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Cheryl[_6_]
June 14th 16, 12:01 PM
I felt ready around the May 24 holiday weekend to think about getting a
new cat. I visited the local city shelter. They had SO many to choose
from! I finally put in a request for a little black DSH girl about 2
years old named Kerry, who'd been turned in as a stray fairly recently.
They wouldn't release her until their vet had given her final OK, which
couldn't happen until after the holiday weekend. By that time, she (the
cat, not the vet!) was sneezing, and diagnosed with cat flu! They said I
could pick another cat (presumably one without cat flu) or wait for
Kerry, but they didn't want me to take Kerry then because I had an old
cat at home who might get quite sick if she picked up cat flu. So last
week, when Kerry finally got her health clearance, I brought her home.
She's a real sweetie, very friendly, and hasn't fought with Cinnamon,
although they don't get very close to each other either, and there's
some hissing. I had her to a regular vet (not the shelter one) yesterday
because this vet wanted to see her before scheduling her spay. She
passed the physical, and the spay was scheduled for Friday. I was
shocked at how much the spay will be, but then I realized just how long
it was since I'd paid for one. Sam was neutered, which of course, is
cheaper than spaying, and the shelter I got Cinnamon from spayed her for
me. So the last spay I paid for must have been Betsy (RB) back in 1990
or 1991. It's now around $300-400 CDN, not including taxes and not
including additional charges if, for example, she ends up being in heat
when I bring her in, or there are other complications - and not
including the initial checkup (which I got a little discount on since I
got Kerry from a shelter)!

There is a low-cost spay/neuter program in my city, but I earn too much
to qualify for it. It makes sense that those of us fortunate enough to
have steady jobs pay our own way - but I'm a bit started to discover
that I am now one of those people old enough to have 20-30 year old
prices stuck in my head. I used to think elderly relatives were so out
of touch when they thought things were terribly expensive because they
hadn't actually bought those things in many years.


--
Cheryl

June 14th 16, 01:05 PM
On Tue, 14 Jun 2016 08:31:33 -0230, Cheryl >
wrote:

>I felt ready around the May 24 holiday weekend to think about getting a
>new cat. I visited the local city shelter. They had SO many to choose
>from! I finally put in a request for a little black DSH girl about 2
>years old named Kerry, who'd been turned in as a stray fairly recently.
>They wouldn't release her until their vet had given her final OK, which
>couldn't happen until after the holiday weekend. By that time, she (the
>cat, not the vet!) was sneezing, and diagnosed with cat flu! They said I
>could pick another cat (presumably one without cat flu) or wait for
>Kerry, but they didn't want me to take Kerry then because I had an old
>cat at home who might get quite sick if she picked up cat flu. So last
>week, when Kerry finally got her health clearance, I brought her home.
>She's a real sweetie, very friendly, and hasn't fought with Cinnamon,
>although they don't get very close to each other either, and there's
>some hissing. I had her to a regular vet (not the shelter one) yesterday
>because this vet wanted to see her before scheduling her spay. She
>passed the physical, and the spay was scheduled for Friday. I was
>shocked at how much the spay will be, but then I realized just how long
>it was since I'd paid for one. Sam was neutered, which of course, is
>cheaper than spaying, and the shelter I got Cinnamon from spayed her for
>me. So the last spay I paid for must have been Betsy (RB) back in 1990
>or 1991. It's now around $300-400 CDN, not including taxes and not
>including additional charges if, for example, she ends up being in heat
>when I bring her in, or there are other complications - and not
>including the initial checkup (which I got a little discount on since I
>got Kerry from a shelter)!
>
>There is a low-cost spay/neuter program in my city, but I earn too much
>to qualify for it. It makes sense that those of us fortunate enough to
>have steady jobs pay our own way - but I'm a bit started to discover
>that I am now one of those people old enough to have 20-30 year old
>prices stuck in my head. I used to think elderly relatives were so out
>of touch when they thought things were terribly expensive because they
>hadn't actually bought those things in many years.

I have argued this with a vet friend, that they are part of the feral
cat problem because they charge so much. It is not complex surgery.
Years ago I was in the OR as such with my Peke whom the vet knew
panicked if I wasn't there when she woke. He knew me well enough to
know I wouldn't freak.

What interested me was the other table in there - the girl comes in
with a female cat, puts her under, shaves her tum etc. even opens up.
The partner comes in, he is a qualified vet, removes the uterus etc.
and leaves. The girl closes her up and stitches. Ten minutes at
best.

I was lucky that my new cat who came to me in late December had
already been chipped and spayed by a Toronto shelter. She came here
with her first family but was not nice with the baby and so they found
me and Winnie, is now mine! I'm glad I didn't have to pay that sort
of price.

