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jmcquown[_2_]
October 18th 16, 04:31 PM
Feral cats are apparently very resourceful little creatures!

DIFF (Dataw Island Feline Foundation) volunteers made sure there was
plenty of food and water at the feeding stations before the evacuation
order due to Hurricane Matthew locked down the island.

I inquired last night on the Dataw Net, any word on the ferals?

All the cats have been accounted for except one shy little guy named
Mini-Peanut. By all accounts he never wanted to feed with the other
cats, preferring to eat by the tennis courts. Some county [shelter]
workers tried to check on him before the resident volunteers came back.
I'm told they couldn't get to the tennis courts due to storm debris.
Yeah, it's a big mess out there, folks.

It could be he Mini-Peanut is still being his usual reticent self and
simply hasn't been spotted yet. I hope!

Purrs that Mini-Peanut is okay.

Jill

dgk
October 19th 16, 03:10 AM
On Tue, 18 Oct 2016 11:31:15 -0400, jmcquown >
wrote:

>Feral cats are apparently very resourceful little creatures!
>
>DIFF (Dataw Island Feline Foundation) volunteers made sure there was
>plenty of food and water at the feeding stations before the evacuation
>order due to Hurricane Matthew locked down the island.
>
>I inquired last night on the Dataw Net, any word on the ferals?
>
>All the cats have been accounted for except one shy little guy named
>Mini-Peanut. By all accounts he never wanted to feed with the other
>cats, preferring to eat by the tennis courts. Some county [shelter]
>workers tried to check on him before the resident volunteers came back.
> I'm told they couldn't get to the tennis courts due to storm debris.
>Yeah, it's a big mess out there, folks.
>
>It could be he Mini-Peanut is still being his usual reticent self and
>simply hasn't been spotted yet. I hope!
>
>Purrs that Mini-Peanut is okay.
>
>Jill

I'm betting on Mini-Peanut being fine because they are so good at
surviving. I used to panic when we'd get a huge snow storm and the
cats all disappeared, then a few days later they showed up to eat.

jmcquown[_2_]
October 19th 16, 05:50 AM
On 10/18/2016 10:10 PM, dgk wrote:
> On Tue, 18 Oct 2016 11:31:15 -0400, jmcquown >
> wrote:
>
>> Feral cats are apparently very resourceful little creatures!
>>
>> DIFF (Dataw Island Feline Foundation) volunteers made sure there was
>> plenty of food and water at the feeding stations before the evacuation
>> order due to Hurricane Matthew locked down the island.
>>
>> I inquired last night on the Dataw Net, any word on the ferals?
>>
>> All the cats have been accounted for except one shy little guy named
>> Mini-Peanut. By all accounts he never wanted to feed with the other
>> cats, preferring to eat by the tennis courts. Some county [shelter]
>> workers tried to check on him before the resident volunteers came back.
>> I'm told they couldn't get to the tennis courts due to storm debris.
>> Yeah, it's a big mess out there, folks.
>>
>> It could be he Mini-Peanut is still being his usual reticent self and
>> simply hasn't been spotted yet. I hope!
>>
>> Purrs that Mini-Peanut is okay.
>>
>> Jill
>
> I'm betting on Mini-Peanut being fine because they are so good at
> surviving. I used to panic when we'd get a huge snow storm and the
> cats all disappeared, then a few days later they showed up to eat.
>
We can only hope. Since he is already a cat who is rarely seen he could
just be hiding.

Jill

MaryL[_2_]
October 19th 16, 07:14 AM
On 10/18/2016 10:31 AM, jmcquown wrote:
> Feral cats are apparently very resourceful little creatures!
>
> DIFF (Dataw Island Feline Foundation) volunteers made sure there was
> plenty of food and water at the feeding stations before the evacuation
> order due to Hurricane Matthew locked down the island.
>
> I inquired last night on the Dataw Net, any word on the ferals?
>
> All the cats have been accounted for except one shy little guy named
> Mini-Peanut. By all accounts he never wanted to feed with the other
> cats, preferring to eat by the tennis courts. Some county [shelter]
> workers tried to check on him before the resident volunteers came back.
> I'm told they couldn't get to the tennis courts due to storm debris.
> Yeah, it's a big mess out there, folks.
>
> It could be he Mini-Peanut is still being his usual reticent self and
> simply hasn't been spotted yet. I hope!
>
> Purrs that Mini-Peanut is okay.
>
> Jill

Great news! Thanks for letting us know. Sending purrs for Mini-Peanut.

