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tioga 0630
December 27th 03, 02:45 PM
I'm posting on this subject for the first time and want to thank
anyone who takes the time to read and respond to me.

Someone I know and love is currently in an untenable domestic
situation and needs to leave the home. This person lives with several
troubled family members, one of whom found and brought home a stray
fourteen years ago.

That person's prolonged absences from the home now, and the fact that
the only other regular habitant (beside my friend) suffers from either
depression or dementia, or a combination of both, has made my friend
the little one's sole caretaker.

This cat was found wild, then raised in two mountain suburbs where she
was able, in warm weather, to roam free. During the summer in
particular, she still enjoys her "nights out" but always returns.

The family situation is deteriorating so rapidly and alarmingly that
my friend may seek out emergency shelter. From that point, finances
dictate that a subsidized apartment is all that can be afforded.

My friend has rejected one housing complex where the management
insists on declawing, but the major concern and heartache is whether
taking the fourteen year-old into such a foreign environment will
probably spell doom for her.

The cat allows my friend to pick her up, but not cuddle or hold her,
and the question of how the cat would be sufficiently tranquilized as
to even get her out of the house is another source of deep concern.

My friend has a pet carrier and is *deeply* devoted to this animal's
health, welfare, and happiness; and if the misery of removing it from
such a geographically lovely but intrinsically negligent setting
doesn't kill my *friend,*, this good human being needs to know
everything possible about changing an old, relatively healthy--and
precious--feline's way of life.

Thank you again for reading this, and God bless to anyone who responds
via post or email.

Gail
December 27th 03, 05:36 PM
The cat is getting on in years and I think would adjust to an apartment. She
would be safer inside, also, especially as she grows older. I think
declawing her, however, would be not be good. There are ways of making sure
she does not claw any furniture including soft paws or something that can be
placed over her nails, or keeping the nails cut and providing her with
scratching pads or posts.
Gail
"tioga 0630" > wrote in message
om...
> I'm posting on this subject for the first time and want to thank
> anyone who takes the time to read and respond to me.
>
> Someone I know and love is currently in an untenable domestic
> situation and needs to leave the home. This person lives with several
> troubled family members, one of whom found and brought home a stray
> fourteen years ago.
>
> That person's prolonged absences from the home now, and the fact that
> the only other regular habitant (beside my friend) suffers from either
> depression or dementia, or a combination of both, has made my friend
> the little one's sole caretaker.
>
> This cat was found wild, then raised in two mountain suburbs where she
> was able, in warm weather, to roam free. During the summer in
> particular, she still enjoys her "nights out" but always returns.
>
> The family situation is deteriorating so rapidly and alarmingly that
> my friend may seek out emergency shelter. From that point, finances
> dictate that a subsidized apartment is all that can be afforded.
>
> My friend has rejected one housing complex where the management
> insists on declawing, but the major concern and heartache is whether
> taking the fourteen year-old into such a foreign environment will
> probably spell doom for her.
>
> The cat allows my friend to pick her up, but not cuddle or hold her,
> and the question of how the cat would be sufficiently tranquilized as
> to even get her out of the house is another source of deep concern.
>
> My friend has a pet carrier and is *deeply* devoted to this animal's
> health, welfare, and happiness; and if the misery of removing it from
> such a geographically lovely but intrinsically negligent setting
> doesn't kill my *friend,*, this good human being needs to know
> everything possible about changing an old, relatively healthy--and
> precious--feline's way of life.
>
> Thank you again for reading this, and God bless to anyone who responds
> via post or email.