MaryL[_2_]
June 14th 16, 03:04 PM
On 6/14/2016 6:01 AM, Cheryl wrote:
> I felt ready around the May 24 holiday weekend to think about getting a
> new cat. I visited the local city shelter. They had SO many to choose
> from! I finally put in a request for a little black DSH girl about 2
> years old named Kerry, who'd been turned in as a stray fairly recently.
> They wouldn't release her until their vet had given her final OK, which
> couldn't happen until after the holiday weekend. By that time, she (the
> cat, not the vet!) was sneezing, and diagnosed with cat flu! They said I
> could pick another cat (presumably one without cat flu) or wait for
> Kerry, but they didn't want me to take Kerry then because I had an old
> cat at home who might get quite sick if she picked up cat flu. So last
> week, when Kerry finally got her health clearance, I brought her home.
> She's a real sweetie, very friendly, and hasn't fought with Cinnamon,
> although they don't get very close to each other either, and there's
> some hissing. I had her to a regular vet (not the shelter one) yesterday
> because this vet wanted to see her before scheduling her spay. She
> passed the physical, and the spay was scheduled for Friday. I was
> shocked at how much the spay will be, but then I realized just how long
> it was since I'd paid for one. Sam was neutered, which of course, is
> cheaper than spaying, and the shelter I got Cinnamon from spayed her for
> me. So the last spay I paid for must have been Betsy (RB) back in 1990
> or 1991. It's now around $300-400 CDN, not including taxes and not
> including additional
<snip>
>
Concatulations! I hope this will be "the beginning of a beautiful
friendship" (as said in "Casablanca") and a very long one.

I agree that some vets contribute to the feral problem when they charge
so much for a simple procedure. I was fortunate with my adoptions. I
paid $75.00 each for Nikki and Selina because the rescue group I adopted
them from charge that flat fee (male or female), which includes spay or
neuter, microchip, vetting and vaccinations, and care for as long as
they have the cat. That amount, of course, does not even begin to cover
the cost of that type of extensive care. I have sometimes told people
that Duffy was the best investment I ever made. I adopted him from a
shelter in a nearby town, and he was only $25.00 because he had been
previously adopted with neutering paid for by that couple.

How is Sammy? I often think of him and hope everything is going well.

MaryL

Cheryl[_6_]
June 14th 16, 03:48 PM
On 2016-06-14 11:34 AM, MaryL wrote:

> Concatulations! I hope this will be "the beginning of a beautiful
> friendship" (as said in "Casablanca") and a very long one.
>
> I agree that some vets contribute to the feral problem when they charge
> so much for a simple procedure. I was fortunate with my adoptions. I
> paid $75.00 each for Nikki and Selina because the rescue group I adopted
> them from charge that flat fee (male or female), which includes spay or
> neuter, microchip, vetting and vaccinations, and care for as long as
> they have the cat. That amount, of course, does not even begin to cover
> the cost of that type of extensive care. I have sometimes told people
> that Duffy was the best investment I ever made. I adopted him from a
> shelter in a nearby town, and he was only $25.00 because he had been
> previously adopted with neutering paid for by that couple.
>
> How is Sammy? I often think of him and hope everything is going well.

Poor Sammy died in March from his kidney problems. They progressed very
quickly - he was actually in the vet clinic for some supportive
treatment when he died, a little over a week after diagnosis. At first I
didn't want another cat, but I changed my mind, sooner than I had expected.

Cinnamon's doing fine, although she's a bit annoyed at the interloper.

The city shelter, where I found Kerry, charges $120 per cat. That
doesn't include spay/neuter, but I was impressed by their care for the
cats. It's not a fancy building, but it's clean, with outside runs for
some of the rooms, and they have a vet on staff and keep good records.
Kerry was checked over, tested for Felv and something else I don't
remember, de-wormed, de-flea'd, and got her first vaccination. She would
have been given a booster, but she got cat flu, and they wouldn't give
her a live vaccine until she was thoroughly recovered, so that's
something I need to do. They microchipped her, too, and gave me a
booklet of instructions on how to care for a cat, one of those shopping
bags with a logo, and a generous plastic bag of the food she was used to
eating. It turns out that she'll eat anything and everything, but the
bag of food was a nice idea.

My previous cats have generally been some version of "free to good home"
so I paid for everything, but Cinnamon was left at the SPCA shelter, and
the SPCA spayed her and gave her to me for free. I think they were
over-run with cats and thought they were unlikely to find another home
for an adult cat that they did a bit more than they usually do. She does
have her "papers" - the documents I signed saying if I ever can't keep
her, she goes back to the SPCA.


