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mooninpappa
February 22nd 04, 01:47 PM
Just been reading the contents of a tin of Whiskas cat food. prolly the most
popular in UK.
With 80% water !
I know why my little Mr m0zZy don't drink much.

David Stevenson
February 22nd 04, 04:26 PM
mooninpappa wrote
>Just been reading the contents of a tin of Whiskas cat food. prolly the most
>popular in UK.
>With 80% water !
>I know why my little Mr m0zZy don't drink much.

Have you ever purchased and eaten margarine? Do you realise that is
82% water?

--
David Stevenson Storypage: http://blakjak.com/sty_menu.htm
Liverpool, England, UK > Emails welcome
Nanki Poo: SI Bp+W B 10 Y L+ W++ C+ I T+ A- E H++ V- F Q P B+ PA+ PL+ SC
Minke: SI W+Cp B 1 Y++ L-- W- C+

David Stevenson
February 22nd 04, 04:26 PM
mooninpappa wrote
>Just been reading the contents of a tin of Whiskas cat food. prolly the most
>popular in UK.
>With 80% water !
>I know why my little Mr m0zZy don't drink much.

Have you ever purchased and eaten margarine? Do you realise that is
82% water?

--
David Stevenson Storypage: http://blakjak.com/sty_menu.htm
Liverpool, England, UK > Emails welcome
Nanki Poo: SI Bp+W B 10 Y L+ W++ C+ I T+ A- E H++ V- F Q P B+ PA+ PL+ SC
Minke: SI W+Cp B 1 Y++ L-- W- C+

---MIKE---
February 22nd 04, 07:13 PM
That's the big advantage of canned cat food. The cat gets plenty of
water that becomes urine. This helps prevent urinary crystals. My cats
hardly drink any water (I have 5 bowls and a fountain).


-MIKE

---MIKE---
February 22nd 04, 07:13 PM
That's the big advantage of canned cat food. The cat gets plenty of
water that becomes urine. This helps prevent urinary crystals. My cats
hardly drink any water (I have 5 bowls and a fountain).


-MIKE

whayface
February 24th 04, 01:02 AM
On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 15:26:44 +0000 (UTC), David Stevenson > wrote:

>>Just been reading the contents of a tin of Whiskas cat food. prolly the most
>>popular in UK.
>>With 80% water !
>>I know why my little Mr m0zZy don't drink much.


Dry Matter Value Forumula
Look at the "Guaranteed Analysis" on a label
Subtract the moisture percentage from 100
Divide the resulting figure into the crude protein figure (disregard decimals when
dividing)
The result will be a close approximation of protein by dry matter value

(You can use the same formula to calculate the percentage of fat or fiber by dry matter
value.)

Example:

Here are figures from three different cat foods I happened to have on hand. They are from
three different manufacturers, which shall remain anonymous for purpose of this exercise.


Brand A Premium Canned Food: Protein, 8.5% | Moisture, 78%
Brand B Premium Dry Food: Protein, 32% | Moisture, 10%
Brand C "Supermarket Brand" Canned Food: Protein, 10% | Moisture: 78%

Brand A: Using the formula above, and subtracting the moisture from 100%, we divide the
remainder, 22 into the 8.5 protein content for a result of 38.5% protein by dry matter.

Brand B: 100 minus 10 equals 90, divided into 32 gives us 35.5%.

Brand C: 100 minus 78 equals 22 divided into 10 for 45%.

You can see in the example given that the two canned food brands contain more dry matter
protein content than Brand B, a dry food, which at first glance seems to contain far more
protein. In fact, by this test alone, one might think that Brand C (the "supermarket"
brand) is superior for protein content.

Not so fast!

Actually, the first two listed ingredients on Brand C's label are "meat by-products," and
"poultry by-products," which were listed under "What to Avoid" in the first part of this
series. The protein quality of this "supermarket" brand simply does not make the cut.

The 95%, 25%, 3% Rules

AAFCO has provided certain other rules for "truth in advertising" in cat foods. Don't let
those fancy designations such as "gourmet" or "feast" slip one past you. With these rules
you'll know at least the minimum your cat is getting of the advertised ingredient.
Here are the rules:
The 95% Rule
A cat food may not be labeled simply "Chicken for Cats," or "Chicken Cat Food," unless it
contains 95% or more chicken by total weight of the product.
The 25% Rule
Foods labeled "Chicken Entre," "Chicken Dinner," "Chicken Feast," or the like, must
contain 25% to 95% chicken. Combinations, such as "Chicken and Beef Dinner" must contain a
total of 25% to 95% of the combined meats, listed in order of quantity, and the second
meat listed must comprise at least 3% of the total weight. (Imagine ordering a "steak and
lobster" dinner and finding the "lobster" will barely fill a fork.)
The 3% Rule
A food labelled "Kitty Stew with Chicken" must contain 3% or more chicken. ("With" is the
optimum word here.)
"Flavor"
Barely worth mentioning here, but if you see something similar to "chicken flavored," be
assured that the product is unlikely to contain any chicken at all, as long as there is a
"sufficiently detectable" amount of chicken flavor. Since these "flavors" may be the
result of digests or by-products of the named animal, I'd avoid these at all costs.

whayface
February 24th 04, 01:02 AM
On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 15:26:44 +0000 (UTC), David Stevenson > wrote:

>>Just been reading the contents of a tin of Whiskas cat food. prolly the most
>>popular in UK.
>>With 80% water !
>>I know why my little Mr m0zZy don't drink much.


Dry Matter Value Forumula
Look at the "Guaranteed Analysis" on a label
Subtract the moisture percentage from 100
Divide the resulting figure into the crude protein figure (disregard decimals when
dividing)
The result will be a close approximation of protein by dry matter value

(You can use the same formula to calculate the percentage of fat or fiber by dry matter
value.)

Example:

Here are figures from three different cat foods I happened to have on hand. They are from
three different manufacturers, which shall remain anonymous for purpose of this exercise.


Brand A Premium Canned Food: Protein, 8.5% | Moisture, 78%
Brand B Premium Dry Food: Protein, 32% | Moisture, 10%
Brand C "Supermarket Brand" Canned Food: Protein, 10% | Moisture: 78%

Brand A: Using the formula above, and subtracting the moisture from 100%, we divide the
remainder, 22 into the 8.5 protein content for a result of 38.5% protein by dry matter.

Brand B: 100 minus 10 equals 90, divided into 32 gives us 35.5%.

Brand C: 100 minus 78 equals 22 divided into 10 for 45%.

You can see in the example given that the two canned food brands contain more dry matter
protein content than Brand B, a dry food, which at first glance seems to contain far more
protein. In fact, by this test alone, one might think that Brand C (the "supermarket"
brand) is superior for protein content.

Not so fast!

Actually, the first two listed ingredients on Brand C's label are "meat by-products," and
"poultry by-products," which were listed under "What to Avoid" in the first part of this
series. The protein quality of this "supermarket" brand simply does not make the cut.

The 95%, 25%, 3% Rules

AAFCO has provided certain other rules for "truth in advertising" in cat foods. Don't let
those fancy designations such as "gourmet" or "feast" slip one past you. With these rules
you'll know at least the minimum your cat is getting of the advertised ingredient.
Here are the rules:
The 95% Rule
A cat food may not be labeled simply "Chicken for Cats," or "Chicken Cat Food," unless it
contains 95% or more chicken by total weight of the product.
The 25% Rule
Foods labeled "Chicken Entre," "Chicken Dinner," "Chicken Feast," or the like, must
contain 25% to 95% chicken. Combinations, such as "Chicken and Beef Dinner" must contain a
total of 25% to 95% of the combined meats, listed in order of quantity, and the second
meat listed must comprise at least 3% of the total weight. (Imagine ordering a "steak and
lobster" dinner and finding the "lobster" will barely fill a fork.)
The 3% Rule
A food labelled "Kitty Stew with Chicken" must contain 3% or more chicken. ("With" is the
optimum word here.)
"Flavor"
Barely worth mentioning here, but if you see something similar to "chicken flavored," be
assured that the product is unlikely to contain any chicken at all, as long as there is a
"sufficiently detectable" amount of chicken flavor. Since these "flavors" may be the
result of digests or by-products of the named animal, I'd avoid these at all costs.