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View Full Version : Re: vet question, advice requested


Priscilla Ballou
July 27th 03, 08:00 PM
In article >,
"QuiltShopHopper" <[email protected]> wrote:

> My docile, laid back and passive 12 yr old kitty, who sleeps most of the
> time, has started shaking her front paw and holding up that front leg when
> she sits down. She walks on that leg just fine as if nothing hurts. I
> can't figure out, and neither can the vet, what the problem is.
> Vet wants me to bring her in for an all day stay to sedate her then xray her
> front leg and environs. Thi$ will co$t me $ome real money. I feel that (1)
> it's not a bone problem if she walks on it , (2) it's not necessary to
> sedate a cat who is asleep 20 hours out of every 24 anyway, (3) why does she
> have to stay all day in a charge-per-hour cage waiting for sedation and an
> xray instead of me just making an appt, bringing her in, and me waiting for
> her, then learning the results of the xray and discussing a plan of action?
> Do all or most vets demand that they keep her all day, and sedate a cat who
> is elderly and passive? Seems to me that the vet is doing this to pay off
> his car sooner.
> I welcome all opinions on this.
> Thanks in advance,

I wonder if she would hold her paw in the right position for the xray
without being sedated.

Priscilla
--
Minutus cantorum, minutus balorum,
minutus carborata descendum pantorum.
(thanks be to topfive.com)

Elaine Rene
July 27th 03, 09:12 PM
>,
> "QuiltShopHopper" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > My docile, laid back and passive 12 yr old kitty, who sleeps most of the
> > time, has started shaking her front paw and holding up that front leg
when
> > she sits down. She walks on that leg just fine as if nothing hurts. I
> > can't figure out, and neither can the vet, what the problem is.
> > Vet wants me to bring her in for an all day stay to sedate her then xray
her
> > front leg and environs. Thi$ will co$t me $ome real money. I feel that
(1)
> > it's not a bone problem if she walks on it , (2) it's not necessary to
> > sedate a cat who is asleep 20 hours out of every 24 anyway, (3) why does
she
> > have to stay all day in a charge-per-hour cage waiting for sedation and
an
> > xray instead of me just making an appt, bringing her in, and me waiting
for
> > her, then learning the results of the xray and discussing a plan of
action?
> > Do all or most vets demand that they keep her all day, and sedate a cat
who
> > is elderly and passive? Seems to me that the vet is doing this to pay
off
> > his car sooner.
> > I welcome all opinions on this.
> > Thanks in advance,

Have you asked the vet these very questions? I would do so. I think it is
always better for a cat to have his owner nearby whenever possible on a trip
to the vet.

Elaine

Elaine Rene
July 27th 03, 09:12 PM
>,
> "QuiltShopHopper" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > My docile, laid back and passive 12 yr old kitty, who sleeps most of the
> > time, has started shaking her front paw and holding up that front leg
when
> > she sits down. She walks on that leg just fine as if nothing hurts. I
> > can't figure out, and neither can the vet, what the problem is.
> > Vet wants me to bring her in for an all day stay to sedate her then xray
her
> > front leg and environs. Thi$ will co$t me $ome real money. I feel that
(1)
> > it's not a bone problem if she walks on it , (2) it's not necessary to
> > sedate a cat who is asleep 20 hours out of every 24 anyway, (3) why does
she
> > have to stay all day in a charge-per-hour cage waiting for sedation and
an
> > xray instead of me just making an appt, bringing her in, and me waiting
for
> > her, then learning the results of the xray and discussing a plan of
action?
> > Do all or most vets demand that they keep her all day, and sedate a cat
who
> > is elderly and passive? Seems to me that the vet is doing this to pay
off
> > his car sooner.
> > I welcome all opinions on this.
> > Thanks in advance,

Have you asked the vet these very questions? I would do so. I think it is
always better for a cat to have his owner nearby whenever possible on a trip
to the vet.

