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John Kasupski
January 14th 17, 04:30 AM
In another thread, I promised (or threatened, depending on your point of view)
to tell the story of how my relatively new kitten Minnie changed my mind about
not really wanting a pet - so, here goes...

Why didn't I want another pet at the time? About fifteen years ago, I had a cat
named Goldie, a male orange tabby who was, to make a long story shorter, the
coolest cat I'd ever seen - and I've seen my share. Then one morning I left for
work and saw him lying dead on the shoulder of the road about fifty feet from
the driveway. He'd gotten outside during the night and been struck and killed by
a passing vehicle. It was obvious he'd been on the shoulder of the road and not
in the driving lane when he was hit, so whoever killed him deliberately swerved
off the road onto the shoulder to do so. I'd like to spend ten minutes alone in
a locked room with the driver of that vehicle.

I never wanted another pet after that because (a) I always felt no other pet
could ever replace him in my eyes - Goldie set the bar way too high in that
regard - and (b) I'm still deeply heartbroken even to this day when I think
about how I lost him. I moved here at the beginning of June and twice since then
I'd turned down offers of cats. But then a week or so before Halloween, I got a
call from someone who was about to move someplace that doesn't allow pets, and
either I took this kitten or she went to an animal shelter. Knowing what happens
to animals at shelters if they aren't adopted after a certain time, I agreed to
take her in - but only until I found someone else to take her permanently.

So, a few days later, the previous owner brought Minnie over, stayed for an hour
or so and told me what she could about the kitten's past history. I learned that
the kitten had been taken in from out on somebody's front porch - no telling if
she'd been a "stray" before that, or run away, or had been abandoned - but that
woman's five-year old son had subsequently been basically been caught red handed
trying to drown the kitty in the toilet, so the kitty had ended up with a second
new owner...the one who had just left her behind (perhaps not for the first
time) at the end of a three-hour bus trip on a chilly and rainy day in late
October, taking the cat carrier she'd transported the kitten in with her as she
departed out the back door, never to return again.

The kitten just sat there on my kitchen floor staring at the door briefly, then
looked up expectantly at me. I'm sure she understood that she had just been
dumped here and was now looking at her third human in four months, not to
mention the first of those who happened to be a man. To say that I felt sorry
for her at that moment would be a major understatement, so I scooped her up,
carried her into the dining room, sat down in my computer chair, and put her
down in front of me on the table. She promptly put her back end down and sat
there facing me with her front legs holding her up and I began petting her,
which she permitted with zero fuss, while I spoke to her quietly in an effort to
reassure her that everything would be alright.

After about five minutes us getting to know each other, her little motor fired
up, and I moved my face closer to hers and whispered, "Good girl," I said. "At
least now I know you CAN purr. That's a start." Whereupon she stood up on all
fours, leaned forward and stretched out her neck to close the remaining distance
between my face and hers, continued purring as loudly as a kitten possibly can,
and started gently licking my nose...and I decided then and there that although
I'll forever miss Goldie and still feel I'll probably never have another pet who
can ever even hold a candle to him, this adorable little creature standing here
in front of me had just at least earned the chance to take her best shot at it.

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

P.S. - I noted elsewhere in this newsgroup that I've only had Minnie since
Halloween and already I could write a book. I fear I've come close to doing
exactly that here. Sorry about the length of this post. And in case anyone has
made it all the way down here and is wondering - NO, Minnie will not be judged
in comparison to Goldie. She could poop gold nuggets three times a day for the
next fifteen years, thereby making me a billionaire, and measuring up to Goldie
would still be impossible. I will NEVER forget him! But Minnie already has, and
will continue to have, a special place in my heart that's her very own. - JDK

dgk
January 14th 17, 06:39 AM
On Fri, 13 Jan 2017 22:30:14 -0500, John Kasupski >
wrote:

>
>In another thread, I promised (or threatened, depending on your point of view)
>to tell the story of how my relatively new kitten Minnie changed my mind about
>not really wanting a pet - so, here goes...
>...
>After about five minutes us getting to know each other, her little motor fired
>up, and I moved my face closer to hers and whispered, "Good girl," I said. "At
>least now I know you CAN purr. That's a start." Whereupon she stood up on all
>fours, leaned forward and stretched out her neck to close the remaining distance
>between my face and hers, continued purring as loudly as a kitten possibly can,
>and started gently licking my nose...and I decided then and there that although
>I'll forever miss Goldie and still feel I'll probably never have another pet who
>can ever even hold a candle to him, this adorable little creature standing here
>in front of me had just at least earned the chance to take her best shot at it.
>
>John D. Kasupski
>Niagara Falls, NY
>
>P.S. - I noted elsewhere in this newsgroup that I've only had Minnie since
>Halloween and already I could write a book. I fear I've come close to doing
>exactly that here. Sorry about the length of this post. And in case anyone has
>made it all the way down here and is wondering - NO, Minnie will not be judged
>in comparison to Goldie. She could poop gold nuggets three times a day for the
>next fifteen years, thereby making me a billionaire, and measuring up to Goldie
>would still be impossible. I will NEVER forget him! But Minnie already has, and
>will continue to have, a special place in my heart that's her very own. - JDK

I can see it. You can't compare them since they're all so different,
it really isn't fair to compare them.

I've had two cats, Nico and Espy, who were simply amazing. Very smart,
very personable, and very big pains since smart cats tend to get into
strange situations.

None of my current cats are that smart or personable. Baby is pretty
feral so it's an accomplishment when she comes to me for petting.
Nipsy is a whiner, and can be very annoying, but he's very cute when
he's sleeping. And Scooter is a joy, not as smart as Espy or Nico, but
he does so many funny things that he's fun to have around. They're all
special in their own way.

And Marlo, who's living at my mother's house, has greatly improved
mom's life. Mom adores her, calling me almost every day to tell me the
newest cute thing that Marlo has done. Since mom omly lives a half
mile away, I get to see Marlo almost every day and she is a somewhat
different cat than she was. I don't think she misses the other three
at all - maybe she was meant to be a single cat.

Mom never wanted a cat, but now that she has one, she adores Marlo.
Strange how that happens.

Joy[_3_]
January 14th 17, 07:46 AM
On 1/13/2017 7:30 PM, John Kasupski wrote:
>
> In another thread, I promised (or threatened, depending on your point of view)
> to tell the story of how my relatively new kitten Minnie changed my mind about
> not really wanting a pet - so, here goes...
>
> Why didn't I want another pet at the time? About fifteen years ago, I had a cat
> named Goldie, a male orange tabby who was, to make a long story shorter, the
> coolest cat I'd ever seen - and I've seen my share. Then one morning I left for
> work and saw him lying dead on the shoulder of the road about fifty feet from
> the driveway. He'd gotten outside during the night and been struck and killed by
> a passing vehicle. It was obvious he'd been on the shoulder of the road and not
> in the driving lane when he was hit, so whoever killed him deliberately swerved
> off the road onto the shoulder to do so. I'd like to spend ten minutes alone in
> a locked room with the driver of that vehicle.
>
> I never wanted another pet after that because (a) I always felt no other pet
> could ever replace him in my eyes - Goldie set the bar way too high in that
> regard - and (b) I'm still deeply heartbroken even to this day when I think
> about how I lost him. I moved here at the beginning of June and twice since then
> I'd turned down offers of cats. But then a week or so before Halloween, I got a
> call from someone who was about to move someplace that doesn't allow pets, and
> either I took this kitten or she went to an animal shelter. Knowing what happens
> to animals at shelters if they aren't adopted after a certain time, I agreed to
> take her in - but only until I found someone else to take her permanently.
>
> So, a few days later, the previous owner brought Minnie over, stayed for an hour
> or so and told me what she could about the kitten's past history. I learned that
> the kitten had been taken in from out on somebody's front porch - no telling if
> she'd been a "stray" before that, or run away, or had been abandoned - but that
> woman's five-year old son had subsequently been basically been caught red handed
> trying to drown the kitty in the toilet, so the kitty had ended up with a second
> new owner...the one who had just left her behind (perhaps not for the first
> time) at the end of a three-hour bus trip on a chilly and rainy day in late
> October, taking the cat carrier she'd transported the kitten in with her as she
> departed out the back door, never to return again.
>
> The kitten just sat there on my kitchen floor staring at the door briefly, then
> looked up expectantly at me. I'm sure she understood that she had just been
> dumped here and was now looking at her third human in four months, not to
> mention the first of those who happened to be a man. To say that I felt sorry
> for her at that moment would be a major understatement, so I scooped her up,
> carried her into the dining room, sat down in my computer chair, and put her
> down in front of me on the table. She promptly put her back end down and sat
> there facing me with her front legs holding her up and I began petting her,
> which she permitted with zero fuss, while I spoke to her quietly in an effort to
> reassure her that everything would be alright.
>
> After about five minutes us getting to know each other, her little motor fired
> up, and I moved my face closer to hers and whispered, "Good girl," I said. "At
> least now I know you CAN purr. That's a start." Whereupon she stood up on all
> fours, leaned forward and stretched out her neck to close the remaining distance
> between my face and hers, continued purring as loudly as a kitten possibly can,
> and started gently licking my nose...and I decided then and there that although
> I'll forever miss Goldie and still feel I'll probably never have another pet who
> can ever even hold a candle to him, this adorable little creature standing here
> in front of me had just at least earned the chance to take her best shot at it.
>
> John D. Kasupski
> Niagara Falls, NY
>
> P.S. - I noted elsewhere in this newsgroup that I've only had Minnie since
> Halloween and already I could write a book. I fear I've come close to doing
> exactly that here. Sorry about the length of this post. And in case anyone has
> made it all the way down here and is wondering - NO, Minnie will not be judged
> in comparison to Goldie. She could poop gold nuggets three times a day for the
> next fifteen years, thereby making me a billionaire, and measuring up to Goldie
> would still be impossible. I will NEVER forget him! But Minnie already has, and
> will continue to have, a special place in my heart that's her very own. - JDK
>

