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Dee Falt
October 6th 03, 10:23 PM
Can someone provide some assistance on how to find a home for two
cats in the Houston area? This is for my son who provided the
following info:

Searching for a new home in the Houston area for two neutered black
cats. The cats are 7 year old litter mates (born approx. December
1996) named Punk and Blue who have lived together all of their lives.
Aside from pot bellies, no health problems. Both have been declawed
in the front, whilethe back claws remain. We are looking for a new
home for them because Blueis not reacting well to a new baby, and we
have another baby on the way. Both are very sweet, affectionate cats
that we are reluctantly seeking a new home for.

Any ideas, suggestions, etc would be appreciated. Thank you.

Dee

amp11pleasedontspam
October 6th 03, 10:44 PM
Dee,

There are probably some good ideas on how to help the cats adapt to the
new children and avoid letting go of the two cats.

If it is entirely impossible the following are some ideas on finding homes
for
cats - it is kind of trick to find a good home for cats, but is not
impossible
if a person is patient and screens people well. Note that charging for
a cat helps keep the wrong people away, and the general idea is to find
people who understand how to take care of cats and who care about cats.

Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the conditions -
there
are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could elicit from
this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may be able
to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).

And is there anyone in the group who might know a cat behaviorist in the
Houston area?

If all else fails, sites with ideas are:

http://www.petrescue.com/library/place-pets.htm

http://www.expage.com/page/petadoptionform

The following is a site with suggestion on how to screen people on the
phone.

http://www.petrescue.com/library/cat-phone-screen.pdf

Best of luck to your son, the children and the cats - I bet that there is
some
means of helping the cats to adapt so that everyone would be happy!

Alan



"Dee Falt" > wrote in message
...
> Can someone provide some assistance on how to find a home for two
> cats in the Houston area? This is for my son who provided the
> following info:
>
> Searching for a new home in the Houston area for two neutered black
> cats. The cats are 7 year old litter mates (born approx. December
> 1996) named Punk and Blue who have lived together all of their lives.
> Aside from pot bellies, no health problems. Both have been declawed
> in the front, whilethe back claws remain. We are looking for a new
> home for them because Blueis not reacting well to a new baby, and we
> have another baby on the way. Both are very sweet, affectionate cats
> that we are reluctantly seeking a new home for.
>
> Any ideas, suggestions, etc would be appreciated. Thank you.
>
> Dee
>

amp11pleasedontspam
October 6th 03, 10:44 PM
Dee,

There are probably some good ideas on how to help the cats adapt to the
new children and avoid letting go of the two cats.

If it is entirely impossible the following are some ideas on finding homes
for
cats - it is kind of trick to find a good home for cats, but is not
impossible
if a person is patient and screens people well. Note that charging for
a cat helps keep the wrong people away, and the general idea is to find
people who understand how to take care of cats and who care about cats.

Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the conditions -
there
are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could elicit from
this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may be able
to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).

And is there anyone in the group who might know a cat behaviorist in the
Houston area?

If all else fails, sites with ideas are:

http://www.petrescue.com/library/place-pets.htm

http://www.expage.com/page/petadoptionform

The following is a site with suggestion on how to screen people on the
phone.

http://www.petrescue.com/library/cat-phone-screen.pdf

Best of luck to your son, the children and the cats - I bet that there is
some
means of helping the cats to adapt so that everyone would be happy!

Alan



"Dee Falt" > wrote in message
...
> Can someone provide some assistance on how to find a home for two
> cats in the Houston area? This is for my son who provided the
> following info:
>
> Searching for a new home in the Houston area for two neutered black
> cats. The cats are 7 year old litter mates (born approx. December
> 1996) named Punk and Blue who have lived together all of their lives.
> Aside from pot bellies, no health problems. Both have been declawed
> in the front, whilethe back claws remain. We are looking for a new
> home for them because Blueis not reacting well to a new baby, and we
> have another baby on the way. Both are very sweet, affectionate cats
> that we are reluctantly seeking a new home for.
>
> Any ideas, suggestions, etc would be appreciated. Thank you.
>
> Dee
>

Dee Falt
October 6th 03, 11:20 PM
On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:44:43 GMT, "amp11pleasedontspam"
> wrote:

>Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the conditions -
>there >are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could elicit from
>this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may be able
>to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).

Thank you, Alan, for your response. I'm afraid their space limitations
virtually preclude keeping the cats. I'm well aware of the situation
and is is with great reluctance (and I concur) that a new environment
would be best.

I have one indoor cat plus a colony of ferals. The indoor cat was a
feral for almost two years, but she is very much a fully domesticated
cat although she hob nobs with the others.

Dee

Dee Falt
October 6th 03, 11:20 PM
On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:44:43 GMT, "amp11pleasedontspam"
> wrote:

>Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the conditions -
>there >are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could elicit from
>this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may be able
>to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).

