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John Doe[_2_]
February 12th 15, 09:11 PM
I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark two
nights ago. It was warm out but having the thing strapped to my forhead
at eye level, it is so powerful I could see what looked like moderate to
heavy snowfall that was probably actually teeny tiny specks of pollen.
It was not mist, unfortunately.

Perhaps more importantly... In my peripheral vision, in the light's
outer coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see all
the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the store.

The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to your
forhead.

Christina Websell
February 13th 15, 10:37 PM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
>I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark two
> nights ago. It was warm out but having the thing strapped to my forhead
> at eye level, it is so powerful I could see what looked like moderate to
> heavy snowfall that was probably actually teeny tiny specks of pollen.
> It was not mist, unfortunately.
>
> Perhaps more importantly... In my peripheral vision, in the light's
> outer coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see all
> the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the store.
>
> The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to your
> forhead.

How do you know that they are stray cats? I ask this as a Brit who doesn't
have any stray cats near me (wish I did as I'd like another)
There seems to be a huge stray/feral cat problem in America.
In my locality, kittens are a rare thing. It costs 80 US dollars to buy
one. Which is good and suggests the spay/neuter program which offers it
free is working.
There's no "free to a good home" kittens near me.

Tweed

John Doe[_2_]
February 13th 15, 11:28 PM
"Christina Websell" > wrote:
> "John Doe" > wrote:

>> I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark two
>> nights ago. It was warm out but having the thing strapped to my
>> forhead at eye level, it is so powerful I could see what looked like
>> moderate to heavy snowfall that was probably actually teeny tiny
>> specks of pollen. It was not mist, unfortunately.
>>
>> Perhaps more importantly... In my peripheral vision, in the light's
>> outer coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see all
>> the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the store.
>>
>> The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to
>> your forhead.
>
> How do you know that they are stray cats?

It wasn't difficult.

> I ask this as a Brit who doesn't have any stray cats near me (wish I
> did as I'd like another)

How do you know that for a fact?

> There seems to be a huge stray/feral cat problem in America.

I would say there are too many in my neighborhood. I don't know about
other neighborhoods. Obviously you don't either.

> In my locality, kittens are a rare thing. It costs 80 US dollars to
> buy one.

I hope you're not talking about a pet store.

> Which is good and suggests the spay/neuter program which offers it
> free is working. There's no "free to a good home" kittens near me.

Having fewer stray cats in Europe nowadays probably helps keep the
bubonic plague away. You all were nearly wiped out and traumatized by
the bubonic plague, makes sense that you are scared to death of stray
animals. I hope something like that never happens here, but I fear it
could.

I do wish more people would get their animals from the Humane Society
instead of from a breeder or a pet store. Then again, that means there
are some gems to be had out there for those of us who care. I brought in
a Calico that's exceptionally well marked, looks better than the Calicos
that come up in a Google image search.

Christina Websell
February 13th 15, 11:40 PM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
> "Christina Websell" > wrote:
>> "John Doe" > wrote:
>
>>> I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark two
>>> nights ago. It was warm out but having the thing strapped to my
>>> forhead at eye level, it is so powerful I could see what looked like
>>> moderate to heavy snowfall that was probably actually teeny tiny
>>> specks of pollen. It was not mist, unfortunately.
>>>
>>> Perhaps more importantly... In my peripheral vision, in the light's
>>> outer coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see all
>>> the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the store.
>>>
>>> The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to
>>> your forhead.
>>
>> How do you know that they are stray cats?
>
> It wasn't difficult.
>
>> I ask this as a Brit who doesn't have any stray cats near me (wish I
>> did as I'd like another)
>
> How do you know that?

How do I know I haven't stray cats near me? Probably because they're not
there..

John Doe[_2_]
February 14th 15, 12:21 AM
"Christina Websell" > wrote:

> "John Doe" > wrote
>> "Christina Websell" > wrote:
>>> "John Doe" > wrote:
>>
>>>> I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark two
>>>> nights ago. It was warm out but having the thing strapped to my
>>>> forhead at eye level, it is so powerful I could see what looked
>>>> like moderate to heavy snowfall that was probably actually teeny
>>>> tiny specks of pollen. It was not mist, unfortunately.
>>>>
>>>> Perhaps more importantly... In my peripheral vision, in the light's
>>>> outer coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see
>>>> all the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the
>>>> store.
>>>>
>>>> The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to
>>>> your forhead.
>>>
>>> How do you know that they are stray cats?
>>
>> It wasn't difficult.
>>
>>> I ask this as a Brit who doesn't have any stray cats near me (wish I
>>> did as I'd like another)
>>
>> How do you know that?
>
> How do I know I haven't stray cats near me? Probably because they're
> not there..

Try using a modern LED headlamp...

Dick Ballard[_2_]
February 14th 15, 07:57 PM
On Fri, 13 Feb 2015 22:37:30 -0000, "Christina Websell"
> wrote:

>
>"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
>>I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark two
>> nights ago. It was warm out but having the thing strapped to my forhead
>> at eye level, it is so powerful I could see what looked like moderate to
>> heavy snowfall that was probably actually teeny tiny specks of pollen.
>> It was not mist, unfortunately.
>>
>> Perhaps more importantly... In my peripheral vision, in the light's
>> outer coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see all
>> the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the store.
>>
>> The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to your
>> forhead.
>
>How do you know that they are stray cats? I ask this as a Brit who doesn't
>have any stray cats near me (wish I did as I'd like another)
>There seems to be a huge stray/feral cat problem in America.
>In my locality, kittens are a rare thing. It costs 80 US dollars to buy
>one. Which is good and suggests the spay/neuter program which offers it
>free is working.
>There's no "free to a good home" kittens near me.
>
>Tweed


Strays or pets? I see other pet cats in my neighborhood (western US),
but few ferals. There are other locations where the feral population
is a problem, and organizations have been formed to
trap/neuter/release as a form of population control.

I think there is a cultural difference between the US and UK regarding
free roaming pet cats. I get the impression from some sources that NOT
allowing one's pet cat to free roam is considered a form of abuse by
many in Britain.

In the US, however, there seems to be a strong bias that pet cats MUST
be kept indoors and properly entertained with all sorts of artificial
and fabricated toys & equipment. Most of the privately owned shelters
require an "indoor only" agreement for adoption. The larger
municipally supported agencies are more liberal on this point.

Dick

Christina Websell
February 15th 15, 06:45 PM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
> "Christina Websell" > wrote:
>
>> "John Doe" > wrote
>>> "Christina Websell" > wrote:
>>>> "John Doe" > wrote:
>>>
>>>>> I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark two
>>>>> nights ago. It was warm out but having the thing strapped to my
>>>>> forhead at eye level, it is so powerful I could see what looked
>>>>> like moderate to heavy snowfall that was probably actually teeny
>>>>> tiny specks of pollen. It was not mist, unfortunately.
>>>>>
>>>>> Perhaps more importantly... In my peripheral vision, in the light's
>>>>> outer coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see
>>>>> all the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the
>>>>> store.
>>>>>
>>>>> The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to
>>>>> your forhead.
>>>>
>>>> How do you know that they are stray cats?
>>>
>>> It wasn't difficult.
>>>
>>>> I ask this as a Brit who doesn't have any stray cats near me (wish I
>>>> did as I'd like another)
>>>
>>> How do you know that?
>>
>> How do I know I haven't stray cats near me? Probably because they're
>> not there..
>
> Try using a modern LED headlamp...

It's different here in the UK. I would find a lot of of eyes from cats who
are allowed out as indoor/outdoor cats.
Including Boyfie.

Christina Websell
February 15th 15, 07:09 PM
"Dick Ballard" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 13 Feb 2015 22:37:30 -0000, "Christina Websell"
> > wrote:
>
> Strays or pets? I see other pet cats in my neighborhood (western US),
> but few ferals. There are other locations where the feral population
> is a problem, and organizations have been formed to
> trap/neuter/release as a form of population control.
>
> I think there is a cultural difference between the US and UK regarding
> free roaming pet cats. I get the impression from some sources that NOT
> allowing one's pet cat to free roam is considered a form of abuse by
> many in Britain.