And that is as it should be. Thanks for sharing this story with us.

John Kasupski
January 14th 17, 08:30 AM
On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 00:39:16 -0500, dgk > wrote:

>I can see it. You can't compare them since they're all so different,
>it really isn't fair to compare them.

True...but that's not it. You see...<sigh>

Well, since I started the thread, I suppose it's okay for me to hijack it and
talk about Goldie (RB).

I didn't pick him...he picked me. I was over at a friend's house helping him fix
his wife's car. We were standing there in his garage, and up walked this cat who
started rubbing up on me and purring up a storm and practically jumped right
into my arms when I bent down to scratch behind his ears. An hour later, he's
still at it. We finish fixing the car, I get in my truck to leave, he hops right
in with me and sets up shop on the passenger's seat. I ask my buddy whose cat
this is...he tells me it's a stray that's always around the neighborhood, and
that his daughter's been leaving food out on their porch for the cat, so it
keeps coming around...and "If you want it, take it with you." He wasn't a cat
lover, and he said he was getting tired of having to go buy cat food for his
daughter to feed to this cat, who she'd named Goldie.

I got out of my truck, went in the house, and found his daughter. I felt I had
to ask her first. She was only 14, and I was Godfather to her older brother.

She was okay with it. I took another look at the cat as I started the engine. He
made no attempt to bail out through the open window...instead he moved over,
laid down across my lap, and looked up at me as if to ask, "Well? Are we going
for a ride or not?"

We went for a ride. When I got home, my wife and kids were out in the yard. The
cat jumped out of the truck and went right over to them, giving each of them in
turn the same treatment he'd given me in my buddy's garage. The kids weren't
having any part of NOT letting him in the house after that, and my wife already
had fallen in love with him too.

Two o'clock in the morning, he hops onto the bed with a mouse. That was the
first. He caught one every day for the first five days. Then once he'd caught
all the mice, he went outside on day six and climbed up into a tree and came
down with a bird in his mouth. The house sat on a 16-acre lot and he'd follow us
all over the property like a dog would. There was a pond out back fed by an
underground stream. One real hot summer day we took the kids back to the pond
and let them go swimming. Goldie jumped in right in with them and acted like he
was having the time of his life.

We did have a dog. My wife inherited him when her grandfather passed away. He
was too big and mean to allow it to run loose with the kids around, so we built
a doghouse in the front yard and left him chained to a stake in the dirt next to
it when the kids were outside. Goldie knew down to the last inch exactly how far
the dog could reach on that chain because the grass was mostly gone in the dog's
area...and he'd sit just outside the dog's reach calmly grooming himself. He
never batted the dog in the snoot or did anything else to further antagonize the
dog. He just sat there showing absolutely no fear with the dog's mouth about two
inches away snarling and snapping his teeth the whole time. It was enough. That
dog couldn't have been any more enraged and humiliated if Goldie had sat there
waving an upraised middle finger in his face.

The cat also loved to go for a ride in the truck. Open any of the doors, and he
was in the truck in an instant. You didn't even see him anywhere nearby, but
he'd get himself in there so fast it seemed like he was already in there before
you got the door open.

Aside from mice and birds, he'd also eat whatever you ate. Beef, pork, chicken,
duck, venison, cold cuts, veggies...anything you offered him, he'd eat it...yet
you could pile food on your dinner plate, put it on the table, and walk out of
the room for five minutes, and come back to find it hadn't been touched. Not by
Goldie, anyway...the dog was another matter entirely.

The despicable person who deliberately swerved off the road and onto the
shoulder to hit and kill Goldie and thereby took him away from us...well, as far
as I'm concerned, there's no place in Hades hot enough for that person, and
that's all there is to it. He was the coolest, most affectionate, best-behaved
cat I've ever had the pleasure of being around, I will miss him forever, and I'd
never embarrass any other cat by comparing him or her to Goldie.

>I've had two cats, Nico and Espy, who were simply amazing. Very smart,
>very personable, and very big pains since smart cats tend to get into
>strange situations.

Usually the smartest ones seem to figure out how to get themselves out of
trouble too if they get into it, but - as with all things - there sometimes are
exceptions. I had a cat who was smart enough to turn the kitchen faucet on by
himself so he could get a drink, but he often slid into the stainless steel sink
and couldn't get back out because his claws couldn't gain any traction. Luckily,
he was also smart enough not to go near the sink to begin with when he heard the
garbage disposal running.

>None of my current cats are that smart or personable. Baby is pretty
>feral so it's an accomplishment when she comes to me for petting.
>Nipsy is a whiner, and can be very annoying, but he's very cute when
>he's sleeping. And Scooter is a joy, not as smart as Espy or Nico, but
>he does so many funny things that he's fun to have around. They're all
>special in their own way.

Even if your cat is dumber than a stump, he or she is still your cat, which is
in itself enough to make them special. :-)

>And Marlo, who's living at my mother's house, has greatly improved
>mom's life. Mom adores her, calling me almost every day to tell me the
>newest cute thing that Marlo has done. Since mom omly lives a half
>mile away, I get to see Marlo almost every day and she is a somewhat
>different cat than she was. I don't think she misses the other three
>at all - maybe she was meant to be a single cat.

Before the world brought me Minnie, my landlady was trying to get me to take one
of her cats because he doesn't get along with her other pets and she thought he
might do better here as a single cat. Nwo that Minnie is her, she's a single
cat, and if hers came here too, he wouldn't be. I could still end up with him at
least temporarily just to see if he would get along with Minnie, in which case
she'd then have a feline companion for those times when her human companion
won't get off the doggone computer and pay attention to her. But neither kitty
has been altered yet so if we proceed with investigating the possibility, we'll
have to fix that first or we could end up with a houseful of newborn kittens.
Taking them all back to her house wouldn't be an option. There's already two
other cats, a dog, three horses, two mules, and more chickens than I could count
last time I was over there since they insisted on being mean and refused to stay
in one place long enough for me to take an accurate census.

>Mom never wanted a cat, but now that she has one, she adores Marlo.
>Strange how that happens.

Kind of like myself and Minnie. I didn't want another cat, but when I moved in
here the rest of the world suddenly entered into a sinister conspiracy to make
me have a cat. The rest of the world finally won after a five-month battle, and
it took mere minutes alone in the house with me for the kitty to change my mind.
I've come to believe that we humans are either wired to be cat lovers or we're
not, and that any cat who really wants to will earn the love and affection of us
cat-lovers whether we like it or not.

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

John Kasupski
January 14th 17, 10:38 AM
On Fri, 13 Jan 2017 22:46:18 -0800, Joy > wrote:

>> P.S. - I noted elsewhere in this newsgroup that I've only had Minnie since
>> Halloween and already I could write a book. I fear I've come close to doing
>> exactly that here. Sorry about the length of this post. And in case anyone has
>> made it all the way down here and is wondering - NO, Minnie will not be judged
>> in comparison to Goldie. She could poop gold nuggets three times a day for the
>> next fifteen years, thereby making me a billionaire, and measuring up to Goldie
>> would still be impossible. I will NEVER forget him! But Minnie already has, and
>> will continue to have, a special place in my heart that's her very own. - JDK
>>
>
>And that is as it should be. Thanks for sharing this story with us.