Elaine

Bill
July 28th 03, 04:30 PM
>"QuiltShopHopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
...
> My docile, laid back and passive 12 yr old kitty, who sleeps most of the
> time, has started shaking her front paw and holding up that front leg when
> she sits down. She walks on that leg just fine as if nothing hurts. I
> can't figure out, and neither can the vet, what the problem is.
> Vet wants me to bring her in for an all day stay to sedate her then xray
her
> front leg and environs. Thi$ will co$t me $ome real money. I feel that
(1)
> it's not a bone problem if she walks on it , (2) it's not necessary to
> sedate a cat who is asleep 20 hours out of every 24 anyway, (3) why does
she
> have to stay all day in a charge-per-hour cage waiting for sedation and an
> xray instead of me just making an appt, bringing her in, and me waiting
for
> her, then learning the results of the xray and discussing a plan of
action?
> Do all or most vets demand that they keep her all day, and sedate a cat
who
> is elderly and passive? Seems to me that the vet is doing this to pay off
> his car sooner.
> I welcome all opinions on this.
> Thanks in advance,
>
> QSH
>
>

These are questions you should call your vet and ask, but this sounds
reasonable to me.

The cat will not fall asleep in a strange place like the vet's office in at
precisely the time they want to take the X-ray with her leg precisely in the
correct position for the X-ray. If the cat were not sedated, someone would
have to stay in the room to hold the leg in position and expose themselves
to X-rays.

When cats are sedated, they cannot roll over on the other side. If they lie
on the same side too long, they can have dangerous respiratory problems.
Someone must "flip" them every 30 minutes or so until they are awake enough
to do it themselves. You could do this yourself at home, but I'd rather the
experts at the vet's office do it.

The per hour cage charge seems a bit much. See if you can negotiate a flat
rate, only let them keep her part of the day until she wakes up enough to
move around, or check out another vet.

Bill

Bill
July 28th 03, 04:30 PM
>"QuiltShopHopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
...
> My docile, laid back and passive 12 yr old kitty, who sleeps most of the
> time, has started shaking her front paw and holding up that front leg when
> she sits down. She walks on that leg just fine as if nothing hurts. I
> can't figure out, and neither can the vet, what the problem is.
> Vet wants me to bring her in for an all day stay to sedate her then xray
her
> front leg and environs. Thi$ will co$t me $ome real money. I feel that
(1)
> it's not a bone problem if she walks on it , (2) it's not necessary to
> sedate a cat who is asleep 20 hours out of every 24 anyway, (3) why does
she
> have to stay all day in a charge-per-hour cage waiting for sedation and an
> xray instead of me just making an appt, bringing her in, and me waiting
for
> her, then learning the results of the xray and discussing a plan of
action?
> Do all or most vets demand that they keep her all day, and sedate a cat
who
> is elderly and passive? Seems to me that the vet is doing this to pay off
> his car sooner.
> I welcome all opinions on this.
> Thanks in advance,
>
> QSH
>
>

These are questions you should call your vet and ask, but this sounds
reasonable to me.

The cat will not fall asleep in a strange place like the vet's office in at
precisely the time they want to take the X-ray with her leg precisely in the
correct position for the X-ray. If the cat were not sedated, someone would
have to stay in the room to hold the leg in position and expose themselves
to X-rays.

When cats are sedated, they cannot roll over on the other side. If they lie
on the same side too long, they can have dangerous respiratory problems.
Someone must "flip" them every 30 minutes or so until they are awake enough
to do it themselves. You could do this yourself at home, but I'd rather the
experts at the vet's office do it.

The per hour cage charge seems a bit much. See if you can negotiate a flat
rate, only let them keep her part of the day until she wakes up enough to
move around, or check out another vet.

Bill

Karen Chuplis
July 28th 03, 04:58 PM
Bill, these are precisely why it really shouldn't be necessary for her cat
to be sedated to be x-rayed. The cat is described as docile. Certainly my
vet got two very clear shots on a non-sedated cat that is a bit of a bugger
at the office and was there a fraction of the time and with no sedation.
Certain x-rays might need sedation, I suppose, but it sure seems that she
needs to check around. Also, I have never heard of an *hourly* charge for a
cage. Daily, but not hourly. This vet just sounds a bit off to me.

