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Kris
July 4th 03, 11:33 PM
My 4-year old kitty has thrown up 3 times today. This morning it was last
night's food. A couple of hours later it was a clear, thick liquid. Just a
few minutes ago it was 2 lumps of brown stuff that looked like matted hair.
Since this is July 4th, my vet isn't in but hopefully will be tomorrow. I
give her the Purina hairball treats once a week according to the directions
but I know that's not the cure-all for hairballs. Is there anything else I
can give her until I can get her into the vet?

She hasn't drank any water all day from what I can tell and she hasn't eaten
any food. She hides for a couple of hours after she's thrown up then is her
usual affectionate self until she throws up again. So, I'm thinking this is
not an emergency vet situation. However, if my vet doesn't have his usual
Saturday hours tomorrow, then I'll take her to the emergency vet.

Thanks for any help or advice.

Cathy Friedmann
July 4th 03, 11:48 PM
After the last bout a little while ago - of throwing up the hair masses, see
if she now acts fine, including eating & everything. If so, that was her
problem: a hairball that needed to come up, & finally did.

Cathy

--
"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon

"Kris" > wrote in message
...
> My 4-year old kitty has thrown up 3 times today. This morning it was last
> night's food. A couple of hours later it was a clear, thick liquid. Just
a
> few minutes ago it was 2 lumps of brown stuff that looked like matted
hair.
> Since this is July 4th, my vet isn't in but hopefully will be tomorrow. I
> give her the Purina hairball treats once a week according to the
directions
> but I know that's not the cure-all for hairballs. Is there anything else
I
> can give her until I can get her into the vet?
>
> She hasn't drank any water all day from what I can tell and she hasn't
eaten
> any food. She hides for a couple of hours after she's thrown up then is
her
> usual affectionate self until she throws up again. So, I'm thinking this
is
> not an emergency vet situation. However, if my vet doesn't have his usual
> Saturday hours tomorrow, then I'll take her to the emergency vet.
>
> Thanks for any help or advice.
>
>

Cathy Friedmann
July 4th 03, 11:48 PM
After the last bout a little while ago - of throwing up the hair masses, see
if she now acts fine, including eating & everything. If so, that was her
problem: a hairball that needed to come up, & finally did.

Cathy

--
"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon

"Kris" > wrote in message
...
> My 4-year old kitty has thrown up 3 times today. This morning it was last
> night's food. A couple of hours later it was a clear, thick liquid. Just
a
> few minutes ago it was 2 lumps of brown stuff that looked like matted
hair.
> Since this is July 4th, my vet isn't in but hopefully will be tomorrow. I
> give her the Purina hairball treats once a week according to the
directions
> but I know that's not the cure-all for hairballs. Is there anything else
I
> can give her until I can get her into the vet?
>
> She hasn't drank any water all day from what I can tell and she hasn't
eaten
> any food. She hides for a couple of hours after she's thrown up then is
her
> usual affectionate self until she throws up again. So, I'm thinking this
is
> not an emergency vet situation. However, if my vet doesn't have his usual
> Saturday hours tomorrow, then I'll take her to the emergency vet.
>
> Thanks for any help or advice.
>
>

Kris
July 4th 03, 11:53 PM
Thanks Laura. I do brush her but probably not as often as I should.

I will definitely get her in somewhere tomorrow if she's not better. She's
under my bed right now recovering from her latest bout of vomiting. I hope
the fireworks tonight don't make her sicker.


"Laura R." > wrote in message
.net...
> circa Fri, 04 Jul 2003 22:33:26 GMT, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav,
> Kris ) said,
> >
> > My 4-year old kitty has thrown up 3 times today. This morning it was
last
> > night's food. A couple of hours later it was a clear, thick liquid.
Just a
> > few minutes ago it was 2 lumps of brown stuff that looked like matted
hair.
> > Since this is July 4th, my vet isn't in but hopefully will be tomorrow.
I
> > give her the Purina hairball treats once a week according to the
directions
> > but I know that's not the cure-all for hairballs. Is there anything
else I
> > can give her until I can get her into the vet?
> >
> > She hasn't drank any water all day from what I can tell and she hasn't
eaten
> > any food. She hides for a couple of hours after she's thrown up then is
her
> > usual affectionate self until she throws up again. So, I'm thinking
this is
> > not an emergency vet situation. However, if my vet doesn't have his
usual
> > Saturday hours tomorrow, then I'll take her to the emergency vet.
> >
> > Thanks for any help or advice.
> >
> What you describe is pretty typical for my cats when they're bringing
> up a hairball. As far as prevention of hairballs, the best thing to
> do is brush the cat regularly. Daily is good. The more hair that ends
> up in the brush, the less hair ends up in the cat's tummy.
>
> Laura

Kris
July 4th 03, 11:53 PM
Thanks Laura. I do brush her but probably not as often as I should.

I will definitely get her in somewhere tomorrow if she's not better. She's
under my bed right now recovering from her latest bout of vomiting. I hope
the fireworks tonight don't make her sicker.


"Laura R." > wrote in message
.net...
> circa Fri, 04 Jul 2003 22:33:26 GMT, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav,
> Kris ) said,
> >
> > My 4-year old kitty has thrown up 3 times today. This morning it was
last
> > night's food. A couple of hours later it was a clear, thick liquid.
Just a
> > few minutes ago it was 2 lumps of brown stuff that looked like matted
hair.
> > Since this is July 4th, my vet isn't in but hopefully will be tomorrow.
I
> > give her the Purina hairball treats once a week according to the
directions
> > but I know that's not the cure-all for hairballs. Is there anything
else I
> > can give her until I can get her into the vet?
> >
> > She hasn't drank any water all day from what I can tell and she hasn't
eaten
> > any food. She hides for a couple of hours after she's thrown up then is
her
> > usual affectionate self until she throws up again. So, I'm thinking
this is
> > not an emergency vet situation. However, if my vet doesn't have his
usual
> > Saturday hours tomorrow, then I'll take her to the emergency vet.
> >
> > Thanks for any help or advice.
> >
> What you describe is pretty typical for my cats when they're bringing
> up a hairball. As far as prevention of hairballs, the best thing to
> do is brush the cat regularly. Daily is good. The more hair that ends
> up in the brush, the less hair ends up in the cat's tummy.
>
> Laura

Caliban
July 5th 03, 12:09 AM
My five-year-old cat was vomiting with increasing regularity a few months
ago. I started him on Petromalt, a flavored petroleum jelly hairball remedy,
and this seems to have cleared up the problem completely. Pet stores,
Targets, Wal-Marts etc. all have a variety of these petroleum jelly-based
"medicines." My cat doesn't like the flavor (of course), so I rubbed it onto
his paw, per the directions. I did two weeks of a one-inch ribbon each day.
I saw results immediately. He vomited only once in that first two weeks, it
was only a bit of spittle, and his feces look fine. Now I give him a
3/4-inch ribbon twice a week. I brush him down once a day, too. He seems
completely cured.

