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Ablang
December 8th 03, 03:39 AM
Every time I visit my local shelter, the purebred I see the most by
far is the Siamese cat. I have my suspicions as to why they seem to be
available in abundance. I read they have a reputation for mischief and
trouble. So a lot of them must be getting turned in because they knock
things over, or are incorrigible.

Is there anyone here who can attest for or against the Siamese cat?
Surely not all of them are bad or have bad thoughts like the one depicted
in the "Get Fuzzy" comic strips.

--
My cat's job is to look pretty, smell good, sleep, eat, pee, & poop, in
that order.

William Berry
December 8th 03, 04:14 AM
"Ablang" > wrote in message
...
> Every time I visit my local shelter, the purebred I see the most by
> far is the Siamese cat. I have my suspicions as to why they seem to be
> available in abundance. I read they have a reputation for mischief and
> trouble. So a lot of them must be getting turned in because they knock
> things over, or are incorrigible.
>
> Is there anyone here who can attest for or against the Siamese cat?

Hey Ablang,
I love Siamese Cats. The purebred one's can be a little strange, but then
those Cats also sell for big bucks. I had three Siamese Cats at one time and
I couldn't tell that they were anymore malevolent then any of my other Cats.
Besides, I think Siamese are so beautiful, there like fine hand-painted
china, no pun intended.
Seeya, William Berry, author of "Do You Hear The Cat Voices Singing? ISBN#
1-59113-445-5

William Berry
December 8th 03, 04:14 AM
"Ablang" > wrote in message
...
> Every time I visit my local shelter, the purebred I see the most by
> far is the Siamese cat. I have my suspicions as to why they seem to be
> available in abundance. I read they have a reputation for mischief and
> trouble. So a lot of them must be getting turned in because they knock
> things over, or are incorrigible.
>
> Is there anyone here who can attest for or against the Siamese cat?

Hey Ablang,
I love Siamese Cats. The purebred one's can be a little strange, but then
those Cats also sell for big bucks. I had three Siamese Cats at one time and
I couldn't tell that they were anymore malevolent then any of my other Cats.
Besides, I think Siamese are so beautiful, there like fine hand-painted
china, no pun intended.
Seeya, William Berry, author of "Do You Hear The Cat Voices Singing? ISBN#
1-59113-445-5

m. L. Briggs
December 8th 03, 07:12 AM
On Mon, 8 Dec 2003 02:39:47 +0000 (UTC), Ablang
> wrote:

> Every time I visit my local shelter, the purebred I see the most by
>far is the Siamese cat. I have my suspicions as to why they seem to be
>available in abundance. I read they have a reputation for mischief and
>trouble. So a lot of them must be getting turned in because they knock
>things over, or are incorrigible.
>
> Is there anyone here who can attest for or against the Siamese cat?
>Surely not all of them are bad or have bad thoughts like the one depicted
>in the "Get Fuzzy" comic strips.

I was adopted by a Siamese who was about two years old -- had her for
14 years. She was a traditionmal (applehead) Siamese and was the most
wonderful cat one could hope for. She talked to me and we understood
each other. She was not a lap cast, but was always close to me. She
like to keep me on schedule and always reminded me of the time. I
miss her. MLB

m. L. Briggs
December 8th 03, 07:12 AM
On Mon, 8 Dec 2003 02:39:47 +0000 (UTC), Ablang
> wrote:

> Every time I visit my local shelter, the purebred I see the most by
>far is the Siamese cat. I have my suspicions as to why they seem to be
>available in abundance. I read they have a reputation for mischief and
>trouble. So a lot of them must be getting turned in because they knock
>things over, or are incorrigible.
>
> Is there anyone here who can attest for or against the Siamese cat?
>Surely not all of them are bad or have bad thoughts like the one depicted
>in the "Get Fuzzy" comic strips.

I was adopted by a Siamese who was about two years old -- had her for
14 years. She was a traditionmal (applehead) Siamese and was the most
wonderful cat one could hope for. She talked to me and we understood
each other. She was not a lap cast, but was always close to me. She
like to keep me on schedule and always reminded me of the time. I
miss her. MLB

-L.
December 8th 03, 07:56 AM
Ablang > wrote in message >...
> Every time I visit my local shelter, the purebred I see the most by
> far is the Siamese cat. I have my suspicions as to why they seem to be
> available in abundance. I read they have a reputation for mischief and
> trouble. So a lot of them must be getting turned in because they knock
> things over, or are incorrigible.

