks like a
nice way to build a shelter:

http://www.ehow.com/how_8270025_build-cat-shelter-extreme-cold.html

John Doe[_2_]
December 17th 14, 06:52 PM
dgk > wrote:

> John Doe > wrote:
>
>>I was thinking of ways to keep it warm during the winter. You know, boxes
>>or whatever. I bought an electric blanket and it hasn't left the area since
>>that day. The weather hardly gets below freezing, so I'm hoping for a cold
>>night :) I think it will work at least down to 0F. One night was about 30
>>and it was no problem. Since then, I put it in a larger box that is only
>>half covered. It's kind of paranoid, like half feral, it cringes when it's
>>petted but it enjoys having its head scratched. So if it gets near zero it
>>will probably move into that covered half of the box. Still on the electric
>>blanket, that should keep it warm and cozy. Since the electric blanket is
>>folded up, it generates concentrated heat and must be left on the lowest
>>settings. As with all of their bedding, clean paper towels are used like
>>sheets.
>
> I made a home out of a styrofoam box with those cheap stick-um tiles
> to keep them from scratching through the styrofoam. I also installed a
> heated pad designed for outdoor use by cats, something like this:

I was thinking about using Styrofoam, but it's probably not as cold here.

> http://www.amazon.com/3093-Extreme-Weather-Kitty-Fleece/dp/B0009YWJRE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418823885&sr=8-1&keywords=pet+heating+pad+outdoor

Thanks, I was wondering about that. I did look briefly before buying an
electric blanket.

> Sorry if that URL breaks but just look for "pet heating pad outdoor".
> I put lots of straw in the house and change that yearly. I don't
> recommend blankets because they get fleas and such. This looks like a
> nice way to build a shelter:

You are worried about fleas and you only change the bedding once per
year? I use clean paper towels, changed at least every few days, as a
cover on all of their bedding. The blanket can be folded up in many
different ways, and it is washable. Fleas will always be a concern since
it's an outdoor cat. One marvelous thing about using clean bright white
paper towels is that you know what's going on with the cat. You can see
all of the dirt and any blood. And it helps clean your cat.

Hopefully your outdoor cats are neutered.

Christina Websell
December 20th 14, 09:39 PM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
> dgk > wrote:
>
>> John Doe > wrote:
>>
>>>I was thinking of ways to keep it warm during the winter. You know, boxes
>>>or whatever. I bought an electric blanket and it hasn't left the area
>>>since
>>>that day. The weather hardly gets below freezing, so I'm hoping for a
>>>cold
>>>night :) I think it will work at least down to 0F. One night was about
>>>30
>>>and it was no problem. Since then, I put it in a larger box that is only
>>>half covered. It's kind of paranoid, like half feral, it cringes when
>>>it's
>>>petted but it enjoys having its head scratched. So if it gets near zero
>>>it
>>>will probably move into that covered half of the box. Still on the
>>>electric
>>>blanket, that should keep it warm and cozy. Since the electric blanket is
>>>folded up, it generates concentrated heat and must be left on the lowest
>>>settings. As with all of their bedding, clean paper towels are used like
>>>sheets.
>>
>> I made a home out of a styrofoam box with those cheap stick-um tiles
>> to keep them from scratching through the styrofoam. I also installed a
>> heated pad designed for outdoor use by cats, something like this:
>
> I was thinking about using Styrofoam, but it's probably not as cold here.
>
>> http://www.amazon.com/3093-Extreme-Weather-Kitty-Fleece/dp/B0009YWJRE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418823885&sr=8-1&keywords=pet+heating+pad+outdoor
>
> Thanks, I was wondering about that. I did look briefly before buying an
> electric blanket.
>
>> Sorry if that URL breaks but just look for "pet heating pad outdoor".
>> I put lots of straw in the house and change that yearly. I don't
>> recommend blankets because they get fleas and such. This looks like a
>> nice way to build a shelter:
>
> You are worried about fleas and you only change the bedding once per
> year? I use clean paper towels, changed at least every few days, as a
> cover on all of their bedding. The blanket can be folded up in many
> different ways, and it is washable. Fleas will always be a concern since
> it's an outdoor cat. One marvelous thing about using clean bright white
> paper towels is that you know what's going on with the cat. You can see
> all of the dirt and any blood. And it helps clean your cat.
>
> Hopefully your outdoor cats are neutered.

Well, let's not get into a p*ssing contest, eh? We are all on the same side
here.

An electric blanket is a good thing for a cat. Boyfie has one under his
duvet. It was once mine.

John Doe[_2_]
December 20th 14, 10:20 PM
There was no ****ing contest. If this poster had read or considered my
entire reply, it might notice that I thanked the prior author for the
heads up on the cat heating pad.

More likely it's just annoyed by the advice about using clean paper
towels changed regularly...

--
"Christina Websell" <spamfree tinawebsell.wanadoo.co.uk> wrote in news:cfm987Fdds6U1 mid.individual.net:

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> From: "Christina Websell" <spamfree tinawebsell.wanadoo.co.uk>
> Newsgroups: rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> Subject: Re: My outside cat has an electric blanket
> Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 21:39:49 -0000
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>
>
> "John Doe" <always.look message.header> wrote in message
> news:m6sjdi$3ac$1 dont-email.me...
>> dgk <dgk somewhere.com> wrote:
>>
>>> John Doe <always.look message.header> wrote:
>>>
>>>>I was thinking of ways to keep it warm during the winter. You know, boxes
>>>>or whatever. I bought an electric blanket and it hasn't left the area
>>>>since
>>>>that day. The weather hardly gets below freezing, so I'm hoping for a
>>>>cold
>>>>night :) I think it will work at least down to 0F. One night was about
>>>>30
>>>>and it was no problem. Since then, I put it in a larger box that is only
>>>>half covered. It's kind of paranoid, like half feral, it cringes when
>>>>it's
>>>>petted but it enjoys having its head scratched. So if it gets near zero
>>>>it
>>>>will probably move into that covered half of the box. Still on the
>>>>electric
>>>>blanket, that should keep it warm and cozy. Since the electric blanket is
>>>>folded up, it generates concentrated heat and must be left on the lowest
>>>>settings. As with all of their bedding, clean paper towels are used like
>>>>sheets.
>>>
>>> I made a home out of a styrofoam box with those cheap stick-um tiles
>>> to keep them from scratching through the styrofoam. I also installed a
>>> heated pad designed for outdoor use by cats, something like this:
>>
>> I was thinking about using Styrofoam, but it's probably not as cold here.
>>
>>> http://www.amazon.com/3093-Extreme-Weather-Kitty-Fleece/dp/B0009YWJRE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418823885&sr=8-1&keywords=pet+heating+pad+outdoor
>>
>> Thanks, I was wondering about that. I did look briefly before buying an
>> electric blanket.
>>
>>> Sorry if that URL breaks but just look for "pet heating pad outdoor".
>>> I put lots of straw in the house and change that yearly. I don't
>>> recommend blankets because they get fleas and such. This looks like a
>>> nice way to build a shelter:
>>
>> You are worried about fleas and you only change the bedding once per
>> year? I use clean paper towels, changed at least every few days, as a
>> cover on all of their bedding. The blanket can be folded up in many
>> different ways, and it is washable. Fleas will always be a concern since
>> it's an outdoor cat. One marvelous thing about using clean bright white
>> paper towels is that you know what's going on with the cat. You can see
>> all of the dirt and any blood. And it helps clean your cat.
>>
>> Hopefully your outdoor cats are neutered.
>
> Well, let's not get into a p*ssing contest, eh? We are all on the same side
> here.
>
> An electric blanket is a good thing for a cat. Boyfie has one under his
> duvet. It was once mine.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

Mack A. Damia
December 20th 14, 11:34 PM
On Sat, 20 Dec 2014 22:20:17 +0000 (UTC), John Doe
> wrote:

>"Christina Websell"

Ignore this poster. She is a notorious drunk and shrew who never
changes her underwear.

--

John Doe[_2_]
December 20th 14, 11:41 PM
Mack A. Damia > wrote:

> John Doe > wrote:
>
>>"Christina Websell"
>
> Ignore this poster. She is a notorious drunk and shrew who never
> changes her underwear.

How do you know that she never changes her underwear?

Mack A. Damia
December 21st 14, 12:17 AM
On Sat, 20 Dec 2014 23:41:18 +0000 (UTC), John Doe
> wrote:

>Mack A. Damia > wrote:
>
>> John Doe > wrote:
>>
>>>"Christina Websell"
>>
>> Ignore this poster. She is a notorious drunk and shrew who never
>> changes her underwear.
>
>How do you know that she never changes her underwear?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wz1x28DHF08

--

December 27th 14, 04:59 AM
Aw...that's really sweet and warm. I guess she really needs a warm blanket.

A.
https://www.facebook.com/mainecoonandothercatlovers


On Tuesday, 16 December 2014 08:18:36 UTC+8, John Doe wrote:
> I was thinking of ways to keep it warm during the winter. You know, boxes
> or whatever. I bought an electric blanket and it hasn't left the area since
> that day. The weather hardly gets below freezing, so I'm hoping for a cold
> night :) I think it will work at least down to 0F. One night was about 30
> and it was no problem. Since then, I put it in a larger box that is only
> half covered. It's kind of paranoid, like half feral, it cringes when it's
> petted but it enjoys having its head scratched. So if it gets near zero it
> will probably move into that covered half of the box. Still on the electric
> blanket, that should keep it warm and cozy. Since the electric blanket is
> folded up, it generates concentrated heat and must be left on the lowest
> settings. As with all of their bedding, clean paper towels are used like
> sheets.
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> Since it's kept outside, of course it's neutered.

John Doe[_2_]
December 27th 14, 06:39 PM
Thanks. It's also easy. It's also useful here because the half-feral cat
apparently for self-defense reasons does not like being inside of a box.

John Doe[_2_]
February 12th 15, 08:59 PM
Before I started taking care of it, it had been in the neighborhood for
years. Unfortunately, it was part feral so it wouldn't make a good pet.
And a few days ago, it disappeared.



> I was thinking of ways to keep it warm during the winter. You know,
> boxes or whatever. I bought an electric blanket and it hasn't left the
> area since that day. The weather hardly gets below freezing, so I'm
> hoping for a cold night :) I think it will work at least down to 0F.
> One night was about 30 and it was no problem. Since then, I put it in
> a larger box that is only half covered. It's kind of paranoid, like
> half feral, it cringes when it's petted but it enjoys having its head
> scratched. So if it gets near zero it will probably move into that
> covered half of the box. Still on the electric blanket, that should
> keep it warm and cozy. Since the electric blanket is folded up, it
> generates concentrated heat and must be left on the lowest settings.
> As with all of their bedding, clean paper towels are used like sheets.
>
>
>
>
>

John Doe[_2_]
February 14th 15, 05:55 PM
Thomasina came back!

I was feeding it Purina Pro Plan and Purina Veterinary Diets DH. It liked
the five dollars per pound DH. But I am not going to feed a (neutered)
stray cat five dollars per pound cat food alone. So I was trying to mix in
the relatively cheap Pro Plan. Being feral, it might prefer wet food, but
that wouldn't explain why it likes the DH. It definitely likes Fancy Feast.
I might try Friskies or some other ordinary canned cat food with some DH
for a tooth-cleaning dessert.





> Before I started taking care of it, it had been in the neighborhood for
> years. Unfortunately, it was part feral so it wouldn't make a good pet.
> And a few days ago, it disappeared.

John Doe[_2_]
March 4th 15, 06:50 PM
Yes. Feeding it Friskies (plus some Purina DH for tooth cleaning) seems
to have solved the straying problem. Apparently it wasn't so much my
interaction with it. Apparently it couldn't handle the moistened Purina
Pro Plan. I now have a (big) housecat that likes the moistened Purina
Pro Plan. The outside cat's problem might have to do with its feralness.






> Thomasina came back!
>
> I was feeding it Purina Pro Plan and Purina Veterinary Diets DH. It
> liked the five dollars per pound DH. But I am not going to feed a
> (neutered) stray cat five dollars per pound cat food alone. So I was
> trying to mix in the relatively cheap Pro Plan. Being feral, it might
> prefer wet food, but that wouldn't explain why it likes the DH. It
> definitely likes Fancy Feast. I might try Friskies or some other
> ordinary canned cat food with some DH for a tooth-cleaning dessert.
>
>
>
>
>
>> Before I started taking care of it, it had been in the neighborhood
>> for years. Unfortunately, it was part feral so it wouldn't make a
>> good pet. And a few days ago, it disappeared.

Christina Websell
June 18th 15, 08:04 PM
"Mack A. Damia" > wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 20 Dec 2014 22:20:17 +0000 (UTC), John Doe
> > wrote:
>
>>"Christina Websell"
>
> Ignore this poster. She is a notorious drunk and shrew who never
> changes her underwear.
>
> --
Plonk

>
>
>
>

Mack A. Damia
June 18th 15, 10:00 PM
On Thu, 18 Jun 2015 20:04:50 +0100, "Christina Websell"
> wrote:

>
>"Mack A. Damia" > wrote in message
...
>> On Sat, 20 Dec 2014 22:20:17 +0000 (UTC), John Doe
>> > wrote:
>>
>>>"Christina Websell"
>>
>> Ignore this poster. She is a notorious drunk and shrew who never
>> changes her underwear.
>>
>> --
>Plonk

This idiot, Webfeet, is plonking something from last year?

I think you must be developmentally-disabled. I taught enough of you
during my career.

--

gamincat[_2_]
June 24th 15, 05:09 AM
On Monday, December 15, 2014 at 6:18:36 PM UTC-6, John Doe wrote:
> I was thinking of ways to keep it warm during the winter. You know, boxes
> or whatever. I bought an electric blanket and it hasn't left the area since
> that day. The weather hardly gets below freezing, so I'm hoping for a cold
> night :) I think it will work at least down to 0F. One night was about 30
> and it was no problem. Since then, I put it in a larger box that is only
> half covered. It's kind of paranoid, like half feral, it cringes when it's
> petted but it enjoys having its head scratched. So if it gets near zero it
> will probably move into that covered half of the box. Still on the electric
> blanket, that should keep it warm and cozy. Since the electric blanket is
> folded up, it generates concentrated heat and must be left on the lowest
> settings. As with all of their bedding, clean paper towels are used like
> sheets.
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> Since it's kept outside, of course it's neutered.

Your feral cat reminds me of something I have to relate. A few years ago, my friend started feeding a stray cat in her backyard. The cat was very friendly but no one was looking for it in local ads. She didn't want to take it inside because she had 2 cats already so she looked around for a home without much luck (very pretty long haired blue tortie). Winter came so she fixed up a box with plastic to protect it and blankets inside. Then came a weather report of a huge snowstorm coming. She was so worried about the kitty that she put her in the garage. There was a huge amount of snow, so she kept her in the garage for over a week. The cat acted very fearful while in the garage and hid from her whereas before she could pet her, but she ate her food. She didn't run out, even when my friend had to take her car out and lifted the doors, but one day she did go out.

My friend put the box out again and the cat went inside. My friend had a neighbor over the next day and my friend decided to get the blankets and clean them. When the cat left the box, she pulled out the blankets and.....two newborn kittens fell to the ground. My friend froze in panic, but the neighbor picked up the little things which were OK and found three more in the box. They restored everything and waited for the mother to return. When she went back in the box, my friend blocked the entrance with her body and carried the whole thing to her extra bedroom.

Well, this is a long story, but that's how Blue and her kittens came to live with my friend. And that's how I got my cat, Flag, one of her kittens who is now a huge gray tabby.

