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Joy[_3_]
June 15th 16, 12:07 AM
Sometimes I hardly recognize Koala, my little feral cat. When I first
got him, he hid most of the time. Once he started coming out where he
could be seen, he ran every time I took a step toward him. Eventually
he got over that, and then he would let me pet him, but only if he were
on the floor and I was standing.

A couple of months ago he started coming up when I was sitting in my
recliner, and lying on my legs, out of reach. He has actually laid on
my lap a couple of times, and last night he came up on my lap and nudged
and meowed for me to pet him for a while before he laid down on my lap.

Joy

Matt Ferrari[_3_]
June 15th 16, 01:12 AM
"Joy" > wrote in message
...
>
> Sometimes I hardly recognize Koala, my little feral cat. When I first got
> him, he hid most of the time. Once he started coming out where he could
> be seen, he ran every time I took a step toward him. Eventually he got
> over that, and then he would let me pet him, but only if he were on the
> floor and I was standing.
>
> A couple of months ago he started coming up when I was sitting in my
> recliner, and lying on my legs, out of reach. He has actually laid on my
> lap a couple of times, and last night he came up on my lap and nudged and
> meowed for me to pet him for a while before he laid down on my lap.
>
> Joy


those are precious meowmees :)

Joy[_3_]
June 15th 16, 01:43 AM
On 6/14/2016 5:12 PM, Matt Ferrari wrote:
> "Joy" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> Sometimes I hardly recognize Koala, my little feral cat. When I first got
>> him, he hid most of the time. Once he started coming out where he could
>> be seen, he ran every time I took a step toward him. Eventually he got
>> over that, and then he would let me pet him, but only if he were on the
>> floor and I was standing.
>>
>> A couple of months ago he started coming up when I was sitting in my
>> recliner, and lying on my legs, out of reach. He has actually laid on my
>> lap a couple of times, and last night he came up on my lap and nudged and
>> meowed for me to pet him for a while before he laid down on my lap.
>>
>> Joy
>
>
> those are precious meowmees :)
>
>

Yes they are.

Joy[_3_]
June 15th 16, 07:22 PM
On 6/15/2016 6:34 AM, Adrian wrote:
> Joy > wrote:
>>
>> Sometimes I hardly recognize Koala, my little feral cat. When I first
>> got him, he hid most of the time. Once he started coming out where he
>> could be seen, he ran every time I took a step toward him. Eventually
>> he got over that, and then he would let me pet him, but only if he were
>> on the floor and I was standing.
>>
>> A couple of months ago he started coming up when I was sitting in my
>> recliner, and lying on my legs, out of reach. He has actually laid on
>> my lap a couple of times, and last night he came up on my lap and nudged
>> and meowed for me to pet him for a while before he laid down on my lap.
>>
>> Joy
>>
>
> That reminds me of, Shadow (RB) it literally took years for him to trust me
> completely, eventually he learned to enjoy belly rubs.
>

Koala hasn't reached that point yet, although he would like to. He
definitely shows jealousy when Pickles gets a belly rub. Maybe someday ...

Joy[_3_]
June 15th 16, 07:22 PM
On 6/15/2016 2:24 AM, Judith Latham wrote:
> In article >,
> Joy > wrote:
>
>> Sometimes I hardly recognize Koala, my little feral cat. When I first
>> got him, he hid most of the time. Once he started coming out where he
>> could be seen, he ran every time I took a step toward him. Eventually
>> he got over that, and then he would let me pet him, but only if he were
>> on the floor and I was standing.
>
>> A couple of months ago he started coming up when I was sitting in my
>> recliner, and lying on my legs, out of reach. He has actually laid on
>> my lap a couple of times, and last night he came up on my lap and nudged
>> and meowed for me to pet him for a while before he laid down on my lap.
>
>> Joy
>
> How wonderful! Bless him.
>
> judith
>

Yes, it is wonderful! He didn't settle on my lap this morning, but he
did come up for some petting, and came within two inches of a nose boop.

dgk
June 19th 16, 08:29 PM
On Tue, 14 Jun 2016 16:07:44 -0700, Joy >
wrote:

>
>Sometimes I hardly recognize Koala, my little feral cat. When I first
>got him, he hid most of the time. Once he started coming out where he
>could be seen, he ran every time I took a step toward him. Eventually
>he got over that, and then he would let me pet him, but only if he were
>on the floor and I was standing.
>
>A couple of months ago he started coming up when I was sitting in my
>recliner, and lying on my legs, out of reach. He has actually laid on
>my lap a couple of times, and last night he came up on my lap and nudged
>and meowed for me to pet him for a while before he laid down on my lap.
>
>Joy

What was the timeline for this? It gives me a certain amount of hope
for Baby, who does come out from under the bed sometimes (for 10
minutes or so) and will let me pet her. I brought her with me when I
moved from Queens NY last July so it's almost a year since she became
an indoor cat, after spending the first six years of her life on the
street in Queens.

