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View Full Version : Flees biting kitten and ....... ME!


Asfand Yar Qazi
January 13th 04, 10:38 PM
Heya,

Sorry for cross-posting. Don't know which group to send to..

So, got this kitten from Charlton in South-east London. Absolute
bargain, only £20. Crazy little blogger. Does really stupid things.
Now about a year old.

But, since he's been going outside, a worrying phenomenon has
started.... SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCH

And that's just us humans. The poor cat wakes up suddenly at times and
viciously attacks various parts of his skin.

What can we do? I've checked this website:
http://www.yourfamilyshealth.com/family_health/pets/fleas/

and it says to vaccum regularly could have an affect. We can't really
afford exterminators and stuff right now.

Would this not have happened if we didn't let him inside, and trained
him to stay inside all the time?

btw, as a side note, does anyone have any advice for us poor humans?
Any cream we can put on our skins to stop the biting? Oh, and will
washing duvets kill them?

Thanks,
Asfand Yar




--
http://www.it-is-truth.org/

~*Connie*~
January 13th 04, 11:28 PM
there is nothing you can do outside of flea spray and frontline or advantage
or other flea medication from your vet for your pet. Fleas are notorious
for being hard to kill. You can bath your cat to help, but the fleas are
living in your environment and there is nothing that will kill the eggs, so
you need something that will treat for several months.

Good luck.

"Asfand Yar Qazi" > wrote in message
...
> Heya,
>
> Sorry for cross-posting. Don't know which group to send to..
>
> So, got this kitten from Charlton in South-east London. Absolute
> bargain, only £20. Crazy little blogger. Does really stupid things.
> Now about a year old.
>
> But, since he's been going outside, a worrying phenomenon has
> started....
SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCH
>
> And that's just us humans. The poor cat wakes up suddenly at times and
> viciously attacks various parts of his skin.
>
> What can we do? I've checked this website:
> http://www.yourfamilyshealth.com/family_health/pets/fleas/
>
> and it says to vaccum regularly could have an affect. We can't really
> afford exterminators and stuff right now.
>
> Would this not have happened if we didn't let him inside, and trained
> him to stay inside all the time?
>
> btw, as a side note, does anyone have any advice for us poor humans?
> Any cream we can put on our skins to stop the biting? Oh, and will
> washing duvets kill them?
>
> Thanks,
> Asfand Yar
>
>
>
>
> --
> http://www.it-is-truth.org/
>

~*Connie*~
January 13th 04, 11:28 PM
there is nothing you can do outside of flea spray and frontline or advantage
or other flea medication from your vet for your pet. Fleas are notorious
for being hard to kill. You can bath your cat to help, but the fleas are
living in your environment and there is nothing that will kill the eggs, so
you need something that will treat for several months.

Good luck.

"Asfand Yar Qazi" > wrote in message
...
> Heya,
>
> Sorry for cross-posting. Don't know which group to send to..
>
> So, got this kitten from Charlton in South-east London. Absolute
> bargain, only £20. Crazy little blogger. Does really stupid things.
> Now about a year old.
>
> But, since he's been going outside, a worrying phenomenon has
> started....
SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCH
>
> And that's just us humans. The poor cat wakes up suddenly at times and
> viciously attacks various parts of his skin.
>
> What can we do? I've checked this website:
> http://www.yourfamilyshealth.com/family_health/pets/fleas/
>
> and it says to vaccum regularly could have an affect. We can't really
> afford exterminators and stuff right now.
>
> Would this not have happened if we didn't let him inside, and trained
> him to stay inside all the time?
>
> btw, as a side note, does anyone have any advice for us poor humans?
> Any cream we can put on our skins to stop the biting? Oh, and will
> washing duvets kill them?
>
> Thanks,
> Asfand Yar
>
>
>
>
> --
> http://www.it-is-truth.org/
>

Mary
January 14th 04, 12:27 AM
"Asfand Yar Qazi" > wrote in
message ...
> Would this not have happened if we didn't let him inside, and
trained
> him to stay inside all the time?

Bingo.

Mary
January 14th 04, 12:27 AM
"Asfand Yar Qazi" > wrote in
message ...
> Would this not have happened if we didn't let him inside, and
trained
> him to stay inside all the time?

Bingo.

Tina Laitinen
January 14th 04, 01:00 AM
I subscribe to a news letter called Handy Hints and one newsletter gave a
few helpful flea tips. Here they are enjoy. I don't know if they work or
not but my sister tried the salt one and she got a couple of hundred fleas
in her vaccumn bags. My mum tried it to. Salt is cheap to you can probably
get it at the dollar store or whereever.

Tina

Sprinkle dry Clorox 2 onto your carpet, let it set for
30 minutes and then vacuum as usual. Be sure to emptythe bag. Because it
will be infested with fleas."

If your animal sleeps on their own pet bed, make sure it has cedar chips in
the stuffing. Cedar chips help repel fleas...

Fleas don't like garlic powder or brewer's yeast. Sprinkle affected areas
with either one...Adding a few sprinkles of either one to your animal's
daily diet will also help in controlling fleas on the animal.

Sprinkle salt all over the carpet and leave overnight, the next morning,
vacuum thoroughly. Fleas will eat the salt, but cannot tolerate it and will,
how do I say this kindly...EXPLODE internally..

Avon's Skin-so-soft was mentioned as a flea deterrant when rubbed into the
animal's coat.

If you don't have that available, boil a lemon, cut in
half with some water (1 or 2 cups) for a few minutes.Cool, strain and put
into a spray bottle. Spray youranimal's fur. Be careful around their eyes
and in fact, if you want to apply some to your pet's face, spray the lemon
mix on your hand and apply it that way to be safe.

If you want to make sure you do have fleas in your house, mix liquid soap
and water in a shallow pan or bowl and place it near a light on the floor.
In a day or two you should see the the little bugger floating face down or
face up (hard to tell with a flea).

Pour a little white vinegar in your pet's drinking bowl daily. This will
help build up a natural flea repellant within the animal...

Tina Laitinen
January 14th 04, 01:00 AM
I subscribe to a news letter called Handy Hints and one newsletter gave a
few helpful flea tips. Here they are enjoy. I don't know if they work or
not but my sister tried the salt one and she got a couple of hundred fleas
in her vaccumn bags. My mum tried it to. Salt is cheap to you can probably
get it at the dollar store or whereever.

Tina

Sprinkle dry Clorox 2 onto your carpet, let it set for
30 minutes and then vacuum as usual. Be sure to emptythe bag. Because it
will be infested with fleas."

If your animal sleeps on their own pet bed, make sure it has cedar chips in
the stuffing. Cedar chips help repel fleas...

Fleas don't like garlic powder or brewer's yeast. Sprinkle affected areas
with either one...Adding a few sprinkles of either one to your animal's
daily diet will also help in controlling fleas on the animal.

Sprinkle salt all over the carpet and leave overnight, the next morning,
vacuum thoroughly. Fleas will eat the salt, but cannot tolerate it and will,
how do I say this kindly...EXPLODE internally..