That is as it MUST be, Joy! Otherwise, it wouldn't be any less unfair to her if
I simply took her out back and drowned her in the creek. Remember, this kitten
was taken in off of someone's porch into an environment that was far less than
favorable because there was a five-year old around who probably never left her
alone for a minute. And after she was rescued from there, she spent a lot of
time alone in an apartment, listening to people who lived in other apartments in
the building coming and going and never really knowing for sure whether she was
hearing her new owner finally coming home, or someone else...and possibly even
someone else coming to drag her back to where that five-year old almost drowned
her in the toilet the last time she was there (shudder).

So thanks to all that, she has behavioral issues. She still lives part of her
life in terror because of how she lived before she got here. I had her for six
weeks before she finally realized I wasn't going to mess with her when she was
eating and quit going into deer-in-the-headlights mode every time I happened to
walk by her when she had her face down in her food dish. It's a slow process
after a kitten reaches a certain age and still hasn't been socialized properly,
but I'm making noticeable progress, and the more I earn her trust, the more I'm
encouraged by the changes in her behavior. No, she'll never be perfect, but I'll
never be perfect either, so I'm not going to expect her to be!

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

jmcquown[_2_]
January 16th 17, 06:14 PM
On 1/13/2017 10:30 PM, John Kasupski wrote:
> P.S. - I noted elsewhere in this newsgroup that I've only had Minnie since
> Halloween and already I could write a book. I fear I've come close to doing
> exactly that here. Sorry about the length of this post. And in case anyone has
> made it all the way down here and is wondering - NO, Minnie will not be judged
> in comparison to Goldie. She could poop gold nuggets three times a day for the
> next fifteen years, thereby making me a billionaire, and measuring up to Goldie
> would still be impossible. I will NEVER forget him! But Minnie already has, and
> will continue to have, a special place in my heart that's her very own. - JDK

I didn't want another cat after Persia (RB 2014), either. She was my
first cat and, as I've already noted, she was quite clever. That trick
with the can of Fancy Feast (FF) in the pantry was even more impressive
because the FF was sitting next to an identical size can of chopped
green chili peppers. Apparently cats can smell through the can. :)

As far as cats getting themselves into and out of situations, where I
lived when Persia demanded entry was a ground level apartment (actually,
they were all that way). There was a washer & dryer in the hallway
hidden behind two metal sliding bi-fold doors. Persia managed to open
one of the doors, jump on on the dryer and then down into the small
space between the dryer and the wall. Ooops! She couldn't jump back
up! Not enough room to leap, no way to get a grip on the side of the
dryer. If I hadn't been home and heard her meowing who knows how long
she'd have been there? I moved the dryer, picked her up. She proceeded
to give me a "I meant to do that" look and pranced off. LOL

I wound up having to put rubber bands on the knobs on the bi-fold doors
so she couldn't open them again. Not for lack of trying! I'm not sure
what the heck was so interesting about the laundry room.

I digress. Persia was my first cat. She was likely 2-3 years old when
she came to live with me (the vet's best guess). She was about 16 when
she died.

I didn't want another cat. But in June, 2015 someone where I live now
died. She had (turned out) 3 cats. One was my cat Buffy, an orange
tabby. Another was a Tonkinese boy named Frankie. I learned there had
been a third cat, Suz-Q but she had already been adopted. Anyway, turns
out my now cat Buffy was regularly beaten up and bullied by Frankie.
The person who was adopting out the cats had to lock Frankie in the
sunroom so I could meet Buffy. She was hiding on a chair under a glass
dining room table. Guess she didn't know we could see her. LOL

Buffy was very shy... when I went to get her we had to entice her into
the soft carrier I'd brought with me with a bit of wet food in a bowl.
She didn't put up a fuss in the carrier, either. I brought her home and
let her out in the bedroom. (That's where the food/water is and the
litterbox is in the master bathroom. Here's your new home!)

Long story short, Buffy hid under the bed for a while but soon ventured
out. I looked under the bed, couldn't find her. I finally did find her
on a chair under the dining room table. It has a tablecloth over it.
So, she was on the chair, it's like being invisible. <G> I spoke to her
softly, tapped my fingers on the floor. "It's okay, Buffy." She jumped
down and came to me.

She finally figured out there isn't a 'Frankie' going to beat her up.
It didn't take her long to become a regular love-bug. :) She does
occasionally jump at loud noises.

Jill

John Kasupski
January 17th 17, 12:41 AM
On Mon, 16 Jan 2017 12:14:36 -0500, jmcquown > wrote:

>Apparently cats can smell through the can. :)

This.

The morning of Christmas Eve, I couldn't decide on a vegetable to make with
dinner later - so I ended up letting Minnie choose. I took out a can of corn, a
can of carrots, and a can of green beans and lined them up in the middle of the
kitchen floor about ten inches apart, then I went and sat at the kitchen table,

Minnie emerged from her favorite kitchen hiding place - a cardbox box she
adopted after I brought groceries home in it, but that's another story - and
looked up at me for a few seconds as if to ask, "Okay, human - what are you
trying to pull now?" She then went over and sniffed each can it briefly, went
around to the other side and sniffed them again in the reverse order, but I
noticed that she did pause to peer over at me for a few seconds as she was
re-sniffing the can of corn. "Hmmm...was that it?" I thought, as she went and
laid down on the throw rug in front of the kitchen sink and sat there waiting to
see what I was up to with all this.

After a few minutes of silence, I said to her, "So, Minnie...pick one of those
out, will you?" Somewhat to my surprise, she immediately got up and stepped
straight up to the can of corn and sniffed it again while looking at me as if to
say, "I already did, silly human - how did you manage to miss it?" Then she
walked away and into the dining room to indicate that her verdict was final and
there would be no possiblity of appeal.

"Alright," I called after her..."I got it that time. Corn it is!"

The thing is, it has turned out that so far, corn seems to be the only vegetable
Minnie will eat. It doesn't seem to matter to her if it's kernel or cream corn,
but she consistently declines all the other ones I typically buy such as
carrots, green beans, peas, potato...and so it did occur to me to wonder if she
could indeed somehow smell the contents right through the cans.

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

Jack Campin
January 17th 17, 02:39 AM
> Apparently cats can smell through the can. :)

We used to keep tinned catfood in an open drawer. That drawer soon
became Marblecake's favourite sleeping spot. The food must often
have been warm when we opened it.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
e m a i l : j a c k @ c a m p i n . m e . u k
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mobile 07800 739 557 <http://www.campin.me.uk> Twitter: JackCampin

John Kasupski
January 17th 17, 06:50 AM
On Tue, 17 Jan 2017 01:39:30 +0000, Jack Campin > wrote:

>> Apparently cats can smell through the can. :)
>
>We used to keep tinned catfood in an open drawer. That drawer soon
>became Marblecake's favourite sleeping spot. The food must often
>have been warm when we opened it.

I seem to recall reading somewhere that cats like their food best when it's at
their own body temperatures...so our cats would probably tell us it was very
thoughtful and considerate of Marblecake to warm it up for you before you served
it, thereby saving you the time and effort, and they'd probably also suggest
that you remember to say "Thank you!"

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

Bastette
January 18th 17, 12:39 AM
John Kasupski wrote:

> The thing is, it has turned out that so far, corn seems to be the only
> vegetable Minnie will eat. It doesn't seem to matter to her if it's
> kernel or cream corn,

With creamed corn, or any other processed food that has more than just the
vegetable in it, it's a good idea to read the ingredients list to make sure
there's no onion. Onion is bad for cats and can cause serious health problems,
maybe even death. The same is true for garlic, although that's less likely
to be found in creamed corn.

--
If you can't operate your turn signal, what makes you think you can
drive the rest of the car? -- bumper sticker

Bastette
January 18th 17, 02:36 AM
John Kasupski wrote:

> We did have a dog. My wife inherited him when her grandfather passed
> away. He was too big and mean to allow it to run loose with the kids
> around, so we built a doghouse in the front yard and left him chained
> to a stake in the dirt next to it when the kids were outside. Goldie
> knew down to the last inch exactly how far the dog could reach on that
> chain because the grass was mostly gone in the dog's area...and he'd
> sit just outside the dog's reach calmly grooming himself. He never
> batted the dog in the snoot or did anything else to further antagonize
> the dog. He just sat there showing absolutely no fear with the dog's
> mouth about two inches away snarling and snapping his teeth the whole
> time. It was enough. That dog couldn't have been any more enraged and
> humiliated if Goldie had sat there waving an upraised middle finger
> in his face.

