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Tristan Miller
February 2nd 04, 07:10 PM
Greetings.

Every day it doesn't rain, I take my ferret for a walk, either with a leash
in the city or without a leash in the forest. As I mentioned in a previous
post, I'm thinking of getting a cat too, and was wondering about the
feasibility of it joining us for the walks.

I have seen some people taking their cat for walks on leashes. I've tried
to do the same with my grandparents' cat but didn't have much success. Can
all cats eventually be trained to do this, or is it something only certain
felines take to? If the former, what's the best technique of teaching
them? I plan on getting a kitten, so I'm hopeful that teaching it from an
early age will help.

Also, is it at all feasible to take a cat for a walk in the forest without a
leash, or will it run off or get stuck up a tree?

Regards,
Tristan

--
_
_V.-o Tristan Miller [en,(fr,de,ia)] >< Space is limited
/ |`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard
(7_\\ http://www.nothingisreal.com/ >< To finish what you

Ted Davis
February 2nd 04, 09:46 PM
On Mon, 02 Feb 2004 20:10:04 +0100, Tristan Miller
> wrote:

>Greetings.
>
>Every day it doesn't rain, I take my ferret for a walk, either with a leash
>in the city or without a leash in the forest. As I mentioned in a previous
>post, I'm thinking of getting a cat too, and was wondering about the
>feasibility of it joining us for the walks.
>
>I have seen some people taking their cat for walks on leashes. I've tried
>to do the same with my grandparents' cat but didn't have much success. Can
>all cats eventually be trained to do this, or is it something only certain
>felines take to? If the former, what's the best technique of teaching
>them? I plan on getting a kitten, so I'm hopeful that teaching it from an
>early age will help.

I had good success one time with young cats - the older one wanted no
part of it. Some cats never adapt to a harness.

Suggestions for training generally involve letting the cat get used to
wearing the harness for a week or two, for longer periods each day.
Then a light leash is attached and the cat is allowed, again of a week
or more, to the leash being attached to the harness, but not to
anything else. Eventually the leash can be held for ever longer
periods until the cat gets used to the idea of being restrained. Then
comes the fun: taking a terrified indoor cat outside, leash or no
leash, the cat will probably try to runn away and hide (or climb you).

>
>Also, is it at all feasible to take a cat for a walk in the forest without a
>leash, or will it run off or get stuck up a tree?

I take my cats for walks in fields and woods, but they already know
the territory from having explored it on their own. They will follow
me into new areas and not get lost or stranded, but they are already
familiar with similar areas closer to home and can be counted on to
find their way back. Indoor cats are a completely different matter
and have to be protected and guarded by their human. Indoor cats are
best left indoors, except for excursions on enclosed porches or
carefully supervised balconies.


T.E.D. )
SPAM filter: Messages to this address *must* contain "T.E.D."
somewhere in the body or they will be automatically rejected.

Ted Davis
February 2nd 04, 09:46 PM
On Mon, 02 Feb 2004 20:10:04 +0100, Tristan Miller
> wrote:

>Greetings.
>
>Every day it doesn't rain, I take my ferret for a walk, either with a leash
>in the city or without a leash in the forest. As I mentioned in a previous
>post, I'm thinking of getting a cat too, and was wondering about the
>feasibility of it joining us for the walks.
>
>I have seen some people taking their cat for walks on leashes. I've tried
>to do the same with my grandparents' cat but didn't have much success. Can
>all cats eventually be trained to do this, or is it something only certain
>felines take to? If the former, what's the best technique of teaching
>them? I plan on getting a kitten, so I'm hopeful that teaching it from an
>early age will help.

I had good success one time with young cats - the older one wanted no
part of it. Some cats never adapt to a harness.

Suggestions for training generally involve letting the cat get used to
wearing the harness for a week or two, for longer periods each day.
Then a light leash is attached and the cat is allowed, again of a week
or more, to the leash being attached to the harness, but not to
anything else. Eventually the leash can be held for ever longer
periods until the cat gets used to the idea of being restrained. Then
comes the fun: taking a terrified indoor cat outside, leash or no
leash, the cat will probably try to runn away and hide (or climb you).

>
>Also, is it at all feasible to take a cat for a walk in the forest without a
>leash, or will it run off or get stuck up a tree?