Some kittens got other homes and some live with the mother, Blue, at my friend's large house with her other 2 cats. Blue has zero interest in going outside ever again - she stays far away if a door is opened. Happy ending.

dgk
June 25th 15, 06:44 PM
On Wed, 17 Dec 2014 18:52:35 +0000 (UTC), John Doe
> wrote:

>dgk > wrote:
>
>> John Doe > wrote:
>>
>>>I was thinking of ways to keep it warm during the winter. You know, boxes
>>>or whatever. I bought an electric blanket and it hasn't left the area since
>>>that day. The weather hardly gets below freezing, so I'm hoping for a cold
>>>night :) I think it will work at least down to 0F. One night was about 30
>>>and it was no problem. Since then, I put it in a larger box that is only
>>>half covered. It's kind of paranoid, like half feral, it cringes when it's
>>>petted but it enjoys having its head scratched. So if it gets near zero it
>>>will probably move into that covered half of the box. Still on the electric
>>>blanket, that should keep it warm and cozy. Since the electric blanket is
>>>folded up, it generates concentrated heat and must be left on the lowest
>>>settings. As with all of their bedding, clean paper towels are used like
>>>sheets.
>>
>> I made a home out of a styrofoam box with those cheap stick-um tiles
>> to keep them from scratching through the styrofoam. I also installed a
>> heated pad designed for outdoor use by cats, something like this:
>
>I was thinking about using Styrofoam, but it's probably not as cold here.
>
>> http://www.amazon.com/3093-Extreme-Weather-Kitty-Fleece/dp/B0009YWJRE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418823885&sr=8-1&keywords=pet+heating+pad+outdoor
>
>Thanks, I was wondering about that. I did look briefly before buying an
>electric blanket.
>
>> Sorry if that URL breaks but just look for "pet heating pad outdoor".
>> I put lots of straw in the house and change that yearly. I don't
>> recommend blankets because they get fleas and such. This looks like a
>> nice way to build a shelter:
>
>You are worried about fleas and you only change the bedding once per
>year? I use clean paper towels, changed at least every few days, as a
>cover on all of their bedding. The blanket can be folded up in many
>different ways, and it is washable. Fleas will always be a concern since
>it's an outdoor cat. One marvelous thing about using clean bright white
>paper towels is that you know what's going on with the cat. You can see
>all of the dirt and any blood. And it helps clean your cat.
>
>Hopefully your outdoor cats are neutered.

The outdoor cats are neutered and they seem not to get fleas. I'm
moving in a few days and was worried about one of the outdoor cats,
Baby. She's around 6 years old and I've been handling her since she
was two weeks old. She lives in the box and hangs around the front of
my house much of the time. Since the other main feeder is also moving
out of the neighborhood, I was really worrying about Baby.

I never took her in the house because she often hangs out with her
mom, Jet, and Jet is much too feral to take in. I didn't want to break
them up. But since the two main feeders are leaving, I took Baby into
the house a few days ago. She yowled the first few nights but last
night she was mostly quiet. There has been no conflict with my other
three cats.

I took her to the vet and she is still tiny (8.2 lbs) but in very good
shape. No fleas and she got her rabies vaccine. I know from five years
ago that she was HIV and Leukemia negative.

So in a week or so we all get into a rented minivan and head for
Florida. I will donate the heated box to some TNR person nearby.

Mack A. Damia
June 25th 15, 07:07 PM
On Thu, 25 Jun 2015 13:44:25 -0400, dgk > wrote:


>So in a week or so we all get into a rented minivan and head for
>Florida. I will donate the heated box to some TNR person nearby.

I was going to post a question about traveling with cats. I have two,
and I would like to take them with me if and when I go away for
several months.

Do you keep them in separate carriers? What about feeding and litter
during, say, a two or three day driving trip?

--

buglady[_2_]
June 25th 15, 11:03 PM
On 6/25/2015 2:07 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
> Do you keep them in separate carriers? What about feeding and litter
> during, say, a two or three day driving trip?

..............I'd say yes to separate carriers. Take them out of
carriers in motel room at night, set up litter box in bathroom and feed
as usual. Bring a little whisk broom and pan to clean up before you
leave. You can offer water and litter box during the day, but I bet
they won't be interested and it increases the chances of them getting
loose and lost if you open the carriers before they're safe in a room.
If there's a way you can put water in the carrier w/o it being spilled
all over during the ride, I'd do that. Cats can hold it forever. Ever
take a cat into the vet to stay overnight to get a urine sample? Good
luck with that! Alternatively you can get a big crate and put both of
them in with a litter box and water during the ride, but, take it from
me, that's hard to haul in and out of the car.