The Internet has reports that Vaseline petroleum jelly works just as well,
typically suggesting one put a dollop on the cat's nose. I see one site also
states pats of butter work, too. See
http://home.stny.rr.com/carmon/Vomit.htm . The mechanism appears to be
simply lubricating the fur the kitty has swallowed so it passes more readily
through its "plumbing."

Please post an update. :-)

"Kris" > wrote
> My 4-year old kitty has thrown up 3 times today. This morning it was last
> night's food. A couple of hours later it was a clear, thick liquid. Just
a
> few minutes ago it was 2 lumps of brown stuff that looked like matted
hair.
> Since this is July 4th, my vet isn't in but hopefully will be tomorrow. I
> give her the Purina hairball treats once a week according to the
directions
> but I know that's not the cure-all for hairballs. Is there anything else
I
> can give her until I can get her into the vet?
>
> She hasn't drank any water all day from what I can tell and she hasn't
eaten
> any food. She hides for a couple of hours after she's thrown up then is
her
> usual affectionate self until she throws up again. So, I'm thinking this
is
> not an emergency vet situation. However, if my vet doesn't have his usual
> Saturday hours tomorrow, then I'll take her to the emergency vet.
>
> Thanks for any help or advice.

Caliban
July 5th 03, 12:09 AM
My five-year-old cat was vomiting with increasing regularity a few months
ago. I started him on Petromalt, a flavored petroleum jelly hairball remedy,
and this seems to have cleared up the problem completely. Pet stores,
Targets, Wal-Marts etc. all have a variety of these petroleum jelly-based
"medicines." My cat doesn't like the flavor (of course), so I rubbed it onto
his paw, per the directions. I did two weeks of a one-inch ribbon each day.
I saw results immediately. He vomited only once in that first two weeks, it
was only a bit of spittle, and his feces look fine. Now I give him a
3/4-inch ribbon twice a week. I brush him down once a day, too. He seems
completely cured.

The Internet has reports that Vaseline petroleum jelly works just as well,
typically suggesting one put a dollop on the cat's nose. I see one site also
states pats of butter work, too. See
http://home.stny.rr.com/carmon/Vomit.htm . The mechanism appears to be
simply lubricating the fur the kitty has swallowed so it passes more readily
through its "plumbing."

Please post an update. :-)

"Kris" > wrote
> My 4-year old kitty has thrown up 3 times today. This morning it was last
> night's food. A couple of hours later it was a clear, thick liquid. Just
a
> few minutes ago it was 2 lumps of brown stuff that looked like matted
hair.
> Since this is July 4th, my vet isn't in but hopefully will be tomorrow. I
> give her the Purina hairball treats once a week according to the
directions
> but I know that's not the cure-all for hairballs. Is there anything else
I
> can give her until I can get her into the vet?
>
> She hasn't drank any water all day from what I can tell and she hasn't
eaten
> any food. She hides for a couple of hours after she's thrown up then is
her
> usual affectionate self until she throws up again. So, I'm thinking this
is
> not an emergency vet situation. However, if my vet doesn't have his usual
> Saturday hours tomorrow, then I'll take her to the emergency vet.
>
> Thanks for any help or advice.

Cathy Friedmann
July 5th 03, 12:53 AM
"Caliban" > wrote in message
rthlink.net...
> My five-year-old cat was vomiting with increasing regularity a few months
> ago. I started him on Petromalt, a flavored petroleum jelly hairball
remedy,
> and this seems to have cleared up the problem completely. Pet stores,
> Targets, Wal-Marts etc. all have a variety of these petroleum jelly-based
> "medicines." My cat doesn't like the flavor (of course), so I rubbed it
onto
> his paw, per the directions. I did two weeks of a one-inch ribbon each
day.
> I saw results immediately. He vomited only once in that first two weeks,
it
> was only a bit of spittle, and his feces look fine. Now I give him a
> 3/4-inch ribbon twice a week. I brush him down once a day, too. He seems
> completely cured.
>
> The Internet has reports that Vaseline petroleum jelly works just as well,
> typically suggesting one put a dollop on the cat's nose.

The hairball remedies Petromalt and Laxatone (basically the same thing as
Petromalt) - are both just petroleum jelly (Vaseline), with flavor added.
If you have the molasses flavored kind that you cat doesn't like, try & see
if you can find the fish-flavored variety, in case that's a bigger hit w/
him.

Cathy

--
"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon


I see one site also
> states pats of butter work, too. See
> http://home.stny.rr.com/carmon/Vomit.htm . The mechanism appears to be
> simply lubricating the fur the kitty has swallowed so it passes more
readily
> through its "plumbing."
>
> Please post an update. :-)

Cathy Friedmann
July 5th 03, 12:53 AM
"Caliban" > wrote in message
rthlink.net...
> My five-year-old cat was vomiting with increasing regularity a few months
> ago. I started him on Petromalt, a flavored petroleum jelly hairball
remedy,
> and this seems to have cleared up the problem completely. Pet stores,
> Targets, Wal-Marts etc. all have a variety of these petroleum jelly-based
> "medicines." My cat doesn't like the flavor (of course), so I rubbed it
onto
> his paw, per the directions. I did two weeks of a one-inch ribbon each
day.
> I saw results immediately. He vomited only once in that first two weeks,
it
> was only a bit of spittle, and his feces look fine. Now I give him a
> 3/4-inch ribbon twice a week. I brush him down once a day, too. He seems
> completely cured.
>
> The Internet has reports that Vaseline petroleum jelly works just as well,
> typically suggesting one put a dollop on the cat's nose.

The hairball remedies Petromalt and Laxatone (basically the same thing as
Petromalt) - are both just petroleum jelly (Vaseline), with flavor added.
If you have the molasses flavored kind that you cat doesn't like, try & see
if you can find the fish-flavored variety, in case that's a bigger hit w/
him.

Cathy

--
"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon


I see one site also
> states pats of butter work, too. See
> http://home.stny.rr.com/carmon/Vomit.htm . The mechanism appears to be
> simply lubricating the fur the kitty has swallowed so it passes more
readily
> through its "plumbing."
>
> Please post an update. :-)

k
July 5th 03, 04:59 AM
Laxatone, or PetroMalt, are available at
your vet's. Inexpensive, and a more standard
hairball treatment than the Purina routine.
Always keep some on hand.

If it is hairballs, more often than not,
they are ok, once they get the hairball up.
I'd definitely have any cat that didn't
return to normal by morning to the vet.