I take my cats for walks in fields and woods, but they already know
the territory from having explored it on their own. They will follow
me into new areas and not get lost or stranded, but they are already
familiar with similar areas closer to home and can be counted on to
find their way back. Indoor cats are a completely different matter
and have to be protected and guarded by their human. Indoor cats are
best left indoors, except for excursions on enclosed porches or
carefully supervised balconies.


T.E.D. )
SPAM filter: Messages to this address *must* contain "T.E.D."
somewhere in the body or they will be automatically rejected.

Yngver
February 2nd 04, 10:09 PM
Tristan Miller wrote:

>Every day it doesn't rain, I take my ferret for a walk, either with a leash
>in the city or without a leash in the forest. As I mentioned in a previous
>post, I'm thinking of getting a cat too, and was wondering about the
>feasibility of it joining us for the walks.

Depends on the personality of the cat, and probably partially on how well it
gets on with the ferret.
>
>I have seen some people taking their cat for walks on leashes. I've tried
>to do the same with my grandparents' cat but didn't have much success. Can
>all cats eventually be trained to do this, or is it something only certain
>felines take to? If the former, what's the best technique of teaching
>them? I plan on getting a kitten, so I'm hopeful that teaching it from an
>early age will help.

If you are getting a kitten, I think you will have pretty good luck in teaching
it to walk on a leash. Both of our older cats were leash trained while kittens
and they enjoy walks in the woods. We did recently adopt an adult stray cat,
and she is not very happy with the leash. I admit I haven't tried too hard with
her because it's been cold, but I think with adults it does take a lot more
patience to get them used to leash walking.
>
>Also, is it at all feasible to take a cat for a walk in the forest without a
>leash, or will it run off or get stuck up a tree?
>
Ours don't. Our cat who enjoys leash walking the most (the other one sort of
just follows her) loves to walk along any path or trail we find. She's never
tried to run off--although she does stop to stare when she sees a squirrel or
bird--and she's never attempted to go up a tree. The other cat, as I said,
basically just follows the first cat--she's not very adventurous, but she wants
to do what the other cat does.

My opinion is that you can teach a kitten just about anything. The fact that
your ferret is already used to leash-training will likely demonstrate to the
kitten how to behave on the leash, and I'd bet the kitten will want to go
wherever the ferret goes anyway. Have fun--we all, human and cat both, enjoy
our walks in the woods.

Yngver
February 2nd 04, 10:09 PM
Tristan Miller wrote:

>Every day it doesn't rain, I take my ferret for a walk, either with a leash
>in the city or without a leash in the forest. As I mentioned in a previous
>post, I'm thinking of getting a cat too, and was wondering about the
>feasibility of it joining us for the walks.

Depends on the personality of the cat, and probably partially on how well it
gets on with the ferret.
>
>I have seen some people taking their cat for walks on leashes. I've tried
>to do the same with my grandparents' cat but didn't have much success. Can
>all cats eventually be trained to do this, or is it something only certain
>felines take to? If the former, what's the best technique of teaching
>them? I plan on getting a kitten, so I'm hopeful that teaching it from an
>early age will help.

If you are getting a kitten, I think you will have pretty good luck in teaching
it to walk on a leash. Both of our older cats were leash trained while kittens
and they enjoy walks in the woods. We did recently adopt an adult stray cat,
and she is not very happy with the leash. I admit I haven't tried too hard with
her because it's been cold, but I think with adults it does take a lot more
patience to get them used to leash walking.
>
>Also, is it at all feasible to take a cat for a walk in the forest without a
>leash, or will it run off or get stuck up a tree?
>
Ours don't. Our cat who enjoys leash walking the most (the other one sort of
just follows her) loves to walk along any path or trail we find. She's never
tried to run off--although she does stop to stare when she sees a squirrel or
bird--and she's never attempted to go up a tree. The other cat, as I said,
basically just follows the first cat--she's not very adventurous, but she wants
to do what the other cat does.

My opinion is that you can teach a kitten just about anything. The fact that
your ferret is already used to leash-training will likely demonstrate to the
kitten how to behave on the leash, and I'd bet the kitten will want to go
wherever the ferret goes anyway. Have fun--we all, human and cat both, enjoy
our walks in the woods.

