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Gerard
August 5th 03, 07:09 PM
hi i have an 10-12 year old tom cat who in fairly good health but hes being
suffering from a toothache. i brought him to the vets this morning but the
vet said he wouldnt risk removing the tooth because hes to old and the best
thing to do would be finding him foods that are easier for him to chew. ive
tried the tined foods he usually eats (wiskas beef and beef n liver) but
they seem to be causing him discomfort. anyone got any ideas on foods that i
can get for him which would be easier on his teeth .

Karen Chuplis
August 5th 03, 07:44 PM
in article , Gerard at
wrote on 8/5/03 1:09 PM:

> hi i have an 10-12 year old tom cat who in fairly good health but hes being
> suffering from a toothache. i brought him to the vets this morning but the
> vet said he wouldnt risk removing the tooth because hes to old and the best
> thing to do would be finding him foods that are easier for him to chew. ive
> tried the tined foods he usually eats (wiskas beef and beef n liver) but
> they seem to be causing him discomfort. anyone got any ideas on foods that i
> can get for him which would be easier on his teeth .
>
>
Hmm. If a blood panel show he is ok for anesthesia, it's better to have it
out. Infections can lead to wose diseases. My mothers cat had teeth removed
as late as 14 y.o. It may be the vet is not comfortable with dental
procedures. You might look for one who is.

Karen

Karen Chuplis
August 5th 03, 07:44 PM
in article , Gerard at
wrote on 8/5/03 1:09 PM:

> hi i have an 10-12 year old tom cat who in fairly good health but hes being
> suffering from a toothache. i brought him to the vets this morning but the
> vet said he wouldnt risk removing the tooth because hes to old and the best
> thing to do would be finding him foods that are easier for him to chew. ive
> tried the tined foods he usually eats (wiskas beef and beef n liver) but
> they seem to be causing him discomfort. anyone got any ideas on foods that i
> can get for him which would be easier on his teeth .
>
>
Hmm. If a blood panel show he is ok for anesthesia, it's better to have it
out. Infections can lead to wose diseases. My mothers cat had teeth removed
as late as 14 y.o. It may be the vet is not comfortable with dental
procedures. You might look for one who is.

Karen

August 5th 03, 07:58 PM
>the vets this morning but the vet said he
>wouldnt risk removing the tooth because
>hes to old and the best thing to do would
>be finding him foods that are easier for
>him to chew.

Please find another vet ASAP. Any vet that thinks a 10 year old cat is
"too old" to have dental work shouldn't be in practice. I have an 11
year old cat that is at the vet right now having a dental (I just called
to check on her and she's under anesthesia as we speak.) I had bloodwork
done before the dental to make sure she's in good health and they are
using a gas anesthesia (isoflurane) and have her on IV fluids during the
procedure. I have had cats as old as 15 get dental work and as long as
some precautions are taken they have been fine. Please find a vet that
is used to working with older cats and knows what they are doing. It is
cruel to force this cat to suffer with tooth pain indefinitely when it
can be fixed.

Megan



"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing."

-Edmund Burke

Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com

Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22

"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision,
raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and
material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his
way."

- W.H. Murray

August 5th 03, 07:58 PM
>the vets this morning but the vet said he
>wouldnt risk removing the tooth because
>hes to old and the best thing to do would
>be finding him foods that are easier for
>him to chew.

Please find another vet ASAP. Any vet that thinks a 10 year old cat is
"too old" to have dental work shouldn't be in practice. I have an 11
year old cat that is at the vet right now having a dental (I just called
to check on her and she's under anesthesia as we speak.) I had bloodwork
done before the dental to make sure she's in good health and they are
using a gas anesthesia (isoflurane) and have her on IV fluids during the
procedure. I have had cats as old as 15 get dental work and as long as
some precautions are taken they have been fine. Please find a vet that
is used to working with older cats and knows what they are doing. It is
cruel to force this cat to suffer with tooth pain indefinitely when it
can be fixed.

Megan



"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing."