IME, usually, it is for medical problems, because they are "too vocal"
or seen as "aggressive". Siamese are prone to 19 different genetic
diseases. They are probably the most ill-bred breed available.


>
> Is there anyone here who can attest for or against the Siamese cat?
> Surely not all of them are bad or have bad thoughts like the one depicted
> in the "Get Fuzzy" comic strips.

I think Siamese are awsome cats, but again, the breed has become
ill-bred. They also take a certain kind of person to understand their
quirks. We see a lot of them in the shelters, but I think I,
personally, have experienced more surrendered Persians than Siamese.
Most of those are surrendered for behavioral issues, mainly secondary
to declawing.

-L.

-L.
December 8th 03, 07:56 AM
Ablang > wrote in message >...
> Every time I visit my local shelter, the purebred I see the most by
> far is the Siamese cat. I have my suspicions as to why they seem to be
> available in abundance. I read they have a reputation for mischief and
> trouble. So a lot of them must be getting turned in because they knock
> things over, or are incorrigible.

IME, usually, it is for medical problems, because they are "too vocal"
or seen as "aggressive". Siamese are prone to 19 different genetic
diseases. They are probably the most ill-bred breed available.


>
> Is there anyone here who can attest for or against the Siamese cat?
> Surely not all of them are bad or have bad thoughts like the one depicted
> in the "Get Fuzzy" comic strips.

I think Siamese are awsome cats, but again, the breed has become
ill-bred. They also take a certain kind of person to understand their
quirks. We see a lot of them in the shelters, but I think I,
personally, have experienced more surrendered Persians than Siamese.
Most of those are surrendered for behavioral issues, mainly secondary
to declawing.

-L.

Linda Terrell
December 8th 03, 08:55 AM
On Mon, 8 Dec 2003 02:39:47 UTC, Ablang
> wrote:

> Every time I visit my local shelter, the purebred I see the most by
> far is the Siamese cat. I have my suspicions as to why they seem to be
> available in abundance. I read they have a reputation for mischief and
> trouble. So a lot of them must be getting turned in because they knock
> things over, or are incorrigible.
>
> Is there anyone here who can attest for or against the Siamese cat?
> Surely not all of them are bad or have bad thoughts like the one depicted
> in the "Get Fuzzy" comic strips.
>
Go to private breeders and get tradition, "applehead" Siamese.
These are the best of the breed. wonderful, loving cats,but
very quirky.

I love them.
Have 4 right now - 2 tortie points, one flame point kitten found in a
parking lot. Have had 8 over the years..

(I also have 4 other DSH)

LT

Linda Terrell
December 8th 03, 08:55 AM
On Mon, 8 Dec 2003 02:39:47 UTC, Ablang
> wrote:

> Every time I visit my local shelter, the purebred I see the most by
> far is the Siamese cat. I have my suspicions as to why they seem to be
> available in abundance. I read they have a reputation for mischief and
> trouble. So a lot of them must be getting turned in because they knock
> things over, or are incorrigible.
>
> Is there anyone here who can attest for or against the Siamese cat?
> Surely not all of them are bad or have bad thoughts like the one depicted
> in the "Get Fuzzy" comic strips.
>
Go to private breeders and get tradition, "applehead" Siamese.
These are the best of the breed. wonderful, loving cats,but
very quirky.

I love them.
Have 4 right now - 2 tortie points, one flame point kitten found in a
parking lot. Have had 8 over the years..

(I also have 4 other DSH)

LT

David Stevenson
December 8th 03, 05:24 PM
Meghan Noecker wrote
>On Mon, 8 Dec 2003 02:39:47 +0000 (UTC), Ablang
> wrote:
>
>> Every time I visit my local shelter, the purebred I see the most by
>>far is the Siamese cat. I have my suspicions as to why they seem to be
>>available in abundance. I read they have a reputation for mischief and
>>trouble. So a lot of them must be getting turned in because they knock
>>things over, or are incorrigible.
>>
>> Is there anyone here who can attest for or against the Siamese cat?
>>Surely not all of them are bad or have bad thoughts like the one depicted
>>in the "Get Fuzzy" comic strips.
>
>We have only had one that was difficult. He needed to be an only pet
>as he was jealous of the other animals, both cats and dogs.
>
>Overall, though, they are awesome. We currently have 3, and we have
>had 5 others before, and my mom had a few more before I was born.
>
>Basically, Siamese cats are very friendly, very vocal, and very much
>want to be an active member of the family. They don't like to be
>ignored. They are a bit more like dogs in the respect that they will
>follow you around and participate in everything whether you want them
>to or not. They aren't as aloof as many other cats.