Avon's Skin-so-soft was mentioned as a flea deterrant when rubbed into the
animal's coat.

If you don't have that available, boil a lemon, cut in
half with some water (1 or 2 cups) for a few minutes.Cool, strain and put
into a spray bottle. Spray youranimal's fur. Be careful around their eyes
and in fact, if you want to apply some to your pet's face, spray the lemon
mix on your hand and apply it that way to be safe.

If you want to make sure you do have fleas in your house, mix liquid soap
and water in a shallow pan or bowl and place it near a light on the floor.
In a day or two you should see the the little bugger floating face down or
face up (hard to tell with a flea).

Pour a little white vinegar in your pet's drinking bowl daily. This will
help build up a natural flea repellant within the animal...

~*Connie*~
January 14th 04, 02:13 AM
a lot of these sound toxic to the cats

"Tina Laitinen" > wrote in message
able.rogers.com...
> I subscribe to a news letter called Handy Hints and one newsletter gave a
> few helpful flea tips. Here they are enjoy. I don't know if they work or
> not but my sister tried the salt one and she got a couple of hundred fleas
> in her vaccumn bags. My mum tried it to. Salt is cheap to you can
probably
> get it at the dollar store or whereever.
>
> Tina
>
> Sprinkle dry Clorox 2 onto your carpet, let it set for
> 30 minutes and then vacuum as usual. Be sure to emptythe bag. Because it
> will be infested with fleas."
>
> If your animal sleeps on their own pet bed, make sure it has cedar chips
in
> the stuffing. Cedar chips help repel fleas...
>
> Fleas don't like garlic powder or brewer's yeast. Sprinkle affected areas
> with either one...Adding a few sprinkles of either one to your animal's
> daily diet will also help in controlling fleas on the animal.
>
> Sprinkle salt all over the carpet and leave overnight, the next morning,
> vacuum thoroughly. Fleas will eat the salt, but cannot tolerate it and
will,
> how do I say this kindly...EXPLODE internally..
>
> Avon's Skin-so-soft was mentioned as a flea deterrant when rubbed into the
> animal's coat.
>
> If you don't have that available, boil a lemon, cut in
> half with some water (1 or 2 cups) for a few minutes.Cool, strain and put
> into a spray bottle. Spray youranimal's fur. Be careful around their eyes
> and in fact, if you want to apply some to your pet's face, spray the lemon
> mix on your hand and apply it that way to be safe.
>
> If you want to make sure you do have fleas in your house, mix liquid soap
> and water in a shallow pan or bowl and place it near a light on the floor.
> In a day or two you should see the the little bugger floating face down or
> face up (hard to tell with a flea).
>
> Pour a little white vinegar in your pet's drinking bowl daily. This will
> help build up a natural flea repellant within the animal...
>
>

~*Connie*~
January 14th 04, 02:13 AM
a lot of these sound toxic to the cats

"Tina Laitinen" > wrote in message
able.rogers.com...
> I subscribe to a news letter called Handy Hints and one newsletter gave a
> few helpful flea tips. Here they are enjoy. I don't know if they work or
> not but my sister tried the salt one and she got a couple of hundred fleas
> in her vaccumn bags. My mum tried it to. Salt is cheap to you can
probably
> get it at the dollar store or whereever.
>
> Tina
>
> Sprinkle dry Clorox 2 onto your carpet, let it set for
> 30 minutes and then vacuum as usual. Be sure to emptythe bag. Because it
> will be infested with fleas."
>
> If your animal sleeps on their own pet bed, make sure it has cedar chips
in
> the stuffing. Cedar chips help repel fleas...
>
> Fleas don't like garlic powder or brewer's yeast. Sprinkle affected areas
> with either one...Adding a few sprinkles of either one to your animal's
> daily diet will also help in controlling fleas on the animal.
>
> Sprinkle salt all over the carpet and leave overnight, the next morning,
> vacuum thoroughly. Fleas will eat the salt, but cannot tolerate it and
will,
> how do I say this kindly...EXPLODE internally..
>
> Avon's Skin-so-soft was mentioned as a flea deterrant when rubbed into the
> animal's coat.
>
> If you don't have that available, boil a lemon, cut in
> half with some water (1 or 2 cups) for a few minutes.Cool, strain and put
> into a spray bottle. Spray youranimal's fur. Be careful around their eyes
> and in fact, if you want to apply some to your pet's face, spray the lemon
> mix on your hand and apply it that way to be safe.
>
> If you want to make sure you do have fleas in your house, mix liquid soap
> and water in a shallow pan or bowl and place it near a light on the floor.
> In a day or two you should see the the little bugger floating face down or
> face up (hard to tell with a flea).
>
> Pour a little white vinegar in your pet's drinking bowl daily. This will
> help build up a natural flea repellant within the animal...
>
>

Melanie Lacasse
January 14th 04, 02:59 AM
yeah I wouldn't be putting Clorox for one on any floors that my cat would
have access to. I'm sure it would harm your cat if inhaled or ingested. Also
lemon has a high acid content and cats skin is very sensitive...it may
result in a rash or very dry skin. I would call your local vet or pet store
and see if they have some practical and inexpensive ways to controlling your
flea problem...both for your home and your pet.
Hope this helps!

"~*Connie*~" > wrote in message
...
> a lot of these sound toxic to the cats
>
> "Tina Laitinen" > wrote in message
> able.rogers.com...
> > I subscribe to a news letter called Handy Hints and one newsletter gave
a
> > few helpful flea tips. Here they are enjoy. I don't know if they work
or
> > not but my sister tried the salt one and she got a couple of hundred
fleas
> > in her vaccumn bags. My mum tried it to. Salt is cheap to you can
> probably
> > get it at the dollar store or whereever.
> >
> > Tina
> >
> > Sprinkle dry Clorox 2 onto your carpet, let it set for
> > 30 minutes and then vacuum as usual. Be sure to emptythe bag. Because it
> > will be infested with fleas."
> >
> > If your animal sleeps on their own pet bed, make sure it has cedar chips
> in
> > the stuffing. Cedar chips help repel fleas...
> >
> > Fleas don't like garlic powder or brewer's yeast. Sprinkle affected
areas
> > with either one...Adding a few sprinkles of either one to your animal's
> > daily diet will also help in controlling fleas on the animal.
> >
> > Sprinkle salt all over the carpet and leave overnight, the next morning,
> > vacuum thoroughly. Fleas will eat the salt, but cannot tolerate it and
> will,
> > how do I say this kindly...EXPLODE internally..
> >
> > Avon's Skin-so-soft was mentioned as a flea deterrant when rubbed into
the
> > animal's coat.
> >
> > If you don't have that available, boil a lemon, cut in
> > half with some water (1 or 2 cups) for a few minutes.Cool, strain and
put
> > into a spray bottle. Spray youranimal's fur. Be careful around their
eyes
> > and in fact, if you want to apply some to your pet's face, spray the
lemon
> > mix on your hand and apply it that way to be safe.
> >
> > If you want to make sure you do have fleas in your house, mix liquid
soap
> > and water in a shallow pan or bowl and place it near a light on the
floor.
> > In a day or two you should see the the little bugger floating face down
or
> > face up (hard to tell with a flea).
> >
> > Pour a little white vinegar in your pet's drinking bowl daily. This will
> > help build up a natural flea repellant within the animal...
> >
> >
>
>

Melanie Lacasse
January 14th 04, 02:59 AM
yeah I wouldn't be putting Clorox for one on any floors that my cat would
have access to. I'm sure it would harm your cat if inhaled or ingested. Also
lemon has a high acid content and cats skin is very sensitive...it may
result in a rash or very dry skin. I would call your local vet or pet store
and see if they have some practical and inexpensive ways to controlling your
flea problem...both for your home and your pet.
Hope this helps!