Karen

"Bill" > wrote in message
...
> >"QuiltShopHopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> ...
> > My docile, laid back and passive 12 yr old kitty, who sleeps most of the
> > time, has started shaking her front paw and holding up that front leg
when
> > she sits down. She walks on that leg just fine as if nothing hurts. I
> > can't figure out, and neither can the vet, what the problem is.
> > Vet wants me to bring her in for an all day stay to sedate her then xray
> her
> > front leg and environs. Thi$ will co$t me $ome real money. I feel that
> (1)
> > it's not a bone problem if she walks on it , (2) it's not necessary to
> > sedate a cat who is asleep 20 hours out of every 24 anyway, (3) why does
> she
> > have to stay all day in a charge-per-hour cage waiting for sedation and
an
> > xray instead of me just making an appt, bringing her in, and me waiting
> for
> > her, then learning the results of the xray and discussing a plan of
> action?
> > Do all or most vets demand that they keep her all day, and sedate a cat
> who
> > is elderly and passive? Seems to me that the vet is doing this to pay
off
> > his car sooner.
> > I welcome all opinions on this.
> > Thanks in advance,
> >
> > QSH
> >
> >
>
> These are questions you should call your vet and ask, but this sounds
> reasonable to me.
>
> The cat will not fall asleep in a strange place like the vet's office in
at
> precisely the time they want to take the X-ray with her leg precisely in
the
> correct position for the X-ray. If the cat were not sedated, someone
would
> have to stay in the room to hold the leg in position and expose themselves
> to X-rays.
>
> When cats are sedated, they cannot roll over on the other side. If they
lie
> on the same side too long, they can have dangerous respiratory problems.
> Someone must "flip" them every 30 minutes or so until they are awake
enough
> to do it themselves. You could do this yourself at home, but I'd rather
the
> experts at the vet's office do it.
>
> The per hour cage charge seems a bit much. See if you can negotiate a
flat
> rate, only let them keep her part of the day until she wakes up enough to
> move around, or check out another vet.
>
> Bill
>
>
>

Karen Chuplis
July 28th 03, 04:58 PM
Bill, these are precisely why it really shouldn't be necessary for her cat
to be sedated to be x-rayed. The cat is described as docile. Certainly my
vet got two very clear shots on a non-sedated cat that is a bit of a bugger
at the office and was there a fraction of the time and with no sedation.
Certain x-rays might need sedation, I suppose, but it sure seems that she
needs to check around. Also, I have never heard of an *hourly* charge for a
cage. Daily, but not hourly. This vet just sounds a bit off to me.

Karen

"Bill" > wrote in message
...
> >"QuiltShopHopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> ...
> > My docile, laid back and passive 12 yr old kitty, who sleeps most of the
> > time, has started shaking her front paw and holding up that front leg
when
> > she sits down. She walks on that leg just fine as if nothing hurts. I
> > can't figure out, and neither can the vet, what the problem is.
> > Vet wants me to bring her in for an all day stay to sedate her then xray
> her
> > front leg and environs. Thi$ will co$t me $ome real money. I feel that
> (1)
> > it's not a bone problem if she walks on it , (2) it's not necessary to
> > sedate a cat who is asleep 20 hours out of every 24 anyway, (3) why does
> she
> > have to stay all day in a charge-per-hour cage waiting for sedation and
an
> > xray instead of me just making an appt, bringing her in, and me waiting
> for
> > her, then learning the results of the xray and discussing a plan of
> action?
> > Do all or most vets demand that they keep her all day, and sedate a cat
> who
> > is elderly and passive? Seems to me that the vet is doing this to pay
off
> > his car sooner.
> > I welcome all opinions on this.
> > Thanks in advance,
> >
> > QSH
> >
> >
>
> These are questions you should call your vet and ask, but this sounds
> reasonable to me.
>
> The cat will not fall asleep in a strange place like the vet's office in
at
> precisely the time they want to take the X-ray with her leg precisely in
the
> correct position for the X-ray. If the cat were not sedated, someone
would
> have to stay in the room to hold the leg in position and expose themselves
> to X-rays.
>
> When cats are sedated, they cannot roll over on the other side. If they
lie
> on the same side too long, they can have dangerous respiratory problems.
> Someone must "flip" them every 30 minutes or so until they are awake
enough
> to do it themselves. You could do this yourself at home, but I'd rather
the
> experts at the vet's office do it.
>
> The per hour cage charge seems a bit much. See if you can negotiate a
flat
> rate, only let them keep her part of the day until she wakes up enough to
> move around, or check out another vet.
>
> Bill
>
>
>