We first got Ting RB when I was at school. Later I bought my mother
Suk RB as a present - though she had to come to us for her last few
years because of my mother's moves.

My wife and I have had Tao MIA - we only had him for a few months.
Then we got the twins, Pish RB and Tush RB. Tush RB died earlier, so we
got Quango RB, and Nanki Poo when Pish RB went. A couple of years ago
we lost Quango RB, and Minke came into our lives.

Naturally, all of them are Siamese - we would not have any other cat.
Nanki Poo is actually quiet. With Quango ageing so not too active we
forgot how loud a Siamese can be, and when Minke arrived he was the most
quiet sedate kitten imaginable. Now he is a year old he has forgotten
all that, cranked up the volume, and "the yowl" is back!

--
David Stevenson Storypage: http://blakjak.com/sty_menu.htm
Liverpool, England, UK > Emails welcome
Nanki Poo: SI Bp+W B 10 Y L+ W++ C+ I T+ A- E H++ V- F Q P B+ PA+ PL+ SC
Minke: SI W+Cp B 1 Y++ L-- W- C+

David Stevenson
December 8th 03, 05:24 PM
Meghan Noecker wrote
>On Mon, 8 Dec 2003 02:39:47 +0000 (UTC), Ablang
> wrote:
>
>> Every time I visit my local shelter, the purebred I see the most by
>>far is the Siamese cat. I have my suspicions as to why they seem to be
>>available in abundance. I read they have a reputation for mischief and
>>trouble. So a lot of them must be getting turned in because they knock
>>things over, or are incorrigible.
>>
>> Is there anyone here who can attest for or against the Siamese cat?
>>Surely not all of them are bad or have bad thoughts like the one depicted
>>in the "Get Fuzzy" comic strips.
>
>We have only had one that was difficult. He needed to be an only pet
>as he was jealous of the other animals, both cats and dogs.
>
>Overall, though, they are awesome. We currently have 3, and we have
>had 5 others before, and my mom had a few more before I was born.
>
>Basically, Siamese cats are very friendly, very vocal, and very much
>want to be an active member of the family. They don't like to be
>ignored. They are a bit more like dogs in the respect that they will
>follow you around and participate in everything whether you want them
>to or not. They aren't as aloof as many other cats.

We first got Ting RB when I was at school. Later I bought my mother
Suk RB as a present - though she had to come to us for her last few
years because of my mother's moves.

My wife and I have had Tao MIA - we only had him for a few months.
Then we got the twins, Pish RB and Tush RB. Tush RB died earlier, so we
got Quango RB, and Nanki Poo when Pish RB went. A couple of years ago
we lost Quango RB, and Minke came into our lives.

Naturally, all of them are Siamese - we would not have any other cat.
Nanki Poo is actually quiet. With Quango ageing so not too active we
forgot how loud a Siamese can be, and when Minke arrived he was the most
quiet sedate kitten imaginable. Now he is a year old he has forgotten
all that, cranked up the volume, and "the yowl" is back!

--
David Stevenson Storypage: http://blakjak.com/sty_menu.htm
Liverpool, England, UK > Emails welcome
Nanki Poo: SI Bp+W B 10 Y L+ W++ C+ I T+ A- E H++ V- F Q P B+ PA+ PL+ SC
Minke: SI W+Cp B 1 Y++ L-- W- C+

Alan Hannas
December 10th 03, 11:47 PM
On Mon, 8 Dec 2003 02:39:47 +0000 (UTC), Ablang
> wrote:

<snip>
> Is there anyone here who can attest for or against the Siamese cat?

Ablang,

I've had half a dozen Siamese cats over the last 40 years. None of
them has behaved even remotely like the image painted by the Disney
Studios in "Lady and the Tramp". They are very nice cats that love to
be with people. Sit down anywhere in your house and a Siamese will be
up in your lap in moments. They purr incessantly. They don't meow
very well; they make a scratchy sort of noise that some people find
annoying.