Haha, that sounds like a cartoon of a dog and cat! Sort of like Tom and
Jerry, but with a dog and a much-smarter cat.

It also reminds me of a cat belonging to someone who used to post here
several years ago, when the newsgroup was much more active. His name was
Ollie and his human's name was Bev. I don't think she's here anymore, but
I do see her posts on Facebook occasionally. She used to tell us tales
of Ollie's famous nonchalance. She had a relative who was afraid of cats
(afraid of animals, period). He would try to shoo Ollie away by stamping
his feet, waving his arms wildly and yelling. Ollie would just sit there
quietly grooming. That cat could not be intimidated.

> The despicable person who deliberately swerved off the road and onto the
> shoulder to hit and kill Goldie and thereby took him away from us...well,
> as far as I'm concerned, there's no place in Hades hot enough for that
> person, and that's all there is to it.

Is it possible that someone moved Goldie over to the side of the road after
he was killed? People sometimes do that with a dead animal - I did it myself
a few years ago. If someone did this, they might not have known whose cat
it was, so couldn't notify you. Maybe it really was an accident. Of course,
the person who hit him should have stopped, but they might not have meant
to hit him. This is something I would want to believe, if it happened to my
cat. Since you don't know exactly what happened, there's no harm in thinking
of it that way.

> Usually the smartest ones seem to figure out how to get themselves out
> of trouble too if they get into it, but - as with all things - there
> sometimes are exceptions.

Tell me about it! I used to have a cat, Smudge, who was pretty smart. She
would become easily bored with games, once she figured out what the drill
was. She had a mandate to be outside, which was a struggle between us for
a long time - I live in an urban area which is not ideal for outdoor cats.
At least my neighborhood is residential and has a lot of winding streets
that don't get much traffic. She was savvy about cars, too, unlike some of
the neighborhood cats who would go to sleep in the middle of the road! I
guess the asphalt got nice and warm in the summer.

Anyway, Smudge got herself into various scrapes because she was very
curious and always had to investigate things. One time she got locked in
a neighbor's garage for a week. I despaired of ever seeing her again, until
one day when I went outside, I heard this loud, unholy cat meowing. It didn't
sound like Smudge, so I thought some other poor cat was in trouble and I went
to investigate. I followed the sound to a garage, which luckily had a window
on the side. I looked in, and there was Smudge! I think she must have seen
me when I first came out, so she howled to get my attention. It worked!

> Even if your cat is dumber than a stump, he or she is still your cat,
> which is in itself enough to make them special. :-)

My favorite cat ever, Roxy (who passed away last year), was not a genius
cat. She wasn't dumb, just average, but I had her and Smudge at the same
time, and Smudge could make any cat look like a not-so-sharp knife by
comparison. I also have a cat named Licorice (mostly known as "Licky"),
who is somewhere in between those two, intelligence-wise. I like smart
cats, but affection matters a lot more to me. Roxy really was a very
contented, ultra-domesticated animal who was happy to hang out in the
house and cuddle.

You could really see the difference in their play. Smudge took her
predation games very seriously. She'd hunker down, her pupils would get
huge, and she'd slink toward the string (or whatever I was dangling) as
though it was really alive, and dive at it with jaws clamping on it and
claws digging in. Licky is pretty much the same way. Roxy, on the other
hand, would roll over onto her back and wave her arms and legs around
trying to catch the dangling object. She looked completely adorable, but
I'm sure if there had been any prey animals around, they would've been
snickering to themselves.

Now it's just me and Licky, but one of these days I'm going to adopt a
friend for him. I can tell that he gets lonely when I'm not home,
because he's really needy for attention at night, which wasn't the case
when Roxy was around. I just have to get myself to the shelter before
they close, and the hours I keep aren't conducive to that. That's a
different story.

Joyce - really an owl

--
"Once you can accept the universe as matter expanding into nothing
that is something, wearing stripes with plaid comes easy."
-- A. Einstein

John Kasupski
January 18th 17, 03:14 AM
On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 01:36:18 -0000 (UTC), Bastette >
wrote:

>Is it possible that someone moved Goldie over to the side of the road after
>he was killed?

No. I won't go into too many gory details in case someone is eating while
they're reading this, but let's just say that the condition of the remains and
other clues present on the ground near the body made it quite evident that he
was hit right there on the shoulder where I found him and had not been moved.

>You could really see the difference in their play. Smudge took her
>predation games very seriously. She'd hunker down, her pupils would get
>huge, and she'd slink toward the string (or whatever I was dangling) as
>though it was really alive, and dive at it with jaws clamping on it and
>claws digging in. Licky is pretty much the same way. Roxy, on the other
>hand, would roll over onto her back and wave her arms and legs around
>trying to catch the dangling object. She looked completely adorable, but
>I'm sure if there had been any prey animals around, they would've been
>snickering to themselves.

Yeah, right up until the moment she caught them! Goldie was the same way when
you were playing with him. Then when you thought he was plum tuckered out he'd
walk away and return shortly with a dead mouse or bird to drop at your feet. The
personality he presented to us humans was the polar opposite of what his prey
saw from the business end of what we viewed as his ridiculously cute front paws.

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

John Kasupski
January 18th 17, 03:33 AM
On Tue, 17 Jan 2017 23:39:43 -0000 (UTC), Bastette >
wrote:

>With creamed corn, or any other processed food that has more than just the
>vegetable in it, it's a good idea to read the ingredients list to make sure
>there's no onion. Onion is bad for cats and can cause serious health problems,
>maybe even death. The same is true for garlic, although that's less likely
>to be found in creamed corn.

This fact IS a problem, because Minnie likes spaghetti and I haven't seen a jar
of spaghetti sauce yet that doesn't have onion and dried or dehydrated garlic on
the list of ingredients. Luckily, she'll accept pasta without sauce, especially
if I melt a little butter on it for her first.

I only had cream corn because it was given to me, and I've used it up. When I
buy it, it's kernal corn, and again I melt butter on it when I heat it up, which
gives her another reason to like it. Then again, I also melt butter on my peas
and green beans, and she couldn't be any less interested in them.

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

Bastette
January 18th 17, 05:50 AM
John Kasupski wrote:

> On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 01:36:18 -0000 (UTC), Bastette >
> wrote:

>>Is it possible that someone moved Goldie over to the side of the road after
>>he was killed?

> No. I won't go into too many gory details in case someone is eating while
> they're reading this, but let's just say that the condition of the remains and
> other clues present on the ground near the body made it quite evident that he
> was hit right there on the shoulder where I found him and had not been moved.

I'm so sorry to hear this. The very idea that anyone would do something
like that deliberately is so upsetting. Sometimes it feels like the world
is too harsh for the kind of love we feel for our furry friends.

>> Roxy, on the other
>> hand, would roll over onto her back and wave her arms and legs around
>> trying to catch the dangling object. She looked completely adorable, but
>> I'm sure if there had been any prey animals around, they would've been
>> snickering to themselves.

> Yeah, right up until the moment she caught them! Goldie was the same way when
> you were playing with him. Then when you thought he was plum tuckered out he'd
> walk away and return shortly with a dead mouse or bird to drop at your feet. The
> personality he presented to us humans was the polar opposite of what his prey
> saw from the business end of what we viewed as his ridiculously cute front paws.


Ha - good point. Kind of how I might feel seeing a mountain lion coming
toward me.

Joyce

--
Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not
as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarassed millionaires.
--John Steinbeck

John Kasupski
January 18th 17, 08:03 AM
On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 04:50:53 -0000 (UTC), Bastette >
wrote:

>John Kasupski wrote:
>
> > On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 01:36:18 -0000 (UTC), Bastette >
> > wrote:
>
> >>Is it possible that someone moved Goldie over to the side of the road after
> >>he was killed?
>
> > No. I won't go into too many gory details in case someone is eating while
> > they're reading this, but let's just say that the condition of the remains and
> > other clues present on the ground near the body made it quite evident that he
> > was hit right there on the shoulder where I found him and had not been moved.
>
>I'm so sorry to hear this. The very idea that anyone would do something
>like that deliberately is so upsetting. Sometimes it feels like the world
>is too harsh for the kind of love we feel for our furry friends.