"~*Connie*~" > wrote in message
...
> a lot of these sound toxic to the cats
>
> "Tina Laitinen" > wrote in message
> able.rogers.com...
> > I subscribe to a news letter called Handy Hints and one newsletter gave
a
> > few helpful flea tips. Here they are enjoy. I don't know if they work
or
> > not but my sister tried the salt one and she got a couple of hundred
fleas
> > in her vaccumn bags. My mum tried it to. Salt is cheap to you can
> probably
> > get it at the dollar store or whereever.
> >
> > Tina
> >
> > Sprinkle dry Clorox 2 onto your carpet, let it set for
> > 30 minutes and then vacuum as usual. Be sure to emptythe bag. Because it
> > will be infested with fleas."
> >
> > If your animal sleeps on their own pet bed, make sure it has cedar chips
> in
> > the stuffing. Cedar chips help repel fleas...
> >
> > Fleas don't like garlic powder or brewer's yeast. Sprinkle affected
areas
> > with either one...Adding a few sprinkles of either one to your animal's
> > daily diet will also help in controlling fleas on the animal.
> >
> > Sprinkle salt all over the carpet and leave overnight, the next morning,
> > vacuum thoroughly. Fleas will eat the salt, but cannot tolerate it and
> will,
> > how do I say this kindly...EXPLODE internally..
> >
> > Avon's Skin-so-soft was mentioned as a flea deterrant when rubbed into
the
> > animal's coat.
> >
> > If you don't have that available, boil a lemon, cut in
> > half with some water (1 or 2 cups) for a few minutes.Cool, strain and
put
> > into a spray bottle. Spray youranimal's fur. Be careful around their
eyes
> > and in fact, if you want to apply some to your pet's face, spray the
lemon
> > mix on your hand and apply it that way to be safe.
> >
> > If you want to make sure you do have fleas in your house, mix liquid
soap
> > and water in a shallow pan or bowl and place it near a light on the
floor.
> > In a day or two you should see the the little bugger floating face down
or
> > face up (hard to tell with a flea).
> >
> > Pour a little white vinegar in your pet's drinking bowl daily. This will
> > help build up a natural flea repellant within the animal...
> >
> >
>
>

Gee
January 14th 04, 03:10 AM
"Asfand Yar Qazi" > wrote in message
...
> Heya,
>
> Sorry for cross-posting. Don't know which group to send to..
>
> So, got this kitten from Charlton in South-east London. Absolute
> bargain, only £20. Crazy little blogger. Does really stupid things.
> Now about a year old.
>
> But, since he's been going outside, a worrying phenomenon has
> started....
SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCH
>
> And that's just us humans. The poor cat wakes up suddenly at times and
> viciously attacks various parts of his skin.
>
> What can we do? I've checked this website:
> http://www.yourfamilyshealth.com/family_health/pets/fleas/
>
> and it says to vaccum regularly could have an affect. We can't really
> afford exterminators and stuff right now.
>
> Would this not have happened if we didn't let him inside, and trained
> him to stay inside all the time?
>
> btw, as a side note, does anyone have any advice for us poor humans?
> Any cream we can put on our skins to stop the biting? Oh, and will
> washing duvets kill them?
>
> Thanks,
> Asfand Yar
>
>
>
>
> --
> http://www.it-is-truth.org/
>

OK, if you are unemployed, or on certain benefits you should be able to have
the cat seen and treated in either Blue Cross or PDSA (I think). I don;t
know where you live but you should be able to get the info either from their
websites or call them.

Treating the fleas is easy, not hugely expensive either, but time consuming
and requires lots of washing.

Flea treatment for cats - monthly ~£10 for a top range Frontline
Flea treatment for carpet - good one from the vets -do not waste money on
stuff from Tesco ~£7-10

I had to do it couple of years ago. You must wash ALL the clothes and
bedding, on the higher temperature the better, as fleas can jump wherever
they feel like, and lay eggs which can survive a long time. You MUST Spray
the caprpets as per instructions. Hoover carpet, you should have then carpet
protected for about a year with one spray can. Keep putting the frontline on
your kitty once a month.

Gee

Gee
January 14th 04, 03:10 AM
"Asfand Yar Qazi" > wrote in message
...
> Heya,
>
> Sorry for cross-posting. Don't know which group to send to..
>
> So, got this kitten from Charlton in South-east London. Absolute
> bargain, only £20. Crazy little blogger. Does really stupid things.
> Now about a year old.
>
> But, since he's been going outside, a worrying phenomenon has
> started....
SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCH
>
> And that's just us humans. The poor cat wakes up suddenly at times and
> viciously attacks various parts of his skin.
>
> What can we do? I've checked this website:
> http://www.yourfamilyshealth.com/family_health/pets/fleas/
>
> and it says to vaccum regularly could have an affect. We can't really
> afford exterminators and stuff right now.
>
> Would this not have happened if we didn't let him inside, and trained
> him to stay inside all the time?
>
> btw, as a side note, does anyone have any advice for us poor humans?
> Any cream we can put on our skins to stop the biting? Oh, and will
> washing duvets kill them?
>
> Thanks,
> Asfand Yar
>
>
>
>
> --
> http://www.it-is-truth.org/
>

OK, if you are unemployed, or on certain benefits you should be able to have
the cat seen and treated in either Blue Cross or PDSA (I think). I don;t
know where you live but you should be able to get the info either from their
websites or call them.

Treating the fleas is easy, not hugely expensive either, but time consuming
and requires lots of washing.

Flea treatment for cats - monthly ~£10 for a top range Frontline
Flea treatment for carpet - good one from the vets -do not waste money on
stuff from Tesco ~£7-10

I had to do it couple of years ago. You must wash ALL the clothes and
bedding, on the higher temperature the better, as fleas can jump wherever
they feel like, and lay eggs which can survive a long time. You MUST Spray
the caprpets as per instructions. Hoover carpet, you should have then carpet
protected for about a year with one spray can. Keep putting the frontline on
your kitty once a month.