--
Cheryl

MaryL[_2_]
June 14th 16, 04:14 PM
On 6/14/2016 9:48 AM, Cheryl wrote:
> On 2016-06-14 11:34 AM, MaryL wrote:
>
>> Concatulations! I hope this will be "the beginning of a beautiful
>> friendship" (as said in "Casablanca") and a very long one.
>>
>> I agree that some vets contribute to the feral problem when they charge
>> so much for a simple procedure. I was fortunate with my adoptions. I
>> paid $75.00 each for Nikki and Selina because the rescue group I adopted
>> them from charge that flat fee (male or female), which includes spay or
>> neuter, microchip, vetting and vaccinations, and care for as long as
>> they have the cat. That amount, of course, does not even begin to cover
>> the cost of that type of extensive care. I have sometimes told people
>> that Duffy was the best investment I ever made. I adopted him from a
>> shelter in a nearby town, and he was only $25.00 because he had been
>> previously adopted with neutering paid for by that couple.
>>
>> How is Sammy? I often think of him and hope everything is going well.
>
> Poor Sammy died in March from his kidney problems. They progressed very
> quickly - he was actually in the vet clinic for some supportive
> treatment when he died, a little over a week after diagnosis. At first I
> didn't want another cat, but I changed my mind, sooner than I had expected.
>
> Cinnamon's doing fine, although she's a bit annoyed at the interloper.
>
> The city shelter, where I found Kerry, charges $120 per cat. That
> doesn't include spay/neuter, but I was impressed by their care for the
> cats. It's not a fancy building, but it's clean, with outside runs for
> some of the rooms, and they have a vet on staff and keep good records.
> Kerry was checked over, tested for Felv and something else I don't
> remember, de-wormed, de-flea'd, and got her first vaccination. She would
> have been given a booster, but she got cat flu, and they wouldn't give
> her a live vaccine until she was thoroughly recovered, so that's
> something I need to do. They microchipped her, too, and gave me a
> booklet of instructions on how to care for a cat, one of those shopping
> bags with a logo, and a generous plastic bag of the food she was used to
> eating. It turns out that she'll eat anything and everything, but the
> bag of food was a nice idea.
>
> My previous cats have generally been some version of "free to good home"
> so I paid for everything, but Cinnamon was left at the SPCA shelter, and
> the SPCA spayed her and gave her to me for free. I think they were
> over-run with cats and thought they were unlikely to find another home
> for an adult cat that they did a bit more than they usually do. She does
> have her "papers" - the documents I signed saying if I ever can't keep
> her, she goes back to the SPCA.
>
>
Oh, I'm so sorry to hear about Sammy(RB). I don't know how I missed
that. He was lucky to have you to care for him.

I will try to keep up more with your cats. I have followed your
messages about your back and hope to hear better news there.

MaryL

Cheryl[_6_]
June 14th 16, 04:26 PM
On 2016-06-14 12:44 PM, MaryL wrote:
> On 6/14/2016 9:48 AM, Cheryl wrote:
>> On 2016-06-14 11:34 AM, MaryL wrote:
>>
>>> Concatulations! I hope this will be "the beginning of a beautiful
>>> friendship" (as said in "Casablanca") and a very long one.
>>>
>>> I agree that some vets contribute to the feral problem when they charge
>>> so much for a simple procedure. I was fortunate with my adoptions. I
>>> paid $75.00 each for Nikki and Selina because the rescue group I adopted
>>> them from charge that flat fee (male or female), which includes spay or
>>> neuter, microchip, vetting and vaccinations, and care for as long as
>>> they have the cat. That amount, of course, does not even begin to cover
>>> the cost of that type of extensive care. I have sometimes told people
>>> that Duffy was the best investment I ever made. I adopted him from a
>>> shelter in a nearby town, and he was only $25.00 because he had been
>>> previously adopted with neutering paid for by that couple.
>>>
>>> How is Sammy? I often think of him and hope everything is going well.
>>
>> Poor Sammy died in March from his kidney problems. They progressed very
>> quickly - he was actually in the vet clinic for some supportive
>> treatment when he died, a little over a week after diagnosis. At first I
>> didn't want another cat, but I changed my mind, sooner than I had
>> expected.
>>
>> Cinnamon's doing fine, although she's a bit annoyed at the interloper.
>>
>> The city shelter, where I found Kerry, charges $120 per cat. That
>> doesn't include spay/neuter, but I was impressed by their care for the
>> cats. It's not a fancy building, but it's clean, with outside runs for
>> some of the rooms, and they have a vet on staff and keep good records.
>> Kerry was checked over, tested for Felv and something else I don't
>> remember, de-wormed, de-flea'd, and got her first vaccination. She would
>> have been given a booster, but she got cat flu, and they wouldn't give
>> her a live vaccine until she was thoroughly recovered, so that's
>> something I need to do. They microchipped her, too, and gave me a
>> booklet of instructions on how to care for a cat, one of those shopping
>> bags with a logo, and a generous plastic bag of the food she was used to
>> eating. It turns out that she'll eat anything and everything, but the
>> bag of food was a nice idea.
>>
>> My previous cats have generally been some version of "free to good home"
>> so I paid for everything, but Cinnamon was left at the SPCA shelter, and
>> the SPCA spayed her and gave her to me for free. I think they were
>> over-run with cats and thought they were unlikely to find another home
>> for an adult cat that they did a bit more than they usually do. She does
>> have her "papers" - the documents I signed saying if I ever can't keep
>> her, she goes back to the SPCA.
>>
>>
> Oh, I'm so sorry to hear about Sammy(RB). I don't know how I missed
> that. He was lucky to have you to care for him.
>
> I will try to keep up more with your cats. I have followed your
> messages about your back and hope to hear better news there.
>
> MaryL
>
I think you're confusing me with the other Cheryl! I'm the one from Canada.

--
Cheryl

MaryL[_2_]
June 14th 16, 04:41 PM
> I think you're confusing me with the other Cheryl! I'm the one from Canada.
>
Oh, you're right. I should know to check more closely. Thanks for
letting me know.

MaryL

The New Other Guy
June 14th 16, 05:05 PM
On Tue, 14 Jun 2016 08:31:33 -0230, Cheryl > wrote:

>There is a low-cost spay/neuter program in my city, but I earn too much
>to qualify for it. It makes sense that those of us fortunate enough to
>have steady jobs pay our own way - but I'm a bit started to discover
>that I am now one of those people old enough to have 20-30 year old
>prices stuck in my head. I used to think elderly relatives were so out
>of touch when they thought things were terribly expensive because they
>hadn't actually bought those things in many years.

It's nice that you have another kittie friend.

I'd love to have another, but doubt GLyN would tolerate it.

And while you're unhappy with the cost now, it WON'T be that
long before you may be even LESS happy, because you'll start
getting offered the senior discounts, without even asking.

The New Other Guy
June 14th 16, 05:23 PM
On Tue, 14 Jun 2016 12:18:32 -0230, Cheryl > wrote:

>The city shelter, where I found Kerry, charges $120 per cat. That
>doesn't include spay/neuter,

Many local shelters here do the spay/neuter before adoption.
Others are part of a partnership with local Vets who do them
for reduced fees, along with a general checkup, as part of
the adoption process


And the cost here is less than yours, especially when they're
trying to clear out things when they're fuller than they like.

The fee at the County shelters for dog is $69, $58 for cats,
but drops to $35 for a 'senior' animal (5 years old or more).

Then there are other specials a few times a year.

And there is also the Humane Society, Helen Woodward Center,
and other private shelters.

The Humane Society/SPCA has NO fee for Senior adopters (55+),
but their costs before then are higher than the County
shelters.

June 14th 16, 07:00 PM
On Tue, 14 Jun 2016 12:56:25 -0230, Cheryl >
wrote:

>On 2016-06-14 12:44 PM, MaryL wrote:
>> On 6/14/2016 9:48 AM, Cheryl wrote:
>>> On 2016-06-14 11:34 AM, MaryL wrote:
>>>
>>>> Concatulations! I hope this will be "the beginning of a beautiful
>>>> friendship" (as said in "Casablanca") and a very long one.
>>>>
>>>> I agree that some vets contribute to the feral problem when they charge
>>>> so much for a simple procedure. I was fortunate with my adoptions. I
>>>> paid $75.00 each for Nikki and Selina because the rescue group I adopted
>>>> them from charge that flat fee (male or female), which includes spay or
>>>> neuter, microchip, vetting and vaccinations, and care for as long as
>>>> they have the cat. That amount, of course, does not even begin to cover
>>>> the cost of that type of extensive care. I have sometimes told people
>>>> that Duffy was the best investment I ever made. I adopted him from a
>>>> shelter in a nearby town, and he was only $25.00 because he had been
>>>> previously adopted with neutering paid for by that couple.
>>>>
>>>> How is Sammy? I often think of him and hope everything is going well.
>>>
>>> Poor Sammy died in March from his kidney problems. They progressed very
>>> quickly - he was actually in the vet clinic for some supportive
>>> treatment when he died, a little over a week after diagnosis. At first I
>>> didn't want another cat, but I changed my mind, sooner than I had
>>> expected.
>>>
>>> Cinnamon's doing fine, although she's a bit annoyed at the interloper.
>>>
>>> The city shelter, where I found Kerry, charges $120 per cat. That
>>> doesn't include spay/neuter, but I was impressed by their care for the
>>> cats. It's not a fancy building, but it's clean, with outside runs for
>>> some of the rooms, and they have a vet on staff and keep good records.
>>> Kerry was checked over, tested for Felv and something else I don't
>>> remember, de-wormed, de-flea'd, and got her first vaccination. She would
>>> have been given a booster, but she got cat flu, and they wouldn't give
>>> her a live vaccine until she was thoroughly recovered, so that's
>>> something I need to do. They microchipped her, too, and gave me a
>>> booklet of instructions on how to care for a cat, one of those shopping
>>> bags with a logo, and a generous plastic bag of the food she was used to
>>> eating. It turns out that she'll eat anything and everything, but the
>>> bag of food was a nice idea.
>>>
>>> My previous cats have generally been some version of "free to good home"
>>> so I paid for everything, but Cinnamon was left at the SPCA shelter, and
>>> the SPCA spayed her and gave her to me for free. I think they were
>>> over-run with cats and thought they were unlikely to find another home
>>> for an adult cat that they did a bit more than they usually do. She does
>>> have her "papers" - the documents I signed saying if I ever can't keep
>>> her, she goes back to the SPCA.
>>>
>>>
>> Oh, I'm so sorry to hear about Sammy(RB). I don't know how I missed
>> that. He was lucky to have you to care for him.
>>
>> I will try to keep up more with your cats. I have followed your
>> messages about your back and hope to hear better news there.
>>
>> MaryL
>>
>I think you're confusing me with the other Cheryl! I'm the one from Canada.

Cheryl, did I know you from a needlework group light years ago?

jmcquown[_2_]
June 14th 16, 10:33 PM
On 6/14/2016 7:01 AM, Cheryl wrote:
> I felt ready around the May 24 holiday weekend to think about getting a
> new cat. I visited the local city shelter. They had SO many to choose
> from! I finally put in a request for a little black DSH girl about 2
> years old named Kerry, who'd been turned in as a stray fairly recently.
> They wouldn't release her until their vet had given her final OK, which
> couldn't happen until after the holiday weekend. By that time, she (the
> cat, not the vet!) was sneezing, and diagnosed with cat flu! They said I
> could pick another cat (presumably one without cat flu) or wait for
> Kerry, but they didn't want me to take Kerry then because I had an old
> cat at home who might get quite sick if she picked up cat flu. So last
> week, when Kerry finally got her health clearance, I brought her home.
> She's a real sweetie, very friendly, and hasn't fought with Cinnamon,
> although they don't get very close to each other either, and there's
> some hissing. I had her to a regular vet (not the shelter one) yesterday
> because this vet wanted to see her before scheduling her spay. She
> passed the physical, and the spay was scheduled for Friday. I was
> shocked at how much the spay will be, but then I realized just how long
> it was since I'd paid for one. Sam was neutered, which of course, is
> cheaper than spaying, and the shelter I got Cinnamon from spayed her for
> me. So the last spay I paid for must have been Betsy (RB) back in 1990
> or 1991. It's now around $300-400 CDN, not including taxes and not
> including additional charges if, for example, she ends up being in heat
> when I bring her in, or there are other complications - and not
> including the initial checkup (which I got a little discount on since I
> got Kerry from a shelter)!
>
> There is a low-cost spay/neuter program in my city, but I earn too much
> to qualify for it. It makes sense that those of us fortunate enough to
> have steady jobs pay our own way - but I'm a bit started to discover
> that I am now one of those people old enough to have 20-30 year old
> prices stuck in my head. I used to think elderly relatives were so out
> of touch when they thought things were terribly expensive because they
> hadn't actually bought those things in many years.
>
>
Congrats on the new furbaby. :)

I agree about vets charging high rates for things. I was absolutely
stunned when I took Persia (RB 2014) for that sad, final trip. The vet
ran a blood panel before doing the deed. (I am not sure why she did;
Persia was in end-stage renal failure. I wasn't really thinking
clearly.) did NOT expect to be charged over $700 to end her suffering. :(

Jill

Cheryl[_5_]
June 14th 16, 11:28 PM
On 2016-06-14 7:03 PM, jmcquown wrote:
> On 6/14/2016 7:01 AM, Cheryl wrote:
>> I felt ready around the May 24 holiday weekend to think about getting a
>> new cat. I visited the local city shelter. They had SO many to choose
>> from! I finally put in a request for a little black DSH girl about 2
>> years old named Kerry, who'd been turned in as a stray fairly recently.
>> They wouldn't release her until their vet had given her final OK, which
>> couldn't happen until after the holiday weekend. By that time, she (the
>> cat, not the vet!) was sneezing, and diagnosed with cat flu! They said I
>> could pick another cat (presumably one without cat flu) or wait for
>> Kerry, but they didn't want me to take Kerry then because I had an old
>> cat at home who might get quite sick if she picked up cat flu. So last
>> week, when Kerry finally got her health clearance, I brought her home.
>> She's a real sweetie, very friendly, and hasn't fought with Cinnamon,
>> although they don't get very close to each other either, and there's
>> some hissing. I had her to a regular vet (not the shelter one) yesterday
>> because this vet wanted to see her before scheduling her spay. She
>> passed the physical, and the spay was scheduled for Friday. I was
>> shocked at how much the spay will be, but then I realized just how long
>> it was since I'd paid for one. Sam was neutered, which of course, is
>> cheaper than spaying, and the shelter I got Cinnamon from spayed her for
>> me. So the last spay I paid for must have been Betsy (RB) back in 1990
>> or 1991. It's now around $300-400 CDN, not including taxes and not
>> including additional charges if, for example, she ends up being in heat
>> when I bring her in, or there are other complications - and not
>> including the initial checkup (which I got a little discount on since I
>> got Kerry from a shelter)!
>>
>> There is a low-cost spay/neuter program in my city, but I earn too much
>> to qualify for it. It makes sense that those of us fortunate enough to
>> have steady jobs pay our own way - but I'm a bit started to discover
>> that I am now one of those people old enough to have 20-30 year old
>> prices stuck in my head. I used to think elderly relatives were so out
>> of touch when they thought things were terribly expensive because they
>> hadn't actually bought those things in many years.
>>
>>
> Congrats on the new furbaby. :)
>
> I agree about vets charging high rates for things. I was absolutely
> stunned when I took Persia (RB 2014) for that sad, final trip. The vet
> ran a blood panel before doing the deed. (I am not sure why she did;
> Persia was in end-stage renal failure. I wasn't really thinking
> clearly.) did NOT expect to be charged over $700 to end her suffering. :(

I paid a bit for Sam's care although he didn't live long enough for me
to have to euthanize him. At the time I added it all up, but I've put it
out of my mind now and can only remember that it was in the high 3
figures. And I was astonished at the amount charged for cremation. I
must say that the clinic not only laid out exactly what all the options
would cost, but insisted I sign an estimate before they did anything.

--
Cheryl

---
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MaryL[_2_]
June 14th 16, 11:34 PM
On 6/14/2016 4:33 PM, jmcquown wrote:
>
> I agree about vets charging high rates for things. I was absolutely
> stunned when I took Persia (RB 2014) for that sad, final trip. The vet
> ran a blood panel before doing the deed. (I am not sure why she did;
> Persia was in end-stage renal failure. I wasn't really thinking
> clearly.) did NOT expect to be charged over $700 to end her suffering. :(
>
> Jill

That's outrageous. I paid about $300 for Holly's final trip, but most
of that was because I had her cremated and arranged to have her own
cremains returned to me. They are now scattered around a holly shrub
that is planted right outside a window that was one of Holly's favorite
windows. She would lie on top of a sofa that sits beside the window.

MaryL

Cheryl[_5_]
June 14th 16, 11:42 PM
On 2016-06-14 3:30 PM, wrote:
> On Tue, 14 Jun 2016 12:56:25 -0230, Cheryl >
> wrote:
>
>> On 2016-06-14 12:44 PM, MaryL wrote:
>>> On 6/14/2016 9:48 AM, Cheryl wrote:
>>>> On 2016-06-14 11:34 AM, MaryL wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Concatulations! I hope this will be "the beginning of a beautiful
>>>>> friendship" (as said in "Casablanca") and a very long one.
>>>>>
>>>>> I agree that some vets contribute to the feral problem when they charge
>>>>> so much for a simple procedure. I was fortunate with my adoptions. I
>>>>> paid $75.00 each for Nikki and Selina because the rescue group I adopted
>>>>> them from charge that flat fee (male or female), which includes spay or
>>>>> neuter, microchip, vetting and vaccinations, and care for as long as
>>>>> they have the cat. That amount, of course, does not even begin to cover
>>>>> the cost of that type of extensive care. I have sometimes told people
>>>>> that Duffy was the best investment I ever made. I adopted him from a
>>>>> shelter in a nearby town, and he was only $25.00 because he had been
>>>>> previously adopted with neutering paid for by that couple.
>>>>>
>>>>> How is Sammy? I often think of him and hope everything is going well.
>>>>
>>>> Poor Sammy died in March from his kidney problems. They progressed very
>>>> quickly - he was actually in the vet clinic for some supportive
>>>> treatment when he died, a little over a week after diagnosis. At first I
>>>> didn't want another cat, but I changed my mind, sooner than I had
>>>> expected.
>>>>
>>>> Cinnamon's doing fine, although she's a bit annoyed at the interloper.
>>>>
>>>> The city shelter, where I found Kerry, charges $120 per cat. That
>>>> doesn't include spay/neuter, but I was impressed by their care for the
>>>> cats. It's not a fancy building, but it's clean, with outside runs for
>>>> some of the rooms, and they have a vet on staff and keep good records.
>>>> Kerry was checked over, tested for Felv and something else I don't
>>>> remember, de-wormed, de-flea'd, and got her first vaccination. She would
>>>> have been given a booster, but she got cat flu, and they wouldn't give
>>>> her a live vaccine until she was thoroughly recovered, so that's
>>>> something I need to do. They microchipped her, too, and gave me a
>>>> booklet of instructions on how to care for a cat, one of those shopping
>>>> bags with a logo, and a generous plastic bag of the food she was used to
>>>> eating. It turns out that she'll eat anything and everything, but the
>>>> bag of food was a nice idea.
>>>>
>>>> My previous cats have generally been some version of "free to good home"
>>>> so I paid for everything, but Cinnamon was left at the SPCA shelter, and
>>>> the SPCA spayed her and gave her to me for free. I think they were
>>>> over-run with cats and thought they were unlikely to find another home
>>>> for an adult cat that they did a bit more than they usually do. She does
>>>> have her "papers" - the documents I signed saying if I ever can't keep
>>>> her, she goes back to the SPCA.
>>>>
>>>>
>>> Oh, I'm so sorry to hear about Sammy(RB). I don't know how I missed
>>> that. He was lucky to have you to care for him.
>>>
>>> I will try to keep up more with your cats. I have followed your
>>> messages about your back and hope to hear better news there.
>>>
>>> MaryL
>>>
>> I think you're confusing me with the other Cheryl! I'm the one from Canada.
>
> Cheryl, did I know you from a needlework group light years ago?
>
You might. I did follow and sometimes post in a needlework group oh,
eons ago. I can't even remember the name, and I've kind of gotten out of
needlework over the years, although I sometimes think I should take it
up again, maybe starting with finishing a knitting project. The child it
was originally intended for now has children of her own - if I remember
correctly who the original intended recipient was, after all this time.

--
Cheryl

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Cheryl[_5_]
June 14th 16, 11:48 PM
On 2016-06-14 1:53 PM, The New Other Guy wrote:
> On Tue, 14 Jun 2016 12:18:32 -0230, Cheryl > wrote:
>
>> The city shelter, where I found Kerry, charges $120 per cat. That
>> doesn't include spay/neuter,
>
> Many local shelters here do the spay/neuter before adoption.
> Others are part of a partnership with local Vets who do them
> for reduced fees, along with a general checkup, as part of
> the adoption process
>
>
> And the cost here is less than yours, especially when they're
> trying to clear out things when they're fuller than they like.
>
> The fee at the County shelters for dog is $69, $58 for cats,
> but drops to $35 for a 'senior' animal (5 years old or more).
>
> Then there are other specials a few times a year.
>
> And there is also the Humane Society, Helen Woodward Center,
> and other private shelters.
>
> The Humane Society/SPCA has NO fee for Senior adopters (55+),
> but their costs before then are higher than the County
> shelters.

I think one of the reasons the SPCA was so unusually generous in spaying
Cinnamon before they let me have her was that she was an older cat and
there were lots of other kittens and younger cats looking for homes at
the time.

I don't think being a senior alone in enough to give you a discount
around here. They do get to benefit from the low-cost spay and neuter
program, but only if their income is very low. They don't say exactly
how low, but they need to be in receipt of a particular income
supplement intended, here in Canada to help out seniors with very few if
any other resources. I always think about a typical recipient as being
an elderly widow who never worked outside the home and whose late
husband worked at a low-paying job without a private pension plan so
even her government widow's benefit is low.

--
Cheryl

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June 15th 16, 12:00 AM
On Tue, 14 Jun 2016 20:12:19 -0230, Cheryl > wrote:

>On 2016-06-14 3:30 PM, wrote:
>> On Tue, 14 Jun 2016 12:56:25 -0230, Cheryl >
>> wrote:
>>
>>> On 2016-06-14 12:44 PM, MaryL wrote:
>>>> On 6/14/2016 9:48 AM, Cheryl wrote:
>>>>> On 2016-06-14 11:34 AM, MaryL wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Concatulations! I hope this will be "the beginning of a beautiful
>>>>>> friendship" (as said in "Casablanca") and a very long one.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I agree that some vets contribute to the feral problem when they charge
>>>>>> so much for a simple procedure. I was fortunate with my adoptions. I
>>>>>> paid $75.00 each for Nikki and Selina because the rescue group I adopted
>>>>>> them from charge that flat fee (male or female), which includes spay or
>>>>>> neuter, microchip, vetting and vaccinations, and care for as long as
>>>>>> they have the cat. That amount, of course, does not even begin to cover
>>>>>> the cost of that type of extensive care. I have sometimes told people
>>>>>> that Duffy was the best investment I ever made. I adopted him from a
>>>>>> shelter in a nearby town, and he was only $25.00 because he had been
>>>>>> previously adopted with neutering paid for by that couple.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> How is Sammy? I often think of him and hope everything is going well.
>>>>>
>>>>> Poor Sammy died in March from his kidney problems. They progressed very
>>>>> quickly - he was actually in the vet clinic for some supportive
>>>>> treatment when he died, a little over a week after diagnosis. At first I
>>>>> didn't want another cat, but I changed my mind, sooner than I had
>>>>> expected.
>>>>>
>>>>> Cinnamon's doing fine, although she's a bit annoyed at the interloper.
>>>>>
>>>>> The city shelter, where I found Kerry, charges $120 per cat. That
>>>>> doesn't include spay/neuter, but I was impressed by their care for the
>>>>> cats. It's not a fancy building, but it's clean, with outside runs for
>>>>> some of the rooms, and they have a vet on staff and keep good records.
>>>>> Kerry was checked over, tested for Felv and something else I don't
>>>>> remember, de-wormed, de-flea'd, and got her first vaccination. She would
>>>>> have been given a booster, but she got cat flu, and they wouldn't give
>>>>> her a live vaccine until she was thoroughly recovered, so that's
>>>>> something I need to do. They microchipped her, too, and gave me a
>>>>> booklet of instructions on how to care for a cat, one of those shopping
>>>>> bags with a logo, and a generous plastic bag of the food she was used to
>>>>> eating. It turns out that she'll eat anything and everything, but the
>>>>> bag of food was a nice idea.
>>>>>
>>>>> My previous cats have generally been some version of "free to good home"
>>>>> so I paid for everything, but Cinnamon was left at the SPCA shelter, and
>>>>> the SPCA spayed her and gave her to me for free. I think they were
>>>>> over-run with cats and thought they were unlikely to find another home
>>>>> for an adult cat that they did a bit more than they usually do. She does
>>>>> have her "papers" - the documents I signed saying if I ever can't keep
>>>>> her, she goes back to the SPCA.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>> Oh, I'm so sorry to hear about Sammy(RB). I don't know how I missed
>>>> that. He was lucky to have you to care for him.
>>>>
>>>> I will try to keep up more with your cats. I have followed your
>>>> messages about your back and hope to hear better news there.
>>>>
>>>> MaryL
>>>>
>>> I think you're confusing me with the other Cheryl! I'm the one from Canada.
>>
>> Cheryl, did I know you from a needlework group light years ago?
>>
>You might. I did follow and sometimes post in a needlework group oh,
>eons ago. I can't even remember the name, and I've kind of gotten out of
>needlework over the years, although I sometimes think I should take it
>up again, maybe starting with finishing a knitting project. The child it
>was originally intended for now has children of her own - if I remember
>correctly who the original intended recipient was, after all this time.

RCTN - there are still some posts there odd times. Most drifted off
to fools book unfortunately.

jmcquown[_2_]
June 15th 16, 12:10 AM
On 6/14/2016 6:34 PM, MaryL wrote:
> On 6/14/2016 4:33 PM, jmcquown wrote:
>>
>> I agree about vets charging high rates for things. I was absolutely
>> stunned when I took Persia (RB 2014) for that sad, final trip. The vet
>> ran a blood panel before doing the deed. (I am not sure why she did;
>> Persia was in end-stage renal failure. I wasn't really thinking
>> clearly.) did NOT expect to be charged over $700 to end her
>> suffering. :(
>>
>> Jill
>
> That's outrageous. I paid about $300 for Holly's final trip, but most
> of that was because I had her cremated and arranged to have her own
> cremains returned to me. They are now scattered around a holly shrub
> that is planted right outside a window that was one of Holly's favorite
> windows. She would lie on top of a sofa that sits beside the window.
>
> MaryL
>
>
I did have Persia cremated. (Her cremains are in a small urn I'd
purchased many years earlier.) So sure, that figured into the cost.
But the bill absolutely floored me. If I had been thinking clearly I
would have asked why on earth she was bothering with blood work. Then a
vet tech came in and said we'll keep her overnight, give her fluids... I
stopped him. NO. I will not be taking her home. He looked confused.
Did you tell her (the vet) that? Of course I did. Why do you think I'm
sitting here crying?

I don't want to *think* about what the bill would have been if I had
agreed to some sort of last ditch effort to prolong her life.

Jill

Bastette
June 15th 16, 11:44 PM
Judith Latham wrote:

> I know exactly what you mean about comparing prices from years ago. Many
> years ago, I remember shopping with my mother in the late 1990s and
> commenting at the price of a loaf of bread. I compared it to the price it
> was in our old currency and that changed in 1971. My Mom's reaction was
> "Oh Judith, get up to date."

You know you're out of date when your *mother* chides you about it! :)

--
Joyce

Something you'll never hear an 8-year-old say:

"Nana, will you spit on your hankie and wipe the gravy off my face?"