"Kris" > wrote in message >...
> Thanks Laura. I do brush her but probably not as often as I should.
>
> I will definitely get her in somewhere tomorrow if she's not better. She's
> under my bed right now recovering from her latest bout of vomiting. I hope
> the fireworks tonight don't make her sicker.
>
>
> "Laura R." > wrote in message
> .net...
> > circa Fri, 04 Jul 2003 22:33:26 GMT, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav,
> > Kris ) said,
> > >
> > > My 4-year old kitty has thrown up 3 times today. This morning it was
> last
> > > night's food. A couple of hours later it was a clear, thick liquid.
> Just a
> > > few minutes ago it was 2 lumps of brown stuff that looked like matted
> hair.
> > > Since this is July 4th, my vet isn't in but hopefully will be tomorrow.
> I
> > > give her the Purina hairball treats once a week according to the
> directions
> > > but I know that's not the cure-all for hairballs. Is there anything
> else I
> > > can give her until I can get her into the vet?
> > >
> > > She hasn't drank any water all day from what I can tell and she hasn't
> eaten
> > > any food. She hides for a couple of hours after she's thrown up then is
> her
> > > usual affectionate self until she throws up again. So, I'm thinking
> this is
> > > not an emergency vet situation. However, if my vet doesn't have his
> usual
> > > Saturday hours tomorrow, then I'll take her to the emergency vet.
> > >
> > > Thanks for any help or advice.
> > >
> > What you describe is pretty typical for my cats when they're bringing
> > up a hairball. As far as prevention of hairballs, the best thing to
> > do is brush the cat regularly. Daily is good. The more hair that ends
> > up in the brush, the less hair ends up in the cat's tummy.
> >
> > Laura

k
July 5th 03, 04:59 AM
Laxatone, or PetroMalt, are available at
your vet's. Inexpensive, and a more standard
hairball treatment than the Purina routine.
Always keep some on hand.

If it is hairballs, more often than not,
they are ok, once they get the hairball up.
I'd definitely have any cat that didn't
return to normal by morning to the vet.


"Kris" > wrote in message >...
> Thanks Laura. I do brush her but probably not as often as I should.
>
> I will definitely get her in somewhere tomorrow if she's not better. She's
> under my bed right now recovering from her latest bout of vomiting. I hope
> the fireworks tonight don't make her sicker.
>
>
> "Laura R." > wrote in message
> .net...
> > circa Fri, 04 Jul 2003 22:33:26 GMT, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav,
> > Kris ) said,
> > >
> > > My 4-year old kitty has thrown up 3 times today. This morning it was
> last
> > > night's food. A couple of hours later it was a clear, thick liquid.
> Just a
> > > few minutes ago it was 2 lumps of brown stuff that looked like matted
> hair.
> > > Since this is July 4th, my vet isn't in but hopefully will be tomorrow.
> I
> > > give her the Purina hairball treats once a week according to the
> directions
> > > but I know that's not the cure-all for hairballs. Is there anything
> else I
> > > can give her until I can get her into the vet?
> > >
> > > She hasn't drank any water all day from what I can tell and she hasn't
> eaten
> > > any food. She hides for a couple of hours after she's thrown up then is
> her
> > > usual affectionate self until she throws up again. So, I'm thinking
> this is
> > > not an emergency vet situation. However, if my vet doesn't have his
> usual
> > > Saturday hours tomorrow, then I'll take her to the emergency vet.
> > >
> > > Thanks for any help or advice.
> > >
> > What you describe is pretty typical for my cats when they're bringing
> > up a hairball. As far as prevention of hairballs, the best thing to
> > do is brush the cat regularly. Daily is good. The more hair that ends
> > up in the brush, the less hair ends up in the cat's tummy.
> >
> > Laura

Caliban
July 5th 03, 05:34 PM
Hi Cathy,

As it happens, my cat's first tube of hairball remedy was the molasses (I
think) flavored Petromalt. His second tube is Hartz's salmon flavored one.
My cat is not keen on either, but it's not a big problem. At least the drops
he shakes off his paw clean up easily from the carpet.

After this second tube runs out, I am thinking of trying the butter or maybe
giving him helpings of canned tuna fish in oil (people version) a few times
a week.

He was on dried food (Iams mostly) for almost all his life, so perhaps the
fur he consumed didn't pass because of insufficient oil in his diet. Diet
variety perhaps helps ensure oil, too? I will have to check the labels of
the various cat foods and treats designed to prevent hair balls and see if
they work mostly by adding oil to the diet.

"Cathy Friedmann" > wrote
> "Caliban" > wrote
snip
> > The Internet has reports that Vaseline petroleum jelly works just as
well,
> > typically suggesting one put a dollop on the cat's nose.
>
> The hairball remedies Petromalt and Laxatone (basically the same thing as
> Petromalt) - are both just petroleum jelly (Vaseline), with flavor added.
> If you have the molasses flavored kind that you cat doesn't like, try &
see
> if you can find the fish-flavored variety, in case that's a bigger hit w/
> him.

> I see one site also
> > states pats of butter work, too. See
> > http://home.stny.rr.com/carmon/Vomit.htm . The mechanism appears to be
> > simply lubricating the fur the kitty has swallowed so it passes more
> readily
> > through its "plumbing."

Caliban
July 5th 03, 05:34 PM
Hi Cathy,

As it happens, my cat's first tube of hairball remedy was the molasses (I
think) flavored Petromalt. His second tube is Hartz's salmon flavored one.
My cat is not keen on either, but it's not a big problem. At least the drops
he shakes off his paw clean up easily from the carpet.

After this second tube runs out, I am thinking of trying the butter or maybe
giving him helpings of canned tuna fish in oil (people version) a few times
a week.

He was on dried food (Iams mostly) for almost all his life, so perhaps the
fur he consumed didn't pass because of insufficient oil in his diet. Diet
variety perhaps helps ensure oil, too? I will have to check the labels of
the various cat foods and treats designed to prevent hair balls and see if
they work mostly by adding oil to the diet.

"Cathy Friedmann" > wrote
> "Caliban" > wrote
snip
> > The Internet has reports that Vaseline petroleum jelly works just as
well,
> > typically suggesting one put a dollop on the cat's nose.
>
> The hairball remedies Petromalt and Laxatone (basically the same thing as
> Petromalt) - are both just petroleum jelly (Vaseline), with flavor added.
> If you have the molasses flavored kind that you cat doesn't like, try &
see
> if you can find the fish-flavored variety, in case that's a bigger hit w/
> him.

> I see one site also
> > states pats of butter work, too. See
> > http://home.stny.rr.com/carmon/Vomit.htm . The mechanism appears to be
> > simply lubricating the fur the kitty has swallowed so it passes more
> readily
> > through its "plumbing."

Cathy Friedmann
July 5th 03, 08:37 PM
"Kris" > wrote in message
...
> Hey all. Thanks for your responses. She started feeling better last
night
> after getting the hair balls up. She's eating and drinking and seems
> perfectly OK now. I will try the Petromalt or Laxatone as suggested.
I'll
> also start brushing her every day, too.