Gail
December 27th 03, 05:36 PM
The cat is getting on in years and I think would adjust to an apartment. She
would be safer inside, also, especially as she grows older. I think
declawing her, however, would be not be good. There are ways of making sure
she does not claw any furniture including soft paws or something that can be
placed over her nails, or keeping the nails cut and providing her with
scratching pads or posts.
Gail
"tioga 0630" > wrote in message
om...
> I'm posting on this subject for the first time and want to thank
> anyone who takes the time to read and respond to me.
>
> Someone I know and love is currently in an untenable domestic
> situation and needs to leave the home. This person lives with several
> troubled family members, one of whom found and brought home a stray
> fourteen years ago.
>
> That person's prolonged absences from the home now, and the fact that
> the only other regular habitant (beside my friend) suffers from either
> depression or dementia, or a combination of both, has made my friend
> the little one's sole caretaker.
>
> This cat was found wild, then raised in two mountain suburbs where she
> was able, in warm weather, to roam free. During the summer in
> particular, she still enjoys her "nights out" but always returns.
>
> The family situation is deteriorating so rapidly and alarmingly that
> my friend may seek out emergency shelter. From that point, finances
> dictate that a subsidized apartment is all that can be afforded.
>
> My friend has rejected one housing complex where the management
> insists on declawing, but the major concern and heartache is whether
> taking the fourteen year-old into such a foreign environment will
> probably spell doom for her.
>
> The cat allows my friend to pick her up, but not cuddle or hold her,
> and the question of how the cat would be sufficiently tranquilized as
> to even get her out of the house is another source of deep concern.
>
> My friend has a pet carrier and is *deeply* devoted to this animal's
> health, welfare, and happiness; and if the misery of removing it from
> such a geographically lovely but intrinsically negligent setting
> doesn't kill my *friend,*, this good human being needs to know
> everything possible about changing an old, relatively healthy--and
> precious--feline's way of life.
>
> Thank you again for reading this, and God bless to anyone who responds
> via post or email.

tioga 0630
December 28th 03, 11:56 AM
"Annie Wxill" > wrote in message

> Do not post an address, but could you please let us know the general
> geographic area? It's possible that someone may be in that area and know of
> some resources that can provide help for your friend and the cat.

Thanks so much, Annie (and everyone else who posted reassurances).
This person is in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

One other question: Is it normal to be bothered by thinking of a cat
becoming "depressed" if she can no longer go outdoors? I volunteer at
a nursing home, and frankly, most of the (mentally competent) women
there don't seem to mind too much. But then again, these women never
had fun rolling in the grass and pretending they were queens of the
jungle in their glory days.

tioga 0630
December 28th 03, 11:56 AM
"Annie Wxill" > wrote in message

> Do not post an address, but could you please let us know the general
> geographic area? It's possible that someone may be in that area and know of
> some resources that can provide help for your friend and the cat.

Thanks so much, Annie (and everyone else who posted reassurances).
This person is in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

One other question: Is it normal to be bothered by thinking of a cat
becoming "depressed" if she can no longer go outdoors? I volunteer at
a nursing home, and frankly, most of the (mentally competent) women
there don't seem to mind too much. But then again, these women never
had fun rolling in the grass and pretending they were queens of the
jungle in their glory days.

tioga 0630
December 28th 03, 12:01 PM
(Luvskats00) wrote in message

> You don't tell us where you live. As far as I know, there is no locale in the
> USA where management has the legal right to force a declaw. I know that earlier
> this year it became law (where someone on public assistance could not be forced
> to give up their pet if moving into public housing.) Can you build a little
> enclosure outside so the cat could enjoy the outdoors without being exposed to
> any danger?

Hmm... That may be an idea. Hopefully, this is something can be done
with a little chicken wire and 1 X 4's.

I had no idea such a law was passed. Could you give me specifics on
it? I almost vomited when my friend told me the management of the
apartment complex where she wanted to move insisted on something so
barbaric--even after a hefty (for public aid people, that is) deposit.

I'd like to know about the law because this apartment complex was
owned by a private property management company which may not fall
under the scope of this law. If you have any links, please post
them--and God Bless.

tioga 0630
December 28th 03, 12:01 PM
(Luvskats00) wrote in message

> You don't tell us where you live. As far as I know, there is no locale in the
> USA where management has the legal right to force a declaw. I know that earlier
> this year it became law (where someone on public assistance could not be forced
> to give up their pet if moving into public housing.) Can you build a little
> enclosure outside so the cat could enjoy the outdoors without being exposed to
> any danger?

Hmm... That may be an idea. Hopefully, this is something can be done
with a little chicken wire and 1 X 4's.

I had no idea such a law was passed. Could you give me specifics on
it? I almost vomited when my friend told me the management of the
apartment complex where she wanted to move insisted on something so
barbaric--even after a hefty (for public aid people, that is) deposit.

I'd like to know about the law because this apartment complex was
owned by a private property management company which may not fall
under the scope of this law. If you have any links, please post
them--and God Bless.

m. L. Briggs
December 31st 03, 02:15 AM
On 27 Dec 2003 05:45:56 -0800, (tioga 0630) wrote:

>I'm posting on this subject for the first time and want to thank
>anyone who takes the time to read and respond to me.
>
>Someone I know and love is currently in an untenable domestic
>situation and needs to leave the home. This person lives with several
>troubled family members, one of whom found and brought home a stray
>fourteen years ago.
>
>That person's prolonged absences from the home now, and the fact that
>the only other regular habitant (beside my friend) suffers from either
>depression or dementia, or a combination of both, has made my friend
>the little one's sole caretaker.
>
>This cat was found wild, then raised in two mountain suburbs where she
>was able, in warm weather, to roam free. During the summer in
>particular, she still enjoys her "nights out" but always returns.
>
>The family situation is deteriorating so rapidly and alarmingly that
>my friend may seek out emergency shelter. From that point, finances
>dictate that a subsidized apartment is all that can be afforded.
>
>My friend has rejected one housing complex where the management
>insists on declawing, but the major concern and heartache is whether
>taking the fourteen year-old into such a foreign environment will
>probably spell doom for her.
>
>The cat allows my friend to pick her up, but not cuddle or hold her,
>and the question of how the cat would be sufficiently tranquilized as
>to even get her out of the house is another source of deep concern.
>
>My friend has a pet carrier and is *deeply* devoted to this animal's
>health, welfare, and happiness; and if the misery of removing it from
>such a geographically lovely but intrinsically negligent setting
>doesn't kill my *friend,*, this good human being needs to know
>everything possible about changing an old, relatively healthy--and
>precious--feline's way of life.
>
>Thank you again for reading this, and God bless to anyone who responds
>via post or email.

My suggestion is for your friend to put the cat in the carrier and
take her to the new place. She should then leave her in a quiet room
with food and water and perhaps a radio playing until she seems to
accept the situation. Do not let her outside -- keep it as an inside
only cat. Being treated well, and fed well, with a clean litter box,
the cat should adjust in time. Best of luck. MLB

m. L. Briggs
December 31st 03, 02:15 AM
On 27 Dec 2003 05:45:56 -0800, (tioga 0630) wrote:

>I'm posting on this subject for the first time and want to thank
>anyone who takes the time to read and respond to me.
>
>Someone I know and love is currently in an untenable domestic
>situation and needs to leave the home. This person lives with several
>troubled family members, one of whom found and brought home a stray
>fourteen years ago.
>
>That person's prolonged absences from the home now, and the fact that
>the only other regular habitant (beside my friend) suffers from either
>depression or dementia, or a combination of both, has made my friend
>the little one's sole caretaker.
>
>This cat was found wild, then raised in two mountain suburbs where she
>was able, in warm weather, to roam free. During the summer in
>particular, she still enjoys her "nights out" but always returns.
>
>The family situation is deteriorating so rapidly and alarmingly that
>my friend may seek out emergency shelter. From that point, finances
>dictate that a subsidized apartment is all that can be afforded.
>
>My friend has rejected one housing complex where the management
>insists on declawing, but the major concern and heartache is whether
>taking the fourteen year-old into such a foreign environment will
>probably spell doom for her.
>
>The cat allows my friend to pick her up, but not cuddle or hold her,
>and the question of how the cat would be sufficiently tranquilized as
>to even get her out of the house is another source of deep concern.
>
>My friend has a pet carrier and is *deeply* devoted to this animal's
>health, welfare, and happiness; and if the misery of removing it from
>such a geographically lovely but intrinsically negligent setting
>doesn't kill my *friend,*, this good human being needs to know
>everything possible about changing an old, relatively healthy--and
>precious--feline's way of life.
>
>Thank you again for reading this, and God bless to anyone who responds
>via post or email.

My suggestion is for your friend to put the cat in the carrier and
take her to the new place. She should then leave her in a quiet room
with food and water and perhaps a radio playing until she seems to
accept the situation. Do not let her outside -- keep it as an inside
only cat. Being treated well, and fed well, with a clean litter box,
the cat should adjust in time. Best of luck. MLB