It isn't really great progress though. She still isn't very happy. I
happened to be back in Queens last week and stopped by the old block.
The green areas in front of my old house have been completely paved
over, leaving nowhere for a cat to hang out. The same is true of the
house across the street where my friend Serene lived. Both were small
houses and are being renovated to hold three apartments each - not
quite legally I'm sure.

There are still two people willing to feed the cats on the block, but
both are very elderly. When they die, there will be no one left to
care fo them at all. Still, Baby seems so unhappy now that I'm
considering taking her back to the block where her cat friends (and
mother) still live. She may face tough times ahead, but I just don't
know that she'll ever be happy as an indoor cat.

On the other hand, I'm seriously working on getting a fence built
around my yard here in Florida so I can let them out part-time. Not
free roaming, but at least they'll have some grass to walk on and some
bushes to lie under. Maybe she'll be content with that. I'll try it
before doing something as drastic and taking her back.

Joy[_3_]
June 19th 16, 09:01 PM
On 6/19/2016 12:29 PM, dgk wrote:
> On Tue, 14 Jun 2016 16:07:44 -0700, Joy >
> wrote:
>
>>
>> Sometimes I hardly recognize Koala, my little feral cat. When I first
>> got him, he hid most of the time. Once he started coming out where he
>> could be seen, he ran every time I took a step toward him. Eventually
>> he got over that, and then he would let me pet him, but only if he were
>> on the floor and I was standing.
>>
>> A couple of months ago he started coming up when I was sitting in my
>> recliner, and lying on my legs, out of reach. He has actually laid on
>> my lap a couple of times, and last night he came up on my lap and nudged
>> and meowed for me to pet him for a while before he laid down on my lap.
>>
>> Joy
>
> What was the timeline for this? It gives me a certain amount of hope
> for Baby, who does come out from under the bed sometimes (for 10
> minutes or so) and will let me pet her. I brought her with me when I
> moved from Queens NY last July so it's almost a year since she became
> an indoor cat, after spending the first six years of her life on the
> street in Queens.
>
> It isn't really great progress though. She still isn't very happy. I
> happened to be back in Queens last week and stopped by the old block.
> The green areas in front of my old house have been completely paved
> over, leaving nowhere for a cat to hang out. The same is true of the
> house across the street where my friend Serene lived. Both were small
> houses and are being renovated to hold three apartments each - not
> quite legally I'm sure.
>
> There are still two people willing to feed the cats on the block, but
> both are very elderly. When they die, there will be no one left to
> care fo them at all. Still, Baby seems so unhappy now that I'm
> considering taking her back to the block where her cat friends (and
> mother) still live. She may face tough times ahead, but I just don't
> know that she'll ever be happy as an indoor cat.
>
> On the other hand, I'm seriously working on getting a fence built
> around my yard here in Florida so I can let them out part-time. Not
> free roaming, but at least they'll have some grass to walk on and some
> bushes to lie under. Maybe she'll be content with that. I'll try it
> before doing something as drastic and taking her back.
>

It will be two years next month since I got Koala. He was four months
old when I got him. I'd say there is still hope for Baby. If you can
make an outside area where she'd be safe, I'd definitely try that.

Christina Websell
June 20th 16, 06:33 PM
"Joy" > wrote in message
...
>
> Sometimes I hardly recognize Koala, my little feral cat. When I first got
> him, he hid most of the time. Once he started coming out where he could
> be seen, he ran every time I took a step toward him. Eventually he got
> over that, and then he would let me pet him, but only if he were on the
> floor and I was standing.
>
> A couple of months ago he started coming up when I was sitting in my
> recliner, and lying on my legs, out of reach. He has actually laid on my
> lap a couple of times, and last night he came up on my lap and nudged and
> meowed for me to pet him for a while before he laid down on my lap.
>
> Joy

Brilliant news! It takes patience, lots of patience over a long time. It's
paying off. I'm happy for you both.