Good. :-)

One of my cats was feeling just sort of "off' at one point, & so she had a
vet appt. *Just* before the appt. - as I was about to put her into the
carrier - she threw up a _huge_ hairball. And immediately felt better. ;-)

Cathy

--
"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon
>
>
>
> "wombn" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On Fri, 04 Jul 2003 22:43:50 GMT, Laura R.
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >What you describe is pretty typical for my cats when they're bringing
> > >up a hairball. As far as prevention of hairballs, the best thing to
> > >do is brush the cat regularly. Daily is good. The more hair that ends
> > >up in the brush, the less hair ends up in the cat's tummy.
> > >
> > I read somewhere recently (have no idea where I read this) that
> > hairballs do serve a bit of purpose for cats: fiber. So I imagine
> > that some amount of it is necessary, no?
> >
> > I wonder how much mouse hair feral cats end up eating....
> >
> > My childhood cat used to bring her kills into the house through the
> > heating vents... she was shorthaired and only did the hairball thing
> > now-and-then.
> >
> > I wish I understood this stuff better.
> >
>
>

Cathy Friedmann
July 5th 03, 08:37 PM
"Kris" > wrote in message
...
> Hey all. Thanks for your responses. She started feeling better last
night
> after getting the hair balls up. She's eating and drinking and seems
> perfectly OK now. I will try the Petromalt or Laxatone as suggested.
I'll
> also start brushing her every day, too.

Good. :-)

One of my cats was feeling just sort of "off' at one point, & so she had a
vet appt. *Just* before the appt. - as I was about to put her into the
carrier - she threw up a _huge_ hairball. And immediately felt better. ;-)

Cathy

--
"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon
>
>
>
> "wombn" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On Fri, 04 Jul 2003 22:43:50 GMT, Laura R.
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >What you describe is pretty typical for my cats when they're bringing
> > >up a hairball. As far as prevention of hairballs, the best thing to
> > >do is brush the cat regularly. Daily is good. The more hair that ends
> > >up in the brush, the less hair ends up in the cat's tummy.
> > >
> > I read somewhere recently (have no idea where I read this) that
> > hairballs do serve a bit of purpose for cats: fiber. So I imagine
> > that some amount of it is necessary, no?
> >
> > I wonder how much mouse hair feral cats end up eating....
> >
> > My childhood cat used to bring her kills into the house through the
> > heating vents... she was shorthaired and only did the hairball thing
> > now-and-then.
> >
> > I wish I understood this stuff better.
> >
>
>

Kris
July 5th 03, 08:43 PM
Hey all. Thanks for your responses. She started feeling better last night
after getting the hair balls up. She's eating and drinking and seems
perfectly OK now. I will try the Petromalt or Laxatone as suggested. I'll
also start brushing her every day, too.



"wombn" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 04 Jul 2003 22:43:50 GMT, Laura R.
> > wrote:
>
> >What you describe is pretty typical for my cats when they're bringing
> >up a hairball. As far as prevention of hairballs, the best thing to
> >do is brush the cat regularly. Daily is good. The more hair that ends
> >up in the brush, the less hair ends up in the cat's tummy.
> >
> I read somewhere recently (have no idea where I read this) that
> hairballs do serve a bit of purpose for cats: fiber. So I imagine
> that some amount of it is necessary, no?
>
> I wonder how much mouse hair feral cats end up eating....
>
> My childhood cat used to bring her kills into the house through the
> heating vents... she was shorthaired and only did the hairball thing
> now-and-then.
>
> I wish I understood this stuff better.
>

Kris
July 5th 03, 08:43 PM
Hey all. Thanks for your responses. She started feeling better last night
after getting the hair balls up. She's eating and drinking and seems
perfectly OK now. I will try the Petromalt or Laxatone as suggested. I'll
also start brushing her every day, too.



"wombn" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 04 Jul 2003 22:43:50 GMT, Laura R.
> > wrote:
>
> >What you describe is pretty typical for my cats when they're bringing
> >up a hairball. As far as prevention of hairballs, the best thing to
> >do is brush the cat regularly. Daily is good. The more hair that ends
> >up in the brush, the less hair ends up in the cat's tummy.
> >
> I read somewhere recently (have no idea where I read this) that
> hairballs do serve a bit of purpose for cats: fiber. So I imagine
> that some amount of it is necessary, no?
>
> I wonder how much mouse hair feral cats end up eating....
>
> My childhood cat used to bring her kills into the house through the
> heating vents... she was shorthaired and only did the hairball thing
> now-and-then.
>
> I wish I understood this stuff better.
>

Nicole
July 5th 03, 10:44 PM
Hairball formula foods control hairballs by adding fiber to the diet -- the
fiber is supposed to flush the hair out

i use Laxaire on my cat -- works fairly well in conjunction with hairball
formulated food
"Laura R." > wrote in message
.net...
> circa Sat, 05 Jul 2003 16:34:53 GMT, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav,
> Caliban ) said,
> > Hi Cathy,
> >
> > As it happens, my cat's first tube of hairball remedy was the molasses
(I
> > think) flavored Petromalt. His second tube is Hartz's salmon flavored
one.
> > My cat is not keen on either, but it's not a big problem. At least the
drops
> > he shakes off his paw clean up easily from the carpet.
>
> Try plain ol' vaseline. You could even try mixing it into his food.
> >
> > After this second tube runs out, I am thinking of trying the butter or
maybe
> > giving him helpings of canned tuna fish in oil (people version) a few
times
> > a week.
>
> Feeding tuna or its oil regularly to your cat is generally not a good
> idea except as an occasional treat or to stimulate inappetant cats to
> eat.
>
> http://sd.essortment.com/nutritioncats_rnsg.htm
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/feline-hyperT/message/7506
> http://www.pampered-paws.net/faqcat.htm#faq_04
> http://www.vegsource.com/animal/cats/messages/18406.html
>
> The below article debates the toxicity of tuna, and I offer no
> statement as to whether or not I agree with it, but note the
> information at the end about the oil from canned tuna depleting
> vitamin E in cats.
>
> http://www.gorbzilla.com/files%20for%20download/all_about_tuna.PDF
> >
> > He was on dried food (Iams mostly) for almost all his life, so perhaps
the
> > fur he consumed didn't pass because of insufficient oil in his diet.
Diet
> > variety perhaps helps ensure oil, too? I will have to check the labels
of
> > the various cat foods and treats designed to prevent hair balls and see
if
> > they work mostly by adding oil to the diet.
> >
> >
> They don't. Some use petrolatum (petroleum jelly) and others use
> vegetable fiber. Just because a substance is slippery doesn't mean
> it's suitable to treat hairballs.
>
> http://www.purina.com/purinaessentials/faqs.asp#q6
>
> http://tinyurl.com/g3sr
>
> http://tinyurl.com/g3sq
>
> http://www.penmarric.ns.ca/catcare/usefulinfo/Hairballs.htm
>
> The single best thing you can do to help prevent hairballs is groom
> the cat regularly. The less hair the cat swallows, the less hair
> there is to cause irritation in his/her digestive tract.
> Supplementing with vegetable-fiber foods, with petrolatum or with
> fiber supplements is good, but simply adding fat (butter, oil) to a
> cat's diet does just that- adds fat. Cat diets are already pretty
> high-fat in comparison to what would be best for humans.
>
> In fact, since you mentioned that your cat ate mostly Iams, check out
> the little interactive demo here:
>
> http://tinyurl.com/g3t5
>
> Note that what Iams uses for hairball control is cellulose and beet
> pulp fiber. Fatty acids (fish oils) are used to add shine to the
> coat.
>
> Last, note the warning about oil-based hairball remedies here:
>
> http://www.dummies.com/WileyCDA/DummiesArticle/id-700.html
>
> Laura