In a perfect , Goldie jumps into the ditch at the last instant and survives
unharmed. The driver loses control of the vehicle, which veers into the ditch,
flips upside down, and goes airborne fifty feet into a utility pole, The driver
is decapitated on impact. The body remains in the vehicle. The head rolls on
another twenty feet, coming to rest at the feet of a whitetail deer grazing
nearby - who, having witnessed the entire incident, unhesitatingly kicks it into
the ditch and walks away satisfied that justice has been served.

> >> Roxy, on the other
> >> hand, would roll over onto her back and wave her arms and legs around
> >> trying to catch the dangling object. She looked completely adorable, but
> >> I'm sure if there had been any prey animals around, they would've been
> >> snickering to themselves.
>
> > Yeah, right up until the moment she caught them! Goldie was the same way when
> > you were playing with him. Then when you thought he was plum tuckered out he'd
> > walk away and return shortly with a dead mouse or bird to drop at your feet. The
> > personality he presented to us humans was the polar opposite of what his prey
> > saw from the business end of what we viewed as his ridiculously cute front paws.
>
>
>Ha - good point. Kind of how I might feel seeing a mountain lion coming
>toward me.

Don't get me wrong, I've seen plenty of cats who wouldn't hurt a fly. A mouse
could walk out into the middle of the room, unfold a lawn chair, and sit there
in it calmly sipping a glass of iced tea while watching soap operas on TV all
afternoon, and those cats probably wouldn't move a muscle. But you can rest
assured that another cat in the neighborhood recently slaughtered a mouse in
cold blood, and the word's gotten out in the mouse community about the brutal
murder up the block, so they're not likely to tempt fate in such a manner. :-)

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

John Kasupski
January 18th 17, 08:05 AM
On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 02:03:28 -0500, John Kasupski > wrote:

>In a perfect , Goldie jumps into the ditch at the last instant and survives
>unharmed. The driver loses control of the vehicle, which veers into the ditch,
>flips upside down, and goes airborne fifty feet into a utility pole, The driver
>is decapitated on impact. The body remains in the vehicle. The head rolls on
>another twenty feet, coming to rest at the feet of a whitetail deer grazing
>nearby - who, having witnessed the entire incident, unhesitatingly kicks it into
>the ditch and walks away satisfied that justice has been served.

Oops - sorry! I guess that's what I get for posting at two o'clock in the
morning. That should read, "In a perfect world..."

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

Joy[_3_]
January 18th 17, 08:24 AM
On 1/17/2017 11:03 PM, John Kasupski wrote:
> On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 04:50:53 -0000 (UTC), Bastette >
> wrote:
>
>> John Kasupski wrote:
>>
>>> On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 01:36:18 -0000 (UTC), Bastette >
>>> wrote:
>>
>>>> Is it possible that someone moved Goldie over to the side of the road after
>>>> he was killed?
>>
>>> No. I won't go into too many gory details in case someone is eating while
>>> they're reading this, but let's just say that the condition of the remains and
>>> other clues present on the ground near the body made it quite evident that he
>>> was hit right there on the shoulder where I found him and had not been moved.
>>
>> I'm so sorry to hear this. The very idea that anyone would do something
>> like that deliberately is so upsetting. Sometimes it feels like the world
>> is too harsh for the kind of love we feel for our furry friends.
>
> In a perfect , Goldie jumps into the ditch at the last instant and survives
> unharmed. The driver loses control of the vehicle, which veers into the ditch,
> flips upside down, and goes airborne fifty feet into a utility pole, The driver
> is decapitated on impact. The body remains in the vehicle. The head rolls on
> another twenty feet, coming to rest at the feet of a whitetail deer grazing
> nearby - who, having witnessed the entire incident, unhesitatingly kicks it into
> the ditch and walks away satisfied that justice has been served.
>
>>>> Roxy, on the other
>>>> hand, would roll over onto her back and wave her arms and legs around
>>>> trying to catch the dangling object. She looked completely adorable, but
>>>> I'm sure if there had been any prey animals around, they would've been
>>>> snickering to themselves.
>>
>>> Yeah, right up until the moment she caught them! Goldie was the same way when
>>> you were playing with him. Then when you thought he was plum tuckered out he'd
>>> walk away and return shortly with a dead mouse or bird to drop at your feet. The
>>> personality he presented to us humans was the polar opposite of what his prey
>>> saw from the business end of what we viewed as his ridiculously cute front paws.
>>
>>
>> Ha - good point. Kind of how I might feel seeing a mountain lion coming
>> toward me.
>
> Don't get me wrong, I've seen plenty of cats who wouldn't hurt a fly. A mouse
> could walk out into the middle of the room, unfold a lawn chair, and sit there
> in it calmly sipping a glass of iced tea while watching soap operas on TV all
> afternoon, and those cats probably wouldn't move a muscle. But you can rest
> assured that another cat in the neighborhood recently slaughtered a mouse in
> cold blood, and the word's gotten out in the mouse community about the brutal
> murder up the block, so they're not likely to tempt fate in such a manner. :-)
>
> John D. Kasupski
> Niagara Falls, NY
>

Many years ago the very first cat I ever had was in the house when I saw
a mouse in the kitchen. I got the cat and set him down where he could
see the mouse. The cat took one look, then turned around and ran out of
the room.

In contrast, I've had a couple of indoor/outdoor cats who were real
hunters, and who liked to bring their prey in the house to play with it.

John Kasupski
January 18th 17, 09:09 AM
On Tue, 17 Jan 2017 23:24:07 -0800, Joy > wrote:

>Many years ago the very first cat I ever had was in the house when I saw
>a mouse in the kitchen. I got the cat and set him down where he could
>see the mouse. The cat took one look, then turned around and ran out of
>the room.

LOL! Well, cat, there goes YOUR reputation around here...thanks for nothing!

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY'

jmcquown[_2_]
January 19th 17, 12:55 AM
On 1/18/2017 2:03 AM, John Kasupski wrote:
> Don't get me wrong, I've seen plenty of cats who wouldn't hurt a fly. A mouse
> could walk out into the middle of the room, unfold a lawn chair, and sit there
> in it calmly sipping a glass of iced tea while watching soap operas on TV all
> afternoon, and those cats probably wouldn't move a muscle. But you can rest
> assured that another cat in the neighborhood recently slaughtered a mouse in
> cold blood, and the word's gotten out in the mouse community about the brutal
> murder up the block, so they're not likely to tempt fate in such a manner.:-)
>
> John D. Kasupski
> Niagara Falls, NY

Shortly after Persia (RB) decided to live with me I found her standing
outside the entrance to the kitchen off the hallway. She meowed at me
but absolutely would *not* go into the kitchen. I flipped on the light.
There was a dead mouse in the middle of the kitchen floor. It hadn't
been killed by her; there wasn't a mark on it. (For all I knew it
keeled over from a heart attack when it saw Persia.) She refused to go
into the kitchen until I had disposed of the mouse and mopped the floor!
Guess she was afraid of mice. ;)

She was great at catching the nasty palmetto bugs that sometimes got
inside, though. I'm not afraid of mice but palmetto bugs absolutely
creep me out.

Jill

jmcquown[_2_]
January 19th 17, 12:56 AM
On 1/18/2017 2:05 AM, John Kasupski wrote:
> On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 02:03:28 -0500, John Kasupski > wrote:
>
>> In a perfect , Goldie jumps into the ditch at the last instant and survives
>> unharmed. The driver loses control of the vehicle, which veers into the ditch,
>> flips upside down, and goes airborne fifty feet into a utility pole, The driver
>> is decapitated on impact. The body remains in the vehicle. The head rolls on
>> another twenty feet, coming to rest at the feet of a whitetail deer grazing
>> nearby - who, having witnessed the entire incident, unhesitatingly kicks it into
>> the ditch and walks away satisfied that justice has been served.
>
> Oops - sorry! I guess that's what I get for posting at two o'clock in the
> morning. That should read, "In a perfect world..."
>
> John D. Kasupski
> Niagara Falls, NY
>
I knew what you meant. We all do it from time to time, regardless of
what time it is. If you know what I mean. :)

Jill

jmcquown[_2_]
January 19th 17, 12:58 AM
On 1/17/2017 9:33 PM, John Kasupski wrote:
> On Tue, 17 Jan 2017 23:39:43 -0000 (UTC), Bastette >
> wrote:
>
>> With creamed corn, or any other processed food that has more than just the
>> vegetable in it, it's a good idea to read the ingredients list to make sure
>> there's no onion. Onion is bad for cats and can cause serious health problems,
>> maybe even death. The same is true for garlic, although that's less likely
>> to be found in creamed corn.
>
> This fact IS a problem, because Minnie likes spaghetti and I haven't seen a jar
> of spaghetti sauce yet that doesn't have onion and dried or dehydrated garlic on
> the list of ingredients. Luckily, she'll accept pasta without sauce, especially
> if I melt a little butter on it for her first.
>
> I only had cream corn because it was given to me, and I've used it up. When I
> buy it, it's kernal corn, and again I melt butter on it when I heat it up, which
> gives her another reason to like it. Then again, I also melt butter on my peas
> and green beans, and she couldn't be any less interested in them.
>
> John D. Kasupski
> Niagara Falls, NY
>
I can't remember who it was who used to post here who had a cat that
loved broccoli...