Yes.
>
> In the US, however, there seems to be a strong bias that pet cats MUST
> be kept indoors and properly entertained with all sorts of artificial
> and fabricated toys & equipment. Most of the privately owned shelters
> require an "indoor only" agreement for adoption. The larger
> municipally supported agencies are more liberal on this point.
>
> Dick

I'm not going to enter into an argument. It's my opinion that cats like to
go out in UK and they should. If I adopted a cat from a shelter here they
wouldn't let me keep it totally in the house.

Christina Websell
February 15th 15, 08:01 PM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
>> Having fewer stray cats in Europe nowadays probably helps keep the
> bubonic plague away. You all were nearly wiped out and traumatized by
> the bubonic plague, makes sense that you are scared to death of stray
> animals. I hope something like that never happens here, but I fear it
> could.

?? Bubonic plague was caused by black rats in the 1600's. I doubt you got
it over in the USA at that time.

buglady[_2_]
February 15th 15, 09:34 PM
On 2/13/2015 6:28 PM, John Doe wrote:
> Having fewer stray cats in Europe nowadays probably helps keep the
> bubonic plague away. You all were nearly wiped out and traumatized by
> the bubonic plague, makes sense that you are scared to death of stray
> animals. I hope something like that never happens here, but I fear it
> could.
...........Huh? Bubonic plague comes from fleas on rats or other
rodents. Cats killed rats. Unfortunately cats can be killed by the
plague too, so things only got worse over time. The major factor of
spread was the rats on the ships, which transported it all over. And
there already is bubonic plague here popping up occasionally in AZ.

http://www.azdhs.gov/phs/oids/vector/plague/

..........She's saying the cats in the UK are owned, not strays, not that
there aren't cats all over outside.

buglady
take out the dog before replying

Mark Carroll[_2_]
February 15th 15, 09:53 PM
"Christina Websell" > writes:

> I'm not going to enter into an argument. It's my opinion that cats like to
> go out in UK and they should. If I adopted a cat from a shelter here they
> wouldn't let me keep it totally in the house.

I adopted a pair of cats in the UK from a shelter and we were honest
about intending to keep them indoors. The RSPCA guy came for a home
visit and was quite interested to hear about indoor cats -- the idea
was clearly new to him -- but we explained more and he had no problem
with it and adopted the cats.

-- Mark

Mark Carroll[_2_]
February 15th 15, 10:00 PM
Mark Carroll > writes:
(snip)
> we explained more and he had no problem with it and adopted the cats.

Ha, sorry for the ambiguity, *we* adopted the cats. (-:

-- Mark

John Doe[_2_]
February 15th 15, 11:09 PM
buglady > wrote:

> John Doe wrote:

>> Having fewer stray cats in Europe nowadays probably helps keep the
>> bubonic plague away. You all were nearly wiped out and traumatized by
>> the bubonic plague, makes sense that you are scared to death of stray
>> animals. I hope something like that never happens here, but I fear it
>> could.

> ..........Huh? Bubonic plague comes from fleas on rats or other
> rodents.

Obviously it can come from fleas on cats too. Fleas are equal
opportunity biters. Otherwise they wouldn't bite us.

> Cats killed rats. Unfortunately cats can be killed by the plague too,
> so things only got worse over time.

My guess is that depending on cats to kill rats was one of their
problems. Using cats is probably better than using poison and traps, but
better would be cleaning up after themselves. Avoid attracting the rats
in the first place.

> The major factor of spread was the rats on the ships, which
> transported it all over. And there already is bubonic plague here
> popping up occasionally in AZ.
>
> http://www.azdhs.gov/phs/oids/vector/plague/

That's very interesting.

> .........She's saying the cats in the UK are owned, not strays, not
> that there aren't cats all over outside.

I C. I should have been more precise in my wording.

--








>
> buglady take out the dog before replying

John Doe[_2_]
February 15th 15, 11:14 PM
"Christina Websell" > wrote:

>>>>> "John Doe" > wrote:

>>>>>> I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark
>>>>>> two nights ago...In my peripheral vision, in the light's outer
>>>>>> coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see
>>>>>> all the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the
>>>>>> store.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to
>>>>>> your forhead.

> I would find a lot of of eyes from cats who are allowed out as
> indoor/outdoor cats. Including Boyfie.

So you were playing semantics because you disagree with the idea that
keeping a cat outside might be wrong?

Of course there is no way to tell just by looking from a distance
whether a cat is owned or not.