Tweed

Christina Websell
June 20th 16, 07:05 PM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 14 Jun 2016 16:07:44 -0700, Joy >
> wrote:
>
>>
>>Sometimes I hardly recognize Koala, my little feral cat. When I first
>>got him, he hid most of the time. Once he started coming out where he
>>could be seen, he ran every time I took a step toward him. Eventually
>>he got over that, and then he would let me pet him, but only if he were
>>on the floor and I was standing.
>>
>>A couple of months ago he started coming up when I was sitting in my
>>recliner, and lying on my legs, out of reach. He has actually laid on
>>my lap a couple of times, and last night he came up on my lap and nudged
>>and meowed for me to pet him for a while before he laid down on my lap.
>>
>>Joy
>
> What was the timeline for this? It gives me a certain amount of hope
> for Baby, who does come out from under the bed sometimes (for 10
> minutes or so) and will let me pet her. I brought her with me when I
> moved from Queens NY last July so it's almost a year since she became
> an indoor cat, after spending the first six years of her life on the
> street in Queens.
>
> It isn't really great progress though. She still isn't very happy. I
> happened to be back in Queens last week and stopped by the old block.
> The green areas in front of my old house have been completely paved
> over, leaving nowhere for a cat to hang out. The same is true of the
> house across the street where my friend Serene lived. Both were small
> houses and are being renovated to hold three apartments each - not
> quite legally I'm sure.
>
> There are still two people willing to feed the cats on the block, but
> both are very elderly. When they die, there will be no one left to
> care fo them at all. Still, Baby seems so unhappy now that I'm
> considering taking her back to the block where her cat friends (and
> mother) still live. She may face tough times ahead, but I just don't
> know that she'll ever be happy as an indoor cat.
>
> On the other hand, I'm seriously working on getting a fence built
> around my yard here in Florida so I can let them out part-time. Not
> free roaming, but at least they'll have some grass to walk on and some
> bushes to lie under. Maybe she'll be content with that. I'll try it
> before doing something as drastic and taking her back.

Ex ferals and those cats that went slightly feral because of losing their
homes find it difficult to fit in to a home, either for the first time, or
"again." It took me 3 or 4 months to get Boyfriend to feed just inside the
back door (and two years before I could close it as he panicked without an
escape route) luckily I live in a low crime area. It does take a long
time, literally years for these cats to trust: never push them to interact
with you, they will eventually.
Please do not even think of taking Baby back to an uncertain future on the
streets. Boyfie took a long time, much longer than you've given Baby but
now his ideal world would be if I sat down all the time and he was on my
knee 24/7. You have to be patient, and yes, sometimes it takes years. Baby
will come fine if you give her space long enough and don't try to pet her.
One day she will approach you. Just my experience with the most scaredy lost
cat I ever had. I hope it helps.

Tweed
P.S. If you take Baby back to the streets you are blocked, you took her to
Florida, now be patient

Christina Websell
June 20th 16, 10:08 PM
"Adrian" > wrote in message
...
> Joy > wrote:
>>
>> Sometimes I hardly recognize Koala, my little feral cat. When I first
>> got him, he hid most of the time. Once he started coming out where he
>> could be seen, he ran every time I took a step toward him. Eventually
>> he got over that, and then he would let me pet him, but only if he were
>> on the floor and I was standing.
>>
>> A couple of months ago he started coming up when I was sitting in my
>> recliner, and lying on my legs, out of reach. He has actually laid on
>> my lap a couple of times, and last night he came up on my lap and nudged
>> and meowed for me to pet him for a while before he laid down on my lap.
>>
>> Joy
>>
>
> That reminds me of, Shadow (RB) it literally took years for him to trust
> me
> completely, eventually he learned to enjoy belly rubs.
>
> --
> Adrian

I agree, it take a long time. They will never be like other cats. Boyfie
is great with me now but is afraid of everyone else, even if he knows them
well. Like they fed him for weeks while I was in hospital, the minute I
return he becomes afraid of them again. Sort of like he tolerated them when
he needed feeding. He knows Claire very well, she looked after him for
weeks, but if she comes to visit he goes up to his bedroom to avoid her,like
he never saw her before.
Luckily she is not offended, she has Tigger, who is so proud of himself he
could offend everyone. I don't want to remind Tigger that he was dumped at
the side of the road in a bag of kittens and how lucky he is He is very
regal.