Gee
February 5th 04, 03:29 AM
"Tristan Miller" > wrote in message
...
> Greetings.
>
> Every day it doesn't rain, I take my ferret for a walk, either with a
leash
> in the city or without a leash in the forest. As I mentioned in a
previous
> post, I'm thinking of getting a cat too, and was wondering about the
> feasibility of it joining us for the walks.
>
> I have seen some people taking their cat for walks on leashes. I've tried
> to do the same with my grandparents' cat but didn't have much success.

I got 4 cats. Since QT got run over others became indoor cats with leash
outings. Luckily I trained them all from kittenhood to walk on leash, so
they are completely comfortable with it. However Charlie, who was a stray
and moved himself in, is not having any of it. He absolutely hates the
harness, but I think it;s probably becuase I believe he was at some point
involved in some accident and his back is still sensitive to touch. Or maybe
becuase he never had a "restraint" on his body :)

Can
> all cats eventually be trained to do this, or is it something only certain
> felines take to? If the former, what's the best technique of teaching
> them? I plan on getting a kitten, so I'm hopeful that teaching it from an
> early age will help.

Definitly. Get a cat used to cat collar first. Then put the harness on it
and either go cold turkey and leave the harness on (as kitten will get used
to it quickly like to a collar) or do it gradually, which may just prolong
it. Make sure harness at first is loose enough not to restrain the cat too
much and slowly tighten it up. Once its comfy with it, attach leash and let
him/her run around with it. Finally start walking it outdoors.It will be
more interested in new smells and birds and bees then the harness :)

Check this:
http://cats.about.com/library/howto/htwalkleash.htm

> Also, is it at all feasible to take a cat for a walk in the forest without
a
> leash, or will it run off or get stuck up a tree?

If a cat doesn;t know the territory, i strongly advise you don;t let it off
the leash. It may not find home again, also the "freedom" is not all cracked
up to be.

Gee

Gee
February 5th 04, 03:29 AM
"Tristan Miller" > wrote in message
...
> Greetings.
>
> Every day it doesn't rain, I take my ferret for a walk, either with a
leash
> in the city or without a leash in the forest. As I mentioned in a
previous
> post, I'm thinking of getting a cat too, and was wondering about the
> feasibility of it joining us for the walks.
>
> I have seen some people taking their cat for walks on leashes. I've tried
> to do the same with my grandparents' cat but didn't have much success.

I got 4 cats. Since QT got run over others became indoor cats with leash
outings. Luckily I trained them all from kittenhood to walk on leash, so
they are completely comfortable with it. However Charlie, who was a stray
and moved himself in, is not having any of it. He absolutely hates the
harness, but I think it;s probably becuase I believe he was at some point
involved in some accident and his back is still sensitive to touch. Or maybe
becuase he never had a "restraint" on his body :)

Can
> all cats eventually be trained to do this, or is it something only certain
> felines take to? If the former, what's the best technique of teaching
> them? I plan on getting a kitten, so I'm hopeful that teaching it from an
> early age will help.

Definitly. Get a cat used to cat collar first. Then put the harness on it
and either go cold turkey and leave the harness on (as kitten will get used
to it quickly like to a collar) or do it gradually, which may just prolong
it. Make sure harness at first is loose enough not to restrain the cat too
much and slowly tighten it up. Once its comfy with it, attach leash and let
him/her run around with it. Finally start walking it outdoors.It will be
more interested in new smells and birds and bees then the harness :)

Check this:
http://cats.about.com/library/howto/htwalkleash.htm

> Also, is it at all feasible to take a cat for a walk in the forest without
a
> leash, or will it run off or get stuck up a tree?

If a cat doesn;t know the territory, i strongly advise you don;t let it off
the leash. It may not find home again, also the "freedom" is not all cracked
up to be.

Gee

Bob Brenchley.
February 5th 04, 03:19 PM
On Thu, 5 Feb 2004 03:29:16 -0000, "Gee" > wrote:

>
>"Tristan Miller" > wrote in message
...
>> Greetings.
>>
>> Every day it doesn't rain, I take my ferret for a walk, either with a
>leash
>> in the city or without a leash in the forest. As I mentioned in a
>previous
>> post, I'm thinking of getting a cat too, and was wondering about the
>> feasibility of it joining us for the walks.
>>
>> I have seen some people taking their cat for walks on leashes. I've tried
>> to do the same with my grandparents' cat but didn't have much success.
>
>I got 4 cats. Since QT got run over others became indoor cats with leash
>outings.