They are a muscular breed, surprisingly heavy for their size. Years
ago, the breed was noted for slightly crossed eyes and a kink in their
tail. These conditions apparently have been bred out of the line
several years ago. I would heartily recommend you consider one.

Good luck

Alan

P.S.
At the moment I'm feeling somewhat melancholy about them. We just
took our 13y/o Siamese to the vet today to be put down. She was a
high-strung cat, who'd developed some health problems. In addition
she'd began urinating out of the litter box. When she opted for the
laundry basket on Monday, it was time.

Alan Hannas
December 10th 03, 11:47 PM
On Mon, 8 Dec 2003 02:39:47 +0000 (UTC), Ablang
> wrote:

<snip>
> Is there anyone here who can attest for or against the Siamese cat?

Ablang,

I've had half a dozen Siamese cats over the last 40 years. None of
them has behaved even remotely like the image painted by the Disney
Studios in "Lady and the Tramp". They are very nice cats that love to
be with people. Sit down anywhere in your house and a Siamese will be
up in your lap in moments. They purr incessantly. They don't meow
very well; they make a scratchy sort of noise that some people find
annoying.

They are a muscular breed, surprisingly heavy for their size. Years
ago, the breed was noted for slightly crossed eyes and a kink in their
tail. These conditions apparently have been bred out of the line
several years ago. I would heartily recommend you consider one.

Good luck

Alan

P.S.
At the moment I'm feeling somewhat melancholy about them. We just
took our 13y/o Siamese to the vet today to be put down. She was a
high-strung cat, who'd developed some health problems. In addition
she'd began urinating out of the litter box. When she opted for the
laundry basket on Monday, it was time.

December 12th 03, 10:04 AM
A lot of people mistakenly consider any cat with points (darker feet, tail,
ears, and face) to be Siamese, but Siamese is a distinct breed from other
pointed varieties, such as Balinese, Birman, Burmese, Colorpoint Shorthair,
and Himilayan. A lot of people just call any pointed long-haired cat a
Himalayan and any pointed shorthair a Siamese.

I suppose that only a purebred geek really cares about the distinction,
since people typically say "Siamese" when they mean "pointed", but when you
are talking about characteristics of the Siamese breed and genetic diseases
to which they are prone, the distinction matters. Pointed, non-Siamese cats
aren't necessarily any more likely to have these diseases than any other
cat.

When I was growing up, we had a calico who had a litter of two pointed
kittens, one black one, one calico, one orange mackerel, and one grey tabby.
We called the two pointed ones "Siamese", but they weren't significantly
more Siamese than their four littermates.

--
Ferris Germane >

"Meghan Noecker" > wrote in message
...
> On 7 Dec 2003 22:56:59 -0800, (-L.) wrote:
>
>
> >
> >IME, usually, it is for medical problems, because they are "too vocal"
> >or seen as "aggressive". Siamese are prone to 19 different genetic
> >diseases. They are probably the most ill-bred breed available.
>
> Do you have a list of those or know of any online references to them?
> I've had siamese cats all my life, and we have only had one with
> health problems. She got cancer when she was 13. My first lived to be
> 19, and she never had any problems. Our youngest siamese to die was
> the 13 year old with cancer.
>
> Do you know if this is more in the modern breed, the traditional
> breed, or common in both? I have never been into showing, so I really
> have never talked to breeders, just met people on occasion who love
> theirs as much as I love mine.
>
> I would love to learn more as I do plan to continue with the siamese
> and balinese cats.
>
> Meghan & the Zoo Crew
> Equine and Pet Photography
> http://www.zoocrewphoto.com

December 12th 03, 10:04 AM
A lot of people mistakenly consider any cat with points (darker feet, tail,
ears, and face) to be Siamese, but Siamese is a distinct breed from other
pointed varieties, such as Balinese, Birman, Burmese, Colorpoint Shorthair,
and Himilayan. A lot of people just call any pointed long-haired cat a
Himalayan and any pointed shorthair a Siamese.

I suppose that only a purebred geek really cares about the distinction,
since people typically say "Siamese" when they mean "pointed", but when you
are talking about characteristics of the Siamese breed and genetic diseases
to which they are prone, the distinction matters. Pointed, non-Siamese cats
aren't necessarily any more likely to have these diseases than any other
cat.

When I was growing up, we had a calico who had a litter of two pointed
kittens, one black one, one calico, one orange mackerel, and one grey tabby.
We called the two pointed ones "Siamese", but they weren't significantly
more Siamese than their four littermates.