Gee

Tina Laitinen
January 14th 04, 03:52 AM
"Melanie Lacasse" > wrote in message
able.rogers.com...
> yeah I wouldn't be putting Clorox for one on any floors that my cat would
> have access to. I'm sure it would harm your cat if inhaled or ingested.
Also
> lemon has a high acid content and cats skin is very sensitive...it may
> result in a rash or very dry skin. I would call your local vet or pet
store
> and see if they have some practical and inexpensive ways to controlling
your
> flea problem...both for your home and your pet.
> Hope this helps!
>
> "~*Connie*~" > wrote in message
> ...
> > a lot of these sound toxic to the cats
> >
> > "Tina Laitinen" > wrote in message
> > able.rogers.com...
> > > I subscribe to a news letter called Handy Hints and one newsletter
gave
> a
> > > few helpful flea tips. Here they are enjoy. I don't know if they
work
> or
> > > not but my sister tried the salt one and she got a couple of hundred
> fleas
> > > in her vaccumn bags. My mum tried it to. Salt is cheap to you can
> > probably
> > > get it at the dollar store or whereever.
> > >
> > > Tina
> > >
> > > Sprinkle dry Clorox 2 onto your carpet, let it set for
> > > 30 minutes and then vacuum as usual. Be sure to emptythe bag. Because
it
> > > will be infested with fleas."
> > >
> > > If your animal sleeps on their own pet bed, make sure it has cedar
chips
> > in
> > > the stuffing. Cedar chips help repel fleas...
> > >
> > > Fleas don't like garlic powder or brewer's yeast. Sprinkle affected
> areas
> > > with either one...Adding a few sprinkles of either one to your
animal's
> > > daily diet will also help in controlling fleas on the animal.
> > >
> > > Sprinkle salt all over the carpet and leave overnight, the next
morning,
> > > vacuum thoroughly. Fleas will eat the salt, but cannot tolerate it and
> > will,
> > > how do I say this kindly...EXPLODE internally..
> > >
> > > Avon's Skin-so-soft was mentioned as a flea deterrant when rubbed into
> the
> > > animal's coat.
> > >
> > > If you don't have that available, boil a lemon, cut in
> > > half with some water (1 or 2 cups) for a few minutes.Cool, strain and
> put
> > > into a spray bottle. Spray youranimal's fur. Be careful around their
> eyes
> > > and in fact, if you want to apply some to your pet's face, spray the
> lemon
> > > mix on your hand and apply it that way to be safe.
> > >
> > > If you want to make sure you do have fleas in your house, mix liquid
> soap
> > > and water in a shallow pan or bowl and place it near a light on the
> floor.
> > > In a day or two you should see the the little bugger floating face
down
> or
> > > face up (hard to tell with a flea).
> > >
> > > Pour a little white vinegar in your pet's drinking bowl daily. This
will
> > > help build up a natural flea repellant within the animal...
> > >

The salt one is very inexpensive and it's been tried already. Salt is not
toxic to cats and the fleas just love it. My mum tried it and she said it
got all the fleas out of her carpet.

Tina

Tina Laitinen
January 14th 04, 03:52 AM
"Melanie Lacasse" > wrote in message
able.rogers.com...
> yeah I wouldn't be putting Clorox for one on any floors that my cat would
> have access to. I'm sure it would harm your cat if inhaled or ingested.
Also
> lemon has a high acid content and cats skin is very sensitive...it may
> result in a rash or very dry skin. I would call your local vet or pet
store
> and see if they have some practical and inexpensive ways to controlling
your
> flea problem...both for your home and your pet.
> Hope this helps!
>
> "~*Connie*~" > wrote in message
> ...
> > a lot of these sound toxic to the cats
> >
> > "Tina Laitinen" > wrote in message
> > able.rogers.com...
> > > I subscribe to a news letter called Handy Hints and one newsletter
gave
> a
> > > few helpful flea tips. Here they are enjoy. I don't know if they
work
> or
> > > not but my sister tried the salt one and she got a couple of hundred
> fleas
> > > in her vaccumn bags. My mum tried it to. Salt is cheap to you can
> > probably
> > > get it at the dollar store or whereever.
> > >
> > > Tina
> > >
> > > Sprinkle dry Clorox 2 onto your carpet, let it set for
> > > 30 minutes and then vacuum as usual. Be sure to emptythe bag. Because
it
> > > will be infested with fleas."
> > >
> > > If your animal sleeps on their own pet bed, make sure it has cedar
chips
> > in
> > > the stuffing. Cedar chips help repel fleas...
> > >
> > > Fleas don't like garlic powder or brewer's yeast. Sprinkle affected
> areas
> > > with either one...Adding a few sprinkles of either one to your
animal's
> > > daily diet will also help in controlling fleas on the animal.
> > >
> > > Sprinkle salt all over the carpet and leave overnight, the next
morning,
> > > vacuum thoroughly. Fleas will eat the salt, but cannot tolerate it and
> > will,
> > > how do I say this kindly...EXPLODE internally..
> > >
> > > Avon's Skin-so-soft was mentioned as a flea deterrant when rubbed into
> the
> > > animal's coat.
> > >
> > > If you don't have that available, boil a lemon, cut in
> > > half with some water (1 or 2 cups) for a few minutes.Cool, strain and
> put
> > > into a spray bottle. Spray youranimal's fur. Be careful around their
> eyes
> > > and in fact, if you want to apply some to your pet's face, spray the
> lemon
> > > mix on your hand and apply it that way to be safe.
> > >
> > > If you want to make sure you do have fleas in your house, mix liquid
> soap
> > > and water in a shallow pan or bowl and place it near a light on the
> floor.
> > > In a day or two you should see the the little bugger floating face
down
> or
> > > face up (hard to tell with a flea).
> > >
> > > Pour a little white vinegar in your pet's drinking bowl daily. This
will
> > > help build up a natural flea repellant within the animal...
> > >

The salt one is very inexpensive and it's been tried already. Salt is not
toxic to cats and the fleas just love it. My mum tried it and she said it
got all the fleas out of her carpet.

Tina

Dennis Carr
January 14th 04, 04:40 AM
On Wed, 14 Jan 2004 02:59:25 +0000, Melanie Lacasse wrote:

> Also
> lemon has a high acid content and cats skin is very sensitive...it may
> result in a rash or very dry skin.

Not to mention that cats tend to not like citrus.


--
Dennis Carr - | I may be out of my mind,
http://www.dennis.furtopia.org | But I have more fun that way.
------------------------------------+-------------------------------

Dennis Carr
January 14th 04, 04:40 AM
On Wed, 14 Jan 2004 02:59:25 +0000, Melanie Lacasse wrote:

> Also
> lemon has a high acid content and cats skin is very sensitive...it may
> result in a rash or very dry skin.

Not to mention that cats tend to not like citrus.


--
Dennis Carr - | I may be out of my mind,
http://www.dennis.furtopia.org | But I have more fun that way.
------------------------------------+-------------------------------

Dennis Carr
January 14th 04, 04:42 AM
On Tue, 13 Jan 2004 22:38:14 +0000, Asfand Yar Qazi wrote:

> But, since he's been going outside, a worrying phenomenon has
> started.... SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCH
>
> And that's just us humans. The poor cat wakes up suddenly at times and
> viciously attacks various parts of his skin.

My sympathies. Fleas isn't fun.