Thank you, Alan, for your response. I'm afraid their space limitations
virtually preclude keeping the cats. I'm well aware of the situation
and is is with great reluctance (and I concur) that a new environment
would be best.

I have one indoor cat plus a colony of ferals. The indoor cat was a
feral for almost two years, but she is very much a fully domesticated
cat although she hob nobs with the others.

Dee

Dee
October 7th 03, 12:52 AM
On Mon, 6 Oct 2003, Dee Falt wrote:

> Can someone provide some assistance on how to find a home for two
> cats in the Houston area? This is for my son who provided the
> following info:

I've looked to home five cats over the past two years. Three came to live
with me, one with my boyfriend, and one to a very nice no-kill shelter for
adoption. Alot of the people here do alot, and have all they can handle
right now. Good luck to you.

Dee

Dee
October 7th 03, 12:52 AM
On Mon, 6 Oct 2003, Dee Falt wrote:

> Can someone provide some assistance on how to find a home for two
> cats in the Houston area? This is for my son who provided the
> following info:

I've looked to home five cats over the past two years. Three came to live
with me, one with my boyfriend, and one to a very nice no-kill shelter for
adoption. Alot of the people here do alot, and have all they can handle
right now. Good luck to you.

Dee

Michele
November 4th 03, 08:19 PM
I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
"space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.

I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
have to give the KID up for adoption.

Michele


Dee Falt > wrote in message >...
> On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:44:43 GMT, "amp11pleasedontspam"
> > wrote:
>
> >Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the conditions -
> >there >are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could elicit from
> >this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may be able
> >to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).
>
> Thank you, Alan, for your response. I'm afraid their space limitations
> virtually preclude keeping the cats. I'm well aware of the situation
> and is is with great reluctance (and I concur) that a new environment
> would be best.
>
> I have one indoor cat plus a colony of ferals. The indoor cat was a
> feral for almost two years, but she is very much a fully domesticated
> cat although she hob nobs with the others.
>
> Dee

Michele
November 4th 03, 08:19 PM
I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
"space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.

I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
have to give the KID up for adoption.

Michele


Dee Falt > wrote in message >...
> On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:44:43 GMT, "amp11pleasedontspam"
> > wrote:
>
> >Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the conditions -
> >there >are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could elicit from
> >this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may be able
> >to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).
>
> Thank you, Alan, for your response. I'm afraid their space limitations
> virtually preclude keeping the cats. I'm well aware of the situation
> and is is with great reluctance (and I concur) that a new environment
> would be best.
>
> I have one indoor cat plus a colony of ferals. The indoor cat was a
> feral for almost two years, but she is very much a fully domesticated
> cat although she hob nobs with the others.
>
> Dee

perky1
November 5th 03, 02:49 AM
I would like to know why some
people think of humans before
4 legged creatures? We're All
animals. I think that if someone
loved and nurtured some animal,
whether it be 2-legged or 4-legged, for 7 yrs, well, I just
don't understand how one can
be given up.
That's just my opinion, for
all it's worth.---Perky1
"Michele" > wrote in message
om...
> I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
> their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
> just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
> cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
> consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
> that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
> a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
> take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
> vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
> with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
> an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
> "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.
>
> I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
> way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
> myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
> have to give the KID up for adoption.
>
> Michele
>
>
> Dee Falt > wrote in message
>...
> > On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:44:43 GMT, "amp11pleasedontspam"
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the
conditions -
> > >there >are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could
elicit from
> > >this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may be
able
> > >to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).
> >
> > Thank you, Alan, for your response. I'm afraid their space limitations
> > virtually preclude keeping the cats. I'm well aware of the situation
> > and is is with great reluctance (and I concur) that a new environment
> > would be best.
> >
> > I have one indoor cat plus a colony of ferals. The indoor cat was a
> > feral for almost two years, but she is very much a fully domesticated
> > cat although she hob nobs with the others.
> >
> > Dee

perky1
November 5th 03, 02:49 AM
I would like to know why some
people think of humans before
4 legged creatures? We're All
animals. I think that if someone
loved and nurtured some animal,
whether it be 2-legged or 4-legged, for 7 yrs, well, I just
don't understand how one can
be given up.
That's just my opinion, for
all it's worth.---Perky1
"Michele" > wrote in message
om...
> I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
> their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
> just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
> cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
> consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
> that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
> a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
> take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
> vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
> with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
> an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
> "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.
>
> I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
> way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
> myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
> have to give the KID up for adoption.
>
> Michele
>
>
> Dee Falt > wrote in message
>...
> > On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:44:43 GMT, "amp11pleasedontspam"
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the
conditions -
> > >there >are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could
elicit from
> > >this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may be
able
> > >to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).
> >
> > Thank you, Alan, for your response. I'm afraid their space limitations
> > virtually preclude keeping the cats. I'm well aware of the situation
> > and is is with great reluctance (and I concur) that a new environment
> > would be best.
> >
> > I have one indoor cat plus a colony of ferals. The indoor cat was a
> > feral for almost two years, but she is very much a fully domesticated
> > cat although she hob nobs with the others.
> >
> > Dee

Prying Eyes
November 7th 03, 12:32 AM
I would never give up my cat's even if I have children, I mean my cats have
giving me such a comfort in my life and I am sure that when I have children
I would need them the most. Then again that just me and I have come attached
to them to the point they are part of my family, which includes my rabbit
and dog. Even though some members of my family thing the dog has become a
hassle to take care, I am trying my best to convenience them about the
positive things our dog can bring instead of the negative things.


"Michele" > wrote in message
om...
> I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
> their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
> just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
> cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
> consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
> that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
> a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
> take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
> vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
> with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
> an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
> "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.
>
> I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
> way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
> myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
> have to give the KID up for adoption.
>
> Michele
>
>
> Dee Falt > wrote in message
>...
> > On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:44:43 GMT, "amp11pleasedontspam"
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the
conditions -
> > >there >are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could
elicit from
> > >this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may be
able
> > >to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).
> >
> > Thank you, Alan, for your response. I'm afraid their space limitations
> > virtually preclude keeping the cats. I'm well aware of the situation
> > and is is with great reluctance (and I concur) that a new environment
> > would be best.
> >
> > I have one indoor cat plus a colony of ferals. The indoor cat was a
> > feral for almost two years, but she is very much a fully domesticated
> > cat although she hob nobs with the others.
> >
> > Dee

Prying Eyes
November 7th 03, 12:32 AM
I would never give up my cat's even if I have children, I mean my cats have
giving me such a comfort in my life and I am sure that when I have children
I would need them the most. Then again that just me and I have come attached
to them to the point they are part of my family, which includes my rabbit
and dog. Even though some members of my family thing the dog has become a
hassle to take care, I am trying my best to convenience them about the
positive things our dog can bring instead of the negative things.


"Michele" > wrote in message
om...
> I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
> their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
> just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
> cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
> consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
> that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
> a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
> take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
> vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
> with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
> an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
> "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.
>
> I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
> way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
> myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
> have to give the KID up for adoption.
>
> Michele
>
>
> Dee Falt > wrote in message
>...
> > On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:44:43 GMT, "amp11pleasedontspam"
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the
conditions -
> > >there >are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could
elicit from
> > >this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may be
able
> > >to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).
> >
> > Thank you, Alan, for your response. I'm afraid their space limitations
> > virtually preclude keeping the cats. I'm well aware of the situation
> > and is is with great reluctance (and I concur) that a new environment
> > would be best.
> >
> > I have one indoor cat plus a colony of ferals. The indoor cat was a
> > feral for almost two years, but she is very much a fully domesticated
> > cat although she hob nobs with the others.
> >
> > Dee

onebyone
November 8th 03, 06:20 AM
"Michele" > wrote in message
om...
> I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
> their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
> just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
> cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
> consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
> that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
> a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
> take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
> vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
> with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
> an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
> "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.
>
> I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
> way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
> myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
> have to give the KID up for adoption.
>
> Michele
>
>
> Dee Falt > wrote in message
>...
> > On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:44:43 GMT, "amp11pleasedontspam"
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the
conditions -
> > >there >are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could
elicit from
> > >this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may be
able
> > >to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).
> >
> > Thank you, Alan, for your response. I'm afraid their space limitations
> > virtually preclude keeping the cats. I'm well aware of the situation
> > and is is with great reluctance (and I concur) that a new environment
> > would be best.
> >
> > I have one indoor cat plus a colony of ferals. The indoor cat was a
> > feral for almost two years, but she is very much a fully domesticated
> > cat although she hob nobs with the others.
> >
> > Dee

onebyone
November 8th 03, 06:20 AM
"Michele" > wrote in message
om...
> I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
> their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
> just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
> cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
> consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
> that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
> a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
> take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
> vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
> with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
> an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
> "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.
>
> I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
> way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
> myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
> have to give the KID up for adoption.
>
> Michele
>
>
> Dee Falt > wrote in message
>...
> > On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:44:43 GMT, "amp11pleasedontspam"
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the
conditions -
> > >there >are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could
elicit from
> > >this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may be
able
> > >to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).
> >
> > Thank you, Alan, for your response. I'm afraid their space limitations
> > virtually preclude keeping the cats. I'm well aware of the situation
> > and is is with great reluctance (and I concur) that a new environment
> > would be best.
> >
> > I have one indoor cat plus a colony of ferals. The indoor cat was a
> > feral for almost two years, but she is very much a fully domesticated
> > cat although she hob nobs with the others.
> >
> > Dee

onebyone
November 8th 03, 06:23 AM
Michele, I have to laugh out loud at your last sentence! For years when
people would ask my husband and I when were we "going to start having kids"?
I would tell them they we weren't, because "we were afraid that one of our
children would have allergies to our cats, and we would have to put the
child into Foster care". The looks on their faces were priceless! LOL

Michele, you are my kind of person!!!


"Michele" > wrote in message
om...
> I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
> their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
> just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
> cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
> consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
> that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
> a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
> take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
> vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
> with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
> an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
> "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.
>
> I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
> way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
> myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
> have to give the KID up for adoption.
>
> Michele
>
>
> Dee Falt > wrote in message
>...
> > On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:44:43 GMT, "amp11pleasedontspam"
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the
conditions -
> > >there >are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could
elicit from
> > >this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may be
able
> > >to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).
> >
> > Thank you, Alan, for your response. I'm afraid their space limitations
> > virtually preclude keeping the cats. I'm well aware of the situation
> > and is is with great reluctance (and I concur) that a new environment
> > would be best.
> >
> > I have one indoor cat plus a colony of ferals. The indoor cat was a
> > feral for almost two years, but she is very much a fully domesticated
> > cat although she hob nobs with the others.
> >
> > Dee

onebyone
November 8th 03, 06:23 AM
Michele, I have to laugh out loud at your last sentence! For years when
people would ask my husband and I when were we "going to start having kids"?
I would tell them they we weren't, because "we were afraid that one of our
children would have allergies to our cats, and we would have to put the
child into Foster care". The looks on their faces were priceless! LOL

Michele, you are my kind of person!!!


"Michele" > wrote in message
om...
> I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
> their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
> just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
> cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
> consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
> that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
> a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
> take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
> vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
> with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
> an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
> "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.
>
> I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
> way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
> myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
> have to give the KID up for adoption.
>
> Michele
>
>
> Dee Falt > wrote in message
>...
> > On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:44:43 GMT, "amp11pleasedontspam"
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the
conditions -
> > >there >are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could
elicit from
> > >this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may be
able
> > >to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).
> >
> > Thank you, Alan, for your response. I'm afraid their space limitations
> > virtually preclude keeping the cats. I'm well aware of the situation
> > and is is with great reluctance (and I concur) that a new environment
> > would be best.
> >
> > I have one indoor cat plus a colony of ferals. The indoor cat was a
> > feral for almost two years, but she is very much a fully domesticated
> > cat although she hob nobs with the others.
> >
> > Dee

Agua Girl
November 8th 03, 07:14 AM
Whenever someone starts out by saying " I can't imagine"....I usually
respond with "lucky you". I know it's unfathomable for some of
us to think about giving up our animals after 7 years but life has a way
of throwing curve balls and you never know when you may be in the
position to do something "unfathomable". My step mother got very very
sick. She has always been a huge cat lover...like crazy cat lady type.
At the time of her illness she was down to just 12 cats. Obviously with
her so ill and my dad taking care of her, it was impossible to continue
to care for 12 cats (and two dogs) so they had the unenviable task of
finding homes for 10 cats, some of whom they had for 5 or 6 years.
They kept the two oldest and did find the others homes. The fact that
anyone is LOOKING for a good home for their cat should be enough.
With so many just dumping them off on the side of the road I don't think
we should judge those who at least try and re-home them. I can't imagine
what turn my life would take that might put me in that position. It won't
be kids ...errr...maybe I shouldn't say that (knock wood) but one never
knows so until then..... :-)

AG
"onebyone" > wrote in message
...
> Michele, I have to laugh out loud at your last sentence! For years when
> people would ask my husband and I when were we "going to start having
kids"?
> I would tell them they we weren't, because "we were afraid that one of our
> children would have allergies to our cats, and we would have to put the
> child into Foster care". The looks on their faces were priceless! LOL
>
> Michele, you are my kind of person!!!
>
>
> "Michele" > wrote in message
> om...
> > I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
> > their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
> > just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
> > cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
> > consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
> > that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
> > a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
> > take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
> > vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
> > with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
> > an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
> > "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.
> >
> > I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
> > way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> > always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
> > myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
> > have to give the KID up for adoption.
> >
> > Michele
> >
> >
> > Dee Falt > wrote in message
> >...
> > > On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:44:43 GMT, "amp11pleasedontspam"
> > > > wrote:
> > >
> > > >Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the
> conditions -
> > > >there >are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could
> elicit from
> > > >this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may
be
> able
> > > >to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).
> > >
> > > Thank you, Alan, for your response. I'm afraid their space limitations
> > > virtually preclude keeping the cats. I'm well aware of the situation
> > > and is is with great reluctance (and I concur) that a new environment
> > > would be best.
> > >
> > > I have one indoor cat plus a colony of ferals. The indoor cat was a
> > > feral for almost two years, but she is very much a fully domesticated
> > > cat although she hob nobs with the others.
> > >
> > > Dee
>
>

Agua Girl
November 8th 03, 07:14 AM
Whenever someone starts out by saying " I can't imagine"....I usually
respond with "lucky you". I know it's unfathomable for some of
us to think about giving up our animals after 7 years but life has a way
of throwing curve balls and you never know when you may be in the
position to do something "unfathomable". My step mother got very very
sick. She has always been a huge cat lover...like crazy cat lady type.
At the time of her illness she was down to just 12 cats. Obviously with
her so ill and my dad taking care of her, it was impossible to continue
to care for 12 cats (and two dogs) so they had the unenviable task of
finding homes for 10 cats, some of whom they had for 5 or 6 years.
They kept the two oldest and did find the others homes. The fact that
anyone is LOOKING for a good home for their cat should be enough.
With so many just dumping them off on the side of the road I don't think
we should judge those who at least try and re-home them. I can't imagine
what turn my life would take that might put me in that position. It won't
be kids ...errr...maybe I shouldn't say that (knock wood) but one never
knows so until then..... :-)

AG
"onebyone" > wrote in message
...
> Michele, I have to laugh out loud at your last sentence! For years when
> people would ask my husband and I when were we "going to start having
kids"?
> I would tell them they we weren't, because "we were afraid that one of our
> children would have allergies to our cats, and we would have to put the
> child into Foster care". The looks on their faces were priceless! LOL
>
> Michele, you are my kind of person!!!
>
>
> "Michele" > wrote in message
> om...
> > I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
> > their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
> > just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
> > cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
> > consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
> > that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
> > a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
> > take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
> > vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
> > with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
> > an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
> > "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.
> >
> > I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
> > way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> > always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
> > myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
> > have to give the KID up for adoption.
> >
> > Michele
> >
> >
> > Dee Falt > wrote in message
> >...
> > > On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:44:43 GMT, "amp11pleasedontspam"
> > > > wrote:
> > >
> > > >Again, if possible, it is best to help the cat to adapt to the
> conditions -
> > > >there >are probably some good behavioral suggestion that one could
> elicit from
> > > >this group (and possibly from a cat behaviorist - veterinarians may
be
> able
> > > >to refer your son and his wife to a local cat behaviorist).
> > >
> > > Thank you, Alan, for your response. I'm afraid their space limitations
> > > virtually preclude keeping the cats. I'm well aware of the situation
> > > and is is with great reluctance (and I concur) that a new environment
> > > would be best.
> > >
> > > I have one indoor cat plus a colony of ferals. The indoor cat was a
> > > feral for almost two years, but she is very much a fully domesticated
> > > cat although she hob nobs with the others.
> > >
> > > Dee
>
>

Michele
November 10th 03, 04:08 PM
That is a very good point.

The main reason I have so many cats is because my mother died
relatively suddenly from colon cancer. At the time I moved in to help
take care of her, the cats, and the house, I brought 10 or 12 cats
from my apartment, and my mother had about 25 cats. During the year
between her diagnosis and her death, and across the two years
following that, I have taken in other cats, but the overall number has
gone down to the low 20's for a variety of reasons. I just took
another one to the vet to be neutered today, and I have someone who
MIGHT adopt him, but I am prepared that they might not after all.
Thank god for my vet and the non-profit org Feline Friends.

My comment was not directed toward people who have "unexpected curve
balls" in life, but at people who think of pets as a temporary
disposable aspect of life, like a car or furniture that when you move
you get rid of and get a new one. I realize that a lot of people put
even less thought into having children, so how can you possibly expect
them (not accusing everyone who is a parent of being this way) to be
RESPONSIBLE and DEDICATED toward their cats and/or dogs?




"Agua Girl" > wrote in message >...
> Whenever someone starts out by saying " I can't imagine"....I usually
> respond with "lucky you". I know it's unfathomable for some of
> us to think about giving up our animals after 7 years but life has a way
> of throwing curve balls and you never know when you may be in the
> position to do something "unfathomable". My step mother got very very
> sick. She has always been a huge cat lover...like crazy cat lady type.
> At the time of her illness she was down to just 12 cats. Obviously with
> her so ill and my dad taking care of her, it was impossible to continue
> to care for 12 cats (and two dogs) so they had the unenviable task of
> finding homes for 10 cats, some of whom they had for 5 or 6 years.
> They kept the two oldest and did find the others homes. The fact that
> anyone is LOOKING for a good home for their cat should be enough.
> With so many just dumping them off on the side of the road I don't think
> we should judge those who at least try and re-home them. I can't imagine
> what turn my life would take that might put me in that position. It won't
> be kids ...errr...maybe I shouldn't say that (knock wood) but one never
> knows so until then..... :-)
>
> AG
> "onebyone" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Michele, I have to laugh out loud at your last sentence! For years when
> > people would ask my husband and I when were we "going to start having
> kids"?
> > I would tell them they we weren't, because "we were afraid that one of our
> > children would have allergies to our cats, and we would have to put the
> > child into Foster care". The looks on their faces were priceless! LOL
> >
> > Michele, you are my kind of person!!!
> >
> >
> > "Michele" > wrote in message
> > om...
> > > I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
> > > their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
> > > just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
> > > cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
> > > consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
> > > that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
> > > a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
> > > take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
> > > vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
> > > with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
> > > an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
> > > "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.
> > >
> > > I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
> > > way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> > > always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
> > > myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
> > > have to give the KID up for adoption.
> > >
> > > Michele
> > >

Michele
November 10th 03, 04:08 PM
That is a very good point.

The main reason I have so many cats is because my mother died
relatively suddenly from colon cancer. At the time I moved in to help
take care of her, the cats, and the house, I brought 10 or 12 cats
from my apartment, and my mother had about 25 cats. During the year
between her diagnosis and her death, and across the two years
following that, I have taken in other cats, but the overall number has
gone down to the low 20's for a variety of reasons. I just took
another one to the vet to be neutered today, and I have someone who
MIGHT adopt him, but I am prepared that they might not after all.
Thank god for my vet and the non-profit org Feline Friends.

My comment was not directed toward people who have "unexpected curve
balls" in life, but at people who think of pets as a temporary
disposable aspect of life, like a car or furniture that when you move
you get rid of and get a new one. I realize that a lot of people put
even less thought into having children, so how can you possibly expect
them (not accusing everyone who is a parent of being this way) to be
RESPONSIBLE and DEDICATED toward their cats and/or dogs?




"Agua Girl" > wrote in message >...
> Whenever someone starts out by saying " I can't imagine"....I usually
> respond with "lucky you". I know it's unfathomable for some of
> us to think about giving up our animals after 7 years but life has a way
> of throwing curve balls and you never know when you may be in the
> position to do something "unfathomable". My step mother got very very
> sick. She has always been a huge cat lover...like crazy cat lady type.
> At the time of her illness she was down to just 12 cats. Obviously with
> her so ill and my dad taking care of her, it was impossible to continue
> to care for 12 cats (and two dogs) so they had the unenviable task of
> finding homes for 10 cats, some of whom they had for 5 or 6 years.
> They kept the two oldest and did find the others homes. The fact that
> anyone is LOOKING for a good home for their cat should be enough.
> With so many just dumping them off on the side of the road I don't think
> we should judge those who at least try and re-home them. I can't imagine
> what turn my life would take that might put me in that position. It won't
> be kids ...errr...maybe I shouldn't say that (knock wood) but one never
> knows so until then..... :-)
>
> AG
> "onebyone" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Michele, I have to laugh out loud at your last sentence! For years when
> > people would ask my husband and I when were we "going to start having
> kids"?
> > I would tell them they we weren't, because "we were afraid that one of our
> > children would have allergies to our cats, and we would have to put the
> > child into Foster care". The looks on their faces were priceless! LOL
> >
> > Michele, you are my kind of person!!!
> >
> >
> > "Michele" > wrote in message
> > om...
> > > I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
> > > their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
> > > just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
> > > cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
> > > consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
> > > that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
> > > a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
> > > take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
> > > vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
> > > with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
> > > an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
> > > "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.
> > >
> > > I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
> > > way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> > > always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
> > > myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
> > > have to give the KID up for adoption.
> > >
> > > Michele
> > >

Michele
November 10th 03, 04:32 PM
Hi - I forgot to mention that I do consider myself lucky in a
relative, half-empty/half-full kind of way because if it were not for
the cats, I would never stop crying. Some people said we should get
rid of most of our cats when my mother got sick, but there were not
many we would want to give up that would make good pets. And of
course we all know that the good shelters are full and have long
waiting lists.

I am committed to these cats (in more than one sense of the word!), my
only fear is if something happens to me, what will happen to them.
Guess I should re-evaluate my life insurance policy...

Michele



"Agua Girl" > wrote in message >...
> Whenever someone starts out by saying " I can't imagine"....I usually
> respond with "lucky you". I know it's unfathomable for some of
> us to think about giving up our animals after 7 years but life has a way
> of throwing curve balls and you never know when you may be in the
> position to do something "unfathomable". My step mother got very very
> sick. She has always been a huge cat lover...like crazy cat lady type.
> At the time of her illness she was down to just 12 cats. Obviously with
> her so ill and my dad taking care of her, it was impossible to continue
> to care for 12 cats (and two dogs) so they had the unenviable task of
> finding homes for 10 cats, some of whom they had for 5 or 6 years.
> They kept the two oldest and did find the others homes. The fact that
> anyone is LOOKING for a good home for their cat should be enough.
> With so many just dumping them off on the side of the road I don't think
> we should judge those who at least try and re-home them. I can't imagine
> what turn my life would take that might put me in that position. It won't
> be kids ...errr...maybe I shouldn't say that (knock wood) but one never
> knows so until then..... :-)
>
> AG
> "onebyone" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Michele, I have to laugh out loud at your last sentence! For years when
> > people would ask my husband and I when were we "going to start having
> kids"?
> > I would tell them they we weren't, because "we were afraid that one of our
> > children would have allergies to our cats, and we would have to put the
> > child into Foster care". The looks on their faces were priceless! LOL
> >
> > Michele, you are my kind of person!!!
> >
> >
> > "Michele" > wrote in message
> > om...
> > > I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
> > > their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
> > > just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
> > > cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
> > > consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
> > > that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
> > > a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
> > > take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
> > > vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
> > > with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
> > > an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
> > > "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.
> > >
> > > I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
> > > way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> > > always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
> > > myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
> > > have to give the KID up for adoption.
> > >
> > > Michele
> > >

Michele
November 10th 03, 04:32 PM
Hi - I forgot to mention that I do consider myself lucky in a
relative, half-empty/half-full kind of way because if it were not for
the cats, I would never stop crying. Some people said we should get
rid of most of our cats when my mother got sick, but there were not
many we would want to give up that would make good pets. And of
course we all know that the good shelters are full and have long
waiting lists.

I am committed to these cats (in more than one sense of the word!), my
only fear is if something happens to me, what will happen to them.
Guess I should re-evaluate my life insurance policy...

Michele



"Agua Girl" > wrote in message >...
> Whenever someone starts out by saying " I can't imagine"....I usually
> respond with "lucky you". I know it's unfathomable for some of
> us to think about giving up our animals after 7 years but life has a way
> of throwing curve balls and you never know when you may be in the
> position to do something "unfathomable". My step mother got very very
> sick. She has always been a huge cat lover...like crazy cat lady type.
> At the time of her illness she was down to just 12 cats. Obviously with
> her so ill and my dad taking care of her, it was impossible to continue
> to care for 12 cats (and two dogs) so they had the unenviable task of
> finding homes for 10 cats, some of whom they had for 5 or 6 years.
> They kept the two oldest and did find the others homes. The fact that
> anyone is LOOKING for a good home for their cat should be enough.
> With so many just dumping them off on the side of the road I don't think
> we should judge those who at least try and re-home them. I can't imagine
> what turn my life would take that might put me in that position. It won't
> be kids ...errr...maybe I shouldn't say that (knock wood) but one never
> knows so until then..... :-)
>
> AG
> "onebyone" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Michele, I have to laugh out loud at your last sentence! For years when
> > people would ask my husband and I when were we "going to start having
> kids"?
> > I would tell them they we weren't, because "we were afraid that one of our
> > children would have allergies to our cats, and we would have to put the
> > child into Foster care". The looks on their faces were priceless! LOL
> >
> > Michele, you are my kind of person!!!
> >
> >
> > "Michele" > wrote in message
> > om...
> > > I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years, invest in
> > > their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets and then
> > > just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid of the
> > > cats and move on to something else "more important" (people usually
> > > consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I realize
> > > that people's priorities should be addressed before animals' (if I had
> > > a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I would
> > > take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat to the
> > > vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a family
> > > with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a minute. Get
> > > an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so many
> > > "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the fact.
> > >
> > > I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the wrong
> > > way. But I have 22+ cats (all spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> > > always say to people that I won't have kids (I am spayed/neutered
> > > myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I would
> > > have to give the KID up for adoption.
> > >
> > > Michele
> > >

Mary
November 10th 03, 09:59 PM
"Michele" > wrote in message
om...
> Hi - I forgot to mention that I do consider myself lucky in a
> relative, half-empty/half-full kind of way because if it were not
for
> the cats, I would never stop crying. Some people said we should get
> rid of most of our cats when my mother got sick, but there were not
> many we would want to give up that would make good pets. And of
> course we all know that the good shelters are full and have long
> waiting lists.
>
> I am committed to these cats (in more than one sense of the word!),
my
> only fear is if something happens to me, what will happen to them.
> Guess I should re-evaluate my life insurance policy...
>
> Michele
>
>
>
> "Agua Girl" > wrote in message
>...
> > Whenever someone starts out by saying " I can't imagine"....I
usually
> > respond with "lucky you". I know it's unfathomable for some of
> > us to think about giving up our animals after 7 years but life has
a way
> > of throwing curve balls and you never know when you may be in the
> > position to do something "unfathomable". My step mother got very
very
> > sick. She has always been a huge cat lover...like crazy cat lady
type.
> > At the time of her illness she was down to just 12 cats.
Obviously with
> > her so ill and my dad taking care of her, it was impossible to
continue
> > to care for 12 cats (and two dogs) so they had the unenviable task
of
> > finding homes for 10 cats, some of whom they had for 5 or 6 years.
> > They kept the two oldest and did find the others homes. The fact
that
> > anyone is LOOKING for a good home for their cat should be enough.
> > With so many just dumping them off on the side of the road I don't
think
> > we should judge those who at least try and re-home them. I can't
imagine
> > what turn my life would take that might put me in that position.
It won't
> > be kids ...errr...maybe I shouldn't say that (knock wood) but one
never
> > knows so until then..... :-)
> >
> > AG
> > "onebyone" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > Michele, I have to laugh out loud at your last sentence! For
years when
> > > people would ask my husband and I when were we "going to start
having
> > kids"?
> > > I would tell them they we weren't, because "we were afraid that
one of our
> > > children would have allergies to our cats, and we would have to
put the
> > > child into Foster care". The looks on their faces were
priceless! LOL
> > >
> > > Michele, you are my kind of person!!!
> > >
> > >
> > > "Michele" > wrote in message
> > > om...
> > > > I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years,
invest in
> > > > their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets
and then
> > > > just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid
of the
> > > > cats and move on to something else "more important" (people
usually
> > > > consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I
realize
> > > > that people's priorities should be addressed before animals'
(if I had
> > > > a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I
would
> > > > take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat
to the
> > > > vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a
family
> > > > with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a
minute. Get
> > > > an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so
many
> > > > "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the
fact.
> > > >
> > > > I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the
wrong
> > > > way. But I have 22+ cats (all
spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> > > > always say to people that I won't have kids (I am
spayed/neutered
> > > > myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I
would
> > > > have to give the KID up for adoption.
> > > >
> > > > Michele
> > > >

You're going to Heaven, girl. If there is one. :0)

Mary
November 10th 03, 09:59 PM
"Michele" > wrote in message
om...
> Hi - I forgot to mention that I do consider myself lucky in a
> relative, half-empty/half-full kind of way because if it were not
for
> the cats, I would never stop crying. Some people said we should get
> rid of most of our cats when my mother got sick, but there were not
> many we would want to give up that would make good pets. And of
> course we all know that the good shelters are full and have long
> waiting lists.
>
> I am committed to these cats (in more than one sense of the word!),
my
> only fear is if something happens to me, what will happen to them.
> Guess I should re-evaluate my life insurance policy...
>
> Michele
>
>
>
> "Agua Girl" > wrote in message
>...
> > Whenever someone starts out by saying " I can't imagine"....I
usually
> > respond with "lucky you". I know it's unfathomable for some of
> > us to think about giving up our animals after 7 years but life has
a way
> > of throwing curve balls and you never know when you may be in the
> > position to do something "unfathomable". My step mother got very
very
> > sick. She has always been a huge cat lover...like crazy cat lady
type.
> > At the time of her illness she was down to just 12 cats.
Obviously with
> > her so ill and my dad taking care of her, it was impossible to
continue
> > to care for 12 cats (and two dogs) so they had the unenviable task
of
> > finding homes for 10 cats, some of whom they had for 5 or 6 years.
> > They kept the two oldest and did find the others homes. The fact
that
> > anyone is LOOKING for a good home for their cat should be enough.
> > With so many just dumping them off on the side of the road I don't
think
> > we should judge those who at least try and re-home them. I can't
imagine
> > what turn my life would take that might put me in that position.
It won't
> > be kids ...errr...maybe I shouldn't say that (knock wood) but one
never
> > knows so until then..... :-)
> >
> > AG
> > "onebyone" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > Michele, I have to laugh out loud at your last sentence! For
years when
> > > people would ask my husband and I when were we "going to start
having
> > kids"?
> > > I would tell them they we weren't, because "we were afraid that
one of our
> > > children would have allergies to our cats, and we would have to
put the
> > > child into Foster care". The looks on their faces were
priceless! LOL
> > >
> > > Michele, you are my kind of person!!!
> > >
> > >
> > > "Michele" > wrote in message
> > > om...
> > > > I don't understand how people can have 2 cats for 7 years,
invest in
> > > > their medicals, etc., and presumably really love these pets
and then
> > > > just decide that it's time to have kids now and let's get rid
of the
> > > > cats and move on to something else "more important" (people
usually
> > > > consider humans outweigh animals in the scheme of things). I
realize
> > > > that people's priorities should be addressed before animals'
(if I had
> > > > a kid who was sick and a cat who was sick at the same time, I
would
> > > > take the kid to the pediatrician before I would take the cat
to the
> > > > vererinarian), but if you know that SOMEDAY you might start a
family
> > > > with which the animals could be incompatible, THINK for a
minute. Get
> > > > an older animal, or hold off until you have a place without so
many
> > > > "space limitations". ALWAYS I hear these situations after the
fact.
> > > >
> > > > I know that some of what I have said may rub some people the
wrong
> > > > way. But I have 22+ cats (all
spayed/neutered/rescued/strays), and I
> > > > always say to people that I won't have kids (I am
spayed/neutered
> > > > myself anyway) because if the kid turned out to be allergic, I
would
> > > > have to give the KID up for adoption.
> > > >
> > > > Michele
> > > >

You're going to Heaven, girl. If there is one. :0)