Jill

John Kasupski
January 19th 17, 01:22 AM
On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 18:56:24 -0500, jmcquown > wrote:

>On 1/18/2017 2:05 AM, John Kasupski wrote:
>> On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 02:03:28 -0500, John Kasupski > wrote:
>>
>> Oops - sorry! I guess that's what I get for posting at two o'clock in the
>> morning. That should read, "In a perfect world..."
>>
>I knew what you meant. We all do it from time to time, regardless of
>what time it is. If you know what I mean. :)

It's just that once upon a time in a galaxy far away I was a contributing editor
for a nationally circulated magazine, and I was known for turning in what we
referred to as "clean copy" - so I hate letting errors like that slip by me.

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

John Kasupski
January 19th 17, 01:31 AM
On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 18:55:29 -0500, jmcquown > wrote:

>Shortly after Persia (RB) decided to live with me I found her standing
>outside the entrance to the kitchen off the hallway. She meowed at me
>but absolutely would *not* go into the kitchen. I flipped on the light.
> There was a dead mouse in the middle of the kitchen floor. It hadn't
>been killed by her; there wasn't a mark on it. (For all I knew it
>keeled over from a heart attack when it saw Persia.) She refused to go
>into the kitchen until I had disposed of the mouse and mopped the floor!
> Guess she was afraid of mice. ;)
>
>She was great at catching the nasty palmetto bugs that sometimes got
>inside, though. I'm not afraid of mice but palmetto bugs absolutely
>creep me out.

Well, I suppose a cat who is afraid of mice has to redeem her feline reputation
somehow, doesn't she? :-)

We don't have palmetto bugs this far north, but we do have cockroaches, which
are similar, and I've been known to evacuate a residence and fumigate the whole
place with aerosol insecticide bombs after seeing just one of them around.

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

Matt Ferrari[_5_]
January 19th 17, 01:36 AM
On Friday, January 13, 2017 at 9:30:34 PM UTC-6, John Kasupski wrote:
> In another thread, I promised (or threatened, depending on your point of view)
> to tell the story of how my relatively new kitten Minnie changed my mind about
> not really wanting a pet - so, here goes...
>
> Why didn't I want another pet at the time? About fifteen years ago, I had a cat
> named Goldie, a male orange tabby who was, to make a long story shorter, the
> coolest cat I'd ever seen - and I've seen my share. Then one morning I left for
> work and saw him lying dead on the shoulder of the road about fifty feet from
> the driveway. He'd gotten outside during the night and been struck and killed by
> a passing vehicle. It was obvious he'd been on the shoulder of the road and not
> in the driving lane when he was hit, so whoever killed him deliberately swerved
> off the road onto the shoulder to do so. I'd like to spend ten minutes alone in
> a locked room with the driver of that vehicle.
>

It might be cold comfort since your cat died, but it might have been hit and then moved to the shoulder. I accidently hit a squirrel while driving my moped and i Moved it off the road by a tree to try and give it a chance to live.

John Kasupski
January 19th 17, 02:38 AM
On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 16:36:38 -0800 (PST), Matt Ferrari >
wrote:

>It might be cold comfort since your cat died, but it might have been hit and then moved

That was already suggested by someone else upthread. I mentioned that the
condition of the remains and other clues present on the ground near the body
made it quite evident that he was hit right there on the shoulder where I found
him and had not been moved. I hesitate to go into specific details concerning my
analysis of the, um...crime scene <grin> because not everyone's stomach will be
receptive to reading such material, but basically, motor vehicles don't usually
leave red tire tracks on dry asphalt, sprinkled with other things that used to
be inside the body of the dearly departed and are now on the outside.

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

jmcquown[_2_]
January 19th 17, 03:13 AM
On 1/18/2017 7:22 PM, John Kasupski wrote:
> On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 18:56:24 -0500, jmcquown > wrote:
>
>> On 1/18/2017 2:05 AM, John Kasupski wrote:
>>> On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 02:03:28 -0500, John Kasupski > wrote:
>>>
>>> Oops - sorry! I guess that's what I get for posting at two o'clock in the
>>> morning. That should read, "In a perfect world..."
>>>
>> I knew what you meant. We all do it from time to time, regardless of
>> what time it is. If you know what I mean. :)
>
> It's just that once upon a time in a galaxy far away I was a contributing editor
> for a nationally circulated magazine, and I was known for turning in what we
> referred to as "clean copy" - so I hate letting errors like that slip by me.
>
> John D. Kasupski
> Niagara Falls, NY
>
Okay... contributing... you're not being graded here. I'm pretty sure
everyone who read the post understood what you meant. Added the word
"world" and understood.

Jill

John Kasupski
January 19th 17, 05:00 AM
On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 21:13:22 -0500, jmcquown > wrote:

>> It's just that once upon a time in a galaxy far away I was a contributing editor
>> for a nationally circulated magazine, and I was known for turning in what we
>> referred to as "clean copy" - so I hate letting errors like that slip by me.
>>
>Okay... contributing... you're not being graded here. I'm pretty sure
>everyone who read the post understood what you meant. Added the word
>"world" and understood.

We interrupt this program for a brief look into the thoughts of a man who has
noticed errors of spelling and grammar in Tom Clancy novels.

I grew up before our schools started routinely handing out diplomas to
functional illiterates as they do today. When I look at a newspaper and see the
trash that now makes it into print from people with degrees in journalism that
wouldn't have gotten me promoted out of elementary school in my day...

Look at it this way - how would YOU feel if you just discovered you'd somehow
managed to burn dinner beyond recognition? It's simply a matter of us having
certain expectations that we consider it obligatory for us to live up to. When
we don't live up to them, our inner selves tell us, "Shame on you!"

That said, I'm sure most people's minds filled in the blank. My own mind has
plenty of blanks to spare <grin> and it did exactly that before I clicked the
"Send Now" button - that's how I failed to catch it. But thank you for letting
me off easy. My editor at the magazine would've been mortifed and probably
would've sent an e-mail to ask if I'd been feeling under the weather lately.

We now return you to our regularly scheduled discussion of preposterously
precious puddytats, already in progress... :-)

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

Bastette
January 19th 17, 05:12 AM
John Kasupski wrote:

> It's just that once upon a time in a galaxy far away I was a contributing
> editor for a nationally circulated magazine, and I was known for turning
> in what we referred to as "clean copy" - so I hate letting errors like that
> slip by me.

I guess once you've been turning out perfect copy as a profession, it's
not an easy habit to break, even when your audience is pretty lenient (as
we are).

I was wondering if you did something related to writing - have you also
written your own material? (Not for that job, necessarily.)

Joyce

--
"Sentimentality" -- that's what we call the sentiment we don't share.
-- Graham Greene

Bastette
January 19th 17, 05:28 AM
jmcquown wrote:

> On 1/18/2017 7:22 PM, John Kasupski wrote:
>> On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 18:56:24 -0500, jmcquown > wrote:
>>
>>> On 1/18/2017 2:05 AM, John Kasupski wrote:
>>>> On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 02:03:28 -0500, John Kasupski > wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Oops - sorry! I guess that's what I get for posting at two o'clock in the
>>>> morning. That should read, "In a perfect world..."
>>>>
>>> I knew what you meant. We all do it from time to time, regardless of
>>> what time it is. If you know what I mean. :)
>>
>> It's just that once upon a time in a galaxy far away I was a contributing editor
>> for a nationally circulated magazine, and I was known for turning in what we
>> referred to as "clean copy" - so I hate letting errors like that slip by me.
>>
>> John D. Kasupski
>> Niagara Falls, NY
>>
> Okay... contributing... you're not being graded here. I'm pretty sure
> everyone who read the post understood what you meant. Added the word
> "world" and understood.

She's right. Even I figured that out, and that is not one of my strong
points.

Joyce

--
"Sentimentality" -- that's what we call the sentiment we don't share.
-- Graham Greene

Joy[_3_]
January 19th 17, 07:21 AM
On 1/18/2017 8:00 PM, John Kasupski wrote:
> On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 21:13:22 -0500, jmcquown > wrote:
>
>>> It's just that once upon a time in a galaxy far away I was a contributing editor
>>> for a nationally circulated magazine, and I was known for turning in what we
>>> referred to as "clean copy" - so I hate letting errors like that slip by me.
>>>
>> Okay... contributing... you're not being graded here. I'm pretty sure
>> everyone who read the post understood what you meant. Added the word
>> "world" and understood.
>
> We interrupt this program for a brief look into the thoughts of a man who has
> noticed errors of spelling and grammar in Tom Clancy novels.
>
> I grew up before our schools started routinely handing out diplomas to
> functional illiterates as they do today. When I look at a newspaper and see the
> trash that now makes it into print from people with degrees in journalism that
> wouldn't have gotten me promoted out of elementary school in my day...
>
> Look at it this way - how would YOU feel if you just discovered you'd somehow
> managed to burn dinner beyond recognition? It's simply a matter of us having
> certain expectations that we consider it obligatory for us to live up to. When
> we don't live up to them, our inner selves tell us, "Shame on you!"
>
> That said, I'm sure most people's minds filled in the blank. My own mind has
> plenty of blanks to spare <grin> and it did exactly that before I clicked the
> "Send Now" button - that's how I failed to catch it. But thank you for letting
> me off easy. My editor at the magazine would've been mortifed and probably
> would've sent an e-mail to ask if I'd been feeling under the weather lately.
>
> We now return you to our regularly scheduled discussion of preposterously
> precious puddytats, already in progress... :-)
>
> John D. Kasupski
> Niagara Falls, NY
>

Okay, if you work for a magazine, I can understand your mortification.
That said, it is far easier to proofread something someone else has
written. I, too, notice errors in books I'm reading. However, I have
sent out far more than one email that wasn't correct. A Toastmaster
friend and I have fallen into the habit of proofreading anything the
other one writes for the club website. We've both found errors that
needed to be corrected.

John Kasupski
January 19th 17, 07:29 AM
On Thu, 19 Jan 2017 04:12:39 -0000 (UTC), Bastette >
wrote:

>I was wondering if you did something related to writing - have you also
>written your own material? (Not for that job, necessarily.)

Well, prior to that, I had written other material back in the 1980's that was
published in one other magazine and in the newsletters of several computer
users' groups of the period, but nothing like a book or anything like that.

I've wisecracked that I could already write one about Minnie, but it isn't
something I've seriously considered. Given the millions of people here in the
U.S. who have cats as pets, maybe I should. Even if only a relative few bought
the book, the royalties might at least buy Minnie a few more jars of Pounce.

Also, while I'm new to this newsgroup, I've been active on other Usenet groups
for years. I even maintained an FAQ for a sports-related one at one time. So
there's plenty of my drivel around on the internet, but most of it's too old to
be relevant anymore, and one has to know where to look for it or not be too
proud to beg a search engine to locate it.

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

PS: I'm also available if someone out there wishes to hire me and offers fair
and reliable compensation. The e-mail addess on my posts is legit. - JDK

John Kasupski
January 19th 17, 07:53 AM
On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:21:52 -0800, Joy > wrote:

>Okay, if you work for a magazine, I can understand your mortification.
>That said, it is far easier to proofread something someone else has
>written. I, too, notice errors in books I'm reading. However, I have
>sent out far more than one email that wasn't correct. A Toastmaster
>friend and I have fallen into the habit of proofreading anything the
>other one writes for the club website. We've both found errors that
>needed to be corrected.

See? It's not THAT hard to do! :-)

Unless it's 2 AM, you've been up since the previous sunrise, the prospect of
another is looming in the not-so-distant future, and you have an adorable kitten
around who occasionally becomes jealous of the computer when you're in the
middle of rewording a sentence. Then it can be a bit of a challenge. But, that's
not her fault...it's mine for not taking the time to do what I know I should do.

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

jmcquown[_2_]
January 19th 17, 03:06 PM
On 1/18/2017 11:00 PM, John Kasupski wrote:
> On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 21:13:22 -0500, jmcquown > wrote:
>
>>> It's just that once upon a time in a galaxy far away I was a contributing editor
>>> for a nationally circulated magazine, and I was known for turning in what we
>>> referred to as "clean copy" - so I hate letting errors like that slip by me.
>>>
>> Okay... contributing... you're not being graded here. I'm pretty sure
>> everyone who read the post understood what you meant. Added the word
>> "world" and understood.
>
> We interrupt this program for a brief look into the thoughts of a man who has
> noticed errors of spelling and grammar in Tom Clancy novels.
>
*laughing* Where I live there is a little "library" filled with books
donated by people who live here (this is a gated community, don't get me
started). Just take some books, bring them back. Got new books you are
done with? Donate them. I keep a pencil on the table where I read; I'm
constantly correcting spelling in books. I blame spell-check. I don't
think they have actual proofreaders anymore.

> I grew up before our schools started routinely handing out diplomas to
> functional illiterates as they do today. When I look at a newspaper and see the
> trash that now makes it into print from people with degrees in journalism that
> wouldn't have gotten me promoted out of elementary school in my day...
>
I grew up in that era, too. I also don't believe being a jock with some
potential for a sports scholarship should entitle anyone to a free ride.

Oddly enough, I never really attended a proper grammar class when I was
growing up. (Do try not to cringe when you read my posts!) My dad was
a career Marine. We moved at least every two years until he retired.
Each school I attended was different in terms of what they taught in
English class; they were either way ahead of the prior school or lagging
behind what I already knew. Just don't ask me to diagram a sentence. :)
I never managed to take a class in geography, either. Don't get me
started on history. I complained to my senior (high school) history
teacher that we were starting all over again with what I'd been taught
in grade school - the early explorers. No history class I ever took
managed to get any further than the American Civil War. :(

> Look at it this way - how would YOU feel if you just discovered you'd somehow
> managed to burn dinner beyond recognition? It's simply a matter of us having
> certain expectations that we consider it obligatory for us to live up to. When
> we don't live up to them, our inner selves tell us, "Shame on you!"
>
I understand that, especially since I love to cook. (I carry a timer
around with me if timing is critical. LOL) BTW, should RPCA get hit
with a spate of trolls, our response on this ng (other than outright
killfiling them) is to frustrate them by posting recipes! :)

> That said, I'm sure most people's minds filled in the blank. My own mind has
> plenty of blanks to spare <grin> and it did exactly that before I clicked the
> "Send Now" button - that's how I failed to catch it. But thank you for letting
> me off easy. My editor at the magazine would've been mortifed and probably
> would've sent an e-mail to ask if I'd been feeling under the weather lately.
>
> We now return you to our regularly scheduled discussion of preposterously
> precious puddytats, already in progress... :-)
>
> John D. Kasupski
> Niagara Falls, NY
>
Indeed we shall!

Jill

jmcquown[_2_]
January 19th 17, 03:19 PM
On 1/19/2017 1:21 AM, Joy wrote:
> On 1/18/2017 8:00 PM, John Kasupski wrote:
>> On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 21:13:22 -0500, jmcquown >
>> wrote:
>>
>>>> It's just that once upon a time in a galaxy far away I was a
>>>> contributing editor
>>>> for a nationally circulated magazine, and I was known for turning in
>>>> what we
>>>> referred to as "clean copy" - so I hate letting errors like that
>>>> slip by me.
>>>>
>> We interrupt this program for a brief look into the thoughts of a man
>> who has
>> noticed errors of spelling and grammar in Tom Clancy novels.
>>
>> That said, I'm sure most people's minds filled in the blank. My own
>> mind has
>> plenty of blanks to spare <grin> and it did exactly that before I
>> clicked the
>> "Send Now" button - that's how I failed to catch it. But thank you for
>> letting
>> me off easy. My editor at the magazine would've been mortifed and
>> probably
>> would've sent an e-mail to ask if I'd been feeling under the weather
>> lately.
>>
>> We now return you to our regularly scheduled discussion of preposterously
>> precious puddytats, already in progress... :-)
>>
>> John D. Kasupski
>> Niagara Falls, NY
>>
>
> Okay, if you work for a magazine, I can understand your mortification.
> That said, it is far easier to proofread something someone else has
> written. I, too, notice errors in books I'm reading. However, I have
> sent out far more than one email that wasn't correct. A Toastmaster
> friend and I have fallen into the habit of proofreading anything the
> other one writes for the club website. We've both found errors that
> needed to be corrected.
>
I used to proofread marketing materials when I worked for an insurance
company. Obvious typos are easy. Proofreading for context requires a
tad more diligence. I later went to work for a small software company.
In the first week the owner got in a big batch of freshly printed
brochures to be used in a mass mailing campaign for software resellers.
He excitedly handed everyone a copy of the new brochure. I read
through it and got to the final little blurb at the end. Being the new
kid on the block I hesitated. One of my new co-workers urged me to
speak up. "Excuse me, Jeff, did you know this says you offer
*toll-tree* support?" He was mortified! At least two other people had
read it before it went to press. It took the newbie to catch the error. ;)