MaryL

jmcquown[_2_]
October 19th 16, 05:23 PM
On 10/19/2016 2:14 AM, MaryL wrote:
> On 10/18/2016 10:31 AM, jmcquown wrote:
>> Feral cats are apparently very resourceful little creatures!
>>
>> DIFF (Dataw Island Feline Foundation) volunteers made sure there was
>> plenty of food and water at the feeding stations before the evacuation
>> order due to Hurricane Matthew locked down the island.
>>
>> I inquired last night on the Dataw Net, any word on the ferals?
>>
>> All the cats have been accounted for except one shy little guy named
>> Mini-Peanut. By all accounts he never wanted to feed with the other
>> cats, preferring to eat by the tennis courts. Some county [shelter]
>> workers tried to check on him before the resident volunteers came back.
>> I'm told they couldn't get to the tennis courts due to storm debris.
>> Yeah, it's a big mess out there, folks.
>>
>> It could be he Mini-Peanut is still being his usual reticent self and
>> simply hasn't been spotted yet. I hope!
>>
>> Purrs that Mini-Peanut is okay.
>>
>> Jill
>
> Great news! Thanks for letting us know. Sending purrs for Mini-Peanut.
>
> MaryL
>
It is good news! 43 feral cats. They've all had their ears notched so
they can be identified as having been trapped, neutered/released.

Buffy has a notched ear. She was one of the ferals until her former
owner scooped her up as a kitten. Who says you can't turn a feral into
a completely spoiled love bug? Introduce them to a life of luxury when
they're young, of course you can. :)

One idiotic woman wrote in reply to my post how they should stop
neutering the cats because it makes the marsh rat population increase.
Uh, what? How does a feral cat not having testicles relate to an
increase in the marsh rat population? (Maybe someone should be
neutering the rats.) The cats still hunt for food. I didn't understand
the correlation. Is she a proponent of letting the cat population
explode? Apparently.

In the nearly 9 years I've been living here I've only seen a marsh rat
once. That was while cleaning the gutters. They're no bigger than
hamsters. She made it sound like they were all over her house and yard.
Lady, if you have a problem with marsh rats, call an exterminator. Do
NOT tell people not to spay/neuter the feral cats. One does not have
anything to do with the other.

Jill

Bastette
October 19th 16, 07:34 PM
jmcquown wrote:

> One idiotic woman wrote in reply to my post how they should stop
> neutering the cats because it makes the marsh rat population increase.
> Uh, what? How does a feral cat not having testicles relate to an
> increase in the marsh rat population? (Maybe someone should be
> neutering the rats.) The cats still hunt for food. I didn't understand
> the correlation. Is she a proponent of letting the cat population
> explode? Apparently.
> ...
> Lady, if you have a problem with marsh rats, call an exterminator. Do
> NOT tell people not to spay/neuter the feral cats. One does not have
> anything to do with the other.

I don't agree with her suggestion, since in general feral cat populations
are barely under control. If it is well-controlled in your area, then
whatever you're doing there, it's working, so don't tamper with it!

But there is a correlation. The more cats there are, the more hunters
there are, and the more rats will be caught and killed. One cause when
a prey species (for example, deer) explodes is the absence, or small
number of predators. So I think that's what this woman had in mind. It's
not about cats requiring testicles (or ovaries!) to hunt, it's about
the relative sizes of the populations of predators and prey.

--
- Your mom and I are going to divorce next month.
- What??? Why! Call me please?
- I wrote Disney and this phone changed it. We are going to Disney.
-- damnyouautocorrect.com

Jack Campin
October 19th 16, 11:49 PM
> One idiotic woman wrote in reply to my post how they should stop
> neutering the cats because it makes the marsh rat population increase.
> Uh, what? How does a feral cat not having testicles relate to an
> increase in the marsh rat population?

And why the heck would anybody want to kill off marsh rats
anyway? They're cute little things, harmless (except for
carrying a few diseases you can get from a lot of other
things you're more likely be in contact with) and they
occupied your part of the world long before any humans.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marsh_rice_rat

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
e m a i l : j a c k @ c a m p i n . m e . u k
Jack Campin, 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU, Scotland
mobile 07800 739 557 <http://www.campin.me.uk> Twitter: JackCampin

jmcquown[_2_]
October 20th 16, 12:12 AM
On 10/19/2016 6:49 PM, Jack Campin wrote:
>> One idiotic woman wrote in reply to my post how they should stop
>> neutering the cats because it makes the marsh rat population increase.
>> Uh, what? How does a feral cat not having testicles relate to an
>> increase in the marsh rat population?
>
> And why the heck would anybody want to kill off marsh rats
> anyway? They're cute little things, harmless (except for
> carrying a few diseases you can get from a lot of other
> things you're more likely be in contact with) and they
> occupied your part of the world long before any humans.
>
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marsh_rice_rat
>

They are cute little things. It's not as if they're swarming all over
the place. In all the years I've lived here I've only ever seen ONE
marsh rat.

Jill

MaryL[_2_]
October 20th 16, 12:34 AM
On 10/19/2016 11:23 AM, jmcquown wrote:
> On 10/19/2016 2:14 AM, MaryL wrote:
>> On 10/18/2016 10:31 AM, jmcquown wrote:
>>> Feral cats are apparently very resourceful little creatures!
>>>
>>> DIFF (Dataw Island Feline Foundation) volunteers made sure there was
>>> plenty of food and water at the feeding stations before the evacuation
>>> order due to Hurricane Matthew locked down the island.
>>>
>>> I inquired last night on the Dataw Net, any word on the ferals?
>>>
>>> All the cats have been accounted for except one shy little guy named
>>> Mini-Peanut. By all accounts he never wanted to feed with the other
>>> cats, preferring to eat by the tennis courts. Some county [shelter]
>>> workers tried to check on him before the resident volunteers came back.
>>> I'm told they couldn't get to the tennis courts due to storm debris.
>>> Yeah, it's a big mess out there, folks.
>>>
>>> It could be he Mini-Peanut is still being his usual reticent self and
>>> simply hasn't been spotted yet. I hope!
>>>
>>> Purrs that Mini-Peanut is okay.
>>>
>>> Jill
>>
>> Great news! Thanks for letting us know. Sending purrs for Mini-Peanut.
>>
>> MaryL
>>
> It is good news! 43 feral cats. They've all had their ears notched so
> they can be identified as having been trapped, neutered/released.
>
> Buffy has a notched ear. She was one of the ferals until her former
> owner scooped her up as a kitten. Who says you can't turn a feral into
> a completely spoiled love bug? Introduce them to a life of luxury when
> they're young, of course you can. :)
>
<snip>
>
> Jill

My very first cat, many years ago, was feral. He was about 8 months old
when I adopted him. My neighbor was planning to trap the cats that were
running loose in that area and take them to a shelter. I was leaving
for my first semester in graduate school and would be about 1100 miles
from home. I wanted a cat for companionship, and the neighbor offered
to trap one of the cats for me. I was told later that 8 months was too
old to become a companion cat. Well, that is wrong! It took a lot of
time and work, but he became one of the most loving cats I have ever
seen. Within about 2 years, we were bonded and he was a lovebug. He
lived to be 20 years old, and those were 20 years with a most remarkable
cat. I trained him to walk on a harness and leash so he could still go
outdoors--although it was more like he took me for a walk than me taking
him for a walk.

MaryL

jmcquown[_2_]
October 20th 16, 02:27 AM
On 10/19/2016 7:34 PM, MaryL wrote:
> On 10/19/2016 11:23 AM, jmcquown wrote:
>> On 10/19/2016 2:14 AM, MaryL wrote:
>>> On 10/18/2016 10:31 AM, jmcquown wrote:
>>>> Feral cats are apparently very resourceful little creatures!
>>>>
>>>> DIFF (Dataw Island Feline Foundation) volunteers made sure there was
>>>> plenty of food and water at the feeding stations before the evacuation
>>>> order due to Hurricane Matthew locked down the island.
>>>>
>>>> I inquired last night on the Dataw Net, any word on the ferals?
>>>>
>>>> All the cats have been accounted for except one shy little guy named
>>>> Mini-Peanut. By all accounts he never wanted to feed with the other
>>>> cats, preferring to eat by the tennis courts. Some county [shelter]
>>>> workers tried to check on him before the resident volunteers came back.
>>>> I'm told they couldn't get to the tennis courts due to storm debris.
>>>> Yeah, it's a big mess out there, folks.
>>>>
>>>> It could be he Mini-Peanut is still being his usual reticent self and
>>>> simply hasn't been spotted yet. I hope!
>>>>
>>>> Purrs that Mini-Peanut is okay.
>>>>
>>>> Jill
>>>
>>> Great news! Thanks for letting us know. Sending purrs for Mini-Peanut.
>>>
>>> MaryL
>>>
>> It is good news! 43 feral cats. They've all had their ears notched so
>> they can be identified as having been trapped, neutered/released.
>>
>> Buffy has a notched ear. She was one of the ferals until her former
>> owner scooped her up as a kitten. Who says you can't turn a feral into
>> a completely spoiled love bug? Introduce them to a life of luxury when
>> they're young, of course you can. :)
>>
> <snip>
>>
>> Jill
>
> My very first cat, many years ago, was feral. He was about 8 months old
> when I adopted him. My neighbor was planning to trap the cats that were
> running loose in that area and take them to a shelter. I was leaving
> for my first semester in graduate school and would be about 1100 miles
> from home. I wanted a cat for companionship, and the neighbor offered
> to trap one of the cats for me. I was told later that 8 months was too
> old to become a companion cat. Well, that is wrong! It took a lot of
> time and work, but he became one of the most loving cats I have ever
> seen. Within about 2 years, we were bonded and he was a lovebug. He
> lived to be 20 years old, and those were 20 years with a most remarkable
> cat. I trained him to walk on a harness and leash so he could still go
> outdoors--although it was more like he took me for a walk than me taking
> him for a walk.
>
> MaryL
>
>
Ah, what a wonderful anecdote! Thanks. :)

Jill

cshenk
October 24th 16, 10:54 PM
jmcquown wrote in rec.pets.cats.anecdotes:

> It is good news! 43 feral cats. They've all had their ears notched
> so they can be identified as having been trapped, neutered/released.
>
> Buffy has a notched ear. She was one of the ferals until her former
> owner scooped her up as a kitten. Who says you can't turn a feral
> into a completely spoiled love bug? Introduce them to a life of
> luxury when they're young, of course you can. :)

Grin, you can even do it with older ones but it is much harder. I've
had Daisy-chan since Feb 2008 and she was estimated to have lived wild
7 years before we got her. Accounting for her time in a no kill where
she went through 5 foster-moms until no more would take her, she's
between 17 and maybe 18 now (likely). Vet concurs, she has that
distinctive 'aged kitty face' similar to what horses and dogs get in
advanced age.

It's rare for a feral to live that long wild and rarer yet for them to
find the right home to tame in. I suspect, she wanted to be tame and
safe. Well, she's safe at least (grin) and generally tame now. We
still have, and always will have issues that speak back to her wild
times. Her issues are a little different. She wasn't a colony cat and
will not tolerate another cat (considers them as dangerous and taking
her resources).

We love her and she's perfect for us.

--

cshenk
October 24th 16, 11:21 PM
MaryL wrote in rec.pets.cats.anecdotes:

> On 10/19/2016 11:23 AM, jmcquown wrote:
> > On 10/19/2016 2:14 AM, MaryL wrote:
> > > On 10/18/2016 10:31 AM, jmcquown wrote:
> > > > Feral cats are apparently very resourceful little creatures!
> > > >
> > > > DIFF (Dataw Island Feline Foundation) volunteers made sure
> > > > there was plenty of food and water at the feeding stations
> > > > before the evacuation order due to Hurricane Matthew locked
> > > > down the island.
> > > >
> > > > I inquired last night on the Dataw Net, any word on the ferals?
> > > >
> > > > All the cats have been accounted for except one shy little guy
> > > > named Mini-Peanut. By all accounts he never wanted to feed
> > > > with the other cats, preferring to eat by the tennis courts.
> > > > Some county [shelter] workers tried to check on him before the
> > > > resident volunteers came back.
> >>> I'm told they couldn't get to the tennis courts due to storm
> debris.
> > > > Yeah, it's a big mess out there, folks.
> > > >
> > > > It could be he Mini-Peanut is still being his usual reticent
> > > > self and simply hasn't been spotted yet. I hope!
> > > >
> > > > Purrs that Mini-Peanut is okay.
> > > >
> > > > Jill
> > >
> > > Great news! Thanks for letting us know. Sending purrs for
> > > Mini-Peanut.
> > >
> > > MaryL
> > >
> > It is good news! 43 feral cats. They've all had their ears
> > notched so they can be identified as having been trapped,
> > neutered/released.
> >
> > Buffy has a notched ear. She was one of the ferals until her former
> > owner scooped her up as a kitten. Who says you can't turn a feral
> > into a completely spoiled love bug? Introduce them to a life of
> > luxury when they're young, of course you can. :)
> >
> <snip>
> >
> > Jill
>
> My very first cat, many years ago, was feral. He was about 8 months
> old when I adopted him. My neighbor was planning to trap the cats
> that were running loose in that area and take them to a shelter. I
> was leaving for my first semester in graduate school and would be
> about 1100 miles from home. I wanted a cat for companionship, and
> the neighbor offered to trap one of the cats for me. I was told
> later that 8 months was too old to become a companion cat. Well,
> that is wrong! It took a lot of time and work, but he became one of
> the most loving cats I have ever seen. Within about 2 years, we were
> bonded and he was a lovebug. He lived to be 20 years old, and those
> were 20 years with a most remarkable cat. I trained him to walk on a
> harness and leash so he could still go outdoors--although it was more
> like he took me for a walk than me taking him for a walk.
>
> MaryL

Correct MaryL. While the chances of success go down with age of the
cat, they probably have no end date. Just less likely to adapt.

The level of skill of the person is critical. I took in my first foster
cats before graduating from HS. I worked my way up to the more
difficult cats and semi-ferals (raised as kittens by humans but left
for a 6mo or more to make it on their own) then to true feral kittens
and so on.

I do not suggest attempting a true feral age 8+ without a LOT of
background experience. By then, I had close to 30 years worth and it
was TOUGH, yet easy (with experience) to make that first attachment of
trust as I knew to let her guide the timeline, not me. It was more us
letting her be until she wanted to do something. Frankly, most that age
can not become house cats. Daisy-chan was the 1 in a million who could.
She has issues still, but with experience, they can be workable in a
home.



--

jmcquown[_2_]
October 25th 16, 12:27 AM
On 10/24/2016 5:54 PM, cshenk wrote:
> jmcquown wrote in rec.pets.cats.anecdotes:
>
>> It is good news! 43 feral cats. They've all had their ears notched
>> so they can be identified as having been trapped, neutered/released.
>>
>> Buffy has a notched ear. She was one of the ferals until her former
>> owner scooped her up as a kitten. Who says you can't turn a feral
>> into a completely spoiled love bug? Introduce them to a life of
>> luxury when they're young, of course you can. :)
>
> Grin, you can even do it with older ones but it is much harder. I've
> had Daisy-chan since Feb 2008 and she was estimated to have lived wild
> 7 years before we got her. Accounting for her time in a no kill where
> she went through 5 foster-moms until no more would take her, she's
> between 17 and maybe 18 now (likely). Vet concurs, she has that
> distinctive 'aged kitty face' similar to what horses and dogs get in
> advanced age.
>
> It's rare for a feral to live that long wild and rarer yet for them to
> find the right home to tame in. I suspect, she wanted to be tame and
> safe. Well, she's safe at least (grin) and generally tame now. We
> still have, and always will have issues that speak back to her wild
> times. Her issues are a little different. She wasn't a colony cat and
> will not tolerate another cat (considers them as dangerous and taking
> her resources).
>
> We love her and she's perfect for us.
>
Thank you for taking in and taking care of Daisy-chan. She does sound
like a bit of a challenge. I'm glad you took her in, love her and found
a way to make it work. That is a rather old age for a cat. :)

Jill

Joy[_3_]
October 25th 16, 12:29 AM
On 10/24/2016 2:54 PM, cshenk wrote:
> jmcquown wrote in rec.pets.cats.anecdotes:
>
>> It is good news! 43 feral cats. They've all had their ears notched
>> so they can be identified as having been trapped, neutered/released.
>>
>> Buffy has a notched ear. She was one of the ferals until her former
>> owner scooped her up as a kitten. Who says you can't turn a feral
>> into a completely spoiled love bug? Introduce them to a life of
>> luxury when they're young, of course you can. :)
>
> Grin, you can even do it with older ones but it is much harder. I've
> had Daisy-chan since Feb 2008 and she was estimated to have lived wild
> 7 years before we got her. Accounting for her time in a no kill where
> she went through 5 foster-moms until no more would take her, she's
> between 17 and maybe 18 now (likely). Vet concurs, she has that
> distinctive 'aged kitty face' similar to what horses and dogs get in
> advanced age.
>
> It's rare for a feral to live that long wild and rarer yet for them to
> find the right home to tame in. I suspect, she wanted to be tame and
> safe. Well, she's safe at least (grin) and generally tame now. We
> still have, and always will have issues that speak back to her wild
> times. Her issues are a little different. She wasn't a colony cat and
> will not tolerate another cat (considers them as dangerous and taking
> her resources).
>
> We love her and she's perfect for us.
>

How wonderful that you and she found each other!

cshenk
October 25th 16, 02:04 AM
jmcquown wrote in rec.pets.cats.anecdotes:

> On 10/24/2016 5:54 PM, cshenk wrote:
> > jmcquown wrote in rec.pets.cats.anecdotes:
> >
> > > It is good news! 43 feral cats. They've all had their ears
> > > notched so they can be identified as having been trapped,
> > > neutered/released.
> > >
> > > Buffy has a notched ear. She was one of the ferals until her
> > > former owner scooped her up as a kitten. Who says you can't turn
> > > a feral into a completely spoiled love bug? Introduce them to a
> > > life of luxury when they're young, of course you can. :)
> >
> > Grin, you can even do it with older ones but it is much harder.
> > I've had Daisy-chan since Feb 2008 and she was estimated to have
> > lived wild 7 years before we got her. Accounting for her time in a
> > no kill where she went through 5 foster-moms until no more would
> > take her, she's between 17 and maybe 18 now (likely). Vet concurs,
> > she has that distinctive 'aged kitty face' similar to what horses
> > and dogs get in advanced age.
> >
> > It's rare for a feral to live that long wild and rarer yet for them
> > to find the right home to tame in. I suspect, she wanted to be
> > tame and safe. Well, she's safe at least (grin) and generally tame
> > now. We still have, and always will have issues that speak back to
> > her wild times. Her issues are a little different. She wasn't a
> > colony cat and will not tolerate another cat (considers them as
> > dangerous and taking her resources).
> >
> > We love her and she's perfect for us.
> >
> Thank you for taking in and taking care of Daisy-chan. She does
> sound like a bit of a challenge. I'm glad you took her in, love her
> and found a way to make it work. That is a rather old age for a cat.
> :)
>
> Jill

True Jill. She is very unique and the rare example here where a
no-kill was about to be turned in. They had no one willing to foster
her and she spent the last 12 months in a cage before we adopted her.

If it helps, what made it work was she was at deaths door when she was
found with one surviving kitten of her last batch (he didnt make it,
half grown?) and she was pregnant. Under a bush. Dying.

She was in such bad shape, they could handle her and didn't know what
she was.

Taken to no-kill as a solid white cat with green eyes, they expected a
fast adoption. By the time we found her, we had to prove we could
safely handle her and her final of 5 'foster-moms' refused to come in
the room with her with us as she was let out.

She has mishandling issues from her first foster's trying to treat her
as a 'lap kittie' due to her looks. She isn't and never will be a
classic lap kittie. Frankly, I do not like lap kitties bothering me but
she suits me well.
--

cshenk
October 25th 16, 02:22 AM
Joy wrote in rec.pets.cats.anecdotes:

> On 10/24/2016 2:54 PM, cshenk wrote:
> > jmcquown wrote in rec.pets.cats.anecdotes:
> >
> > > It is good news! 43 feral cats. They've all had their ears
> > > notched so they can be identified as having been trapped,
> > > neutered/released.
> > >
> > > Buffy has a notched ear. She was one of the ferals until her
> > > former owner scooped her up as a kitten. Who says you can't turn
> > > a feral into a completely spoiled love bug? Introduce them to a
> > > life of luxury when they're young, of course you can. :)
> >
> > Grin, you can even do it with older ones but it is much harder.
> > I've had Daisy-chan since Feb 2008 and she was estimated to have
> > lived wild 7 years before we got her. Accounting for her time in a
> > no kill where she went through 5 foster-moms until no more would
> > take her, she's between 17 and maybe 18 now (likely). Vet concurs,
> > she has that distinctive 'aged kitty face' similar to what horses
> > and dogs get in advanced age.
> >
> > It's rare for a feral to live that long wild and rarer yet for them
> > to find the right home to tame in. I suspect, she wanted to be
> > tame and safe. Well, she's safe at least (grin) and generally tame
> > now. We still have, and always will have issues that speak back to
> > her wild times. Her issues are a little different. She wasn't a
> > colony cat and will not tolerate another cat (considers them as
> > dangerous and taking her resources).
> >
> > We love her and she's perfect for us.
> >
>
> How wonderful that you and she found each other!

Exactly! LOL, we had to sign a waiver to get her. We are however really
with happy with her.

Here's a silly bit. She learned to play the bed mice game with our
toes about 4 years in, but she inately understood real feet were there.
No bites or scratches *ever*. Just purrs and capturing paws for a
moment or so.

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