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Cheryl[_6_]
April 11th 16, 11:09 AM
A vet suggested to me that I put food in those plastic balls with holes
in them so that my rather large cats would get some exercise. I'm not
sure that this was ever effective, since I put treats in them to
increase the cats' motivation, and the cats seemed to expect the treats
in addition to their meals.

Sam (RB) always took charge, and ensures that plenty of treats were
removed from the ball, while Cinnamon lurked in the vicinity waiting to
sneak a piece or two.

I found a bag of cat treats after Sam died, and thought, well, I suppose
I should see if Cinnamon can figure out how to get them. I put some in a
ball - this one is almost like the one shown:

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/images/products/swatches/st-17804-treat-ball-64922R.jpg

http://tinyurl.com/jjm5s7p

So Cinnamon hunkered down next to it and stared at it. You could almost
see the wheels turning in her head. She started batting at it
tentatively, pausing, thinking a bit, then patting it in a different
way. I'm still not sure she quite understands why some patting produces
treats and some doesn't (she's not exactly an Einstein of cats, tending
more to beauty than brain), but she's managed to become quite efficient
at getting treats!

--
Cheryl

jmcquown[_2_]
April 11th 16, 04:34 PM
On 4/11/2016 6:09 AM, Cheryl wrote:
> A vet suggested to me that I put food in those plastic balls with holes
> in them so that my rather large cats would get some exercise. I'm not
> sure that this was ever effective, since I put treats in them to
> increase the cats' motivation, and the cats seemed to expect the treats
> in addition to their meals.
>
Seems sort of counter-productive for a vet to suggest since the cats
were already large and giving them treats even in a ball
toy/dispenser... you know what I mean. :)

> I found a bag of cat treats after Sam died, and thought, well, I suppose
> I should see if Cinnamon can figure out how to get them. I put some in a
> ball - this one is almost like the one shown:
>
> http://www.drsfostersmith.com/images/products/swatches/st-17804-treat-ball-64922R.jpg
>
>
> http://tinyurl.com/jjm5s7p
>
> So Cinnamon hunkered down next to it and stared at it. You could almost
> see the wheels turning in her head. She started batting at it
> tentatively, pausing, thinking a bit, then patting it in a different
> way. I'm still not sure she quite understands why some patting produces
> treats and some doesn't (she's not exactly an Einstein of cats, tending
> more to beauty than brain), but she's managed to become quite efficient
> at getting treats!
>
Cinnamon will puzzle it out. :) But is that treat-ball working for
exercise or is it just a treat dispenser?

Buffy is plump. I haven't been able to effect a change in her weight,
which is about 13 lbs. I'm sure I'm not over-feeding her, but then this
is only the second cat I've ever been owned by. Persia (RB) required
prescription food almost right off the bat.

Buffy has a stout stubby body with short legs. Maybe she's supposed to
look like a little orange barrel with striped legs. ;)

Jill

Cheryl[_6_]
April 11th 16, 05:24 PM
On 2016-04-11 1:04 PM, jmcquown wrote:
> On 4/11/2016 6:09 AM, Cheryl wrote:
>> A vet suggested to me that I put food in those plastic balls with holes
>> in them so that my rather large cats would get some exercise. I'm not
>> sure that this was ever effective, since I put treats in them to
>> increase the cats' motivation, and the cats seemed to expect the treats
>> in addition to their meals.
>>
> Seems sort of counter-productive for a vet to suggest since the cats
> were already large and giving them treats even in a ball
> toy/dispenser... you know what I mean. :)

Possibly the original instructions were "food". I don't really remember
exactly, but I had the idea that they'd use it more and get more
exercise if food they really liked was placed in it.

> Cinnamon will puzzle it out. :) But is that treat-ball working for
> exercise or is it just a treat dispenser?

Well, now, she certainly moves more when using the treat ball than she
does when strolling over to the bowl on the floor, but whether it's
enough more to count as exercise, I couldn't say! She doesn't get any
other form of exercise than walking to and from her food and water or
the litterbox.

> Buffy is plump. I haven't been able to effect a change in her weight,
> which is about 13 lbs. I'm sure I'm not over-feeding her, but then this
> is only the second cat I've ever been owned by. Persia (RB) required
> prescription food almost right off the bat.
>
> Buffy has a stout stubby body with short legs. Maybe she's supposed to
> look like a little orange barrel with striped legs. ;)

I think Cinnamon is currently a bit more than that, which makes her too
big, even I have to admit that. When she and Sam were weighed by the vet
a few years ago, I pointed out that at least she weighed less than Sam,
and the vet replied "But she's got a shorter wheelbase!".