And you have been exposed as a very sick animal abuser so often in the
past you should have learnt your lesson by now.

> Luckily I trained them all from kittenhood to walk on leash, so
>they are completely comfortable with it.

systematic abuse from an early age is not acceptable to British cat
owners - one reason so many of them have flamed you in the past.

If you live in an area where, for whatever reason, you feel unable to
allow a healthy cat its freedom to roam for at least some time each
day (and only you can judge your area) then don't have a cat. To have
a healthy cat, knowing you will keep it in 24/7 marks you are being
cruel, selfish, or both.

--
Bob.

I see you've set aside this special time to humiliate yourself in
public.

Bob Brenchley.
February 5th 04, 03:19 PM
On Thu, 5 Feb 2004 03:29:16 -0000, "Gee" > wrote:

>
>"Tristan Miller" > wrote in message
...
>> Greetings.
>>
>> Every day it doesn't rain, I take my ferret for a walk, either with a
>leash
>> in the city or without a leash in the forest. As I mentioned in a
>previous
>> post, I'm thinking of getting a cat too, and was wondering about the
>> feasibility of it joining us for the walks.
>>
>> I have seen some people taking their cat for walks on leashes. I've tried
>> to do the same with my grandparents' cat but didn't have much success.
>
>I got 4 cats. Since QT got run over others became indoor cats with leash
>outings.

And you have been exposed as a very sick animal abuser so often in the
past you should have learnt your lesson by now.

> Luckily I trained them all from kittenhood to walk on leash, so
>they are completely comfortable with it.

systematic abuse from an early age is not acceptable to British cat
owners - one reason so many of them have flamed you in the past.

If you live in an area where, for whatever reason, you feel unable to
allow a healthy cat its freedom to roam for at least some time each
day (and only you can judge your area) then don't have a cat. To have
a healthy cat, knowing you will keep it in 24/7 marks you are being
cruel, selfish, or both.

--
Bob.

I see you've set aside this special time to humiliate yourself in
public.

Gee
February 6th 04, 12:48 AM
> >I got 4 cats. Since QT got run over others became indoor cats with leash
> >outings.
>
> And you have been exposed as a very sick animal abuser so often in the
> past you should have learnt your lesson by now.

You are talking about yourself again Bobbit. You may think I am an animal
abuser because I keep my cats indoors, but strangely NOBODY else does. So
you can call me any names you want, (come to think of it, you call everybody
who disagrees with you names LOL) and I will only laugh at you. Like I am
right now reading your trollful post again.

What is it, got shunned from one newsgroup so are now bugging people in
other cat newsgroups. I know dear, it's not fun when nobody wants to talk to
you. He he.

> > Luckily I trained them all from kittenhood to walk on leash, so
> >they are completely comfortable with it.
>
> systematic abuse from an early age is not acceptable to British cat
> owners - one reason so many of them have flamed you in the past.

LOL, good try Bobbit, but you are talking about yourself again, and only
making me laugh at you. You keep forgetting that everybody knows YOU more
then well. Hence everybody killfiling you everywhere you go. And now I will
killfile you in this group as well. You ain't worth my bother.Talk to the
hand.

You are the weakest link. Goodbye.

Gee

Gee
February 6th 04, 12:48 AM
> >I got 4 cats. Since QT got run over others became indoor cats with leash
> >outings.
>
> And you have been exposed as a very sick animal abuser so often in the
> past you should have learnt your lesson by now.

You are talking about yourself again Bobbit. You may think I am an animal
abuser because I keep my cats indoors, but strangely NOBODY else does. So
you can call me any names you want, (come to think of it, you call everybody
who disagrees with you names LOL) and I will only laugh at you. Like I am
right now reading your trollful post again.

What is it, got shunned from one newsgroup so are now bugging people in
other cat newsgroups. I know dear, it's not fun when nobody wants to talk to
you. He he.

> > Luckily I trained them all from kittenhood to walk on leash, so
> >they are completely comfortable with it.
>
> systematic abuse from an early age is not acceptable to British cat
> owners - one reason so many of them have flamed you in the past.

LOL, good try Bobbit, but you are talking about yourself again, and only
making me laugh at you. You keep forgetting that everybody knows YOU more
then well. Hence everybody killfiling you everywhere you go. And now I will
killfile you in this group as well. You ain't worth my bother.Talk to the
hand.

You are the weakest link. Goodbye.

Gee