--
Ferris Germane >

"Meghan Noecker" > wrote in message
...
> On 7 Dec 2003 22:56:59 -0800, (-L.) wrote:
>
>
> >
> >IME, usually, it is for medical problems, because they are "too vocal"
> >or seen as "aggressive". Siamese are prone to 19 different genetic
> >diseases. They are probably the most ill-bred breed available.
>
> Do you have a list of those or know of any online references to them?
> I've had siamese cats all my life, and we have only had one with
> health problems. She got cancer when she was 13. My first lived to be
> 19, and she never had any problems. Our youngest siamese to die was
> the 13 year old with cancer.
>
> Do you know if this is more in the modern breed, the traditional
> breed, or common in both? I have never been into showing, so I really
> have never talked to breeders, just met people on occasion who love
> theirs as much as I love mine.
>
> I would love to learn more as I do plan to continue with the siamese
> and balinese cats.
>
> Meghan & the Zoo Crew
> Equine and Pet Photography
> http://www.zoocrewphoto.com

David Stevenson
December 12th 03, 05:19 PM
wrote
>A lot of people mistakenly consider any cat with points (darker feet, tail,
>ears, and face) to be Siamese, but Siamese is a distinct breed from other
>pointed varieties, such as Balinese, Birman, Burmese, Colorpoint Shorthair,
>and Himilayan. A lot of people just call any pointed long-haired cat a
>Himalayan and any pointed shorthair a Siamese.
>
>I suppose that only a purebred geek really cares about the distinction,
>since people typically say "Siamese" when they mean "pointed", but when you
>are talking about characteristics of the Siamese breed and genetic diseases
>to which they are prone, the distinction matters. Pointed, non-Siamese cats
>aren't necessarily any more likely to have these diseases than any other
>cat.

As far as I am concerned I think that anyone who refers to a cat as
Siamese does so because he believes it is a Siamese. It is more likely
to be ignorance when it is not than a belief that it does not matter.

--
David Stevenson Storypage: http://blakjak.com/sty_menu.htm
Liverpool, England, UK > Emails welcome
Nanki Poo: SI Bp+W B 10 Y L+ W++ C+ I T+ A- E H++ V- F Q P B+ PA+ PL+ SC
Minke: SI W+Cp B 1 Y++ L-- W- C+

David Stevenson
December 12th 03, 05:19 PM
wrote
>A lot of people mistakenly consider any cat with points (darker feet, tail,
>ears, and face) to be Siamese, but Siamese is a distinct breed from other
>pointed varieties, such as Balinese, Birman, Burmese, Colorpoint Shorthair,
>and Himilayan. A lot of people just call any pointed long-haired cat a
>Himalayan and any pointed shorthair a Siamese.
>
>I suppose that only a purebred geek really cares about the distinction,
>since people typically say "Siamese" when they mean "pointed", but when you
>are talking about characteristics of the Siamese breed and genetic diseases
>to which they are prone, the distinction matters. Pointed, non-Siamese cats
>aren't necessarily any more likely to have these diseases than any other
>cat.

As far as I am concerned I think that anyone who refers to a cat as
Siamese does so because he believes it is a Siamese. It is more likely
to be ignorance when it is not than a belief that it does not matter.

--
David Stevenson Storypage: http://blakjak.com/sty_menu.htm
Liverpool, England, UK > Emails welcome
Nanki Poo: SI Bp+W B 10 Y L+ W++ C+ I T+ A- E H++ V- F Q P B+ PA+ PL+ SC
Minke: SI W+Cp B 1 Y++ L-- W- C+

December 13th 03, 12:09 AM
In >, on 12/12/03
at 01:56 AM, (Meghan Noecker) said:

>Do you know if this is more in the modern breed, the traditional breed,
>or common in both? I have never been into showing, so I really have never
>talked to breeders, just met people on occasion who love theirs as much
>as I love mine.

Traditional Siamese are generally healthy.

Alan

--

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December 13th 03, 12:09 AM
In >, on 12/12/03
at 01:56 AM, (Meghan Noecker) said:

>Do you know if this is more in the modern breed, the traditional breed,
>or common in both? I have never been into showing, so I really have never
>talked to breeders, just met people on occasion who love theirs as much
>as I love mine.

Traditional Siamese are generally healthy.

Alan

--

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Faith
December 16th 03, 02:24 AM
You forgot Tonkinese....a wonderful dispositioned pointed breed.
Faith
> wrote in message
...
> A lot of people mistakenly consider any cat with points (darker feet,
tail,
> ears, and face) to be Siamese, but Siamese is a distinct breed from other
> pointed varieties, such as Balinese, Birman, Burmese, Colorpoint
Shorthair,
> and Himilayan. A lot of people just call any pointed long-haired cat a
> Himalayan and any pointed shorthair a Siamese.
>
> I suppose that only a purebred geek really cares about the distinction,
> since people typically say "Siamese" when they mean "pointed", but when
you
> are talking about characteristics of the Siamese breed and genetic
diseases
> to which they are prone, the distinction matters. Pointed, non-Siamese
cats
> aren't necessarily any more likely to have these diseases than any other
> cat.
>
> When I was growing up, we had a calico who had a litter of two pointed
> kittens, one black one, one calico, one orange mackerel, and one grey
tabby.
> We called the two pointed ones "Siamese", but they weren't significantly
> more Siamese than their four littermates.
>
> --
> Ferris Germane >
>
> "Meghan Noecker" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On 7 Dec 2003 22:56:59 -0800, (-L.) wrote:
> >
> >
> > >
> > >IME, usually, it is for medical problems, because they are "too vocal"
> > >or seen as "aggressive". Siamese are prone to 19 different genetic
> > >diseases. They are probably the most ill-bred breed available.
> >
> > Do you have a list of those or know of any online references to them?
> > I've had siamese cats all my life, and we have only had one with
> > health problems. She got cancer when she was 13. My first lived to be
> > 19, and she never had any problems. Our youngest siamese to die was
> > the 13 year old with cancer.
> >
> > Do you know if this is more in the modern breed, the traditional
> > breed, or common in both? I have never been into showing, so I really
> > have never talked to breeders, just met people on occasion who love
> > theirs as much as I love mine.
> >
> > I would love to learn more as I do plan to continue with the siamese
> > and balinese cats.
> >
> > Meghan & the Zoo Crew
> > Equine and Pet Photography
> > http://www.zoocrewphoto.com
>
>

Faith
December 16th 03, 02:24 AM
You forgot Tonkinese....a wonderful dispositioned pointed breed.
Faith
> wrote in message
...
> A lot of people mistakenly consider any cat with points (darker feet,
tail,
> ears, and face) to be Siamese, but Siamese is a distinct breed from other
> pointed varieties, such as Balinese, Birman, Burmese, Colorpoint
Shorthair,
> and Himilayan. A lot of people just call any pointed long-haired cat a
> Himalayan and any pointed shorthair a Siamese.
>
> I suppose that only a purebred geek really cares about the distinction,
> since people typically say "Siamese" when they mean "pointed", but when
you
> are talking about characteristics of the Siamese breed and genetic
diseases
> to which they are prone, the distinction matters. Pointed, non-Siamese
cats
> aren't necessarily any more likely to have these diseases than any other
> cat.
>
> When I was growing up, we had a calico who had a litter of two pointed
> kittens, one black one, one calico, one orange mackerel, and one grey
tabby.
> We called the two pointed ones "Siamese", but they weren't significantly
> more Siamese than their four littermates.
>
> --
> Ferris Germane >
>
> "Meghan Noecker" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On 7 Dec 2003 22:56:59 -0800, (-L.) wrote:
> >
> >
> > >
> > >IME, usually, it is for medical problems, because they are "too vocal"
> > >or seen as "aggressive". Siamese are prone to 19 different genetic
> > >diseases. They are probably the most ill-bred breed available.
> >
> > Do you have a list of those or know of any online references to them?
> > I've had siamese cats all my life, and we have only had one with
> > health problems. She got cancer when she was 13. My first lived to be
> > 19, and she never had any problems. Our youngest siamese to die was
> > the 13 year old with cancer.
> >
> > Do you know if this is more in the modern breed, the traditional
> > breed, or common in both? I have never been into showing, so I really
> > have never talked to breeders, just met people on occasion who love
> > theirs as much as I love mine.
> >
> > I would love to learn more as I do plan to continue with the siamese
> > and balinese cats.
> >
> > Meghan & the Zoo Crew
> > Equine and Pet Photography
> > http://www.zoocrewphoto.com
>
>