I tended to slip back into the habit of free-feeding them, and of course
when Sam was sick, I was so anxious to get some food into him that I
stopped worrying about diets. I'm trying again to feed Cinnamon only the
recommended amount morning and evening, carefully measured out, well,
plus a few treats. She doesn't much appreciate this approach to
cat-feeding. That cat adores her food, and also sometimes moans that the
food isn't quite good enough although if I hold out and leave it there,
she eats it. Now that she's using the treat ball, maybe I'll put part of
her measured allotment of dry food in it.

--
Cheryl

jmcquown[_2_]
April 11th 16, 10:22 PM
On 4/11/2016 12:24 PM, Cheryl wrote:
> On 2016-04-11 1:04 PM, jmcquown wrote:
>> On 4/11/2016 6:09 AM, Cheryl wrote:
>>> A vet suggested to me that I put food in those plastic balls with holes
>>> in them so that my rather large cats would get some exercise. I'm not
>>> sure that this was ever effective, since I put treats in them to
>>> increase the cats' motivation, and the cats seemed to expect the treats
>>> in addition to their meals.
>>>
>> Seems sort of counter-productive for a vet to suggest since the cats
>> were already large and giving them treats even in a ball
>> toy/dispenser... you know what I mean. :)
>
> Possibly the original instructions were "food". I don't really remember
> exactly, but I had the idea that they'd use it more and get more
> exercise if food they really liked was placed in it.
>
>> Cinnamon will puzzle it out. :) But is that treat-ball working for
>> exercise or is it just a treat dispenser?
>
> Well, now, she certainly moves more when using the treat ball than she
> does when strolling over to the bowl on the floor, but whether it's
> enough more to count as exercise, I couldn't say! She doesn't get any
> other form of exercise than walking to and from her food and water or
> the litterbox.
>
>> Buffy is plump. I haven't been able to effect a change in her weight,
>> which is about 13 lbs. I'm sure I'm not over-feeding her, but then this
>> is only the second cat I've ever been owned by. Persia (RB) required
>> prescription food almost right off the bat.
>>
>> Buffy has a stout stubby body with short legs. Maybe she's supposed to
>> look like a little orange barrel with striped legs. ;)
>
> I think Cinnamon is currently a bit more than that, which makes her too
> big, even I have to admit that. When she and Sam were weighed by the vet
> a few years ago, I pointed out that at least she weighed less than Sam,
> and the vet replied "But she's got a shorter wheelbase!".
>
I like that term! A shorter wheelbase. ;) Yep, that describes Buffy.

> I tended to slip back into the habit of free-feeding them, and of course
> when Sam was sick, I was so anxious to get some food into him that I
> stopped worrying about diets. I'm trying again to feed Cinnamon only the
> recommended amount morning and evening, carefully measured out, well,
> plus a few treats. She doesn't much appreciate this approach to
> cat-feeding. That cat adores her food, and also sometimes moans that the
> food isn't quite good enough although if I hold out and leave it there,
> she eats it. Now that she's using the treat ball, maybe I'll put part of
> her measured allotment of dry food in it.
>
I understand completely. Persia had a really sensitive tummy and almost
from the start lots of health problems. Hence the expensive
prescription food.

I really didn't know what to do with Buffy. She was already a little
chubby when I adopted her. She gets a small portion of canned food
every day plus 1/2 a cup of dry, portioned out morning and evening. No
matter how much we play/exercise she is bound to be a chubby little cat.

Jill

Bastette
April 12th 16, 01:27 AM
jmcquown wrote:

> On 4/11/2016 12:24 PM, Cheryl wrote:

> I really didn't know what to do with Buffy. She was already a little
> chubby when I adopted her. She gets a small portion of canned food
> every day plus 1/2 a cup of dry, portioned out morning and evening. No
> matter how much we play/exercise she is bound to be a chubby little cat.

That might just be the case. If she's getting plenty of exercise and
not getting too much to eat, maybe that's just her normal size and shape.
Does she seem comfortable, physically? Does she move with ease? If so,
maybe she's in good health and you don't have to worry about it.

One thing you could consider, if you're not already doing so, is to
buy grain-free cat food. Cats do not need them, and grains could cause
unnecessary weight gain. I don't know if it's available where you live,
but you can definitely order online. It's not cheap, though, so I guess
it depends on your budget.

--
Joyce

There is no alternative to being yourself.

jmcquown[_2_]
April 12th 16, 03:27 AM
On 4/11/2016 8:27 PM, Bastette wrote:
> jmcquown wrote:
>
> > On 4/11/2016 12:24 PM, Cheryl wrote:
>
> > I really didn't know what to do with Buffy. She was already a little
> > chubby when I adopted her. She gets a small portion of canned food
> > every day plus 1/2 a cup of dry, portioned out morning and evening. No
> > matter how much we play/exercise she is bound to be a chubby little cat.
>
> That might just be the case. If she's getting plenty of exercise and
> not getting too much to eat, maybe that's just her normal size and shape.
> Does she seem comfortable, physically? Does she move with ease? If so,
> maybe she's in good health and you don't have to worry about it.
>
She seems very comfortable physically. Unlike Persia, who was
constantly horking up hairballs and seemed to have an upset tummy often,
Buffy is very healthy. She's just a round short-legged cat. ;)

> One thing you could consider, if you're not already doing so, is to
> buy grain-free cat food. Cats do not need them, and grains could cause
> unnecessary weight gain. I don't know if it's available where you live,
> but you can definitely order online. It's not cheap, though, so I guess
> it depends on your budget.
>
She likes her dry Purina One Indoor Advantage cat food. The first
ingredient is turkey. I don't think a half a cup of that a day is
excessive.

Jill

Bastette
April 12th 16, 06:41 PM
jmcquown wrote:

> Bastette wrote:

>> One thing you could consider, if you're not already doing so, is to
>> buy grain-free cat food. Cats do not need them, and grains could cause
>> unnecessary weight gain. I don't know if it's available where you live,
>> but you can definitely order online. It's not cheap, though, so I guess
>> it depends on your budget.

> She likes her dry Purina One Indoor Advantage cat food. The first
> ingredient is turkey. I don't think a half a cup of that a day is
> excessive.

If you don't think it's necessary for her to lose weight - and it sounds
like you don't - then my suggestion about grain-free food is moot.

--
Joyce

"Bacteria, with a few more bells and whistles."
-- Bonnie Bassler, describing human beings

MaryL[_2_]
April 12th 16, 09:17 PM
On 4/12/2016 12:41 PM, Bastette wrote:
> jmcquown wrote:
>
> > Bastette wrote:
>
> >> One thing you could consider, if you're not already doing so, is to
> >> buy grain-free cat food. Cats do not need them, and grains could cause
> >> unnecessary weight gain. I don't know if it's available where you live,
> >> but you can definitely order online. It's not cheap, though, so I guess
> >> it depends on your budget.
>
> > She likes her dry Purina One Indoor Advantage cat food. The first
> > ingredient is turkey. I don't think a half a cup of that a day is
> > excessive.
>
> If you don't think it's necessary for her to lose weight - and it sounds
> like you don't - then my suggestion about grain-free food is moot.
>
Actually, a suggestion for grain-free food is excellent, regardless of
weight. Cats are obligate carnivores and do not digest carbohydrates.
Also, cats that later develop diabetes are usually cats that have been
fed a diet of dry food.

MaryL

Cheryl[_3_]
April 13th 16, 02:40 AM
On 4/11/2016 6:09 AM, Cheryl wrote:
> A vet suggested to me that I put food in those plastic balls with holes
> in them so that my rather large cats would get some exercise. I'm not
> sure that this was ever effective, since I put treats in them to
> increase the cats' motivation, and the cats seemed to expect the treats
> in addition to their meals.
>
> Sam (RB) always took charge, and ensures that plenty of treats were
> removed from the ball, while Cinnamon lurked in the vicinity waiting to
> sneak a piece or two.
>
> I found a bag of cat treats after Sam died, and thought, well, I suppose
> I should see if Cinnamon can figure out how to get them. I put some in a
> ball - this one is almost like the one shown:
>
> http://www.drsfostersmith.com/images/products/swatches/st-17804-treat-ball-64922R.jpg
>
>
> http://tinyurl.com/jjm5s7p
>
> So Cinnamon hunkered down next to it and stared at it. You could almost
> see the wheels turning in her head. She started batting at it
> tentatively, pausing, thinking a bit, then patting it in a different
> way. I'm still not sure she quite understands why some patting produces
> treats and some doesn't (she's not exactly an Einstein of cats, tending
> more to beauty than brain), but she's managed to become quite efficient
> at getting treats!
>
Only one of my cats, Scarlett, figured it out. But Bonnie figured out
to follow her around and eat up the treats Scarlett knocked loose and
didn't get to in time. LOL


--
ღ.¸¸.✫*¨`*✶
Cheryl

Cheryl[_3_]
April 13th 16, 02:42 AM
On 4/11/2016 12:24 PM, Cheryl wrote:
>
> Possibly the original instructions were "food". I don't really remember
> exactly, but I had the idea that they'd use it more and get more
> exercise if food they really liked was placed in it.