-L.
July 29th 03, 03:27 AM
"Bill" > wrote in message >...
> >"QuiltShopHopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> ...
> > My docile, laid back and passive 12 yr old kitty, who sleeps most of the
> > time, has started shaking her front paw and holding up that front leg when
> > she sits down. She walks on that leg just fine as if nothing hurts. I
> > can't figure out, and neither can the vet, what the problem is.
> > Vet wants me to bring her in for an all day stay to sedate her then xray
> her
> > front leg and environs. Thi$ will co$t me $ome real money. I feel that
> (1)
> > it's not a bone problem if she walks on it , (2) it's not necessary to
> > sedate a cat who is asleep 20 hours out of every 24 anyway, (3) why does
> she
> > have to stay all day in a charge-per-hour cage waiting for sedation and an
> > xray instead of me just making an appt, bringing her in, and me waiting
> for
> > her, then learning the results of the xray and discussing a plan of
> action?
> > Do all or most vets demand that they keep her all day, and sedate a cat
> who
> > is elderly and passive? Seems to me that the vet is doing this to pay off
> > his car sooner.
> > I welcome all opinions on this.
> > Thanks in advance,
> >
> > QSH
> >
> >
>
> These are questions you should call your vet and ask, but this sounds
> reasonable to me.
>
> The cat will not fall asleep in a strange place like the vet's office in at
> precisely the time they want to take the X-ray with her leg precisely in the
> correct position for the X-ray. If the cat were not sedated, someone would
> have to stay in the room to hold the leg in position and expose themselves
> to X-rays.
>

It's done all the time, wearing a lead vest. The problem here is that
kitty probably isn't as docile for the vet techs as she is for the
owner, and stillness is imperative for an x-ray. Some cats can be
held without seds for an x-ray - others cannot. Also, with limbs,
sometimes you have to manipulate the limb to get a specific view -
which is impossible on a cat that sin't sedated.



> When cats are sedated, they cannot roll over on the other side. If they lie
> on the same side too long, they can have dangerous respiratory problems.
> Someone must "flip" them every 30 minutes or so until they are awake enough
> to do it themselves.

Never heared of this. Some surgeries take far longer than thirty
minutes, and the cats are not flipped...

> You could do this yourself at home, but I'd rather the
> experts at the vet's office do it.
>
> The per hour cage charge seems a bit much.

I agree. If it is done out-patient, there shouldn't be a charge
unless this is an emergency vet.

-L.

-L.
July 29th 03, 03:27 AM
"Bill" > wrote in message >...
> >"QuiltShopHopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> ...
> > My docile, laid back and passive 12 yr old kitty, who sleeps most of the
> > time, has started shaking her front paw and holding up that front leg when
> > she sits down. She walks on that leg just fine as if nothing hurts. I
> > can't figure out, and neither can the vet, what the problem is.
> > Vet wants me to bring her in for an all day stay to sedate her then xray
> her
> > front leg and environs. Thi$ will co$t me $ome real money. I feel that
> (1)
> > it's not a bone problem if she walks on it , (2) it's not necessary to
> > sedate a cat who is asleep 20 hours out of every 24 anyway, (3) why does
> she
> > have to stay all day in a charge-per-hour cage waiting for sedation and an
> > xray instead of me just making an appt, bringing her in, and me waiting
> for
> > her, then learning the results of the xray and discussing a plan of
> action?
> > Do all or most vets demand that they keep her all day, and sedate a cat
> who
> > is elderly and passive? Seems to me that the vet is doing this to pay off
> > his car sooner.
> > I welcome all opinions on this.
> > Thanks in advance,
> >
> > QSH
> >
> >
>
> These are questions you should call your vet and ask, but this sounds
> reasonable to me.
>
> The cat will not fall asleep in a strange place like the vet's office in at
> precisely the time they want to take the X-ray with her leg precisely in the
> correct position for the X-ray. If the cat were not sedated, someone would
> have to stay in the room to hold the leg in position and expose themselves
> to X-rays.
>

It's done all the time, wearing a lead vest. The problem here is that
kitty probably isn't as docile for the vet techs as she is for the
owner, and stillness is imperative for an x-ray. Some cats can be
held without seds for an x-ray - others cannot. Also, with limbs,
sometimes you have to manipulate the limb to get a specific view -
which is impossible on a cat that sin't sedated.