Nicole
July 5th 03, 10:44 PM
Hairball formula foods control hairballs by adding fiber to the diet -- the
fiber is supposed to flush the hair out

i use Laxaire on my cat -- works fairly well in conjunction with hairball
formulated food
"Laura R." > wrote in message
.net...
> circa Sat, 05 Jul 2003 16:34:53 GMT, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav,
> Caliban ) said,
> > Hi Cathy,
> >
> > As it happens, my cat's first tube of hairball remedy was the molasses
(I
> > think) flavored Petromalt. His second tube is Hartz's salmon flavored
one.
> > My cat is not keen on either, but it's not a big problem. At least the
drops
> > he shakes off his paw clean up easily from the carpet.
>
> Try plain ol' vaseline. You could even try mixing it into his food.
> >
> > After this second tube runs out, I am thinking of trying the butter or
maybe
> > giving him helpings of canned tuna fish in oil (people version) a few
times
> > a week.
>
> Feeding tuna or its oil regularly to your cat is generally not a good
> idea except as an occasional treat or to stimulate inappetant cats to
> eat.
>
> http://sd.essortment.com/nutritioncats_rnsg.htm
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/feline-hyperT/message/7506
> http://www.pampered-paws.net/faqcat.htm#faq_04
> http://www.vegsource.com/animal/cats/messages/18406.html
>
> The below article debates the toxicity of tuna, and I offer no
> statement as to whether or not I agree with it, but note the
> information at the end about the oil from canned tuna depleting
> vitamin E in cats.
>
> http://www.gorbzilla.com/files%20for%20download/all_about_tuna.PDF
> >
> > He was on dried food (Iams mostly) for almost all his life, so perhaps
the
> > fur he consumed didn't pass because of insufficient oil in his diet.
Diet
> > variety perhaps helps ensure oil, too? I will have to check the labels
of
> > the various cat foods and treats designed to prevent hair balls and see
if
> > they work mostly by adding oil to the diet.
> >
> >
> They don't. Some use petrolatum (petroleum jelly) and others use
> vegetable fiber. Just because a substance is slippery doesn't mean
> it's suitable to treat hairballs.
>
> http://www.purina.com/purinaessentials/faqs.asp#q6
>
> http://tinyurl.com/g3sr
>
> http://tinyurl.com/g3sq
>
> http://www.penmarric.ns.ca/catcare/usefulinfo/Hairballs.htm
>
> The single best thing you can do to help prevent hairballs is groom
> the cat regularly. The less hair the cat swallows, the less hair
> there is to cause irritation in his/her digestive tract.
> Supplementing with vegetable-fiber foods, with petrolatum or with
> fiber supplements is good, but simply adding fat (butter, oil) to a
> cat's diet does just that- adds fat. Cat diets are already pretty
> high-fat in comparison to what would be best for humans.
>
> In fact, since you mentioned that your cat ate mostly Iams, check out
> the little interactive demo here:
>
> http://tinyurl.com/g3t5
>
> Note that what Iams uses for hairball control is cellulose and beet
> pulp fiber. Fatty acids (fish oils) are used to add shine to the
> coat.
>
> Last, note the warning about oil-based hairball remedies here:
>
> http://www.dummies.com/WileyCDA/DummiesArticle/id-700.html
>
> Laura

Caliban
July 6th 03, 12:43 AM
"Laura R." > wrote
> circa Sat, 05 Jul 2003 16:34:53 GMT, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav,
> Caliban ) said,
> > Hi Cathy,
> >
> > As it happens, my cat's first tube of hairball remedy was the molasses
(I
> > think) flavored Petromalt. His second tube is Hartz's salmon flavored
one.
> > My cat is not keen on either, but it's not a big problem. At least the
drops
> > he shakes off his paw clean up easily from the carpet.
>
> Try plain ol' vaseline. You could even try mixing it into his food.

I am holding off on vaseline for now, because these "hairball remedies" have
additional nutrients. E.g. the Hartz hairball remedy has Vitamin B1.

And, yes, I want to get my cat down to less and less each week but think it
might come down to some regular amount, say a half-inch ribbon each week or
every other week, to help his digestion.

snip
> > I will have to check the labels of
> > the various cat foods and treats designed to prevent hair balls and see
if
> > they work mostly by adding oil to the diet.
> >
> They don't. Some use petrolatum (petroleum jelly)

Petrolatum is oil.

> and others use
> vegetable fiber. Just because a substance is slippery doesn't mean
> it's suitable to treat hairballs.

I don't know that most oils that are consumable (vegetable, olive,
margarine, butter) wouldn't all have the same effect for short-term
treatment of hairballs.

I will study more on the fiber, however. One of the sites you listed said
its cat food had 4% fiber for the treatment of hairballs. I'll check other
dry foods and see if they're much different. Remember, the original poster
said s/he gave her cat hairball treats. Now maybe the recent vomiting wasn't
hairballs, but if it was, this seems to me to confound what the best remedy
(short or long-term) is.

> The single best thing you can do to help prevent hairballs is groom
> the cat regularly. The less hair the cat swallows, the less hair
> there is to cause irritation in his/her digestive tract.
> Supplementing with vegetable-fiber foods, with petrolatum or with
> fiber supplements is good, but simply adding fat (butter, oil) to a
> cat's diet does just that- adds fat.

Why is it you think butter is worse fat-wise than petrolatum?

> Cat diets are already pretty
> high-fat in comparison to what would be best for humans.
>
> In fact, since you mentioned that your cat ate mostly Iams, check out
> the little interactive demo here:
>
> http://tinyurl.com/g3t5
>
> Note that what Iams uses for hairball control is cellulose and beet
> pulp fiber. Fatty acids (fish oils) are used to add shine to the
> coat.

Years ago when I got my cat (as a six-week-old kitten), his veterinarian
emphatically stated Iams and Hill's Science was far superior to any other
cat foods. I noticed her office sold the stuff. I also know many people
swear by Iams, but not, it seems, based on any particular scientific
results. It seems it just became popular. That is, people like to appear to
"know best." In fact, I'm not sure the studies attesting to Iams superiority
are all that credible. Marketers (read: greedy executives lied) may have got
the better of the public for some time.

Now I see Iams debated regularly here. It's lost its edge, apparently. I fed
my cat strictly dry Iams for years and am now convinced this was a huge
contributor to his recent troubles.

So whom to believe? Several of the sites you provided are cat food
manufacturer-sponsored. And I don't know what the other sites are using for
their sources.

At any rate, as I said, I will look into the high fiber alternatives for
dealing with hairballs and continue brushing down my cat once a day,
something I had not done before. (But nor did I ever have a hairball
situation with a cat like this before, given my several cats in my life
since I was a kid, none of whom were brushed regularly and all of whom lived
healthily for years. So there's still some puzzlement here.)

Thanks for your comments.