For sure you can replace some of the food placed in the bowl into the
toy. So they still get the normal mealtime ritual but anything else they
have to work for. I think it's a great idea.

--
ღ.¸¸.✫*¨`*✶
Cheryl

Cheryl[_3_]
April 13th 16, 02:44 AM
On 4/11/2016 5:22 PM, jmcquown wrote:
>
> I really didn't know what to do with Buffy. She was already a little
> chubby when I adopted her. She gets a small portion of canned food
> every day plus 1/2 a cup of dry, portioned out morning and evening. No
> matter how much we play/exercise she is bound to be a chubby little cat.

My cats get canned too, but the only dry food is 1/4 cup in each of
their bowls, so 1/2 cup might just be way too much.

--
ღ.¸¸.✫*¨`*✶
Cheryl

Bastette
April 14th 16, 10:38 PM
MaryL wrote:

> On 4/12/2016 12:41 PM, Bastette wrote:

>> jmcquown wrote:

>>> Bastette wrote:

>>>> One thing you could consider, if you're not already doing so, is to
>>>> buy grain-free cat food.

>>> She likes her dry Purina One Indoor Advantage cat food. The first
>>> ingredient is turkey. I don't think a half a cup of that a day is
>>> excessive.

>> If you don't think it's necessary for her to lose weight - and it sounds
>> like you don't - then my suggestion about grain-free food is moot.

> Actually, a suggestion for grain-free food is excellent, regardless of
> weight. Cats are obligate carnivores and do not digest carbohydrates.
> Also, cats that later develop diabetes are usually cats that have been
> fed a diet of dry food.

I agree, but since Buffy likes her dry food, I didn't want to push that.

Licky eats only wet food, except occasionally when I'm out of town for more
than one night (which is quite rare these days). Then I leave some grain-
free dry food for him. That way, if my friend who comes to feed him is late,
he won't get hungry while waiting.

One good thing that's happened recently, which might be the result of having
an all-wet diet, is that he no longer has blood in his urine. At least, I'm
no longer seeing little droplets of blood near the litterbox and near his
food dish. He had that problem for *years*, and yes, I brought him to the
vet quite a few times for it. He didn't ever get a blockage, but it worried
me, and anyway, it was probably painful. The vet and I put it down to stress,
because he's a pretty skittish and easily frightened cat. I tried special
diets, but (1) he hated them, and (2) they didn't help. I don't think his
recovery is due to Roxy being gone because I noticed it before that.

--
Joyce

- Mommy loves you too my sweaty litter baby fire
- Ummm what mom?
- MY SWEET LITTLE BABY GIRL!! sorry honey!
-- damnyouautocorrect.com

MaryL[_2_]
April 15th 16, 12:37 AM
On 4/14/2016 4:38 PM, Bastette wrote:
> MaryL wrote:
>
> > On 4/12/2016 12:41 PM, Bastette wrote:
>
> >> jmcquown wrote:
>
> >>> Bastette wrote:
>
> >>>> One thing you could consider, if you're not already doing so, is to
> >>>> buy grain-free cat food.
>
> >>> She likes her dry Purina One Indoor Advantage cat food. The first
> >>> ingredient is turkey. I don't think a half a cup of that a day is
> >>> excessive.
>
> >> If you don't think it's necessary for her to lose weight - and it sounds
> >> like you don't - then my suggestion about grain-free food is moot.
>
> > Actually, a suggestion for grain-free food is excellent, regardless of
> > weight. Cats are obligate carnivores and do not digest carbohydrates.
> > Also, cats that later develop diabetes are usually cats that have been
> > fed a diet of dry food.
>
> I agree, but since Buffy likes her dry food, I didn't want to push that.
>
That comment was really meant for others on the NG who may not be aware
of the correlation between grains/dry food and diabetes. I realize that
Buffy's diet is pretty well set. Ironically, I have diabetes, and I can
see a direct correlation between carbs and spikes in my BG even on my
own meter.

> Licky eats only wet food, except occasionally when I'm out of town for more
> than one night (which is quite rare these days). Then I leave some grain-
> free dry food for him. That way, if my friend who comes to feed him is late,
> he won't get hungry while waiting.
>
My sister does that same thing. Even though she has a professional pet
sitting service, she worries that something could happen to prevent them
from getting to her house to take care of her furbabies.

> One good thing that's happened recently, which might be the result of having
> an all-wet diet, is that he no longer has blood in his urine. At least, I'm
> no longer seeing little droplets of blood near the litterbox and near his
> food dish. He had that problem for *years*, and yes, I brought him to the
> vet quite a few times for it. He didn't ever get a blockage, but it worried
> me, and anyway, it was probably painful. The vet and I put it down to stress,
> because he's a pretty skittish and easily frightened cat. I tried special
> diets, but (1) he hated them, and (2) they didn't help. I don't think his
> recovery is due to Roxy being gone because I noticed it before that.
>
That's good news. Years ago, I had a cat that had many instances of
bladder infection, and he did have blockage. The thing that helped the
most--and even completely stopped the problem--was to give him vitamin C
twice a day.

MaryL

Cheryl[_3_]
April 15th 16, 02:43 AM
On 4/14/2016 5:38 PM, Bastette wrote:

> One good thing that's happened recently, which might be the result of having
> an all-wet diet, is that he no longer has blood in his urine. At least, I'm
> no longer seeing little droplets of blood near the litterbox and near his
> food dish. He had that problem for*years*, and yes, I brought him to the
> vet quite a few times for it.

That is fantastic and a good reason for more moisture filled food! Good
going meowmie!!


--
ღ.¸¸.✫*¨`*✶
Cheryl

jmcquown[_2_]
April 16th 16, 03:35 PM
On 4/12/2016 9:44 PM, Cheryl wrote:
> On 4/11/2016 5:22 PM, jmcquown wrote:
>>
>> I really didn't know what to do with Buffy. She was already a little
>> chubby when I adopted her. She gets a small portion of canned food
>> every day plus 1/2 a cup of dry, portioned out morning and evening. No
>> matter how much we play/exercise she is bound to be a chubby little cat.
>
> My cats get canned too, but the only dry food is 1/4 cup in each of
> their bowls, so 1/2 cup might just be way too much.
>
Thanks, Cheryl. Persia had to have prescription food and only got Fancy
Feast as a treat once a week (she would NOT eat the canned Rx food).

I am still a newbie when it comes to feeding a cat with no health
problems. :)

I've been giving Buffy a 1/2 can of Sheba in the morning and 1/4 cup of
Purina One Indoor dry. Then I give her another 1/4 cup for nighttime
grazing. Maybe I should give her the other half of the can in the
evening and skip the over-night kibble.

I'm still learning.

Jill

dgk
April 17th 16, 03:28 AM
On Mon, 11 Apr 2016 07:39:19 -0230, Cheryl >
wrote:

>A vet suggested to me that I put food in those plastic balls with holes
>in them so that my rather large cats would get some exercise. I'm not
>sure that this was ever effective, since I put treats in them to
>increase the cats' motivation, and the cats seemed to expect the treats
>in addition to their meals.
>
>Sam (RB) always took charge, and ensures that plenty of treats were
>removed from the ball, while Cinnamon lurked in the vicinity waiting to
>sneak a piece or two.
>
>I found a bag of cat treats after Sam died, and thought, well, I suppose
>I should see if Cinnamon can figure out how to get them. I put some in a
>ball - this one is almost like the one shown:
>
>http://www.drsfostersmith.com/images/products/swatches/st-17804-treat-ball-64922R.jpg
>
>http://tinyurl.com/jjm5s7p
>
>So Cinnamon hunkered down next to it and stared at it. You could almost
>see the wheels turning in her head. She started batting at it
>tentatively, pausing, thinking a bit, then patting it in a different
>way. I'm still not sure she quite understands why some patting produces
>treats and some doesn't (she's not exactly an Einstein of cats, tending
>more to beauty than brain), but she's managed to become quite efficient
>at getting treats!

Three* of my four cats are addicted to Temptations. And they now sell
a little dispenser type thing for the Temptations and when I fill it
and leave it on the floor, it's only a short period of time before one
of them has batted it all over the floor and eaten the Temptations.

* Scooter is the one that is immune to Temptations. He sniffs at them.
Stares at them. He knows that the other cats go crazy for them. But
then he walks away.