> When cats are sedated, they cannot roll over on the other side. If they lie
> on the same side too long, they can have dangerous respiratory problems.
> Someone must "flip" them every 30 minutes or so until they are awake enough
> to do it themselves.

Never heared of this. Some surgeries take far longer than thirty
minutes, and the cats are not flipped...

> You could do this yourself at home, but I'd rather the
> experts at the vet's office do it.
>
> The per hour cage charge seems a bit much.

I agree. If it is done out-patient, there shouldn't be a charge
unless this is an emergency vet.

-L.

QuiltShopHopper
July 29th 03, 02:42 PM
> 199.50 for initial visit, procedure, anesthesia, her overnite stay,
> meeting with vet when I picked her up,
> and most likely for her follow-up visit too.>
> Never thought I'd see surgery etc at that price.
>
> There are good vets with very busy practices that
> don't charge to the hilt.



Please tell me you live in Albuquerque. I want that vet!


qsh

QuiltShopHopper
July 29th 03, 02:42 PM
> 199.50 for initial visit, procedure, anesthesia, her overnite stay,
> meeting with vet when I picked her up,
> and most likely for her follow-up visit too.>
> Never thought I'd see surgery etc at that price.
>
> There are good vets with very busy practices that
> don't charge to the hilt.



Please tell me you live in Albuquerque. I want that vet!


qsh

k
July 29th 03, 05:41 PM
Sorry, wish I did:-)
Couple states over -- to the west...


"QuiltShopHopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message >...
> > 199.50 for initial visit, procedure, anesthesia, her overnite stay,
> > meeting with vet when I picked her up,
> > and most likely for her follow-up visit too.>
> > Never thought I'd see surgery etc at that price.
> >
> > There are good vets with very busy practices that
> > don't charge to the hilt.
>
>
>
> Please tell me you live in Albuquerque. I want that vet!
>
>
> qsh

k
July 29th 03, 05:41 PM
Sorry, wish I did:-)
Couple states over -- to the west...


"QuiltShopHopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message >...
> > 199.50 for initial visit, procedure, anesthesia, her overnite stay,
> > meeting with vet when I picked her up,
> > and most likely for her follow-up visit too.>
> > Never thought I'd see surgery etc at that price.
> >
> > There are good vets with very busy practices that
> > don't charge to the hilt.
>
>
>
> Please tell me you live in Albuquerque. I want that vet!
>
>
> qsh

Bill
July 29th 03, 08:02 PM
>"-L." > wrote in message
m...
> "Bill" > wrote in message
>...
>
> . .
> > When cats are sedated, they cannot roll over on the other side. If they
lie
> > on the same side too long, they can have dangerous respiratory problems.
> > Someone must "flip" them every 30 minutes or so until they are awake
enough
> > to do it themselves.
>
> Never heared of this. Some surgeries take far longer than thirty
> minutes, and the cats are not flipped...
>
> . .

I was referring to the recovery period after the surgery or procedure. This
was my experience with kittens, so adult cats may be different.

Bill

Bill
July 29th 03, 08:02 PM
>"-L." > wrote in message
m...
> "Bill" > wrote in message
>...
>
> . .
> > When cats are sedated, they cannot roll over on the other side. If they
lie
> > on the same side too long, they can have dangerous respiratory problems.
> > Someone must "flip" them every 30 minutes or so until they are awake
enough
> > to do it themselves.
>
> Never heared of this. Some surgeries take far longer than thirty
> minutes, and the cats are not flipped...
>
> . .

I was referring to the recovery period after the surgery or procedure. This
was my experience with kittens, so adult cats may be different.

Bill