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View Full Version : Blood in female kittens urine, HELP!


ForewarnedMetal
October 28th 03, 07:37 AM
Hello friends,

I'm having a problem with a female kitten roughly 12 weeks old. She has been
hand fed from a bottle KMR since the very day she was born as she was abandoned
by her mother with the semi-dry placenta still attached. She was weaned from
the bottle late at around 8 weeks old and moved to dry IAMS kitten food on her
own. About 3 days ago we noticed that she was urinating very frequently and in
a very small amount and that there was blood in it giving it a pink color. She
also urinates just about everywhere, including her box which she had once used
exclusively. She doesn't seem to be straining but who knows if she's straining
or not. She is housed indoors and is alone only when my girlfriend and I
leaving for roughly 6 hours at the most to attend school 3 days a week. We are
at a loss to explain why a kitten, who incidentally shows no outward signs of
being ill, would have such a problem. At first we figured it was a UTI of some
sort but have come across articles about a build up of crystals due to a diet
lacking in acid.

This is why we are turning to you. Clearly we should take her to a vet but at
the present time that is not possible due to not being able to afford it. I am
curious as to what you think is causing our kitten's problem and what we can do
about it. Is there a special food to buy? Are antibiotics in order and which
ones would be best? Thank you for all your help in advance.

DJP

Linda Terrell
October 28th 03, 04:51 PM
On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 07:37:51 UTC,
(ForewarnedMetal) wrote:

> Hello friends,
>
> I'm having a problem with a female kitten roughly 12 weeks old. She has been
> hand fed from a bottle KMR since the very day she was born as she was abandoned
> by her mother with the semi-dry placenta still attached. She was weaned from
> the bottle late at around 8 weeks old and moved to dry IAMS kitten food on her
> own. About 3 days ago we noticed that she was urinating very frequently and in
> a very small amount and that there was blood in it giving it a pink color. She
> also urinates just about everywhere, including her box which she had once used
> exclusively. She doesn't seem to be straining but who knows if she's straining
> or not. She is housed indoors and is alone only when my girlfriend and I
> leaving for roughly 6 hours at the most to attend school 3 days a week. We are
> at a loss to explain why a kitten, who incidentally shows no outward signs of
> being ill, would have such a problem. At first we figured it was a UTI of some
> sort but have come across articles about a build up of crystals due to a diet
> lacking in acid.
>
> This is why we are turning to you. Clearly we should take her to a vet but at
> the present time that is not possible due to not being able to afford it. I am
> curious as to what you think is causing our kitten's problem and what we can do
> about it. Is there a special food to buy? Are antibiotics in order and which
> ones would be best? Thank you for all your help in advance.
>
> DJP
>

Triple sulfa is a specific for UTI but I wouldn't begin to know the
dose for a kitten.

No special foods. Make sure she gets lots of liquids. And she must
go to a Vet. Se if you can arrange some payment schedule.

LT

Linda Terrell
October 28th 03, 04:51 PM
On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 07:37:51 UTC,
(ForewarnedMetal) wrote:

> Hello friends,
>
> I'm having a problem with a female kitten roughly 12 weeks old. She has been
> hand fed from a bottle KMR since the very day she was born as she was abandoned
> by her mother with the semi-dry placenta still attached. She was weaned from
> the bottle late at around 8 weeks old and moved to dry IAMS kitten food on her
> own. About 3 days ago we noticed that she was urinating very frequently and in
> a very small amount and that there was blood in it giving it a pink color. She
> also urinates just about everywhere, including her box which she had once used
> exclusively. She doesn't seem to be straining but who knows if she's straining
> or not. She is housed indoors and is alone only when my girlfriend and I
> leaving for roughly 6 hours at the most to attend school 3 days a week. We are
> at a loss to explain why a kitten, who incidentally shows no outward signs of
> being ill, would have such a problem. At first we figured it was a UTI of some
> sort but have come across articles about a build up of crystals due to a diet
> lacking in acid.
>
> This is why we are turning to you. Clearly we should take her to a vet but at
> the present time that is not possible due to not being able to afford it. I am
> curious as to what you think is causing our kitten's problem and what we can do
> about it. Is there a special food to buy? Are antibiotics in order and which
> ones would be best? Thank you for all your help in advance.
>
> DJP
>

Triple sulfa is a specific for UTI but I wouldn't begin to know the
dose for a kitten.

No special foods. Make sure she gets lots of liquids. And she must
go to a Vet. Se if you can arrange some payment schedule.

LT

Napoleon
October 28th 03, 06:47 PM
(ForewarnedMetal) wrote in message >...
> Hello friends,
>
> I'm having a problem with a female kitten roughly 12 weeks old. She has been
> hand fed from a bottle KMR since the very day she was born as she was abandoned
> by her mother with the semi-dry placenta still attached. She was weaned from
> the bottle late at around 8 weeks old and moved to dry IAMS kitten food on her
> own. About 3 days ago we noticed that she was urinating very frequently and in
> a very small amount and that there was blood in it giving it a pink color. She
> also urinates just about everywhere, including her box which she had once used
> exclusively. She doesn't seem to be straining but who knows if she's straining
> or not. She is housed indoors and is alone only when my girlfriend and I
> leaving for roughly 6 hours at the most to attend school 3 days a week. We are
> at a loss to explain why a kitten, who incidentally shows no outward signs of
> being ill, would have such a problem. At first we figured it was a UTI of some
> sort but have come across articles about a build up of crystals due to a diet
> lacking in acid.
>
> This is why we are turning to you. Clearly we should take her to a vet but at
> the present time that is not possible due to not being able to afford it. I am
> curious as to what you think is causing our kitten's problem and what we can do
> about it. Is there a special food to buy? Are antibiotics in order and which
> ones would be best? Thank you for all your help in advance.
>
> DJP

I hope you can resolve the kitty's immediate problem quickly. You've
done a wonderful thing in rescuing the kitten. But, once you get
beyond this crisis, I urge you to think about your situation. You
have to assume that you are going to incur medical expenses if you
decide to care for a cat. If nothing else, they require periodic
checkups to see that nothing is wrong. If your financial situation is
temporary and you anticipate being able to pay for future care, then
no worries. But if you have doubts about being able to do so soon
(and there's nothing unusual about being a "poor student", most
everyone goes through that stage), the best thing for the kitty would
be to find someone who can handle that financial burden. Maybe a
relative or someone you know who will allow you to remain in contact
with the kitty or even just take care of it until you get out of
school. As you have discovered, you just don't know what can crop up
with a cat's health. You may have already gone through this thought
process, since you have only had the kitty for a short while. Good
luck.

Napoleon
October 28th 03, 06:47 PM
(ForewarnedMetal) wrote in message >...
> Hello friends,
>
> I'm having a problem with a female kitten roughly 12 weeks old. She has been
> hand fed from a bottle KMR since the very day she was born as she was abandoned
> by her mother with the semi-dry placenta still attached. She was weaned from
> the bottle late at around 8 weeks old and moved to dry IAMS kitten food on her
> own. About 3 days ago we noticed that she was urinating very frequently and in
> a very small amount and that there was blood in it giving it a pink color. She
> also urinates just about everywhere, including her box which she had once used
> exclusively. She doesn't seem to be straining but who knows if she's straining
> or not. She is housed indoors and is alone only when my girlfriend and I
> leaving for roughly 6 hours at the most to attend school 3 days a week. We are
> at a loss to explain why a kitten, who incidentally shows no outward signs of
> being ill, would have such a problem. At first we figured it was a UTI of some
> sort but have come across articles about a build up of crystals due to a diet
> lacking in acid.
>
> This is why we are turning to you. Clearly we should take her to a vet but at
> the present time that is not possible due to not being able to afford it. I am
> curious as to what you think is causing our kitten's problem and what we can do
> about it. Is there a special food to buy? Are antibiotics in order and which
> ones would be best? Thank you for all your help in advance.
>
> DJP

I hope you can resolve the kitty's immediate problem quickly. You've
done a wonderful thing in rescuing the kitten. But, once you get
beyond this crisis, I urge you to think about your situation. You
have to assume that you are going to incur medical expenses if you
decide to care for a cat. If nothing else, they require periodic
checkups to see that nothing is wrong. If your financial situation is
temporary and you anticipate being able to pay for future care, then
no worries. But if you have doubts about being able to do so soon
(and there's nothing unusual about being a "poor student", most
everyone goes through that stage), the best thing for the kitty would
be to find someone who can handle that financial burden. Maybe a
relative or someone you know who will allow you to remain in contact
with the kitty or even just take care of it until you get out of
school. As you have discovered, you just don't know what can crop up
with a cat's health. You may have already gone through this thought
process, since you have only had the kitty for a short while. Good
luck.

Randy
November 3rd 03, 08:46 AM
Napoleon spoke thusly:

> I hope you can resolve the kitty's immediate problem quickly. You've
> done a wonderful thing in rescuing the kitten. But, once you get
> beyond this crisis, I urge you to think about your situation. You
> have to assume that you are going to incur medical expenses if you
> decide to care for a cat. If nothing else, they require periodic
> checkups to see that nothing is wrong.

It is "best" if they get periodic checkups... it is not required. Heck
my grandma first lived on a farm and had 3 cats that lived for 17 years
each... no medical attention ever... they couldn't have afforded a vet
if they wanted one. Then she moved to Detroit and had another cat for 20
years... nothing except shots.

So while it is best to spend for those checkups I would not call them
required. With all the pets that are put down I would rather see one go
to a loving person with little money and no vet visits than the lethal
alternative. Just get it spayed/neutered!

R

Randy
November 3rd 03, 08:46 AM
Napoleon spoke thusly:

> I hope you can resolve the kitty's immediate problem quickly. You've
> done a wonderful thing in rescuing the kitten. But, once you get
> beyond this crisis, I urge you to think about your situation. You
> have to assume that you are going to incur medical expenses if you
> decide to care for a cat. If nothing else, they require periodic
> checkups to see that nothing is wrong.

It is "best" if they get periodic checkups... it is not required. Heck
my grandma first lived on a farm and had 3 cats that lived for 17 years
each... no medical attention ever... they couldn't have afforded a vet
if they wanted one. Then she moved to Detroit and had another cat for 20
years... nothing except shots.

So while it is best to spend for those checkups I would not call them
required. With all the pets that are put down I would rather see one go
to a loving person with little money and no vet visits than the lethal
alternative. Just get it spayed/neutered!

R