Caliban
July 6th 03, 12:43 AM
"Laura R." > wrote
> circa Sat, 05 Jul 2003 16:34:53 GMT, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav,
> Caliban ) said,
> > Hi Cathy,
> >
> > As it happens, my cat's first tube of hairball remedy was the molasses
(I
> > think) flavored Petromalt. His second tube is Hartz's salmon flavored
one.
> > My cat is not keen on either, but it's not a big problem. At least the
drops
> > he shakes off his paw clean up easily from the carpet.
>
> Try plain ol' vaseline. You could even try mixing it into his food.

I am holding off on vaseline for now, because these "hairball remedies" have
additional nutrients. E.g. the Hartz hairball remedy has Vitamin B1.

And, yes, I want to get my cat down to less and less each week but think it
might come down to some regular amount, say a half-inch ribbon each week or
every other week, to help his digestion.

snip
> > I will have to check the labels of
> > the various cat foods and treats designed to prevent hair balls and see
if
> > they work mostly by adding oil to the diet.
> >
> They don't. Some use petrolatum (petroleum jelly)

Petrolatum is oil.

> and others use
> vegetable fiber. Just because a substance is slippery doesn't mean
> it's suitable to treat hairballs.

I don't know that most oils that are consumable (vegetable, olive,
margarine, butter) wouldn't all have the same effect for short-term
treatment of hairballs.

I will study more on the fiber, however. One of the sites you listed said
its cat food had 4% fiber for the treatment of hairballs. I'll check other
dry foods and see if they're much different. Remember, the original poster
said s/he gave her cat hairball treats. Now maybe the recent vomiting wasn't
hairballs, but if it was, this seems to me to confound what the best remedy
(short or long-term) is.

> The single best thing you can do to help prevent hairballs is groom
> the cat regularly. The less hair the cat swallows, the less hair
> there is to cause irritation in his/her digestive tract.
> Supplementing with vegetable-fiber foods, with petrolatum or with
> fiber supplements is good, but simply adding fat (butter, oil) to a
> cat's diet does just that- adds fat.

Why is it you think butter is worse fat-wise than petrolatum?

> Cat diets are already pretty
> high-fat in comparison to what would be best for humans.
>
> In fact, since you mentioned that your cat ate mostly Iams, check out
> the little interactive demo here:
>
> http://tinyurl.com/g3t5
>
> Note that what Iams uses for hairball control is cellulose and beet
> pulp fiber. Fatty acids (fish oils) are used to add shine to the
> coat.

Years ago when I got my cat (as a six-week-old kitten), his veterinarian
emphatically stated Iams and Hill's Science was far superior to any other
cat foods. I noticed her office sold the stuff. I also know many people
swear by Iams, but not, it seems, based on any particular scientific
results. It seems it just became popular. That is, people like to appear to
"know best." In fact, I'm not sure the studies attesting to Iams superiority
are all that credible. Marketers (read: greedy executives lied) may have got
the better of the public for some time.

Now I see Iams debated regularly here. It's lost its edge, apparently. I fed
my cat strictly dry Iams for years and am now convinced this was a huge
contributor to his recent troubles.

So whom to believe? Several of the sites you provided are cat food
manufacturer-sponsored. And I don't know what the other sites are using for
their sources.

At any rate, as I said, I will look into the high fiber alternatives for
dealing with hairballs and continue brushing down my cat once a day,
something I had not done before. (But nor did I ever have a hairball
situation with a cat like this before, given my several cats in my life
since I was a kid, none of whom were brushed regularly and all of whom lived
healthily for years. So there's still some puzzlement here.)

Thanks for your comments.

PawsForThought
July 6th 03, 05:20 AM
>From: Laura R.

>PawsForThought ) said,
>> Another product that works well is Catlube, made without
>> petroleum-based ingredients:
>>
>> www.vetsbest.com/cats.html#catlube
>>
>>
>You have used this? I'm curious as to why you use clarified butter
>instead of this.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Laura

I used the Catlube with my last cat and it worked well. She seemed to like it
better than the petroleum based remedies.
You can also make your own slippery elm by adding 1 tsp slippery elm powder to
1/2 cup cold water. Stir well to mix it. Then bring slowly to a simmer,
stirring periodically until it thickens. Then cool and store in a glass jar;
it keeps 5 to 7 days in the fridge. Feed 1 tsp of the liquid 5 to 10 mins
before the meal, but it can also be mixed in with the food if the cat won't eat
it plain.

My present cats haven't had hairballs fortunately. I have the ghee in the
house and had read that it worked to keep the digestive tract lubricated so I
gave my cats some and they love it. I just put some on my finger and they lick
it off. It's not much though. Ghee (butter with all the milk solids removed)
is widely used in Ayurvedic medicine and it's quite interesting:
http://www.indiaoz.com.au/health/ayurveda/food_ghee.shtml

Lauren
________
See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe
Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html
http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html
Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm

PawsForThought
July 6th 03, 05:20 AM
>From: Laura R.

>PawsForThought ) said,
>> Another product that works well is Catlube, made without
>> petroleum-based ingredients:
>>
>> www.vetsbest.com/cats.html#catlube
>>
>>
>You have used this? I'm curious as to why you use clarified butter
>instead of this.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Laura

I used the Catlube with my last cat and it worked well. She seemed to like it
better than the petroleum based remedies.
You can also make your own slippery elm by adding 1 tsp slippery elm powder to
1/2 cup cold water. Stir well to mix it. Then bring slowly to a simmer,
stirring periodically until it thickens. Then cool and store in a glass jar;
it keeps 5 to 7 days in the fridge. Feed 1 tsp of the liquid 5 to 10 mins
before the meal, but it can also be mixed in with the food if the cat won't eat
it plain.

My present cats haven't had hairballs fortunately. I have the ghee in the
house and had read that it worked to keep the digestive tract lubricated so I
gave my cats some and they love it. I just put some on my finger and they lick
it off. It's not much though. Ghee (butter with all the milk solids removed)
is widely used in Ayurvedic medicine and it's quite interesting:
http://www.indiaoz.com.au/health/ayurveda/food_ghee.shtml

Lauren
________
See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe
Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html
http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html
Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm

*~*SooZy*~*
July 6th 03, 06:18 PM
"PawsForThought" > wrote in message
...
> >From: Laura R.
>
> ) said,
> >> >From: Laura R.
> >>
> >> >PawsForThought ) said,
> >> >> Another product that works well is Catlube, made without
> >> >> petroleum-based ingredients:
> >> >>
> >> >> www.vetsbest.com/cats.html#catlube
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >You have used this? I'm curious as to why you use clarified butter
> >> >instead of this.
> >> >
> >> >Thanks,
> >> >
> >> >Laura
> >>
> >> I used the Catlube with my last cat and it worked well. She seemed to
like
> >it
> >> better than the petroleum based remedies.
> >> You can also make your own slippery elm by adding 1 tsp slippery elm
powder
> >to
> >> 1/2 cup cold water. Stir well to mix it. Then bring slowly to a simmer,
> >> stirring periodically until it thickens. Then cool and store in a
glass
> >jar;
> >> it keeps 5 to 7 days in the fridge. Feed 1 tsp of the liquid 5 to 10
mins
> >> before the meal, but it can also be mixed in with the food if the cat
won't
> >eat
> >> it plain.
> >>
> >> My present cats haven't had hairballs fortunately. I have the ghee in
the
> >> house and had read that it worked to keep the digestive tract
lubricated so
> >I
> >> gave my cats some and they love it. I just put some on my finger and
they
> >lick
> >> it off. It's not much though. Ghee (butter with all the milk solids
> >removed)
> >> is widely used in Ayurvedic medicine and it's quite interesting:
> >> http://www.indiaoz.com.au/health/ayurveda/food_ghee.shtml
> >>
> >
> >Excellent; thanks for the info. I've seen slippery elm bark listed as
> >useful for a number of digestive ailments but hadn't seen it listed
> >for treatment of hairballs before.
>
> Slippery Elm is very soothing for inflammation or irritation in the
digestive
> tract. It's used for diahrrea, ulcers and vomiting. It also contains
minerals
> and vitamins and most cats will accept it. You can even sprinkle the
powder
> into food to sooth the stomach and intestines. I haven't used it
specifically
> for hairballs but I do know some people who have and say it helps. I
don't
> know if it helps move the hair along so much as probably just very
soothing. I
> wish I'd known about it with my last cat who vomited hairballs frequently.
>
> >As far as the ghee, I'd never heard of it being used for hairballs,
> >either. Do you really think that it is the ghee that is helping your
> >cats WRT hairballs, or is it just grooming and that they're naturally
> >not hairball-prone? Or perhaps the lack of hairballs is related to
> >the diet you feed your cats? I know that ghee is compositionally
> >different than butter, but I wonder how much of its lubricant
> >capabilities survive the digestive process. Perhaps the clarification
> >process decreases its absorptive qualities? If so, I wonder why it
> >isn't more frequently recommended. Do you know if, like some
> >unsaturated fats, it may affect nutrient absorption?
> >
> >Laura
>
> Ghee is actually a saturated fat and it enhances fat soluable nutrient
> absorption like A, D, E and K. I don't think many vets are familiar with
ghee,
> probably only holistic ones. My cats are on a homemade raw diet and I
think
> that probably is a big reason they don't have hairballs. From my
understanding
> of ghee, it can actually aid in the digestive process. One thing I do
notice
> is that when I give ghee to my cats, they seem to have a better appetite.
In
> Ayervedic medicine they believe that ghee enhances the assimilation of
> nutrients, and is good for nerve tissue, reproductive secretions. This
system
> of medicine has been around for 5,000 years and is quite interesting.
>
> Lauren
> ________
> See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe
> Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html
> http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html
> Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm

try mixing a teaspoon of bran (from health shop) this prevents fur balls
occurring, as Lauren says any cat fed on the above diets or BARF wont get
fur balls anyway.... I have one cat fed on dry food (wont even sniff the raw
food) and the other fed on BARF raw meaty bones diet as he was fed on that
from a 3 week old kitten.

*~*SooZy*~*
July 6th 03, 06:18 PM
"PawsForThought" > wrote in message
...
> >From: Laura R.
>
> ) said,
> >> >From: Laura R.
> >>
> >> >PawsForThought ) said,
> >> >> Another product that works well is Catlube, made without
> >> >> petroleum-based ingredients:
> >> >>
> >> >> www.vetsbest.com/cats.html#catlube
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >You have used this? I'm curious as to why you use clarified butter
> >> >instead of this.
> >> >
> >> >Thanks,
> >> >
> >> >Laura
> >>
> >> I used the Catlube with my last cat and it worked well. She seemed to
like
> >it
> >> better than the petroleum based remedies.
> >> You can also make your own slippery elm by adding 1 tsp slippery elm
powder
> >to
> >> 1/2 cup cold water. Stir well to mix it. Then bring slowly to a simmer,
> >> stirring periodically until it thickens. Then cool and store in a
glass
> >jar;
> >> it keeps 5 to 7 days in the fridge. Feed 1 tsp of the liquid 5 to 10
mins
> >> before the meal, but it can also be mixed in with the food if the cat
won't
> >eat
> >> it plain.
> >>
> >> My present cats haven't had hairballs fortunately. I have the ghee in
the
> >> house and had read that it worked to keep the digestive tract
lubricated so
> >I
> >> gave my cats some and they love it. I just put some on my finger and
they
> >lick
> >> it off. It's not much though. Ghee (butter with all the milk solids
> >removed)
> >> is widely used in Ayurvedic medicine and it's quite interesting:
> >> http://www.indiaoz.com.au/health/ayurveda/food_ghee.shtml
> >>
> >
> >Excellent; thanks for the info. I've seen slippery elm bark listed as
> >useful for a number of digestive ailments but hadn't seen it listed
> >for treatment of hairballs before.
>
> Slippery Elm is very soothing for inflammation or irritation in the
digestive
> tract. It's used for diahrrea, ulcers and vomiting. It also contains
minerals
> and vitamins and most cats will accept it. You can even sprinkle the
powder
> into food to sooth the stomach and intestines. I haven't used it
specifically
> for hairballs but I do know some people who have and say it helps. I
don't
> know if it helps move the hair along so much as probably just very
soothing. I
> wish I'd known about it with my last cat who vomited hairballs frequently.
>
> >As far as the ghee, I'd never heard of it being used for hairballs,
> >either. Do you really think that it is the ghee that is helping your
> >cats WRT hairballs, or is it just grooming and that they're naturally
> >not hairball-prone? Or perhaps the lack of hairballs is related to
> >the diet you feed your cats? I know that ghee is compositionally
> >different than butter, but I wonder how much of its lubricant
> >capabilities survive the digestive process. Perhaps the clarification
> >process decreases its absorptive qualities? If so, I wonder why it
> >isn't more frequently recommended. Do you know if, like some
> >unsaturated fats, it may affect nutrient absorption?
> >
> >Laura
>
> Ghee is actually a saturated fat and it enhances fat soluable nutrient
> absorption like A, D, E and K. I don't think many vets are familiar with
ghee,
> probably only holistic ones. My cats are on a homemade raw diet and I
think
> that probably is a big reason they don't have hairballs. From my
understanding
> of ghee, it can actually aid in the digestive process. One thing I do
notice
> is that when I give ghee to my cats, they seem to have a better appetite.
In
> Ayervedic medicine they believe that ghee enhances the assimilation of
> nutrients, and is good for nerve tissue, reproductive secretions. This
system
> of medicine has been around for 5,000 years and is quite interesting.
>
> Lauren
> ________
> See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe
> Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html
> http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html
> Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm

try mixing a teaspoon of bran (from health shop) this prevents fur balls
occurring, as Lauren says any cat fed on the above diets or BARF wont get
fur balls anyway.... I have one cat fed on dry food (wont even sniff the raw
food) and the other fed on BARF raw meaty bones diet as he was fed on that
from a 3 week old kitten.

Caliban
July 6th 03, 09:15 PM
"Laura R." > wrote in message
.net...
> circa Sun, 06 Jul 2003 18:19:12 GMT, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav,
> Caliban ) said,
> > > >
> > > I have no issue with your being a "skeptical consumer". It's the
> > > dismissal of everybody whose opinions aren't exactly what you think
> > > they should be,
> >
> > If one interprets questioning the sources behind opinions as dismissing
> > these opinions, then this is so.
>
> I have now repeatedly told you that the links I gave you offer
> attribution and links to source material.

I have never assailed the statements these sites make as being false.

I have questioned the sources.

You, meanwhile, completely dismissed my comments about Steven Crane's
possible bias and how "educated research" means double blind studies with
placebos, high statistical signficance, and marked differences in outcomes.

Or is it possible you did indeed take note of this, but figured, 'okay, it's
out there. I'll consider it. No point in discussing it further at this
time.'?

Just like I have been doing with so many of your opinions.

> > > even though you admit to not having researched, that
> > > I find off-putting.
> >
> > I have seen no one in this thread present any reputable research.
>
> Because you apparently haven't read what I've posted.
>
> > So I don't
> > know why you're claiming I should defer to another's opinions on this
> > matter, unless you want to be recognized as an "authority."
>
> I didn't claim anything of the sort. I perceive that you are
> completely unwilling to accept the possibility that your idea to feed
> your cat tuna oil and butter may not be the most effective approach,
> *even though* you have *no* research to back up your "idea".

I have never assailed the notion that feeding a cat tuna fish *may* not be a
good idea. But nor do I reject the possibility that it may do no harm and in
fact may help. Can reasonable people disagree agreeably?

You have presented no research to refute the suggestion at web sites that
butter might be an acceptable alternative to petrolatum.

> The fact
> that you continue to dismiss the fact that the best thing you can do
> to prevent hairballs is to groom your cat regularly is quite telling.

I do not dismiss this possibility. I do dismiss that this is the only means
to prevent hairballs.

snip rest. We've strayed far off the trail of substantive discussion, IMO.

Caliban
July 6th 03, 09:15 PM
"Laura R." > wrote in message
.net...
> circa Sun, 06 Jul 2003 18:19:12 GMT, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav,
> Caliban ) said,
> > > >
> > > I have no issue with your being a "skeptical consumer". It's the
> > > dismissal of everybody whose opinions aren't exactly what you think
> > > they should be,
> >
> > If one interprets questioning the sources behind opinions as dismissing
> > these opinions, then this is so.
>
> I have now repeatedly told you that the links I gave you offer
> attribution and links to source material.

I have never assailed the statements these sites make as being false.

I have questioned the sources.

You, meanwhile, completely dismissed my comments about Steven Crane's
possible bias and how "educated research" means double blind studies with
placebos, high statistical signficance, and marked differences in outcomes.

Or is it possible you did indeed take note of this, but figured, 'okay, it's
out there. I'll consider it. No point in discussing it further at this
time.'?

Just like I have been doing with so many of your opinions.

> > > even though you admit to not having researched, that
> > > I find off-putting.
> >
> > I have seen no one in this thread present any reputable research.
>
> Because you apparently haven't read what I've posted.
>
> > So I don't
> > know why you're claiming I should defer to another's opinions on this
> > matter, unless you want to be recognized as an "authority."
>
> I didn't claim anything of the sort. I perceive that you are
> completely unwilling to accept the possibility that your idea to feed
> your cat tuna oil and butter may not be the most effective approach,
> *even though* you have *no* research to back up your "idea".

I have never assailed the notion that feeding a cat tuna fish *may* not be a
good idea. But nor do I reject the possibility that it may do no harm and in
fact may help. Can reasonable people disagree agreeably?

You have presented no research to refute the suggestion at web sites that
butter might be an acceptable alternative to petrolatum.

> The fact
> that you continue to dismiss the fact that the best thing you can do
> to prevent hairballs is to groom your cat regularly is quite telling.

I do not dismiss this possibility. I do dismiss that this is the only means
to prevent hairballs.

snip rest. We've strayed far off the trail of substantive discussion, IMO.

Caliban
July 6th 03, 10:06 PM
"Laura R." > wrote
> circa Sun, 06 Jul 2003 20:15:59 GMT, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav,
> Caliban ) said,
> >
>
> > > I have now repeatedly told you that the links I gave you offer
> > > attribution and links to source material.
> >
> > I have never assailed the statements these sites make as being false.
> >
> > I have questioned the sources.
>
> You have not even looked at the sources.

I believe I have looked at them as closely as you.

It saddens me that you would make an accusation like the above. I won't
bother reading your posts in the future, as I went to some trouble to read
your sources so I could discuss their points.

I do want to clarify what I said in my last post: I for one would not feed a
cat exclusively made-for-humans, canned tuna fish. I might try my cat on
canned tuna in oil a few cat servings a week for the possible advantage of
diet variety and the oil to possibly help with hairballs.

Back to the main topic. For the anecdotal database, I note that my current
veterinarian never suggested a hairball remedy for my cat, despite my
expressed concerns about his vomiting. She wanted to put him under and do
exploratory surgery. That she didn't even suggest trying Petromalt (or
similar) is discouraging. It really pays to do one's own research.

> No, I decided that it was more of your obvious unwillingness to
> actually research before forming an opinion. I figured that if you
> had actually read some of his posts, you might see just how
> assumptive your response was.

I googled and read many of his posts when you first mentioned his name.

He is often defending himself from attacks by many on pets newgroups as
being biased.

I never saw his posts criticize Hill's Science, his employer. On the
contrary.

Caliban
July 6th 03, 10:06 PM
"Laura R." > wrote
> circa Sun, 06 Jul 2003 20:15:59 GMT, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav,
> Caliban ) said,
> >
>
> > > I have now repeatedly told you that the links I gave you offer
> > > attribution and links to source material.
> >
> > I have never assailed the statements these sites make as being false.
> >
> > I have questioned the sources.
>
> You have not even looked at the sources.

I believe I have looked at them as closely as you.

It saddens me that you would make an accusation like the above. I won't
bother reading your posts in the future, as I went to some trouble to read
your sources so I could discuss their points.

I do want to clarify what I said in my last post: I for one would not feed a
cat exclusively made-for-humans, canned tuna fish. I might try my cat on
canned tuna in oil a few cat servings a week for the possible advantage of
diet variety and the oil to possibly help with hairballs.

Back to the main topic. For the anecdotal database, I note that my current
veterinarian never suggested a hairball remedy for my cat, despite my
expressed concerns about his vomiting. She wanted to put him under and do
exploratory surgery. That she didn't even suggest trying Petromalt (or
similar) is discouraging. It really pays to do one's own research.

> No, I decided that it was more of your obvious unwillingness to
> actually research before forming an opinion. I figured that if you
> had actually read some of his posts, you might see just how
> assumptive your response was.

I googled and read many of his posts when you first mentioned his name.

He is often defending himself from attacks by many on pets newgroups as
being biased.

I never saw his posts criticize Hill's Science, his employer. On the
contrary.