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Mat Overton
February 3rd 04, 10:54 AM
Having kept the cat indoors for the first 4 weeks I have finally let it out
(thankfully it returned!) Once the cat starts going out, is it safe to
remove the litter tray completely? Will the cat go outside automatically or
should I leave it in place and hope she goes outside of her own volition?

Ted Davis
February 3rd 04, 02:52 PM
On Tue, 3 Feb 2004 09:54:01 -0000, "Mat Overton"
> wrote:

>Having kept the cat indoors for the first 4 weeks I have finally let it out
>(thankfully it returned!) Once the cat starts going out, is it safe to
>remove the litter tray completely? Will the cat go outside automatically or
>should I leave it in place and hope she goes outside of her own volition?
>

My dozen or so cats require at least five litter pans, even though
they are completely free to come and go as they please. Some of them
haven't been outside in two weeks, a few since it started getting cold
in November. If I remove the litter pans, and it's cold or raining,
one uses my bed, others use papers on my desk (with or without pushing
them to the floor first), and yet others just use the carpet or
baskets of dirty clothes and towels. A couple of them prefer the
outdoors even in bad weather.



T.E.D. )
SPAM filter: Messages to this address *must* contain "T.E.D."
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Ted Davis
February 3rd 04, 02:52 PM
On Tue, 3 Feb 2004 09:54:01 -0000, "Mat Overton"
> wrote:

>Having kept the cat indoors for the first 4 weeks I have finally let it out
>(thankfully it returned!) Once the cat starts going out, is it safe to
>remove the litter tray completely? Will the cat go outside automatically or
>should I leave it in place and hope she goes outside of her own volition?
>

My dozen or so cats require at least five litter pans, even though
they are completely free to come and go as they please. Some of them
haven't been outside in two weeks, a few since it started getting cold
in November. If I remove the litter pans, and it's cold or raining,
one uses my bed, others use papers on my desk (with or without pushing
them to the floor first), and yet others just use the carpet or
baskets of dirty clothes and towels. A couple of them prefer the
outdoors even in bad weather.



T.E.D. )
SPAM filter: Messages to this address *must* contain "T.E.D."
somewhere in the body or they will be automatically rejected.

Bob Brenchley.
February 3rd 04, 05:07 PM
On Tue, 3 Feb 2004 09:54:01 -0000, "Mat Overton"
> wrote:

>Having kept the cat indoors for the first 4 weeks I have finally let it out
>(thankfully it returned!) Once the cat starts going out, is it safe to
>remove the litter tray completely? Will the cat go outside automatically or
>should I leave it in place and hope she goes outside of her own volition?

It is a question of time, and the cat. None of mine have ever needed a
litter tray except when they are either ill, or the weather is
extreme. Even in very bad weather they would rather go out an use a
litter tray in the shed than do it indoors. Cats hate to foul their
own dens, and indoors is their den as far as they are concerned.

One thing though, I've found that if you have to keep a cat indoors
because it is ill, it is best to start off using garden soil rather
than the commercial litters, gradually over a week mixing more of the
commercial litter in until you effect the change. I've watched rescue
cats walk around in obvious discomfort because they would not use the
litter provided in the shelter. My local vet now buys sterilized
top-soil (used in greenhouses) in very large bags to cope with any cat
who dislikes commercial litters.

--
Bob.

Cat's motto: No matter what you've done wrong, always try to make it
look like the dog did it.

Bob Brenchley.
February 3rd 04, 05:07 PM
On Tue, 3 Feb 2004 09:54:01 -0000, "Mat Overton"
> wrote:

>Having kept the cat indoors for the first 4 weeks I have finally let it out
>(thankfully it returned!) Once the cat starts going out, is it safe to
>remove the litter tray completely? Will the cat go outside automatically or
>should I leave it in place and hope she goes outside of her own volition?

It is a question of time, and the cat. None of mine have ever needed a
litter tray except when they are either ill, or the weather is
extreme. Even in very bad weather they would rather go out an use a
litter tray in the shed than do it indoors. Cats hate to foul their
own dens, and indoors is their den as far as they are concerned.

One thing though, I've found that if you have to keep a cat indoors
because it is ill, it is best to start off using garden soil rather
than the commercial litters, gradually over a week mixing more of the
commercial litter in until you effect the change. I've watched rescue
cats walk around in obvious discomfort because they would not use the
litter provided in the shelter. My local vet now buys sterilized
top-soil (used in greenhouses) in very large bags to cope with any cat
who dislikes commercial litters.

--
Bob.

Cat's motto: No matter what you've done wrong, always try to make it
look like the dog did it.