John Doe[_2_]
February 15th 15, 11:17 PM
Mark Carroll > wrote in :

> Mark Carroll > writes:

>> we explained more and he had no problem with it and adopted the cats.
>
> Ha, sorry for the ambiguity, *we* adopted the cats. (-:

FWIW... Yeah, it was ambiguous, but I read "out" into it. As in "he adopted
out the cats".

buglady[_2_]
February 15th 15, 11:32 PM
On 2/15/2015 6:09 PM, John Doe wrote:
> My guess is that depending on cats to kill rats was one of their
> problems. Using cats is probably better than using poison and traps, but
> better would be cleaning up after themselves. Avoid attracting the rats
> in the first place.
..........Um, this was the Middle Ages. Just how clean do you think it
was? And they did not understand the connection between filth and germs
or pests.

buglady
take out the dog before replying

John Doe[_2_]
February 16th 15, 12:24 AM
buglady > wrote:

> John Doe wrote:

>> My guess is that depending on cats to kill rats was one of their
>> problems. Using cats is probably better than using poison and traps,
>> but better would be cleaning up after themselves. Avoid attracting
>> the rats in the first place.

> this was the Middle Ages. Just how clean do you think it was?

Don't really know. I'm sure it varied from one locale to another.

> And they did not understand the connection between filth and germs or
> pests.

But seriously. Noticing that breadcrumbs attract ants, cockroaches, or
rats is not a high level process.

Christina Websell
February 16th 15, 12:27 AM
"Mark Carroll" > wrote in message
...
> "Christina Websell" > writes:
>
>> I'm not going to enter into an argument. It's my opinion that cats like
>> to
>> go out in UK and they should. If I adopted a cat from a shelter here
>> they
>> wouldn't let me keep it totally in the house.
>
> I adopted a pair of cats in the UK from a shelter and we were honest
> about intending to keep them indoors. The RSPCA guy came for a home
> visit and was quite interested to hear about indoor cats -- the idea
> was clearly new to him -- but we explained more and he had no problem
> with it and adopted the cats.
>
> -- Mark

That surprises me. I'd like to believe you. but I don't. As much as I
don't like the RSPCA, I hope they won't ever adopt cats out for a totally
indoor home or I'll like them even less.
Cats are best indoor/outdoor. Outdoor for a bit of hunting mousies and
ratties and indoor when they prefer the bed by the fire.
I would not have a cat to keep it totally inside in the UK and I'm amazed
that the RSPCA have agreed.

John Doe[_2_]
February 16th 15, 12:31 AM
So now this troll is saying that cats should be outside "to hunt mousies
and ratties". Maybe they should be outside playing with skunks and
raccoons, vectors for rabies...

--
"Christina Websell" <spamfree tinawebsell.wanadoo.co.uk> wrote in news:ckcrsiFqr9qU2 mid.individual.net:

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> From: "Christina Websell" <spamfree tinawebsell.wanadoo.co.uk>
> Newsgroups: rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> Subject: Re: Counting stray cats while cycling at night
> Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 00:27:56 -0000
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>
>
> "Mark Carroll" <mtbc ixod.org> wrote in message
> news:87lhjy7sfv.fsf ixod.org...
>> "Christina Websell" <spamfree tinawebsell.wanadoo.co.uk> writes:
>>
>>> I'm not going to enter into an argument. It's my opinion that cats like
>>> to
>>> go out in UK and they should. If I adopted a cat from a shelter here
>>> they
>>> wouldn't let me keep it totally in the house.
>>
>> I adopted a pair of cats in the UK from a shelter and we were honest
>> about intending to keep them indoors. The RSPCA guy came for a home
>> visit and was quite interested to hear about indoor cats -- the idea
>> was clearly new to him -- but we explained more and he had no problem
>> with it and adopted the cats.
>>
>> -- Mark
>
> That surprises me. I'd like to believe you. but I don't. As much as I
> don't like the RSPCA, I hope they won't ever adopt cats out for a totally
> indoor home or I'll like them even less.
> Cats are best indoor/outdoor. Outdoor for a bit of hunting mousies and
> ratties and indoor when they prefer the bed by the fire.
> I would not have a cat to keep it totally inside in the UK and I'm amazed
> that the RSPCA have agreed.
>
>
>
>

(PeteCresswell)
February 16th 15, 01:43 AM
Per Dick Ballard:
> I get the impression from some sources that NOT
>allowing one's pet cat to free roam is considered a form of abuse by
>many in Britain.

Couple years back I saw a documentary about a guy who studied cats in
the UK.

His method was to recruit a number of cat owners who agreed to seal
anything their cat brought home in a plastic bag and freeze it until the
investigator came around periodically to collect and catalog them.

I can't recall the numbers, but he found that each made quite a dent in
the local small animal population.
--
Pete Cresswell

Mack A. Damia
February 16th 15, 02:07 AM
On Sat, 14 Feb 2015 11:57:25 -0800, Dick Ballard
> wrote:

>I think there is a cultural difference between the US and UK regarding
>free roaming pet cats. I get the impression from some sources that NOT
>allowing one's pet cat to free roam is considered a form of abuse by
>many in Britain.

I don't know where that view comes from.

This is a very long time ago, but I recall one cat we had in Hampshire
was hit by a spade thrown by some guy because the cat was in his apple
tree. The cat suffered a while, and I think we had to get her put
down.

After we moved to the U.S. I gradually became aware of the idea that
letting a cat roam was cruel, and when I set up my own home and
adopted a cat, I never let it or any other subsequent ones roam
outdoors.

--

John Doe[_2_]
February 16th 15, 02:37 AM
Mack A. Damia > wrote:

> Dick Ballard > wrote:
>
>> I think there is a cultural difference between the US and UK
>> regarding free roaming pet cats. I get the impression from some
>> sources that NOT allowing one's pet cat to free roam is considered a
>> form of abuse by many in Britain.
>
> I don't know where that view comes from.
>
> This is a very long time ago, but I recall one cat we had in Hampshire
> was hit by a spade thrown by some guy because the cat was in his apple
> tree. The cat suffered a while, and I think we had to get her put
> down.
>
> After we moved to the U.S. I gradually became aware of the idea that
> letting a cat roam was cruel, and when I set up my own home and
> adopted a cat, I never let it or any other subsequent ones roam
> outdoors.

One of the problems is that they just aren't smart enough to avoid some
of the hazards. The most obvious is contact with human beings. Even a
hard-core feral can be easily baited and killed. Then there are dogs.
Antifreeze. Wild animals, depending on the location.

I've got a hard-core feral that spends most of its time when I'm awake
up in a loft in a closet/pantry area, accessible to their Skyway. That's
her place. One time I needed to lighten the load here so I left the
front door wide open for 15 minutes when I went next door. She was in
the front area on a platform when I left. She was still there when I got
back. She's afraid of me, but she is more afraid of the not-so-great
outdoors. Besides an infant room monitor to bring the outside sounds in,
they have access to the breezes and smells from outside, from behind a
lightweight plastic screen when the window is open. None of them have
ever scratched that screen even though they could easily slash it in
half. They enjoy lying at the windowsill taking it in without being
there. Just for fun I have at times in the past taken my male house cat
to show my next-door neighbors a "cat magnet". Dropped him on their side
of the fence and watched him run like crazy back around the fence and to
our door. He's not thrilled about being outside. That's the objective,
take good enough care of them so they enjoy being inside as much or more
than being outside.

Christina Websell
February 17th 15, 06:45 PM
"(PeteCresswell)" > wrote in message
...
> Per Dick Ballard:
>> I get the impression from some sources that NOT
>>allowing one's pet cat to free roam is considered a form of abuse by
>>many in Britain.
>
> Couple years back I saw a documentary about a guy who studied cats in
> the UK.
>
> His method was to recruit a number of cat owners who agreed to seal
> anything their cat brought home in a plastic bag and freeze it until the
> investigator came around periodically to collect and catalog them.
>
> I can't recall the numbers, but he found that each made quite a dent in
> the local small animal population.
> --
> Pete Cresswell

They probably did. Cats like to hunt and if you don't like it, don't have a
cat. Simples ;-)
My cat is brilliant around my chicken huts (small rats killed only, the big
ones he says no to) If you have poultry you will always get rats coming to
share their food.
So he kills the small ones, and it prevents them them getting big. If they
get away from him and get big I get the terriers in. No rat will get away
from them. I have to keep Boyfie inside otherwise they will kill him - so
we do a rat hunt. It's far better than poison. Either they escape or they
don't. no dying slowly.

Christina Websell
February 17th 15, 07:23 PM
"Mack A. Damia" > wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 14 Feb 2015 11:57:25 -0800, Dick Ballard
> > wrote:
>
>>I think there is a cultural difference between the US and UK regarding
>>free roaming pet cats. I get the impression from some sources that NOT
>>allowing one's pet cat to free roam is considered a form of abuse by
>>many in Britain.
>
> I don't know where that view comes from.
>
> This is a very long time ago, but I recall one cat we had in Hampshire
> was hit by a spade thrown by some guy because the cat was in his apple
> tree. The cat suffered a while, and I think we had to get her put
> down.

I hope you called the police. It's not allowed to kill a cat for being in
someone else's apple tree. Boyfie does it occasionally. Up to now it
hasn't been a capital offence.

Mack A. Damia
February 17th 15, 09:32 PM
On Tue, 17 Feb 2015 19:23:32 -0000, "Christina Websell"
> wrote:

>
>"Mack A. Damia" > wrote in message
...
>> On Sat, 14 Feb 2015 11:57:25 -0800, Dick Ballard
>> > wrote:
>>
>>>I think there is a cultural difference between the US and UK regarding
>>>free roaming pet cats. I get the impression from some sources that NOT
>>>allowing one's pet cat to free roam is considered a form of abuse by
>>>many in Britain.
>>
>> I don't know where that view comes from.
>>
>> This is a very long time ago, but I recall one cat we had in Hampshire
>> was hit by a spade thrown by some guy because the cat was in his apple
>> tree. The cat suffered a while, and I think we had to get her put
>> down.
>
> I hope you called the police. It's not allowed to kill a cat for being in
>someone else's apple tree. Boyfie does it occasionally. Up to now it
>hasn't been a capital offence.

I don't remember what we did other than take Penny to the vet. I
think we talked to other neighbors and found out that this guy had a
reputation. It was an upsetting time, and this was 1955.

--

(PeteCresswell)
February 17th 15, 10:35 PM
Per Christina Websell:
>They probably did. Cats like to hunt and if you don't like it, don't have a
>cat. Simples ;-)
>My cat is brilliant around my chicken huts (small rats killed only, the big
>ones he says no to) If you have poultry you will always get rats coming to
>share their food.

My maybe a dozen cats. "Maybe" because she divides them into two groups
"House Cats" that come-and-go from the house and "Barn Cats" which are
semi-wild things that live in the barn and feed on rodents.

Try to touch one of the barn cats and you'll need medical attention.

I saw another documentary called "The Cat Connection" (BBC... might have
been the same one where they described the study...) in which they
described cats - in terms of evolutionary perfection as hunters - as the
dry-land analog of great white sharks.

Guy I worked with had a "Maine Coon" cat - which are even more
compulsive hunters than most.

One day it brought home a live pheasant. He took the pheasant from the
cat, threw it up into the air, and the thing started flying away.... not
like a duck's very steep takeoff... more a gradual increase in altitude
as it crossed the yard. When it was about halfway across the yard, the
cat took off after it, leapt into the air, and dragged it down...
--
Pete Cresswell

Christina Websell
February 23rd 15, 09:33 PM
"buglady" > wrote in message
...
> On 2/13/2015 6:28 PM, John Doe wrote:
>> Having fewer stray cats in Europe nowadays probably helps keep the
>> bubonic plague away. You all were nearly wiped out and traumatized by
>> the bubonic plague, makes sense that you are scared to death of stray
>> animals. I hope something like that never happens here, but I fear it
>> could.
> ..........Huh? Bubonic plague comes from fleas on rats or other rodents.
> Cats killed rats. Unfortunately cats can be killed by the plague too, so
> things only got worse over time. The major factor of spread was the rats
> on the ships, which transported it all over. And there already is bubonic
> plague here popping up occasionally in AZ.
>
> http://www.azdhs.gov/phs/oids/vector/plague/
>
> .........She's saying the cats in the UK are owned, not strays, not that
> there aren't cats all over outside.
>
They are not any cats here in my garden waiting for a home. Yet. I'd really
like to get an unneutered boy and transform his life. Like I did for
Boyfie.
He doesn't agree one bit.

Christina Websell
February 24th 15, 01:08 AM
"buglady" > wrote in message
...
> On 2/13/2015 6:28 PM, John Doe wrote:
>> Having fewer stray cats in Europe nowadays probably helps keep the
>> bubonic plague away. You all were nearly wiped out and traumatized by
>> the bubonic plague, makes sense that you are scared to death of stray
>> animals. I hope something like that never happens here, but I fear it
>> could.
> ..........Huh? Bubonic plague comes from fleas on rats or other rodents.
> Cats killed rats. Unfortunately cats can be killed by the plague too, so
> things only got worse over time. The major factor of spread was the rats
> on the ships, which transported it all over. And there already is bubonic
> plague here popping up occasionally in AZ.
>
> http://www.azdhs.gov/phs/oids/vector/plague/
>
> .........She's saying the cats in the UK are owned, not strays, not that
> there aren't cats all over outside.
>
> buglady

I am sure that there are some stray cats in the UK. I am waiting for one
to arrive to join Boyfriend (he came as a stray himself in 2003) No luck
yet. Never seen a stray cat here for years. Every cat I see is owned and
lives nearby.
Boyfie does not agree with the idea I have about finding another smelly
intact boy and transforming his life. He says he was not smelly ( he was
not)
He has no intention of sharing me. No way. I would really like to find
another boy like him. He's charming

Christina Websell
March 4th 15, 07:04 PM
"(PeteCresswell)" > wrote in message
...
> Per Christina Websell:
>>They probably did. Cats like to hunt and if you don't like it, don't have
>>a
>>cat. Simples ;-)
>>My cat is brilliant around my chicken huts (small rats killed only, the
>>big
>>ones he says no to) If you have poultry you will always get rats coming
>>to
>>share their food.
>
> My maybe a dozen cats. "Maybe" because she divides them into two groups
> "House Cats" that come-and-go from the house and "Barn Cats" which are
> semi-wild things that live in the barn and feed on rodents.
>
> Try to touch one of the barn cats and you'll need medical attention.
>
> I saw another documentary called "The Cat Connection" (BBC... might have
> been the same one where they described the study...) in which they
> described cats - in terms of evolutionary perfection as hunters - as the
> dry-land analog of great white sharks.
>
> Guy I worked with had a "Maine Coon" cat - which are even more
> compulsive hunters than most.
>
> One day it brought home a live pheasant. He took the pheasant from the
> cat, threw it up into the air, and the thing started flying away.... not
> like a duck's very steep takeoff... more a gradual increase in altitude
> as it crossed the yard. When it was about halfway across the yard, the
> cat took off after it, leapt into the air, and dragged it down...
> --
I hope his owner ate it ;-) Pheasants are yummy.
I have a pheasant that visits my garden but my cat says "absolutely not, far
too big.." He's a bit of a wuss tbh. No rats bigger than 4 inches in case
he gets bitten by those brown chisel teeth on the big guys (he isn't stupid)
He rarely hunts birds, too much trouble now he's getting older. He does
very occasionally bring me a wood pigeon. I fry the breasts of those and
make a soup from the rest. So it's not wasted.
Cats will hunt, it's what they like to do; it's their nature.

Christina Websell
March 4th 15, 08:33 PM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
> So now this troll is saying that cats should be outside "to hunt mousies
> and ratties". Maybe they should be outside playing with skunks and
> raccoons, vectors for rabies...


If you are referring to me, I have always made it clear that I appreciate
the difference between the USA & the UK regarding safety for cats.
It is perfectly safe to let cats out here - providing you don't live on a
busy road. We don't have rabies and no animals that will eat them (apart
from a rogue fox now and again) which my cat is aware of. If he sees a fox
that might have ideas on him he's up a tree in 2 seconds.
Saw him scale a tree after a squirrel in that time. He missed it though.
Very little traffic here and he knows how to avoid it.
He is perfectly able to look after himself when he is out.
Which is not to say I haven't worried when he's been out for too long and
once or twice I've been out looking for his dead body on the road but he
comes in saying "what's the problem? I was out looking at rats around the
chicken huts and you know how long it can take for them to come out"






n