buglady
takeout the dog before replying

Mack A. Damia
June 25th 15, 11:07 PM
On Thu, 25 Jun 2015 18:03:53 -0400, buglady >
wrote:

>On 6/25/2015 2:07 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>> Do you keep them in separate carriers? What about feeding and litter
>> during, say, a two or three day driving trip?
>
>.............I'd say yes to separate carriers. Take them out of
>carriers in motel room at night, set up litter box in bathroom and feed
>as usual. Bring a little whisk broom and pan to clean up before you
>leave. You can offer water and litter box during the day, but I bet
>they won't be interested and it increases the chances of them getting
>loose and lost if you open the carriers before they're safe in a room.
>If there's a way you can put water in the carrier w/o it being spilled
>all over during the ride, I'd do that. Cats can hold it forever. Ever
>take a cat into the vet to stay overnight to get a urine sample? Good
>luck with that! Alternatively you can get a big crate and put both of
>them in with a litter box and water during the ride, but, take it from
>me, that's hard to haul in and out of the car.

Thanks! Good advice.

--

buglady[_2_]
June 25th 15, 11:51 PM
On 6/25/2015 6:07 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
> On Thu, 25 Jun 2015 18:03:53 -0400, buglady >
> wrote:
>
>> On 6/25/2015 2:07 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>> Do you keep them in separate carriers? What about feeding and litter
>>> during, say, a two or three day driving trip?
>>
>> .............I'd say yes to separate carriers. Take them out of
>> carriers in motel room at night, set up litter box in bathroom and feed
>> as usual. Bring a little whisk broom and pan to clean up before you
>> leave. You can offer water and litter box during the day, but I bet
>> they won't be interested and it increases the chances of them getting
>> loose and lost if you open the carriers before they're safe in a room.
>> If there's a way you can put water in the carrier w/o it being spilled
>> all over during the ride, I'd do that. Cats can hold it forever. Ever
>> take a cat into the vet to stay overnight to get a urine sample? Good
>> luck with that! Alternatively you can get a big crate and put both of
>> them in with a litter box and water during the ride, but, take it from
>> me, that's hard to haul in and out of the car.
>
> Thanks! Good advice.

..............one other thing. I was moving from IN to FL so I called
motels ahead of time around the area I thought I'd be stopping to see if
they'd allow cats in the room. The answer was yes. I did not make a
reservation as this was one of those motels right off the highway. When
I pulled in I reminded them that I had called about cats being in the
room. Receptionist asked how many cats, answer was 6 then she said NO,
too many cats! I was exhausted, it was dusk and the next place I
stopped I told them I had 2 cats and they let me stay.

Mostly the cats got out of the carrier and hid under the covers for a
while before eating and doing their business.

buglady
take out the dog before replying

Mack A. Damia
June 25th 15, 11:55 PM
On Thu, 25 Jun 2015 18:51:08 -0400, buglady >
wrote:

>On 6/25/2015 6:07 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>> On Thu, 25 Jun 2015 18:03:53 -0400, buglady >
>> wrote:
>>
>>> On 6/25/2015 2:07 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>>> Do you keep them in separate carriers? What about feeding and litter
>>>> during, say, a two or three day driving trip?
>>>
>>> .............I'd say yes to separate carriers. Take them out of
>>> carriers in motel room at night, set up litter box in bathroom and feed
>>> as usual. Bring a little whisk broom and pan to clean up before you
>>> leave. You can offer water and litter box during the day, but I bet
>>> they won't be interested and it increases the chances of them getting
>>> loose and lost if you open the carriers before they're safe in a room.
>>> If there's a way you can put water in the carrier w/o it being spilled
>>> all over during the ride, I'd do that. Cats can hold it forever. Ever
>>> take a cat into the vet to stay overnight to get a urine sample? Good
>>> luck with that! Alternatively you can get a big crate and put both of
>>> them in with a litter box and water during the ride, but, take it from
>>> me, that's hard to haul in and out of the car.
>>
>> Thanks! Good advice.
>
>.............one other thing. I was moving from IN to FL so I called
>motels ahead of time around the area I thought I'd be stopping to see if
>they'd allow cats in the room. The answer was yes. I did not make a
>reservation as this was one of those motels right off the highway. When
>I pulled in I reminded them that I had called about cats being in the
>room. Receptionist asked how many cats, answer was 6 then she said NO,
>too many cats! I was exhausted, it was dusk and the next place I
>stopped I told them I had 2 cats and they let me stay.
>
>Mostly the cats got out of the carrier and hid under the covers for a
>while before eating and doing their business.

I know my two would go under the bed if they are frightened (in a
strange place). I could have a problem getting them out. I have had
the problem here at home especially if I have strangers (workmen, etc)
in the house.

--

Mark Carroll[_2_]
June 26th 15, 08:49 AM
buglady > writes:

> On 6/25/2015 2:07 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>> Do you keep them in separate carriers? What about feeding and litter
>> during, say, a two or three day driving trip?
>
> .............I'd say yes to separate carriers.
(snip)

Agreed; it may be worth my mentioning that we once we had a pair of
carriers with a wide grate at the front that the cats could get their
paw through, and they seemed to quite like being placed so that they
could face each other and even "hold hands"!

Our current cat is actually very sedate so, if there is someone in the
back of the car, we just put a harness on him and have that person look
after him and he just sits there and gives no trouble. When we stop at
places like rest areas we try to park a little way from any craziness or
busy traffic so he can look around a bit without it being too scary.

Some of the carriers intended for things like shipping pets
internationally can be useful. They are big and heavy, but they have
plenty of room for the cat to be able to sit up fully, vents for them to
peer out of, and have a water dispenser.

-- Mark

buglady[_2_]
June 26th 15, 11:40 AM
On 6/25/2015 6:55 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
> I know my two would go under the bed if they are frightened (in a
> strange place). I could have a problem getting them out. I have had
> the problem here at home especially if I have strangers (workmen, etc)
> in the house.

...........I'd say there aren't any motels that have an "under the bed"!
They're all on wooden platforms. I have no idea why.

buglady
take out the dog before replying

dgk
June 26th 15, 02:21 PM
On Fri, 26 Jun 2015 06:40:30 -0400, buglady >
wrote:

>On 6/25/2015 6:55 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>> I know my two would go under the bed if they are frightened (in a
>> strange place). I could have a problem getting them out. I have had
>> the problem here at home especially if I have strangers (workmen, etc)
>> in the house.
>
>..........I'd say there aren't any motels that have an "under the bed"!
> They're all on wooden platforms. I have no idea why.
>
>buglady
>take out the dog before replying
>

From what I've read, use separate carriers. I have one big plastic
carrier - Nipsy will go in that one because he is big. I ordered three
smaller soft-sided carriers for the other three. They are a bit
smaller than I thought - hopefully high enough so they can stand up.
There won't be a whole lot of room in the MiniVan since I'm taking a
bunch of stuff that I don't want to sit in a hot moving van for up to
a week. I'm hoping that the soft sides will allow for a bit of wiggle
room.

My vet said NO to giving them any kind of sedative, but did say not to
feed them in the morning, and probably feed them less than normal. No
litterbox in the van, but I'll put down a tarp to protect the stuff
from any accidents.

I have no idea how I'm going to keep Nipsy and Baby from yowling the
whole way, but hopefully they'll calm down.

Mack A. Damia
June 26th 15, 04:32 PM
On Fri, 26 Jun 2015 08:49:26 +0100, Mark Carroll >
wrote:

>buglady > writes:
>
>> On 6/25/2015 2:07 PM, Mack A. Damia wrote:
>>> Do you keep them in separate carriers? What about feeding and litter
>>> during, say, a two or three day driving trip?
>>
>> .............I'd say yes to separate carriers.
>(snip)
>
>Agreed; it may be worth my mentioning that we once we had a pair of
>carriers with a wide grate at the front that the cats could get their
>paw through, and they seemed to quite like being placed so that they
>could face each other and even "hold hands"!

I do have two carriers, but they take up a lot of space in a small
car.

When I have taken them both to the vet, I have put the carriers in the
back seat with the fronts facing each other, and I have never heard
any complaints from them as long as they can see each other.

--