> What can we do? I've checked this website:
> http://www.yourfamilyshealth.com/family_health/pets/fleas/
>
> and it says to vaccum regularly could have an affect. We can't really
> afford exterminators and stuff right now.

Problem with fleas is that they are like cockroaches. They don't die
except with patience and knowhow.

OK, I guess they're *un*like cockroaches, which just don't die. =^_^=

This is my suggestion then. Get yourself some Bayer Advantage, dose the
cat for about 3-4 months. Keep dosing him for a few months and wait for
the fleas to die. After a fashion, they will not come back.

> Would this not have happened if we didn't let him inside, and trained
> him to stay inside all the time?

Pretty much, but hindsight is 20/20. If the cat keeps going out, you'll
have to keep dosing him with advantage, of course.

> btw, as a side note, does anyone have any advice for us poor humans?
> Any cream we can put on our skins to stop the biting?

Avon Skin-So-Soft is a remarkably good insect repellant. Also use aloe
vera on the bite marks.

> Oh, and will
> washing duvets kill them?

Yeah, but the water has to be hot as hell.

--
Dennis Carr - | I may be out of my mind,
http://www.dennis.furtopia.org | But I have more fun that way.
------------------------------------+-------------------------------

Dennis Carr
January 14th 04, 04:42 AM
On Tue, 13 Jan 2004 22:38:14 +0000, Asfand Yar Qazi wrote:

> But, since he's been going outside, a worrying phenomenon has
> started.... SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCH
>
> And that's just us humans. The poor cat wakes up suddenly at times and
> viciously attacks various parts of his skin.

My sympathies. Fleas isn't fun.

> What can we do? I've checked this website:
> http://www.yourfamilyshealth.com/family_health/pets/fleas/
>
> and it says to vaccum regularly could have an affect. We can't really
> afford exterminators and stuff right now.

Problem with fleas is that they are like cockroaches. They don't die
except with patience and knowhow.

OK, I guess they're *un*like cockroaches, which just don't die. =^_^=

This is my suggestion then. Get yourself some Bayer Advantage, dose the
cat for about 3-4 months. Keep dosing him for a few months and wait for
the fleas to die. After a fashion, they will not come back.

> Would this not have happened if we didn't let him inside, and trained
> him to stay inside all the time?

Pretty much, but hindsight is 20/20. If the cat keeps going out, you'll
have to keep dosing him with advantage, of course.

> btw, as a side note, does anyone have any advice for us poor humans?
> Any cream we can put on our skins to stop the biting?

Avon Skin-So-Soft is a remarkably good insect repellant. Also use aloe
vera on the bite marks.

> Oh, and will
> washing duvets kill them?

Yeah, but the water has to be hot as hell.

--
Dennis Carr - | I may be out of my mind,
http://www.dennis.furtopia.org | But I have more fun that way.
------------------------------------+-------------------------------

Sylvia M.
January 14th 04, 06:45 AM
"~*Connie*~" > wrote in message
...
> there is nothing you can do outside of flea spray and frontline or
advantage
> or other flea medication from your vet for your pet. Fleas are notorious
> for being hard to kill. You can bath your cat to help, but the fleas are
> living in your environment and there is nothing that will kill the eggs,
so
> you need something that will treat for several months.
>
> Good luck.
>
> "Asfand Yar Qazi" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Heya,
> >
> > Sorry for cross-posting. Don't know which group to send to..
> >
> > So, got this kitten from Charlton in South-east London. Absolute
> > bargain, only £20. Crazy little blogger. Does really stupid things.
> > Now about a year old.
> >
> > But, since he's been going outside, a worrying phenomenon has
> > started....
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> > SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> > SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> > SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCH
> >
> > And that's just us humans.

First a poem...a very short one:

FLEAS
Adam had em.

A cat does not have to go out to get fleas.
Humans can bring them into the house.
The flea will hop up on your sock, pants, etc, and accept the ride.
Once in, it's everybody's. So are it's progeny.

Good luck getting rid of them...many good ideas have been offered.

Sylvia...out from lurking ;-)

Sylvia M.
January 14th 04, 06:45 AM
"~*Connie*~" > wrote in message
...
> there is nothing you can do outside of flea spray and frontline or
advantage
> or other flea medication from your vet for your pet. Fleas are notorious
> for being hard to kill. You can bath your cat to help, but the fleas are
> living in your environment and there is nothing that will kill the eggs,
so
> you need something that will treat for several months.
>
> Good luck.
>
> "Asfand Yar Qazi" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Heya,
> >
> > Sorry for cross-posting. Don't know which group to send to..
> >
> > So, got this kitten from Charlton in South-east London. Absolute
> > bargain, only £20. Crazy little blogger. Does really stupid things.
> > Now about a year old.
> >
> > But, since he's been going outside, a worrying phenomenon has
> > started....
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> > SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> > SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> > SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCH
> >
> > And that's just us humans.

First a poem...a very short one:

FLEAS
Adam had em.

A cat does not have to go out to get fleas.
Humans can bring them into the house.
The flea will hop up on your sock, pants, etc, and accept the ride.
Once in, it's everybody's. So are it's progeny.

Good luck getting rid of them...many good ideas have been offered.

Sylvia...out from lurking ;-)

Asfand Yar Qazi
January 14th 04, 11:59 AM
Tina Laitinen wrote:
>
>
> The salt one is very inexpensive and it's been tried already. Salt is not
> toxic to cats and the fleas just love it. My mum tried it and she said it
> got all the fleas out of her carpet.
>
> Tina
>
>

Many suggestions here: I will try as many as I can. Thanks a lot :-)

God bless,
Asfand Yar



--
http://www.it-is-truth.org/

Asfand Yar Qazi
January 14th 04, 11:59 AM
Tina Laitinen wrote:
>
>
> The salt one is very inexpensive and it's been tried already. Salt is not
> toxic to cats and the fleas just love it. My mum tried it and she said it
> got all the fleas out of her carpet.
>
> Tina
>
>

Many suggestions here: I will try as many as I can. Thanks a lot :-)

God bless,
Asfand Yar



--
http://www.it-is-truth.org/

Alison
January 14th 04, 03:59 PM
Hi Asfand,
What flea treatment have you used? It might be worth going to the
vet, they can supply you with
spot- on treatment that you put on once a month and a spray called
Acclaim , that you use on carpets and soft furnishings. The Acclaim
only has to be done once a year and kills all the eggs the fleas lay.
I think dry cleaning the duvets would kill the fleas and eggs.
The chemist would advise you what cream to use for fleas but any
cream for insect bites would help.
Also, if your cat goes outside he needs to be innoculated against cat
diseases and also wormed. If you can't afford a vet , the local PDSA,
RSPCA or Blue Cross might be able to help .
Alison


"Asfand Yar Qazi" > wrote in
message ...
> Heya,
>
> Sorry for cross-posting. Don't know which group to send to..
>
> So, got this kitten from Charlton in South-east London. Absolute
> bargain, only £20. Crazy little blogger. Does really stupid
things.
> Now about a year old.
>
> But, since he's been going outside, a worrying phenomenon has
> started....
SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCH
>
> And that's just us humans. The poor cat wakes up suddenly at times
and
> viciously attacks various parts of his skin.
>
> What can we do? I've checked this website:
> http://www.yourfamilyshealth.com/family_health/pets/fleas/
>
> and it says to vaccum regularly could have an affect. We can't
really
> afford exterminators and stuff right now.
>
> Would this not have happened if we didn't let him inside, and
trained
> him to stay inside all the time?
>
> btw, as a side note, does anyone have any advice for us poor humans?
> Any cream we can put on our skins to stop the biting? Oh, and will
> washing duvets kill them?
>
> Thanks,
> Asfand Yar
>
>
>
>
> --
> http://www.it-is-truth.org/
>
>

Alison
January 14th 04, 03:59 PM
Hi Asfand,
What flea treatment have you used? It might be worth going to the
vet, they can supply you with
spot- on treatment that you put on once a month and a spray called
Acclaim , that you use on carpets and soft furnishings. The Acclaim
only has to be done once a year and kills all the eggs the fleas lay.
I think dry cleaning the duvets would kill the fleas and eggs.
The chemist would advise you what cream to use for fleas but any
cream for insect bites would help.
Also, if your cat goes outside he needs to be innoculated against cat
diseases and also wormed. If you can't afford a vet , the local PDSA,
RSPCA or Blue Cross might be able to help .
Alison


"Asfand Yar Qazi" > wrote in
message ...
> Heya,
>
> Sorry for cross-posting. Don't know which group to send to..
>
> So, got this kitten from Charlton in South-east London. Absolute
> bargain, only £20. Crazy little blogger. Does really stupid
things.
> Now about a year old.
>
> But, since he's been going outside, a worrying phenomenon has
> started....
SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCH
>
> And that's just us humans. The poor cat wakes up suddenly at times
and
> viciously attacks various parts of his skin.
>
> What can we do? I've checked this website:
> http://www.yourfamilyshealth.com/family_health/pets/fleas/
>
> and it says to vaccum regularly could have an affect. We can't
really
> afford exterminators and stuff right now.
>
> Would this not have happened if we didn't let him inside, and
trained
> him to stay inside all the time?
>
> btw, as a side note, does anyone have any advice for us poor humans?
> Any cream we can put on our skins to stop the biting? Oh, and will
> washing duvets kill them?
>
> Thanks,
> Asfand Yar
>
>
>
>
> --
> http://www.it-is-truth.org/
>
>

Sunflower
January 14th 04, 05:02 PM
"Asfand Yar Qazi" > wrote in message
...
> Heya,
>
> Sorry for cross-posting. Don't know which group to send to..
>
> So, got this kitten from Charlton in South-east London. Absolute
> bargain, only £20. Crazy little blogger. Does really stupid things.
> Now about a year old.
>
> But, since he's been going outside, a worrying phenomenon has
> started....
SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCH
>
> And that's just us humans. The poor cat wakes up suddenly at times and
> viciously attacks various parts of his skin.
>
> What can we do? I've checked this website:
> http://www.yourfamilyshealth.com/family_health/pets/fleas/
>
> and it says to vaccum regularly could have an affect. We can't really
> afford exterminators and stuff right now.
>
> Would this not have happened if we didn't let him inside, and trained
> him to stay inside all the time?
>
> btw, as a side note, does anyone have any advice for us poor humans?
> Any cream we can put on our skins to stop the biting? Oh, and will
> washing duvets kill them?
>
> Thanks,
> Asfand Yar
>
>
>
One inexpensive aid to ridding your home of fleas is to construct a "flea
trap" All you need is a night light for an electrical outlet located low
down on the wall by a baseboard and a cake or pie pan or other shallow pan.
Fill the pan with water and add a few squirts of dish soap mixing it up
thouroughly but without making suds. When you get ready to go to bed, place
the pan on the floor below the nightlight and turn the light on. In the
darkness, the fleas will jump towards the light, land in the water, and
because the soap breaks the surface tension that would otherwise support
them on top of the water, they will sink and drown. It's pretty frightening
how many you can get up in the morning and see at the bottom! For
households with curious cats (isnt' that all of them?) putting a pie tin
inside of a just slightly larger shallow pan can help keep you cat from
turning it over and spilling the water.

This doesn't work by itself. You have to combine approaches. You MUST treat
your cat for fleas using Frontline or one of the other veterinary available
flea products. Don't waste your money and time and risk your cat's health
by using an over the counter flea preventative on your cat. You must also
treat the home environment, and that involves a lot of vacuuming. Vacuum
every day, and don't forget the soft furnishings like the sofa and the
drapes and the mattresses. Throw away the used vacuum bags every day and
don't let them sit in the closet. I do not know what home insecticide
treatments are available in the UK, but you want to purchase one (a fogger,
perhaps) with an insect growth regulator. Be sure to follow the directions
of any chemical you may buy, and remove the cat's food and water bowls as
well as any people food that might come into contact with the chemical.

You CAN rid your home of fleas, but it's not a quick process. And, once you
do so, you must be very vigilant about a reinfestation. The usual source is
an animal that is allowed to go in and out, or a new animal that's infested
already. If you wish to continue to allow your cat outdoor access, it's
imperative that he receive the Frontline monthly and you continue to
practice a lot of vacuuming and throw away the bags. It's a lot easier on
you and the cat if you just restrict his access to indoors only though.

Sunflower
January 14th 04, 05:02 PM
"Asfand Yar Qazi" > wrote in message
...
> Heya,
>
> Sorry for cross-posting. Don't know which group to send to..
>
> So, got this kitten from Charlton in South-east London. Absolute
> bargain, only £20. Crazy little blogger. Does really stupid things.
> Now about a year old.
>
> But, since he's been going outside, a worrying phenomenon has
> started....
SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCHS CRATCHSCRATCH
> SCRATCHSCRATCHSCRATCH
>
> And that's just us humans. The poor cat wakes up suddenly at times and
> viciously attacks various parts of his skin.
>
> What can we do? I've checked this website:
> http://www.yourfamilyshealth.com/family_health/pets/fleas/
>
> and it says to vaccum regularly could have an affect. We can't really
> afford exterminators and stuff right now.
>
> Would this not have happened if we didn't let him inside, and trained
> him to stay inside all the time?
>
> btw, as a side note, does anyone have any advice for us poor humans?
> Any cream we can put on our skins to stop the biting? Oh, and will
> washing duvets kill them?
>
> Thanks,
> Asfand Yar
>
>
>
One inexpensive aid to ridding your home of fleas is to construct a "flea
trap" All you need is a night light for an electrical outlet located low
down on the wall by a baseboard and a cake or pie pan or other shallow pan.
Fill the pan with water and add a few squirts of dish soap mixing it up
thouroughly but without making suds. When you get ready to go to bed, place
the pan on the floor below the nightlight and turn the light on. In the
darkness, the fleas will jump towards the light, land in the water, and
because the soap breaks the surface tension that would otherwise support
them on top of the water, they will sink and drown. It's pretty frightening
how many you can get up in the morning and see at the bottom! For
households with curious cats (isnt' that all of them?) putting a pie tin
inside of a just slightly larger shallow pan can help keep you cat from
turning it over and spilling the water.

This doesn't work by itself. You have to combine approaches. You MUST treat
your cat for fleas using Frontline or one of the other veterinary available
flea products. Don't waste your money and time and risk your cat's health
by using an over the counter flea preventative on your cat. You must also
treat the home environment, and that involves a lot of vacuuming. Vacuum
every day, and don't forget the soft furnishings like the sofa and the
drapes and the mattresses. Throw away the used vacuum bags every day and
don't let them sit in the closet. I do not know what home insecticide
treatments are available in the UK, but you want to purchase one (a fogger,
perhaps) with an insect growth regulator. Be sure to follow the directions
of any chemical you may buy, and remove the cat's food and water bowls as
well as any people food that might come into contact with the chemical.

You CAN rid your home of fleas, but it's not a quick process. And, once you
do so, you must be very vigilant about a reinfestation. The usual source is
an animal that is allowed to go in and out, or a new animal that's infested
already. If you wish to continue to allow your cat outdoor access, it's
imperative that he receive the Frontline monthly and you continue to
practice a lot of vacuuming and throw away the bags. It's a lot easier on
you and the cat if you just restrict his access to indoors only though.

Ivor Jones
January 14th 04, 08:55 PM
"Alison" > wrote in message
...
> Hi Asfand,
> What flea treatment have you used? It might be worth going to the
> vet, they can supply you with
> spot- on treatment that you put on once a month

I can thoroughly recommend Advantage - it turns your cat into a walking
flea killer :-))

Ivor

Ivor Jones
January 14th 04, 08:55 PM
"Alison" > wrote in message
...
> Hi Asfand,
> What flea treatment have you used? It might be worth going to the
> vet, they can supply you with
> spot- on treatment that you put on once a month

I can thoroughly recommend Advantage - it turns your cat into a walking
flea killer :-))

Ivor

Asfand Yar Qazi
January 15th 04, 10:40 PM
Sunflower wrote:
>
> You CAN rid your home of fleas, but it's not a quick process. And, once you
> do so, you must be very vigilant about a reinfestation. The usual source is
> an animal that is allowed to go in and out, or a new animal that's infested
> already. If you wish to continue to allow your cat outdoor access, it's
> imperative that he receive the Frontline monthly and you continue to
> practice a lot of vacuuming and throw away the bags.

Great. More work. Its my brother's cat, and he's away at University 5
days a week.

> It's a lot easier on
> you and the cat if you just restrict his access to indoors only though.
>
>

Problem is though, that he's an outdoor animal now (he's been brought up
like that I'm afraid.) My Mum, having been brought up in Pakistan with
animals all her life (cats, dogs, chickens, buffalos, etc.!), can't bear
to see it scratching on the door wanting to go out ("Its in its nature,
I can't stop it," she says.)

Some people keep their cat outside in the shed at all times, even when
they've had kittens. What are your thoughts on this?




--
http://www.it-is-truth.org/

Asfand Yar Qazi
January 15th 04, 10:40 PM
Sunflower wrote:
>
> You CAN rid your home of fleas, but it's not a quick process. And, once you
> do so, you must be very vigilant about a reinfestation. The usual source is
> an animal that is allowed to go in and out, or a new animal that's infested
> already. If you wish to continue to allow your cat outdoor access, it's
> imperative that he receive the Frontline monthly and you continue to
> practice a lot of vacuuming and throw away the bags.

Great. More work. Its my brother's cat, and he's away at University 5
days a week.

> It's a lot easier on
> you and the cat if you just restrict his access to indoors only though.
>
>

Problem is though, that he's an outdoor animal now (he's been brought up
like that I'm afraid.) My Mum, having been brought up in Pakistan with
animals all her life (cats, dogs, chickens, buffalos, etc.!), can't bear
to see it scratching on the door wanting to go out ("Its in its nature,
I can't stop it," she says.)

Some people keep their cat outside in the shed at all times, even when
they've had kittens. What are your thoughts on this?




--
http://www.it-is-truth.org/

JP Hobbs
January 20th 04, 06:41 AM
Asfand Yar Qazi > wrote in message
...
> Sunflower wrote:
> >
> > You CAN rid your home of fleas, but it's not a quick process. And, once
you
> > do so, you must be very vigilant about a reinfestation. The usual
source is
> > an animal that is allowed to go in and out, or a new animal that's
infested
> > already. If you wish to continue to allow your cat outdoor access, it's
> > imperative that he receive the Frontline monthly and you continue to
> > practice a lot of vacuuming and throw away the bags.
>
> Great. More work. Its my brother's cat, and he's away at University 5
> days a week.
>
> > It's a lot easier on
> > you and the cat if you just restrict his access to indoors only though.
> >
> >
>
> Problem is though, that he's an outdoor animal now (he's been brought up
> like that I'm afraid.) My Mum, having been brought up in Pakistan with
> animals all her life (cats, dogs, chickens, buffalos, etc.!), can't bear
> to see it scratching on the door wanting to go out ("Its in its nature,
> I can't stop it," she says.)
>
> Some people keep their cat outside in the shed at all times, even when
> they've had kittens. What are your thoughts on this?

>
> NOT very nice ones. Jean P
>
> --
> http://www.it-is-truth.org/
>

JP Hobbs
January 20th 04, 06:41 AM
Asfand Yar Qazi > wrote in message
...
> Sunflower wrote:
> >
> > You CAN rid your home of fleas, but it's not a quick process. And, once
you
> > do so, you must be very vigilant about a reinfestation. The usual
source is
> > an animal that is allowed to go in and out, or a new animal that's
infested
> > already. If you wish to continue to allow your cat outdoor access, it's
> > imperative that he receive the Frontline monthly and you continue to
> > practice a lot of vacuuming and throw away the bags.
>
> Great. More work. Its my brother's cat, and he's away at University 5
> days a week.
>
> > It's a lot easier on
> > you and the cat if you just restrict his access to indoors only though.
> >
> >
>
> Problem is though, that he's an outdoor animal now (he's been brought up
> like that I'm afraid.) My Mum, having been brought up in Pakistan with
> animals all her life (cats, dogs, chickens, buffalos, etc.!), can't bear
> to see it scratching on the door wanting to go out ("Its in its nature,
> I can't stop it," she says.)
>
> Some people keep their cat outside in the shed at all times, even when
> they've had kittens. What are your thoughts on this?

>
> NOT very nice ones. Jean P
>
> --
> http://www.it-is-truth.org/
>

Shaggin
January 26th 04, 10:35 PM
frontline cost me 30.00 per cat for a 3 month supply. It was well worth that
price to. It worked the magic. You can bathe them and everything and the
medicine stays on them bc it goes into there bloodstream and keeps being
produced from there sweat or something for a month. All your cats have to do
is walk around like they usually do and the fleas are attracted to them. Got
rid of our fleas great!

Shaggin
January 26th 04, 10:35 PM
frontline cost me 30.00 per cat for a 3 month supply. It was well worth that
price to. It worked the magic. You can bathe them and everything and the
medicine stays on them bc it goes into there bloodstream and keeps being
produced from there sweat or something for a month. All your cats have to do
is walk around like they usually do and the fleas are attracted to them. Got
rid of our fleas great!

Shaggin
January 26th 04, 10:36 PM
Would think that sprinkling salt on your carpet even though you vaccum it
wold leave behind some grains of salt that could be an attractant for
ants... unsure though.

Shaggin
January 26th 04, 10:36 PM
Would think that sprinkling salt on your carpet even though you vaccum it
wold leave behind some grains of salt that could be an attractant for
ants... unsure though.

S.A.Smitherman
January 27th 04, 01:54 PM
I don't recommend flea collars and drops etc because some have been known to
cause cats to have toxic reactions such as seizures. The best that we have
used is a product called "Flea-Busters". It may not be available there but
you may be able to get it from your vet or over the internet. Basically it
is composed of boric acid and baking soda. The boric acid is the main
active ingredient. The baking soda is basically used to help disperse the
boric acid in a larger area with less concentration of the boric acid.
These chemicals (both powdered) are cheap and easily obtained. Sprinkle the
mixture over your carpets and upholstery and brush them in. This will last
about a year. If you shampoo the areas, reapply after the area has dried.
Do not apply while the cat is in the room, don't want them to inhale the
dust. It is supposed to be safe, but why take chances. After brushing in
the mixture if is completely safe for animals and people. It is also
odorless and safe for fabrics. I have also heard that diatomatious earth is
also useful. The particles of boric acid or diotomatious earth get under
the scales or platelets of the adult flea and hold them open so that the
flea dehydrates and dies. Sprinkle the gardens and yard with the
diotomatious earth to kill the outside fleas and other garden pests.
Until they are gone, spray yourself with mosquito repellant. Vacuum often,
and remove the bag from the house immediately.

S.A.Smitherman
January 27th 04, 01:54 PM
I don't recommend flea collars and drops etc because some have been known to
cause cats to have toxic reactions such as seizures. The best that we have
used is a product called "Flea-Busters". It may not be available there but
you may be able to get it from your vet or over the internet. Basically it
is composed of boric acid and baking soda. The boric acid is the main
active ingredient. The baking soda is basically used to help disperse the
boric acid in a larger area with less concentration of the boric acid.
These chemicals (both powdered) are cheap and easily obtained. Sprinkle the
mixture over your carpets and upholstery and brush them in. This will last
about a year. If you shampoo the areas, reapply after the area has dried.
Do not apply while the cat is in the room, don't want them to inhale the
dust. It is supposed to be safe, but why take chances. After brushing in
the mixture if is completely safe for animals and people. It is also
odorless and safe for fabrics. I have also heard that diatomatious earth is
also useful. The particles of boric acid or diotomatious earth get under
the scales or platelets of the adult flea and hold them open so that the
flea dehydrates and dies. Sprinkle the gardens and yard with the
diotomatious earth to kill the outside fleas and other garden pests.
Until they are gone, spray yourself with mosquito repellant. Vacuum often,
and remove the bag from the house immediately.

jamie
January 28th 04, 06:38 PM
S.A.Smitherman > wrote:
> I don't recommend flea collars and drops etc because some have been known to
> cause cats to have toxic reactions such as seizures. The best that we have
> used is a product called "Flea-Busters". It may not be available there but
> you may be able to get it from your vet or over the internet. Basically it
> is composed of boric acid and baking soda. The boric acid is the main
> active ingredient. The baking soda is basically used to help disperse the

Boric acid, picked up on their feet and licked off is a good deal more
toxic than flea drops.

--
jamie )

"There's a seeker born every minute."

jamie
January 28th 04, 06:38 PM
S.A.Smitherman > wrote:
> I don't recommend flea collars and drops etc because some have been known to
> cause cats to have toxic reactions such as seizures. The best that we have
> used is a product called "Flea-Busters". It may not be available there but
> you may be able to get it from your vet or over the internet. Basically it
> is composed of boric acid and baking soda. The boric acid is the main
> active ingredient. The baking soda is basically used to help disperse the

Boric acid, picked up on their feet and licked off is a good deal more
toxic than flea drops.

--
jamie )

"There's a seeker born every minute."

~*Connie*~
January 31st 04, 04:04 PM
totally not true. Boric acid is extremely toxic, which is why there is a
skull and cross bone on the container!!! if you put it on your carpet,
regardless if you rub it in or not, its going to get on your cat and your
cat will ingest it!!!

Over the counter drops have a very high rate of cats having reactions, and I
wouldn't recommend it on even a bad day, but I would over what you are
suggesting. Anything gotten from a vet though is VERY safe. Frontline and
advantage get into the oil glands and is redistributed that way (it does not
get into the blood)

"Smitty" > wrote in message
...
> That is why you must rub it in. It less toxic than flea drops when it is
> rubbed into the carpet and sits at the base of the pile where the fleas
are!
>
>

~*Connie*~
January 31st 04, 04:04 PM
totally not true. Boric acid is extremely toxic, which is why there is a
skull and cross bone on the container!!! if you put it on your carpet,
regardless if you rub it in or not, its going to get on your cat and your
cat will ingest it!!!

Over the counter drops have a very high rate of cats having reactions, and I
wouldn't recommend it on even a bad day, but I would over what you are
suggesting. Anything gotten from a vet though is VERY safe. Frontline and
advantage get into the oil glands and is redistributed that way (it does not
get into the blood)

"Smitty" > wrote in message
...
> That is why you must rub it in. It less toxic than flea drops when it is
> rubbed into the carpet and sits at the base of the pile where the fleas
are!
>
>

Smitty
January 31st 04, 04:25 PM
That is why you must rub it in. It less toxic than flea drops when it is
rubbed into the carpet and sits at the base of the pile where the fleas are!

Smitty
January 31st 04, 04:25 PM
That is why you must rub it in. It less toxic than flea drops when it is
rubbed into the carpet and sits at the base of the pile where the fleas are!

Smitty
February 7th 04, 02:10 AM
You rub it into the carpet... not the cat! It kills the fleas at the base
of the carpet. If it weren't safe it wouldn't be recommended by our
veterinarian and marketed as a flea killer under the name of "Flea Busters".
It works. We have used it with absolutely no ill effects. When the fleas
are eradicated from the carpets then the ones in the cats fur eventually
diminish also, and no chemicals have been applied to the animal !!!

Smitty
February 7th 04, 02:10 AM
You rub it into the carpet... not the cat! It kills the fleas at the base
of the carpet. If it weren't safe it wouldn't be recommended by our
veterinarian and marketed as a flea killer under the name of "Flea Busters".
It works. We have used it with absolutely no ill effects. When the fleas
are eradicated from the carpets then the ones in the cats fur eventually
diminish also, and no chemicals have been applied to the animal !!!