-Edmund Burke

Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com

Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22

"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision,
raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and
material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his
way."

- W.H. Murray

Cathy Friedmann
August 5th 03, 08:11 PM
Personally, I don't consider 10 - 12 too old for a dental workup - with
extracting that tooth; your cat probably has a good 5 - 7 years ahead of
him, maybe more. If the vet takes some pre-op precautions, he should be
fine. I know *I* sure wouldn't want to be stuck w/ a toothache forever!
I'd take him to another nearby vet for a second opinion if this vet refuses
to consider getting that painful tooth out of there.

Cathy

--
"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon

"Gerard" > wrote in message
...
> hi i have an 10-12 year old tom cat who in fairly good health but hes
being
> suffering from a toothache. i brought him to the vets this morning but the
> vet said he wouldnt risk removing the tooth because hes to old and the
best
> thing to do would be finding him foods that are easier for him to chew.
ive
> tried the tined foods he usually eats (wiskas beef and beef n liver) but
> they seem to be causing him discomfort. anyone got any ideas on foods that
i
> can get for him which would be easier on his teeth .
>
>

Cathy Friedmann
August 5th 03, 08:11 PM
Personally, I don't consider 10 - 12 too old for a dental workup - with
extracting that tooth; your cat probably has a good 5 - 7 years ahead of
him, maybe more. If the vet takes some pre-op precautions, he should be
fine. I know *I* sure wouldn't want to be stuck w/ a toothache forever!
I'd take him to another nearby vet for a second opinion if this vet refuses
to consider getting that painful tooth out of there.

Cathy

--
"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon

"Gerard" > wrote in message
...
> hi i have an 10-12 year old tom cat who in fairly good health but hes
being
> suffering from a toothache. i brought him to the vets this morning but the
> vet said he wouldnt risk removing the tooth because hes to old and the
best
> thing to do would be finding him foods that are easier for him to chew.
ive
> tried the tined foods he usually eats (wiskas beef and beef n liver) but
> they seem to be causing him discomfort. anyone got any ideas on foods that
i
> can get for him which would be easier on his teeth .
>
>

Yngver
August 5th 03, 09:52 PM
wrote:

>I have an 11
>year old cat that is at the vet right now having a dental (I just called
>to check on her and she's under anesthesia as we speak.) I had bloodwork
>done before the dental to make sure she's in good health and they are
>using a gas anesthesia (isoflurane) and have her on IV fluids during the
>procedure.

Our six year old cat just had dental work done using gas anesthesia and with IV
fluids during the procedure. Is it getting more common to use fluids during the
procedure? Do you know what the benefit is? I just wonder because I don't
recall that with our other cat the last time she had a cleaning, although that
was a while ago, and it was just a cleaning then, no extractions.

Yngver
August 5th 03, 09:52 PM
wrote:

>I have an 11
>year old cat that is at the vet right now having a dental (I just called
>to check on her and she's under anesthesia as we speak.) I had bloodwork
>done before the dental to make sure she's in good health and they are
>using a gas anesthesia (isoflurane) and have her on IV fluids during the
>procedure.

Our six year old cat just had dental work done using gas anesthesia and with IV
fluids during the procedure. Is it getting more common to use fluids during the
procedure? Do you know what the benefit is? I just wonder because I don't
recall that with our other cat the last time she had a cleaning, although that
was a while ago, and it was just a cleaning then, no extractions.

Cheryl
August 5th 03, 10:05 PM
Yngver wrote:
> wrote:
>
>> I have an 11
>> year old cat that is at the vet right now having a dental (I just
>> called
>> to check on her and she's under anesthesia as we speak.) I had
>> bloodwork
>> done before the dental to make sure she's in good health and they
are
>> using a gas anesthesia (isoflurane) and have her on IV fluids
during
>> the procedure.
>
> Our six year old cat just had dental work done using gas anesthesia
> and with IV fluids during the procedure. Is it getting more common
to
> use fluids during the procedure? Do you know what the benefit is? I
> just wonder because I don't recall that with our other cat the last
> time she had a cleaning, although that was a while ago, and it was
> just a cleaning then, no extractions.

This is just a guess, but maybe it keeps the kidneys flushed of the
bacteria in the mouth when there is bleeding? Good question. I have
to get Shamrock (aka stinky breath) one very soon and I'd like to be
prepared for that, though he is young (~2yrs).

Cheryl
August 5th 03, 10:05 PM
Yngver wrote:
> wrote:
>
>> I have an 11
>> year old cat that is at the vet right now having a dental (I just
>> called
>> to check on her and she's under anesthesia as we speak.) I had
>> bloodwork
>> done before the dental to make sure she's in good health and they
are
>> using a gas anesthesia (isoflurane) and have her on IV fluids
during
>> the procedure.
>
> Our six year old cat just had dental work done using gas anesthesia
> and with IV fluids during the procedure. Is it getting more common
to
> use fluids during the procedure? Do you know what the benefit is? I
> just wonder because I don't recall that with our other cat the last
> time she had a cleaning, although that was a while ago, and it was
> just a cleaning then, no extractions.

This is just a guess, but maybe it keeps the kidneys flushed of the
bacteria in the mouth when there is bleeding? Good question. I have
to get Shamrock (aka stinky breath) one very soon and I'd like to be
prepared for that, though he is young (~2yrs).

August 5th 03, 10:38 PM
Yngver wrote:

>Is it getting more common to use fluids
>during the procedure?

I think so. My vet always offers it for younger cats, and *requires* it
for cats aged 10 years or older.

>Do you know what the benefit is?

I did a quick search to make sure I had all the info. There are several
benefits.

IV fluids administered during surgery:

-Help prevent life-threatening hypo-tension (low blood pressure)
- Aid in renal (kidney) function
- Assist with metabolism of anaesthetic and may speed recovery
- Allow quick access to veins if there is a need to administer
medication(s)
- Help to maintain body temperature and prevent hypothermia (when IV
fluids are warmed)

Megan



"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing."

-Edmund Burke

Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com

Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22

"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision,
raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and
material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his
way."

- W.H. Murray

August 5th 03, 10:38 PM
Yngver wrote:

>Is it getting more common to use fluids
>during the procedure?

I think so. My vet always offers it for younger cats, and *requires* it
for cats aged 10 years or older.

>Do you know what the benefit is?

I did a quick search to make sure I had all the info. There are several
benefits.

IV fluids administered during surgery:

-Help prevent life-threatening hypo-tension (low blood pressure)
- Aid in renal (kidney) function
- Assist with metabolism of anaesthetic and may speed recovery
- Allow quick access to veins if there is a need to administer
medication(s)
- Help to maintain body temperature and prevent hypothermia (when IV
fluids are warmed)

Megan



"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing."

-Edmund Burke

Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com

Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22

"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision,
raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and
material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his
way."

- W.H. Murray

Rene
August 6th 03, 04:02 PM
I agree. My parent's cat had teeth removed when she was 14, and it
helped her greatly.

Rene

"Cathy Friedmann" > wrote in message >...
> Personally, I don't consider 10 - 12 too old for a dental workup - with
> extracting that tooth; your cat probably has a good 5 - 7 years ahead of
> him, maybe more. If the vet takes some pre-op precautions, he should be
> fine. I know *I* sure wouldn't want to be stuck w/ a toothache forever!
> I'd take him to another nearby vet for a second opinion if this vet refuses
> to consider getting that painful tooth out of there.
>
> Cathy
>
> --
> "Staccato signals of constant information..."
> ("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon
>
> "Gerard" > wrote in message
> ...
> > hi i have an 10-12 year old tom cat who in fairly good health but hes
> being
> > suffering from a toothache. i brought him to the vets this morning but the
> > vet said he wouldnt risk removing the tooth because hes to old and the
> best
> > thing to do would be finding him foods that are easier for him to chew.
> ive
> > tried the tined foods he usually eats (wiskas beef and beef n liver) but
> > they seem to be causing him discomfort. anyone got any ideas on foods that
> i
> > can get for him which would be easier on his teeth .
> >
> >

Rene
August 6th 03, 04:02 PM
I agree. My parent's cat had teeth removed when she was 14, and it
helped her greatly.

Rene

"Cathy Friedmann" > wrote in message >...
> Personally, I don't consider 10 - 12 too old for a dental workup - with
> extracting that tooth; your cat probably has a good 5 - 7 years ahead of
> him, maybe more. If the vet takes some pre-op precautions, he should be
> fine. I know *I* sure wouldn't want to be stuck w/ a toothache forever!
> I'd take him to another nearby vet for a second opinion if this vet refuses
> to consider getting that painful tooth out of there.
>
> Cathy
>
> --
> "Staccato signals of constant information..."
> ("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon
>
> "Gerard" > wrote in message
> ...
> > hi i have an 10-12 year old tom cat who in fairly good health but hes
> being
> > suffering from a toothache. i brought him to the vets this morning but the
> > vet said he wouldnt risk removing the tooth because hes to old and the
> best
> > thing to do would be finding him foods that are easier for him to chew.
> ive
> > tried the tined foods he usually eats (wiskas beef and beef n liver) but
> > they seem to be causing him discomfort. anyone got any ideas on foods that
> i
> > can get for him which would be easier on his teeth .
> >
> >

Yngver
August 6th 03, 04:40 PM
wrote:

>>Is it getting more common to use fluids
>>during the procedure?
>
>I think so. My vet always offers it for younger cats, and *requires* it
>for cats aged 10 years or older.
>
>>Do you know what the benefit is?
>
>I did a quick search to make sure I had all the info. There are several
>benefits.
>
>IV fluids administered during surgery:
>
>-Help prevent life-threatening hypo-tension (low blood pressure)
>- Aid in renal (kidney) function
>- Assist with metabolism of anaesthetic and may speed recovery
>- Allow quick access to veins if there is a need to administer
>medication(s)
>- Help to maintain body temperature and prevent hypothermia (when IV
>fluids are warmed)
>
Thanks for the info. I thought it was mainly for older cats with CRF, but our
cat doesn't have that. I also sort of wonder if the IV fluids could have any
adverse effects. Instead of a quick recovery, our cat took a long time--two
days before she was back to normal. But she did have three extractions, two of
them rear molars which are big teeth, and she was under anesthesia for longer
than usual. I was wondering if it's possible for them to get too much IV
fluids. She didn't drink any water or other liquids that evening or the entire
following day, yet urinated profusely four times in that time period. It seems
to me she sure must have gotten a lot of fluids, to go that long without
wanting anything to drink.

Yngver
August 6th 03, 04:40 PM
wrote:

>>Is it getting more common to use fluids
>>during the procedure?
>
>I think so. My vet always offers it for younger cats, and *requires* it
>for cats aged 10 years or older.
>
>>Do you know what the benefit is?
>
>I did a quick search to make sure I had all the info. There are several
>benefits.
>
>IV fluids administered during surgery:
>
>-Help prevent life-threatening hypo-tension (low blood pressure)
>- Aid in renal (kidney) function
>- Assist with metabolism of anaesthetic and may speed recovery
>- Allow quick access to veins if there is a need to administer
>medication(s)
>- Help to maintain body temperature and prevent hypothermia (when IV
>fluids are warmed)
>
Thanks for the info. I thought it was mainly for older cats with CRF, but our
cat doesn't have that. I also sort of wonder if the IV fluids could have any
adverse effects. Instead of a quick recovery, our cat took a long time--two
days before she was back to normal. But she did have three extractions, two of
them rear molars which are big teeth, and she was under anesthesia for longer
than usual. I was wondering if it's possible for them to get too much IV
fluids. She didn't drink any water or other liquids that evening or the entire
following day, yet urinated profusely four times in that time period. It seems
to me she sure must have gotten a lot of fluids, to go that long without
wanting anything to drink.

Cathy Friedmann
August 6th 03, 05:17 PM
"Yngver" > wrote in message
...
> wrote:
>
> >>Is it getting more common to use fluids
> >>during the procedure?
> >
> >I think so. My vet always offers it for younger cats, and *requires* it
> >for cats aged 10 years or older.
> >
> >>Do you know what the benefit is?
> >
> >I did a quick search to make sure I had all the info. There are several
> >benefits.
> >
> >IV fluids administered during surgery:
> >
> >-Help prevent life-threatening hypo-tension (low blood pressure)
> >- Aid in renal (kidney) function
> >- Assist with metabolism of anaesthetic and may speed recovery
> >- Allow quick access to veins if there is a need to administer
> >medication(s)
> >- Help to maintain body temperature and prevent hypothermia (when IV
> >fluids are warmed)
> >
> Thanks for the info. I thought it was mainly for older cats with CRF, but
our
> cat doesn't have that. I also sort of wonder if the IV fluids could have
any
> adverse effects. Instead of a quick recovery, our cat took a long
time--two
> days before she was back to normal. But she did have three extractions,
two of
> them rear molars which are big teeth, and she was under anesthesia for
longer
> than usual. I was wondering if it's possible for them to get too much IV
> fluids. She didn't drink any water or other liquids that evening or the
entire
> following day, yet urinated profusely four times in that time period. It
seems
> to me she sure must have gotten a lot of fluids, to go that long without
> wanting anything to drink.

One (a person, at any rate, so I would guess any other mammal) does pee a
lot if getting IV fluids.

The 2-day recovery period sounds like a long time to me, though. In
contrast, Debbie - who was about 5 - 6 at the time - had 5 teeth out once &
was virtually back to normal by the time I picked her up later that day.

Cathy

--
"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon

Cathy Friedmann
August 6th 03, 05:17 PM
"Yngver" > wrote in message
...
> wrote:
>
> >>Is it getting more common to use fluids
> >>during the procedure?
> >
> >I think so. My vet always offers it for younger cats, and *requires* it
> >for cats aged 10 years or older.
> >
> >>Do you know what the benefit is?
> >
> >I did a quick search to make sure I had all the info. There are several
> >benefits.
> >
> >IV fluids administered during surgery:
> >
> >-Help prevent life-threatening hypo-tension (low blood pressure)
> >- Aid in renal (kidney) function
> >- Assist with metabolism of anaesthetic and may speed recovery
> >- Allow quick access to veins if there is a need to administer
> >medication(s)
> >- Help to maintain body temperature and prevent hypothermia (when IV
> >fluids are warmed)
> >
> Thanks for the info. I thought it was mainly for older cats with CRF, but
our
> cat doesn't have that. I also sort of wonder if the IV fluids could have
any
> adverse effects. Instead of a quick recovery, our cat took a long
time--two
> days before she was back to normal. But she did have three extractions,
two of
> them rear molars which are big teeth, and she was under anesthesia for
longer
> than usual. I was wondering if it's possible for them to get too much IV
> fluids. She didn't drink any water or other liquids that evening or the
entire
> following day, yet urinated profusely four times in that time period. It
seems
> to me she sure must have gotten a lot of fluids, to go that long without
> wanting anything to drink.

One (a person, at any rate, so I would guess any other mammal) does pee a
lot if getting IV fluids.

The 2-day recovery period sounds like a long time to me, though. In
contrast, Debbie - who was about 5 - 6 at the time - had 5 teeth out once &
was virtually back to normal by the time I picked her up later that day.

Cathy

--
"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon

Yngver
August 6th 03, 07:08 PM
"Cathy Friedmann" wrote:

>> Thanks for the info. I thought it was mainly for older cats with CRF, but
>our
>> cat doesn't have that. I also sort of wonder if the IV fluids could have
>any
>> adverse effects. Instead of a quick recovery, our cat took a long
>time--two
>> days before she was back to normal. But she did have three extractions,
>two of
>> them rear molars which are big teeth, and she was under anesthesia for
>longer
>> than usual. I was wondering if it's possible for them to get too much IV
>> fluids. She didn't drink any water or other liquids that evening or the
>entire
>> following day, yet urinated profusely four times in that time period. It
>seems
>> to me she sure must have gotten a lot of fluids, to go that long without
>> wanting anything to drink.
>
>One (a person, at any rate, so I would guess any other mammal) does pee a
>lot if getting IV fluids.

What was curious to me was that she was peeing a lot that evening and the next
day, but taking in no liquids. She did eat a little dry kibble, but no liquids.
Seems like the IV fluids would have gone through her by the end of the first
evening.

When I've had IV fluids I'm pretty sure I was back to normal the next day, but
I can't recall for sure.
>
>The 2-day recovery period sounds like a long time to me, though. In
>contrast, Debbie - who was about 5 - 6 at the time - had 5 teeth out once &
>was virtually back to normal by the time I picked her up later that day.
>
Wow, five teeth at once! Poor thing.

Our cat was pretty wobbly when she came home, and better the next day but still
a little unsteady on her feet until the following day. The vet said that one
of her teeth was causing her pain even under anesthesia, so I wonder if he gave
her a little too much after that. Our other cat has had a couple of dental
cleanings but by the time she came home she was pretty much okay, just cranky.
But she never had any extractions.

Yngver
August 6th 03, 07:08 PM
"Cathy Friedmann" wrote:

>> Thanks for the info. I thought it was mainly for older cats with CRF, but
>our
>> cat doesn't have that. I also sort of wonder if the IV fluids could have
>any
>> adverse effects. Instead of a quick recovery, our cat took a long
>time--two
>> days before she was back to normal. But she did have three extractions,
>two of
>> them rear molars which are big teeth, and she was under anesthesia for
>longer
>> than usual. I was wondering if it's possible for them to get too much IV
>> fluids. She didn't drink any water or other liquids that evening or the
>entire
>> following day, yet urinated profusely four times in that time period. It
>seems
>> to me she sure must have gotten a lot of fluids, to go that long without
>> wanting anything to drink.
>
>One (a person, at any rate, so I would guess any other mammal) does pee a
>lot if getting IV fluids.

What was curious to me was that she was peeing a lot that evening and the next
day, but taking in no liquids. She did eat a little dry kibble, but no liquids.
Seems like the IV fluids would have gone through her by the end of the first
evening.

When I've had IV fluids I'm pretty sure I was back to normal the next day, but
I can't recall for sure.
>
>The 2-day recovery period sounds like a long time to me, though. In
>contrast, Debbie - who was about 5 - 6 at the time - had 5 teeth out once &
>was virtually back to normal by the time I picked her up later that day.
>
Wow, five teeth at once! Poor thing.

Our cat was pretty wobbly when she came home, and better the next day but still
a little unsteady on her feet until the following day. The vet said that one
of her teeth was causing her pain even under anesthesia, so I wonder if he gave
her a little too much after that. Our other cat has had a couple of dental
cleanings but by the time she came home she was pretty much okay, just cranky.
But she never had any extractions.

k
August 6th 03, 09:50 PM
"Gerard" > wrote in message >...
> hi i have an 10-12 year old tom cat who in fairly good health but hes being
> suffering from a toothache. i brought him to the vets this morning but the
> vet said he wouldnt risk removing the tooth because hes to old


That is ridiculous.
Never go back to that vet for anything.
Far older cats than yours have the procedure.
Even cats that have medical conditions that require
extra caution have it.


>and the best
> thing to do would be finding him foods that are easier for him to chew.

Nonsense. Do that, the tooth will only get worse, and problems spread
to other teeth. Left uncared for you risk kidney disease, failure, and
death.


ive
> tried the tined foods he usually eats (wiskas beef and beef n liver) but
> they seem to be causing him discomfort. anyone got any ideas on foods that i
> can get for him which would be easier on his teeth .

Take him to another vet.
Standard procedure to have a full checkup, bloodwork, then be scheduled
for a full cleaning of his teeth, and extractions of those teeth that
require it. Cat comes home, heals, can eat anything, goes on to live
for years....

You should have been taking the cat in for periodic cleaning of
teeth through the years.

k
August 6th 03, 09:50 PM
"Gerard" > wrote in message >...
> hi i have an 10-12 year old tom cat who in fairly good health but hes being
> suffering from a toothache. i brought him to the vets this morning but the
> vet said he wouldnt risk removing the tooth because hes to old


That is ridiculous.
Never go back to that vet for anything.
Far older cats than yours have the procedure.
Even cats that have medical conditions that require
extra caution have it.


>and the best
> thing to do would be finding him foods that are easier for him to chew.

Nonsense. Do that, the tooth will only get worse, and problems spread
to other teeth. Left uncared for you risk kidney disease, failure, and
death.


ive
> tried the tined foods he usually eats (wiskas beef and beef n liver) but
> they seem to be causing him discomfort. anyone got any ideas on foods that i
> can get for him which would be easier on his teeth .

Take him to another vet.
Standard procedure to have a full checkup, bloodwork, then be scheduled
for a full cleaning of his teeth, and extractions of those teeth that
require it. Cat comes home, heals, can eat anything, goes on to live
for years....

You should have been taking the cat in for periodic cleaning of
teeth through the years.

Yngver
August 6th 03, 10:43 PM
"Cathy Friedmann" wrote:

>> >contrast, Debbie - who was about 5 - 6 at the time - had 5 teeth out once
>&
>> >was virtually back to normal by the time I picked her up later that day.
>> >
>> Wow, five teeth at once! Poor thing.
>
>Yeah, but... the day after those extractions she purred more than I'd ever
>heard her purr, & continued to be a ready purr-er the rest of her life. So
>I guess she was mighty happy to get those teeth out of there! Yet the only
>symptom she showed beforehand was drooling.

We knew our cat had one tooth that was giving her some pain, but the vet
discovered the problems with the rear molars only after cleaning off the
tartar. That was unexpected. Yet like your cat, our cat wasn't really showing
any symptoms of problems. On her annual exam, the vet noticed the one incisor
was bothering her, so he recommended the dental cleaning/extraction.

I can't tell yet if she is glad to have the teeth out, but she is eating more.
>
>> Our cat was pretty wobbly when she came home, and better the next day but
>still
>> a little unsteady on her feet until the following day. The vet said that
>one
>> of her teeth was causing her pain even under anesthesia, so I wonder if he
>gave
>> her a little too much after that.
>
>Hmmm... yes, that's possible, I suppose. I've had teeth that needed a LOT
>of Novocaine for root canals, surgery, etc. - the amount he assumed would
>work, didn't.
>
My husband is like that. He's sometimes had huge doses of novocaine and still
didn't get numbed up. But of course novocaine is a lot different than using a
genera anesthesia as is done for cats.

The vet said they would note not to use that anesthesia again with our cat, but
I'm not sure what he used. The bill said isoflurane but I thought he told me it
was sevoflurane, which is newer and supposedly even safer.

Yngver
August 6th 03, 10:43 PM
"Cathy Friedmann" wrote:

>> >contrast, Debbie - who was about 5 - 6 at the time - had 5 teeth out once
>&
>> >was virtually back to normal by the time I picked her up later that day.
>> >
>> Wow, five teeth at once! Poor thing.
>
>Yeah, but... the day after those extractions she purred more than I'd ever
>heard her purr, & continued to be a ready purr-er the rest of her life. So
>I guess she was mighty happy to get those teeth out of there! Yet the only
>symptom she showed beforehand was drooling.

We knew our cat had one tooth that was giving her some pain, but the vet
discovered the problems with the rear molars only after cleaning off the
tartar. That was unexpected. Yet like your cat, our cat wasn't really showing
any symptoms of problems. On her annual exam, the vet noticed the one incisor
was bothering her, so he recommended the dental cleaning/extraction.

I can't tell yet if she is glad to have the teeth out, but she is eating more.
>
>> Our cat was pretty wobbly when she came home, and better the next day but
>still
>> a little unsteady on her feet until the following day. The vet said that
>one
>> of her teeth was causing her pain even under anesthesia, so I wonder if he
>gave
>> her a little too much after that.
>
>Hmmm... yes, that's possible, I suppose. I've had teeth that needed a LOT
>of Novocaine for root canals, surgery, etc. - the amount he assumed would
>work, didn't.
>
My husband is like that. He's sometimes had huge doses of novocaine and still
didn't get numbed up. But of course novocaine is a lot different than using a
genera anesthesia as is done for cats.

The vet said they would note not to use that anesthesia again with our cat, but
I'm not sure what he used. The bill said isoflurane but I thought he told me it
was sevoflurane, which is newer and supposedly even safer.

Milinda Lommer, DVM
August 12th 03, 08:11 AM
"Gerard" wrote:
> hi i have an 10-12 year old tom cat who in fairly good health but hes
being
> suffering from a toothache. i brought him to the vets this morning but the
> vet said he wouldnt risk removing the tooth because hes to old and the
best
> thing to do would be finding him foods that are easier for him to chew.
ive
> tried the tined foods he usually eats (wiskas beef and beef n liver) but
> they seem to be causing him discomfort. anyone got any ideas on foods that
i
> can get for him which would be easier on his teeth .

Dear Gerard,

I routinely anesthetize cats 17 to 20 years old. In the right hands,
anesthesia is perfectly safe for an otherwise healthy 10 to 12 year old cat.
Although it is difficult to second-guess the opinion of the doctor who has
actually examined him, your cat's quality of life would most likely be
greatly improved by addressing that tooth (and likely others similarly
affected). Feel free to contact me at petdentist<at>yahoo.com should you
have any additional questions.

Sincerely,
Milinda Lommer, DVM
Diplomate, American Veterinary Dental College

Aggie Animal Dental Service
San Francisco, CA

Milinda Lommer, DVM
August 12th 03, 08:11 AM
"Gerard" wrote:
> hi i have an 10-12 year old tom cat who in fairly good health but hes
being
> suffering from a toothache. i brought him to the vets this morning but the
> vet said he wouldnt risk removing the tooth because hes to old and the
best
> thing to do would be finding him foods that are easier for him to chew.
ive
> tried the tined foods he usually eats (wiskas beef and beef n liver) but
> they seem to be causing him discomfort. anyone got any ideas on foods that
i
> can get for him which would be easier on his teeth .

Dear Gerard,

I routinely anesthetize cats 17 to 20 years old. In the right hands,
anesthesia is perfectly safe for an otherwise healthy 10 to 12 year old cat.
Although it is difficult to second-guess the opinion of the doctor who has
actually examined him, your cat's quality of life would most likely be
greatly improved by addressing that tooth (and likely others similarly
affected). Feel free to contact me at petdentist<at>yahoo.com should you
have any additional questions.

Sincerely,
Milinda Lommer, DVM
Diplomate, American Veterinary Dental College

Aggie Animal Dental Service
San Francisco, CA

PawsForThought
August 12th 03, 01:17 PM
>From: "Milinda Lommer, DVM"

>Dear Gerard,
>
>I routinely anesthetize cats 17 to 20 years old. In the right hands,
>anesthesia is perfectly safe for an otherwise healthy 10 to 12 year old cat.

My 17 year old cat had some tooth extractions and it really helped her.

Lauren
________
See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe
Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html
http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html
Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm

PawsForThought
August 12th 03, 01:17 PM
>From: "Milinda Lommer, DVM"

>Dear Gerard,
>
>I routinely anesthetize cats 17 to 20 years old. In the right hands,
>anesthesia is perfectly safe for an otherwise healthy 10 to 12 year old cat.

My 17 year old cat had some tooth extractions and it really helped her.

Lauren
________
See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe
Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html
http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html
Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm