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View Full Version : Pilling The Cat Revisited


John Kasupski
January 20th 17, 05:49 PM
The subject of pilling a cat came up recently in another thread, and it got me
to thinking about this:

If you and your cat are sitting in the living room and you get up off the couch
to go out to the kitchen and feed your cat, the cat will already be out in the
kitchen waiting next to the food dish for you when you get there.

If you and your cat are sitting in the living room and you get up off the couch
to go out to the kitchen and pill your cat, the cat will seem to have vanished
from the face of the Earth by the time you finish getting to your feet.

How do they know?

I'm initially inclined to think it's something in our body language, which our
cats seem to be experts at reading, but I'd be interested in hearing about any
other theories someone else might have conceived or has read about.

John D. Kasupski
Niagara Falls, NY

Mishi[_2_]
January 20th 17, 06:57 PM
On Friday, January 20, 2017 at 12:50:01 PM UTC-5, John Kasupski wrote:
> The subject of pilling a cat came up recently in another thread, and it got me
> to thinking about this:
>
> If you and your cat are sitting in the living room and you get up off the couch
> to go out to the kitchen and feed your cat, the cat will already be out in the
> kitchen waiting next to the food dish for you when you get there.
>
> If you and your cat are sitting in the living room and you get up off the couch
> to go out to the kitchen and pill your cat, the cat will seem to have vanished
> from the face of the Earth by the time you finish getting to your feet.
>
> How do they know?
>
> I'm initially inclined to think it's something in our body language, which our
> cats seem to be experts at reading, but I'd be interested in hearing about any
> other theories someone else might have conceived or has read about.
>
> John D. Kasupski
> Niagara Falls, NY

Cats are mind readers. :) Actually, they are excellent readers of body language and can figure out what we are going to do from our actions. I have learned to keep the bottles of their meds beside mine, so they never know what I am reaching for. Usually, it works.

Patti
Bridgeport, NY - near Syracuse

Lesley Madigan
January 20th 17, 09:01 PM
In my kitchen there are two drawers one contains- cutlery and odds and ends and one contains none cooking related odds and ends like screwdrivers, spare nails, paintbrushes, cat toys and cat flea treatments.

Bonnie can detect whether I am opening the drawer with cutlery or the other drawer at 300 feet or more and if it's the drawer with the flea treatment in she makes herself scarce at supersonic speeds

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furball

jmcquown[_2_]
January 21st 17, 02:53 PM
On 1/20/2017 4:01 PM, Lesley Madigan wrote:
> In my kitchen there are two drawers one contains- cutlery and odds and ends and one contains none cooking related odds and ends like screwdrivers, spare nails, paintbrushes, cat toys and cat flea treatments.
>
> Bonnie can detect whether I am opening the drawer with cutlery or the other drawer at 300 feet or more and if it's the drawer with the flea treatment in she makes herself scarce at supersonic speeds
>
> Lesley
>
> Slave of the Fabulous Furball
>
Perhaps you should put some cutlery in the drawer with the flea
treatment. ;) Most cats have excellent hearing. I'm convinced Bonnie
can tell the difference between the sound of rattling cutlery and a
screw driver and uh oh, flea treatment! ;)

Jill

jmcquown[_2_]
January 21st 17, 03:01 PM
On 1/20/2017 12:49 PM, John Kasupski wrote:
>
> The subject of pilling a cat came up recently in another thread, and it got me
> to thinking about this:
>
> If you and your cat are sitting in the living room and you get up off the couch
> to go out to the kitchen and feed your cat, the cat will already be out in the
> kitchen waiting next to the food dish for you when you get there.
>
> If you and your cat are sitting in the living room and you get up off the couch
> to go out to the kitchen and pill your cat, the cat will seem to have vanished
> from the face of the Earth by the time you finish getting to your feet.
>
> How do they know?
>
> I'm initially inclined to think it's something in our body language, which our
> cats seem to be experts at reading, but I'd be interested in hearing about any
> other theories someone else might have conceived or has read about.
>
> John D. Kasupski
> Niagara Falls, NY
>
I'm sure it's body language. Cats are excellent when it comes to
reading it. Something about us is different. I think it's because we
sort of tense up a bit yet we try to act nonchalant. We know we're
about to do something the cat won't like so they know it, too.

I've found it's the same as when you need to get the cat in the carrier.
That almost always means they're going to the vet. They can sense it,
so they immediately make themselves scarce.

Jill

Tigger[_2_]
January 21st 17, 05:42 PM
jmcquown wrote:
> On 1/20/2017 4:01 PM, Lesley Madigan wrote:
>> In my kitchen there are two drawers one contains- cutlery and odds and
>> ends and one contains none cooking related odds and ends like
>> screwdrivers, spare nails, paintbrushes, cat toys and cat flea treatments.
>>
>> Bonnie can detect whether I am opening the drawer with cutlery or the
>> other drawer at 300 feet or more and if it's the drawer with the flea
>> treatment in she makes herself scarce at supersonic speeds
>>
> Perhaps you should put some cutlery in the drawer with the flea treatment.
> ;) Most cats have excellent hearing. I'm convinced Bonnie can tell the
> difference between the sound of rattling cutlery and a screw driver and uh
> oh, flea treatment! ;)

Put the flea treatment someplace else. Or, run water or make other noise
at the same time - sound-o-flage. That's what I do.

dgk
January 25th 17, 01:12 PM
On Sat, 21 Jan 2017 10:01:15 -0500, jmcquown >
wrote:

>On 1/20/2017 12:49 PM, John Kasupski wrote:
>>
>> The subject of pilling a cat came up recently in another thread, and it got me
>> to thinking about this:
>>
>> If you and your cat are sitting in the living room and you get up off the couch
>> to go out to the kitchen and feed your cat, the cat will already be out in the
>> kitchen waiting next to the food dish for you when you get there.
>>
>> If you and your cat are sitting in the living room and you get up off the couch
>> to go out to the kitchen and pill your cat, the cat will seem to have vanished
>> from the face of the Earth by the time you finish getting to your feet.
>>
>> How do they know?
>>
>> I'm initially inclined to think it's something in our body language, which our
>> cats seem to be experts at reading, but I'd be interested in hearing about any
>> other theories someone else might have conceived or has read about.
>>
>> John D. Kasupski
>> Niagara Falls, NY
>>
>I'm sure it's body language. Cats are excellent when it comes to
>reading it. Something about us is different. I think it's because we
>sort of tense up a bit yet we try to act nonchalant. We know we're
>about to do something the cat won't like so they know it, too.
>
>I've found it's the same as when you need to get the cat in the carrier.
> That almost always means they're going to the vet. They can sense it,
>so they immediately make themselves scarce.
>
>Jill

That's certainly true. As soon as I try to act "natural" and reach for
the bottle with the dropper, cats are gone.

Bastette
January 26th 17, 04:13 AM
dgk wrote:

> On Sat, 21 Jan 2017 10:01:15 -0500, jmcquown >
> wrote:

>>On 1/20/2017 12:49 PM, John Kasupski wrote:
>>>
>>> The subject of pilling a cat came up recently in another thread, and it got me
>>> to thinking about this:
>>>
>>> If you and your cat are sitting in the living room and you get up off the couch
>>> to go out to the kitchen and feed your cat, the cat will already be out in the
>>> kitchen waiting next to the food dish for you when you get there.
>>>
>>> If you and your cat are sitting in the living room and you get up off the couch
>>> to go out to the kitchen and pill your cat, the cat will seem to have vanished
>>> from the face of the Earth by the time you finish getting to your feet.
>>>
>>> How do they know?
>>>
>>> I'm initially inclined to think it's something in our body language, which our
>>> cats seem to be experts at reading, but I'd be interested in hearing about any
>>> other theories someone else might have conceived or has read about.
>>>
>>> John D. Kasupski
>>> Niagara Falls, NY
>>>
>>I'm sure it's body language. Cats are excellent when it comes to
>>reading it. Something about us is different. I think it's because we
>>sort of tense up a bit yet we try to act nonchalant. We know we're
>>about to do something the cat won't like so they know it, too.
>>
>>I've found it's the same as when you need to get the cat in the carrier.
>> That almost always means they're going to the vet. They can sense it,
>>so they immediately make themselves scarce.
>>
>>Jill

> That's certainly true. As soon as I try to act "natural" and reach for
> the bottle with the dropper, cats are gone.


Heh. If I have something *hidden in my pocket* and I try to act natural,
Licky still knows!

Joyce

Tigger[_2_]
February 12th 17, 02:58 AM
dgk wrote:
....
> That's certainly true. As soon as I try to act "natural" and reach for
> the bottle with the dropper, cats are gone.

One thing I do is make a show of the "object" without otherwise
doing anything with it. Then only once in a while is the "object"
used in its intended capacity.