Joy[_3_]
June 20th 16, 11:10 PM
On 6/20/2016 10:33 AM, Christina Websell wrote:
> "Joy" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> Sometimes I hardly recognize Koala, my little feral cat. When I first got
>> him, he hid most of the time. Once he started coming out where he could
>> be seen, he ran every time I took a step toward him. Eventually he got
>> over that, and then he would let me pet him, but only if he were on the
>> floor and I was standing.
>>
>> A couple of months ago he started coming up when I was sitting in my
>> recliner, and lying on my legs, out of reach. He has actually laid on my
>> lap a couple of times, and last night he came up on my lap and nudged and
>> meowed for me to pet him for a while before he laid down on my lap.
>>
>> Joy
>
> Brilliant news! It takes patience, lots of patience over a long time. It's
> paying off. I'm happy for you both.
>
> Tweed
>
>

Thank you. Yes, it's really lovely. After almost two years, I thought
it would never happen.

dgk
June 23rd 16, 12:47 PM
On Mon, 20 Jun 2016 19:05:54 +0100, "Christina Websell"
> wrote:

>
>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>> On Tue, 14 Jun 2016 16:07:44 -0700, Joy >
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>Sometimes I hardly recognize Koala, my little feral cat. When I first
>>>got him, he hid most of the time. Once he started coming out where he
>>>could be seen, he ran every time I took a step toward him. Eventually
>>>he got over that, and then he would let me pet him, but only if he were
>>>on the floor and I was standing.
>>>
>>>A couple of months ago he started coming up when I was sitting in my
>>>recliner, and lying on my legs, out of reach. He has actually laid on
>>>my lap a couple of times, and last night he came up on my lap and nudged
>>>and meowed for me to pet him for a while before he laid down on my lap.
>>>
>>>Joy
>>
>> What was the timeline for this? It gives me a certain amount of hope
>> for Baby, who does come out from under the bed sometimes (for 10
>> minutes or so) and will let me pet her. I brought her with me when I
>> moved from Queens NY last July so it's almost a year since she became
>> an indoor cat, after spending the first six years of her life on the
>> street in Queens.
>>
>> It isn't really great progress though. She still isn't very happy. I
>> happened to be back in Queens last week and stopped by the old block.
>> The green areas in front of my old house have been completely paved
>> over, leaving nowhere for a cat to hang out. The same is true of the
>> house across the street where my friend Serene lived. Both were small
>> houses and are being renovated to hold three apartments each - not
>> quite legally I'm sure.
>>
>> There are still two people willing to feed the cats on the block, but
>> both are very elderly. When they die, there will be no one left to
>> care fo them at all. Still, Baby seems so unhappy now that I'm
>> considering taking her back to the block where her cat friends (and
>> mother) still live. She may face tough times ahead, but I just don't
>> know that she'll ever be happy as an indoor cat.
>>
>> On the other hand, I'm seriously working on getting a fence built
>> around my yard here in Florida so I can let them out part-time. Not
>> free roaming, but at least they'll have some grass to walk on and some
>> bushes to lie under. Maybe she'll be content with that. I'll try it
>> before doing something as drastic and taking her back.
>
>Ex ferals and those cats that went slightly feral because of losing their
>homes find it difficult to fit in to a home, either for the first time, or
>"again." It took me 3 or 4 months to get Boyfriend to feed just inside the
>back door (and two years before I could close it as he panicked without an
>escape route) luckily I live in a low crime area. It does take a long
>time, literally years for these cats to trust: never push them to interact
>with you, they will eventually.
>Please do not even think of taking Baby back to an uncertain future on the
>streets. Boyfie took a long time, much longer than you've given Baby but
>now his ideal world would be if I sat down all the time and he was on my
>knee 24/7. You have to be patient, and yes, sometimes it takes years. Baby
>will come fine if you give her space long enough and don't try to pet her.
>One day she will approach you. Just my experience with the most scaredy lost
>cat I ever had. I hope it helps.
>
>Tweed
>P.S. If you take Baby back to the streets you are blocked, you took her to
>Florida, now be patient
>
>
Thanks, The problem is that there is really only a small window to
consider it. I'll be back there in late August (for the 2016 US Open
tennis championship), so that would have to be the time. After that it
starts getting cold and I couldn't do it if she didn't have time to
acclimate to the temperature. But I probably won't have a fence up in
time to try her outside here before that happens. So she's likely to
stay where she is, under my bed.

The only reason I'm even thinking about it is because she was always
so happy outside, running around with her tail straight up in the air,
following me as I walked to Serene's house or back to my house. She
was usually walking with Jet, her mom. Now, she rarely comes out from
under the bed, and when she does, she walks around with her tail as
low as it can get, scrapping the floor.

But as I'm typing this I can see her walking down the hall so at least
she is out looking the place over again. It's just three weeks short
of a year since we arrived here. Well, maybe once I get the yard
fenced and she can go out, she'll fall in love with the lizards and
finally be happy again.

Joy[_3_]
June 23rd 16, 07:08 PM
On 6/23/2016 4:47 AM, dgk wrote:
> On Mon, 20 Jun 2016 19:05:54 +0100, "Christina Websell"
> > wrote:
>
>>
>> "dgk" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> On Tue, 14 Jun 2016 16:07:44 -0700, Joy >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> Sometimes I hardly recognize Koala, my little feral cat. When I first
>>>> got him, he hid most of the time. Once he started coming out where he
>>>> could be seen, he ran every time I took a step toward him. Eventually
>>>> he got over that, and then he would let me pet him, but only if he were
>>>> on the floor and I was standing.
>>>>
>>>> A couple of months ago he started coming up when I was sitting in my
>>>> recliner, and lying on my legs, out of reach. He has actually laid on
>>>> my lap a couple of times, and last night he came up on my lap and nudged
>>>> and meowed for me to pet him for a while before he laid down on my lap.
>>>>
>>>> Joy
>>>
>>> What was the timeline for this? It gives me a certain amount of hope
>>> for Baby, who does come out from under the bed sometimes (for 10
>>> minutes or so) and will let me pet her. I brought her with me when I
>>> moved from Queens NY last July so it's almost a year since she became
>>> an indoor cat, after spending the first six years of her life on the
>>> street in Queens.
>>>
>>> It isn't really great progress though. She still isn't very happy. I
>>> happened to be back in Queens last week and stopped by the old block.
>>> The green areas in front of my old house have been completely paved
>>> over, leaving nowhere for a cat to hang out. The same is true of the
>>> house across the street where my friend Serene lived. Both were small
>>> houses and are being renovated to hold three apartments each - not
>>> quite legally I'm sure.
>>>
>>> There are still two people willing to feed the cats on the block, but
>>> both are very elderly. When they die, there will be no one left to
>>> care fo them at all. Still, Baby seems so unhappy now that I'm
>>> considering taking her back to the block where her cat friends (and
>>> mother) still live. She may face tough times ahead, but I just don't
>>> know that she'll ever be happy as an indoor cat.
>>>
>>> On the other hand, I'm seriously working on getting a fence built
>>> around my yard here in Florida so I can let them out part-time. Not
>>> free roaming, but at least they'll have some grass to walk on and some
>>> bushes to lie under. Maybe she'll be content with that. I'll try it
>>> before doing something as drastic and taking her back.
>>
>> Ex ferals and those cats that went slightly feral because of losing their
>> homes find it difficult to fit in to a home, either for the first time, or
>> "again." It took me 3 or 4 months to get Boyfriend to feed just inside the
>> back door (and two years before I could close it as he panicked without an
>> escape route) luckily I live in a low crime area. It does take a long
>> time, literally years for these cats to trust: never push them to interact
>> with you, they will eventually.
>> Please do not even think of taking Baby back to an uncertain future on the
>> streets. Boyfie took a long time, much longer than you've given Baby but
>> now his ideal world would be if I sat down all the time and he was on my
>> knee 24/7. You have to be patient, and yes, sometimes it takes years. Baby
>> will come fine if you give her space long enough and don't try to pet her.
>> One day she will approach you. Just my experience with the most scaredy lost
>> cat I ever had. I hope it helps.
>>
>> Tweed
>> P.S. If you take Baby back to the streets you are blocked, you took her to
>> Florida, now be patient
>>
>>
> Thanks, The problem is that there is really only a small window to
> consider it. I'll be back there in late August (for the 2016 US Open
> tennis championship), so that would have to be the time. After that it
> starts getting cold and I couldn't do it if she didn't have time to
> acclimate to the temperature. But I probably won't have a fence up in
> time to try her outside here before that happens. So she's likely to
> stay where she is, under my bed.
>
> The only reason I'm even thinking about it is because she was always
> so happy outside, running around with her tail straight up in the air,
> following me as I walked to Serene's house or back to my house. She
> was usually walking with Jet, her mom. Now, she rarely comes out from
> under the bed, and when she does, she walks around with her tail as
> low as it can get, scrapping the floor.
>
> But as I'm typing this I can see her walking down the hall so at least
> she is out looking the place over again. It's just three weeks short
> of a year since we arrived here. Well, maybe once I get the yard
> fenced and she can go out, she'll fall in love with the lizards and
> finally be happy again.
>

Yes, I understand. You're considering her happiness. The reason
everybody is telling you not to take her back is that we're considering
her safety. For a good many years, I had a cat door and my cats could
go in and out as they wished. My current cats have always been indoor
cats, so that is no longer the case. Also, I understand there are now
coyotes in the neighborhood, so I wouldn't let them out anyway. If your
area is safe from predators, you might consider installing a cat door.

dgk
June 24th 16, 04:42 AM
On Thu, 23 Jun 2016 11:08:36 -0700, Joy >
wrote:

>On 6/23/2016 4:47 AM, dgk wrote:
>> On Mon, 20 Jun 2016 19:05:54 +0100, "Christina Websell"
>> > wrote:
>>
>>>

>> But as I'm typing this I can see her walking down the hall so at least
>> she is out looking the place over again. It's just three weeks short
>> of a year since we arrived here. Well, maybe once I get the yard
>> fenced and she can go out, she'll fall in love with the lizards and
>> finally be happy again.
>>
>
>Yes, I understand. You're considering her happiness. The reason
>everybody is telling you not to take her back is that we're considering
>her safety. For a good many years, I had a cat door and my cats could
>go in and out as they wished. My current cats have always been indoor
>cats, so that is no longer the case. Also, I understand there are now
>coyotes in the neighborhood, so I wouldn't let them out anyway. If your
>area is safe from predators, you might consider installing a cat door.

Yes, it's always safety vs freedom. I just hate seeing her slink
around when she used to run around so happily. I really thought that
she would adapt much quicker. Is a long miserable life better than a
shorter happy life? If I thought that she'd never be happy inside, I'd
take her back today, but I do hold out hope.

I don't think we have coyotes around, although supposedly we do, but I
have seen foxes in my yard. Small ones, not much bigger than the
catrs, but I do not want them in the yard at the same time. So there
will be a cat door, but it will only be open when the yard is enclosed
and during the daylight hours. And only when I'm home, and at the
beginning, only when I'm out there with them.

Joy[_3_]
June 24th 16, 07:28 AM
On 6/23/2016 8:42 PM, dgk wrote:
> On Thu, 23 Jun 2016 11:08:36 -0700, Joy >
> wrote:
>
>> On 6/23/2016 4:47 AM, dgk wrote:
>>> On Mon, 20 Jun 2016 19:05:54 +0100, "Christina Websell"
>>> > wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>
>>> But as I'm typing this I can see her walking down the hall so at least
>>> she is out looking the place over again. It's just three weeks short
>>> of a year since we arrived here. Well, maybe once I get the yard
>>> fenced and she can go out, she'll fall in love with the lizards and
>>> finally be happy again.
>>>
>>
>> Yes, I understand. You're considering her happiness. The reason
>> everybody is telling you not to take her back is that we're considering
>> her safety. For a good many years, I had a cat door and my cats could
>> go in and out as they wished. My current cats have always been indoor
>> cats, so that is no longer the case. Also, I understand there are now
>> coyotes in the neighborhood, so I wouldn't let them out anyway. If your
>> area is safe from predators, you might consider installing a cat door.
>
> Yes, it's always safety vs freedom. I just hate seeing her slink
> around when she used to run around so happily. I really thought that
> she would adapt much quicker. Is a long miserable life better than a
> shorter happy life? If I thought that she'd never be happy inside, I'd
> take her back today, but I do hold out hope.
>
> I don't think we have coyotes around, although supposedly we do, but I
> have seen foxes in my yard. Small ones, not much bigger than the
> catrs, but I do not want them in the yard at the same time. So there
> will be a cat door, but it will only be open when the yard is enclosed
> and during the daylight hours. And only when I'm home, and at the
> beginning, only when I'm out there with them.
>

I understand everything you say. How long have you had her?

dgk
July 5th 16, 05:00 AM
On Thu, 23 Jun 2016 23:28:14 -0700, Joy >
wrote:

>On 6/23/2016 8:42 PM, dgk wrote:
>> On Thu, 23 Jun 2016 11:08:36 -0700, Joy >
>> wrote:
>>
>>> On 6/23/2016 4:47 AM, dgk wrote:
>>>> On Mon, 20 Jun 2016 19:05:54 +0100, "Christina Websell"
>>>> > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>
>>
>>>> But as I'm typing this I can see her walking down the hall so at least
>>>> she is out looking the place over again. It's just three weeks short
>>>> of a year since we arrived here. Well, maybe once I get the yard
>>>> fenced and she can go out, she'll fall in love with the lizards and
>>>> finally be happy again.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Yes, I understand. You're considering her happiness. The reason
>>> everybody is telling you not to take her back is that we're considering
>>> her safety. For a good many years, I had a cat door and my cats could
>>> go in and out as they wished. My current cats have always been indoor
>>> cats, so that is no longer the case. Also, I understand there are now
>>> coyotes in the neighborhood, so I wouldn't let them out anyway. If your
>>> area is safe from predators, you might consider installing a cat door.
>>
>> Yes, it's always safety vs freedom. I just hate seeing her slink
>> around when she used to run around so happily. I really thought that
>> she would adapt much quicker. Is a long miserable life better than a
>> shorter happy life? If I thought that she'd never be happy inside, I'd
>> take her back today, but I do hold out hope.
>>
>> I don't think we have coyotes around, although supposedly we do, but I
>> have seen foxes in my yard. Small ones, not much bigger than the
>> catrs, but I do not want them in the yard at the same time. So there
>> will be a cat door, but it will only be open when the yard is enclosed
>> and during the daylight hours. And only when I'm home, and at the
>> beginning, only when I'm out there with them.
>>
>
>I understand everything you say. How long have you had her?

Sorry, I was away for 10 days. I took her in almost exactly a year ago
and moved to Florida the next week.

Joy[_3_]
July 5th 16, 05:59 AM
On 7/4/2016 9:00 PM, dgk wrote:
> On Thu, 23 Jun 2016 23:28:14 -0700, Joy >
> wrote:
>
>> On 6/23/2016 8:42 PM, dgk wrote:
>>> On Thu, 23 Jun 2016 11:08:36 -0700, Joy >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 6/23/2016 4:47 AM, dgk wrote:
>>>>> On Mon, 20 Jun 2016 19:05:54 +0100, "Christina Websell"
>>>>> > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>
>>>>> But as I'm typing this I can see her walking down the hall so at least
>>>>> she is out looking the place over again. It's just three weeks short
>>>>> of a year since we arrived here. Well, maybe once I get the yard
>>>>> fenced and she can go out, she'll fall in love with the lizards and
>>>>> finally be happy again.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Yes, I understand. You're considering her happiness. The reason
>>>> everybody is telling you not to take her back is that we're considering
>>>> her safety. For a good many years, I had a cat door and my cats could
>>>> go in and out as they wished. My current cats have always been indoor
>>>> cats, so that is no longer the case. Also, I understand there are now
>>>> coyotes in the neighborhood, so I wouldn't let them out anyway. If your
>>>> area is safe from predators, you might consider installing a cat door.
>>>
>>> Yes, it's always safety vs freedom. I just hate seeing her slink
>>> around when she used to run around so happily. I really thought that
>>> she would adapt much quicker. Is a long miserable life better than a
>>> shorter happy life? If I thought that she'd never be happy inside, I'd
>>> take her back today, but I do hold out hope.
>>>
>>> I don't think we have coyotes around, although supposedly we do, but I
>>> have seen foxes in my yard. Small ones, not much bigger than the
>>> catrs, but I do not want them in the yard at the same time. So there
>>> will be a cat door, but it will only be open when the yard is enclosed
>>> and during the daylight hours. And only when I'm home, and at the
>>> beginning, only when I'm out there with them.
>>>
>>
>> I understand everything you say. How long have you had her?
>
> Sorry, I was away for 10 days. I took her in almost exactly a year ago
> and moved to Florida the next week.
>

If she's been with you that long, I wouldn't take her back and turn her
loose. Too many things will have changed during that time. It does
take some cats a long time to adjust. However, I think she's better off
with you, and eventually she'll realize it. It will be good if you can
create a space where she can go outdoors safely.

Christina Websell
July 28th 16, 02:33 AM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 23 Jun 2016 11:08:36 -0700, Joy >
> wrote:
>
>>On 6/23/2016 4:47 AM, dgk wrote:
>>> On Mon, 20 Jun 2016 19:05:54 +0100, "Christina Websell"
>>> > wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>
>>> But as I'm typing this I can see her walking down the hall so at least
>>> she is out looking the place over again. It's just three weeks short
>>> of a year since we arrived here. Well, maybe once I get the yard
>>> fenced and she can go out, she'll fall in love with the lizards and
>>> finally be happy again.
>>>
>>
>>Yes, I understand. You're considering her happiness. The reason
>>everybody is telling you not to take her back is that we're considering
>>her safety. For a good many years, I had a cat door and my cats could
>>go in and out as they wished. My current cats have always been indoor
>>cats, so that is no longer the case. Also, I understand there are now
>>coyotes in the neighborhood, so I wouldn't let them out anyway. If your
>>area is safe from predators, you might consider installing a cat door.
>
> Yes, it's always safety vs freedom. I just hate seeing her slink
> around when she used to run around so happily. I really thought that
> she would adapt much quicker. Is a long miserable life better than a
> shorter happy life? If I thought that she'd never be happy inside, I'd
> take her back today, but I do hold out hope.
>
> I don't think we have coyotes around, although supposedly we do, but I
> have seen foxes in my yard. Small ones, not much bigger than the
> catrs, but I do not want them in the yard at the same time. So there
> will be a cat door, but it will only be open when the yard is enclosed
> and during the daylight hours. And only when I'm home, and at the
> beginning, only when I'm out there with them.

That sounds like a good idea. I'm cautiously confident that she will adapt
to the home eventually, but it does take a long time, a year wasn't enough
for Boyfie, even though he wasn't a true feral it was more than two years,
nearer three. Now I can hardly peel him off my lap. Give her more time and
don't push her to be friendly, just go about about your business, speak
kindly when you put her food down. Use a special word when you do and
eventually you can use that word to get her to come out. I used to whistle
4 tones and now Boyfie will come in from the out if I do that. Just be
patient, it's not easy and there's no short term fix. Let her hide if she
wants to. I still don't disturb Boyfie if he's gone to his "own" bedroom
even now. Don't expect Baby to ever be like socialised cats, she won't be.
Lots of luck with her.
Tweed

dgk
July 30th 16, 04:30 AM
On Thu, 28 Jul 2016 02:33:33 +0100, "Christina Websell"
> wrote:

>
>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>> On Thu, 23 Jun 2016 11:08:36 -0700, Joy >
>> wrote:
>>
>>>On 6/23/2016 4:47 AM, dgk wrote:
>>>> On Mon, 20 Jun 2016 19:05:54 +0100, "Christina Websell"
>>>> > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>
>>
>>>> But as I'm typing this I can see her walking down the hall so at least
>>>> she is out looking the place over again. It's just three weeks short
>>>> of a year since we arrived here. Well, maybe once I get the yard
>>>> fenced and she can go out, she'll fall in love with the lizards and
>>>> finally be happy again.
>>>>
>>>
>>>Yes, I understand. You're considering her happiness. The reason
>>>everybody is telling you not to take her back is that we're considering
>>>her safety. For a good many years, I had a cat door and my cats could
>>>go in and out as they wished. My current cats have always been indoor
>>>cats, so that is no longer the case. Also, I understand there are now
>>>coyotes in the neighborhood, so I wouldn't let them out anyway. If your
>>>area is safe from predators, you might consider installing a cat door.
>>
>> Yes, it's always safety vs freedom. I just hate seeing her slink
>> around when she used to run around so happily. I really thought that
>> she would adapt much quicker. Is a long miserable life better than a
>> shorter happy life? If I thought that she'd never be happy inside, I'd
>> take her back today, but I do hold out hope.
>>
>> I don't think we have coyotes around, although supposedly we do, but I
>> have seen foxes in my yard. Small ones, not much bigger than the
>> catrs, but I do not want them in the yard at the same time. So there
>> will be a cat door, but it will only be open when the yard is enclosed
>> and during the daylight hours. And only when I'm home, and at the
>> beginning, only when I'm out there with them.
>
>That sounds like a good idea. I'm cautiously confident that she will adapt
>to the home eventually, but it does take a long time, a year wasn't enough
>for Boyfie, even though he wasn't a true feral it was more than two years,
>nearer three. Now I can hardly peel him off my lap. Give her more time and
>don't push her to be friendly, just go about about your business, speak
>kindly when you put her food down. Use a special word when you do and
>eventually you can use that word to get her to come out. I used to whistle
>4 tones and now Boyfie will come in from the out if I do that. Just be
>patient, it's not easy and there's no short term fix. Let her hide if she
>wants to. I still don't disturb Boyfie if he's gone to his "own" bedroom
>even now. Don't expect Baby to ever be like socialised cats, she won't be.
>Lots of luck with her.
>Tweed
>
Thanks for the encouragement. And I think there is friction between
Marlo and Baby that is causing Marlo's overgrooming issue. I think I'm
going to speak to the "behavioral" vet specialist although it will
cost at least $400. There is a $200 initial fee, plus someone comes to
the house to look over the situation and make specific
recommendations. Sounds like My Cat From Hell.