Jill

Joy[_3_]
January 19th 17, 08:16 PM
On 1/18/2017 10:53 PM, John Kasupski wrote:
> On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:21:52 -0800, Joy > wrote:
>
>> Okay, if you work for a magazine, I can understand your mortification.
>> That said, it is far easier to proofread something someone else has
>> written. I, too, notice errors in books I'm reading. However, I have
>> sent out far more than one email that wasn't correct. A Toastmaster
>> friend and I have fallen into the habit of proofreading anything the
>> other one writes for the club website. We've both found errors that
>> needed to be corrected.
>
> See? It's not THAT hard to do! :-)
>
> Unless it's 2 AM, you've been up since the previous sunrise, the prospect of
> another is looming in the not-so-distant future, and you have an adorable kitten
> around who occasionally becomes jealous of the computer when you're in the
> middle of rewording a sentence. Then it can be a bit of a challenge. But, that's
> not her fault...it's mine for not taking the time to do what I know I should do.
>
> John D. Kasupski
> Niagara Falls, NY
>

LOL! I hope you get more sleep tonight, and maybe a nap or two during
the day.

John Kasupski
January 19th 17, 08:35 PM
On Thu, 19 Jan 2017 09:06:41 -0500, jmcquown > wrote:

>I understand that, especially since I love to cook. (I carry a timer
>around with me if timing is critical. LOL) BTW, should RPCA get hit
>with a spate of trolls, our response on this ng (other than outright
>killfiling them) is to frustrate them by posting recipes! :)

I've suspected you were the same Jill McQuown from rec.food.cooking! So, be
advised that your reputation in the online culinary community has preceded you.

Don't worry, I'm not a "google stalker" or anything, it's just that when you're
a man living alone - or with a feline friend who also loves to eat - sometimes
you find yourself rummaging through your cupboards to see what you have,
entering your list of available ingredients into a search engine, and hoping to
stumble across a recipe that looks like it might not be beyond your cooking
capabilities. In so doing, I've run across some recipes you've posted to RFC,
its unofficial website, or elsewhere. The best that you could probably say about
my own culinary skills is that so far I haven't starved to death when left to my
own devices in the kitchen and occasionally I even learn something new, but
Minnie, being the very smart kitty that she is, watches what I do in the kitchen
very carefully, and just last night she rescued me from a potential disaster.

When your cat starts alerting you to your mistakes, you know you're not quite an
expert yet.

FWIW, I've always wanted to try your signature potato leek soup, but while
potatoes are plentiful enough in my neck of the woods, finding somebody who
grows leeks around here seems to be like looking for the proverbial needle in a
haystack. I find that a little strange - we're not all THAT far from PA - but in
this area the farmers and gardeners seem to go for plain old onions and act like
they've never even heard of leeks if you ask. So that's what I'm up against
here. If you live in Niagara Falls, "low country" is the infamous Love Canal
neighborhood about a half a mile from me that's been abandoned because it's
contaminated with toxic waste that was dumped there decades ago.

That's another reason I don't want my cat outside. The creek that runs through
my back yard runs right through that area a bit upstream from here. For all I
know, you might be able to grow great-tasting leeks there...but if you let your
cat eat them, her kittens might come out with 6 ears, 3 eyes, and 2 tails.

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

John Kasupski
January 19th 17, 09:23 PM
On Thu, 19 Jan 2017 11:16:59 -0800, Joy > wrote:

>LOL! I hope you get more sleep tonight, and maybe a nap or two during
>the day.

That would've been last night - and yes, I did...it was actually light out
already this morning before Minnie decided it was time for us to get up.

She's napping right now, naturally - wakes me up, then goes right back to sleep.
Another man might go over to the recliner she's lounging on and jostle her just
to get even, but she and I have reached an unspoken agreement - I don't disturb
her when she sleeps on the recliner, and she sleeps on it rather than under it
where I can't see her and am always wondering where she is.

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

jmcquown[_2_]
January 20th 17, 12:24 AM
On 1/19/2017 2:35 PM, John Kasupski wrote:
> FWIW, I've always wanted to try your signature potato leek soup, but while
> potatoes are plentiful enough in my neck of the woods, finding somebody who
> grows leeks around here seems to be like looking for the proverbial needle in a
> haystack. I find that a little strange - we're not all THAT far from PA - but in
> this area the farmers and gardeners seem to go for plain old onions and act like
> they've never even heard of leeks if you ask. So that's what I'm up against
> here. If you live in Niagara Falls, "low country" is the infamous Love Canal
> neighborhood about a half a mile from me that's been abandoned because it's
> contaminated with toxic waste that was dumped there decades ago.

Ah yes, the infamous Love Canal. I wouldn't want to eat anything grown
there either!

I had a difficult time finding leeks when I wanted to make that soup
recently. Publix, which is a very large upscale supermarket in the
Southern US, didn't have any. The person working in the produce section
had no idea what leeks are, which surprised me since they're usually
pretty knowledgeable. I had to go to Food Lion to find them. I dislike
having to shop at different grocery stores to purchase ingredients for
one simple dish. Oh well, at least it was just across the street rather
than miles away! :)

Jill

Jack Campin
January 20th 17, 02:10 AM
> *laughing* Where I live there is a little "library" filled with books
> donated by people who live here (this is a gated community, don't get
> me started). Just take some books, bring them back. Got new books
> you are done with? Donate them.

Quite a few pubs in Edinburgh and around have shelves of free books.
Working in a charity bookshop, I can often add to their stock (things
in too poor a condition to sell, but still readable and worth more to
people that way than the 5p/Kg we'd get for them as pulp). I make it
my mission to get the pub stock as varied as possible. It tends to
drift towards being all Harlan Coben and Readers Digest stuff, so I
add everything from Maya Angelou to South American travel guidebooks
to cardboard children's books. When I put in a book on differential
geometry it vanished in a day or two.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
e m a i l : j a c k @ c a m p i n . m e . u k
Jack Campin, 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU, Scotland
mobile 07800 739 557 <http://www.campin.me.uk> Twitter: JackCampin

John Kasupski
January 20th 17, 03:00 AM
On Thu, 19 Jan 2017 18:24:35 -0500, jmcquown > wrote:

>Ah yes, the infamous Love Canal. I wouldn't want to eat anything grown
>there either!

This entire Buffalo-Niagara Falls metropolitan corridor is loaded with places
that are polluted with industrial waste, dumped chemicals, even radioactive
stuff that reads 30 times above background if you stand there with a Geiger
counter...which I've actually done. I know the woman who's in charge of disaster
planning for the county health department here, and I told her I wouldn't want
her job for all the tea in China.

>I had a difficult time finding leeks when I wanted to make that soup
>recently. Publix, which is a very large upscale supermarket in the
>Southern US, didn't have any. The person working in the produce section
>had no idea what leeks are, which surprised me since they're usually
>pretty knowledgeable. I had to go to Food Lion to find them. I dislike
>having to shop at different grocery stores to purchase ingredients for
>one simple dish. Oh well, at least it was just across the street rather
>than miles away! :)

Is it Publix that's right across the street from you, or are you telling me you
have a food store that's named for a big, beautiful cat right across the street
from you and expecting me to believe you didn't go directly there to begin with?

We hardly know one another, Jill...I hope you're not Lion to me already. :-)

I only go to upscale supermarkets to buy meat. Can't see paying $3.00 for a box
of spaghetti that tastes the same to me as what I get elsewhere for $0.99. But
maybe next time I go meat shopping, I'll swing by the produce section as well.

It won't be at Food Lion, though. I just found their website using DuckDuckGo
and searched with the store locator, and there isn't one within 50 miles of
here. If I'm going to travel that far to find leeks, I might as well just go
right down to PA and start randomly knocking on farmhouse doors.

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY