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David Wright
April 2nd 04, 11:06 PM
Hello,

Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two cats
bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.

Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have never
brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and became
the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and two
frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up in the
morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!

With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats again,
so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that enjoyable
really!

We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is), or
lock them outside, but we might have to...

Thanks,
David.

ps. Please excuse the cross-posting, there are just too many great cat
newsgroups!!

'cedes
April 2nd 04, 11:23 PM
There is no stopping the sacrificial gifting. As long as they are allowed
outdoors, they are going to attempt to bring you "gifts".
A funny story; I don't allow my cats outdoors at all, but I have a huge
enclosed patio that they think is "outdoors. Yesterday I awoke from a nap,
to find a dismembered bird in bed with me, and all my cats snoozing soundly.
This is the second time in two years that this has happened. The largest gap
in the wire meshed-in patio, is a 1 inch gap betwwen the base and the frame
of the wire. We are clueless as to HOW these birds how squeezed in to meet
their doom. In any event, I truly can't stop my cats from doing this, IF a
bird makes it's way into our patio, but you can probably curtail their
activity, by either keeping them indoors at night, OR making them some sort
of secure enclosure on your house, so that they can not obtain their prey.

http://www.cat-world.com.au/cat-worldenclosures.htm


"David Wright" > wrote in message
...
> Hello,
>
> Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two
cats
> bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
>
> Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have never
> brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and became
> the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and two
> frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
> normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up in
the
> morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!
>
> With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
> avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats
again,
> so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
> noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
> pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that
enjoyable
> really!
>
> We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is),
or
> lock them outside, but we might have to...
>
> Thanks,
> David.
>
> ps. Please excuse the cross-posting, there are just too many great cat
> newsgroups!!
>
>

'cedes
April 2nd 04, 11:23 PM
There is no stopping the sacrificial gifting. As long as they are allowed
outdoors, they are going to attempt to bring you "gifts".
A funny story; I don't allow my cats outdoors at all, but I have a huge
enclosed patio that they think is "outdoors. Yesterday I awoke from a nap,
to find a dismembered bird in bed with me, and all my cats snoozing soundly.
This is the second time in two years that this has happened. The largest gap
in the wire meshed-in patio, is a 1 inch gap betwwen the base and the frame
of the wire. We are clueless as to HOW these birds how squeezed in to meet
their doom. In any event, I truly can't stop my cats from doing this, IF a
bird makes it's way into our patio, but you can probably curtail their
activity, by either keeping them indoors at night, OR making them some sort
of secure enclosure on your house, so that they can not obtain their prey.

http://www.cat-world.com.au/cat-worldenclosures.htm


"David Wright" > wrote in message
...
> Hello,
>
> Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two
cats
> bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
>
> Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have never
> brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and became
> the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and two
> frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
> normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up in
the
> morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!
>
> With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
> avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats
again,
> so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
> noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
> pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that
enjoyable
> really!
>
> We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is),
or
> lock them outside, but we might have to...
>
> Thanks,
> David.
>
> ps. Please excuse the cross-posting, there are just too many great cat
> newsgroups!!
>
>

m. L. Briggs
April 2nd 04, 11:27 PM
On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 23:06:52 +0100, "David Wright"
> wrote:

>Hello,
>
>Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two cats
>bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
>
>Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have never
>brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and became
>the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and two
>frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
>normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up in the
>morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!
>
>With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
>avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats again,
>so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
>noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
>pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that enjoyable
>really!
>
>We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is), or
>lock them outside, but we might have to...
>
>Thanks,
>David.
>
>ps. Please excuse the cross-posting, there are just too many great cat
>newsgroups!!
>
It would probably be best to keep them indoors. Cats will stay
cleaner and wonm't bring in germy things.

m. L. Briggs
April 2nd 04, 11:27 PM
On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 23:06:52 +0100, "David Wright"
> wrote:

>Hello,
>
>Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two cats
>bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
>
>Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have never
>brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and became
>the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and two
>frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
>normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up in the
>morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!
>
>With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
>avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats again,
>so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
>noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
>pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that enjoyable
>really!
>
>We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is), or
>lock them outside, but we might have to...
>
>Thanks,
>David.
>
>ps. Please excuse the cross-posting, there are just too many great cat
>newsgroups!!
>
It would probably be best to keep them indoors. Cats will stay
cleaner and wonm't bring in germy things.

Andy Martin
April 3rd 04, 01:27 AM
I have a 3 legged cat who cant stretch to birds but often digs up worms and
offers them instead!


"'cedes" > wrote in message
...
> There is no stopping the sacrificial gifting. As long as they are allowed
> outdoors, they are going to attempt to bring you "gifts".
> A funny story; I don't allow my cats outdoors at all, but I have a huge
> enclosed patio that they think is "outdoors. Yesterday I awoke from a nap,
> to find a dismembered bird in bed with me, and all my cats snoozing
soundly.
> This is the second time in two years that this has happened. The largest
gap
> in the wire meshed-in patio, is a 1 inch gap betwwen the base and the
frame
> of the wire. We are clueless as to HOW these birds how squeezed in to meet
> their doom. In any event, I truly can't stop my cats from doing this, IF a
> bird makes it's way into our patio, but you can probably curtail their
> activity, by either keeping them indoors at night, OR making them some
sort
> of secure enclosure on your house, so that they can not obtain their prey.
>
> http://www.cat-world.com.au/cat-worldenclosures.htm
>
>
> "David Wright" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Hello,
> >
> > Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two
> cats
> > bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
> >
> > Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have never
> > brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and
became
> > the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and
two
> > frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
> > normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up in
> the
> > morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!
> >
> > With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
> > avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats
> again,
> > so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
> > noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
> > pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that
> enjoyable
> > really!
> >
> > We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door
is),
> or
> > lock them outside, but we might have to...
> >
> > Thanks,
> > David.
> >
> > ps. Please excuse the cross-posting, there are just too many great cat
> > newsgroups!!
> >
> >
>
>

Andy Martin
April 3rd 04, 01:27 AM
I have a 3 legged cat who cant stretch to birds but often digs up worms and
offers them instead!


"'cedes" > wrote in message
...
> There is no stopping the sacrificial gifting. As long as they are allowed
> outdoors, they are going to attempt to bring you "gifts".
> A funny story; I don't allow my cats outdoors at all, but I have a huge
> enclosed patio that they think is "outdoors. Yesterday I awoke from a nap,
> to find a dismembered bird in bed with me, and all my cats snoozing
soundly.
> This is the second time in two years that this has happened. The largest
gap
> in the wire meshed-in patio, is a 1 inch gap betwwen the base and the
frame
> of the wire. We are clueless as to HOW these birds how squeezed in to meet
> their doom. In any event, I truly can't stop my cats from doing this, IF a
> bird makes it's way into our patio, but you can probably curtail their
> activity, by either keeping them indoors at night, OR making them some
sort
> of secure enclosure on your house, so that they can not obtain their prey.
>
> http://www.cat-world.com.au/cat-worldenclosures.htm
>
>
> "David Wright" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Hello,
> >
> > Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two
> cats
> > bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
> >
> > Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have never
> > brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and
became
> > the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and
two
> > frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
> > normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up in
> the
> > morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!
> >
> > With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
> > avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats
> again,
> > so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
> > noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
> > pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that
> enjoyable
> > really!
> >
> > We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door
is),
> or
> > lock them outside, but we might have to...
> >
> > Thanks,
> > David.
> >
> > ps. Please excuse the cross-posting, there are just too many great cat
> > newsgroups!!
> >
> >
>
>

MaryL
April 3rd 04, 04:30 AM
"David Wright" > wrote in message
...
> Hello,
>
> Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two
cats
> bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
>
>
> Thanks,
> David.
>
>

Although it's unpleasant for you, these really are "gifts" from your cats.
I don't know of any to prevent it unless your cats become indoor-only cats
(which would be my preference). My cat, Holly, brings me a gift every
evening. Since she is indoor-only, she brings me a little red leather
mouse -- the same mouse for several months now (and so worn that it is
hardly red any more).

MaryL

MaryL
April 3rd 04, 04:30 AM
"David Wright" > wrote in message
...
> Hello,
>
> Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two
cats
> bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
>
>
> Thanks,
> David.
>
>

Although it's unpleasant for you, these really are "gifts" from your cats.
I don't know of any to prevent it unless your cats become indoor-only cats
(which would be my preference). My cat, Holly, brings me a gift every
evening. Since she is indoor-only, she brings me a little red leather
mouse -- the same mouse for several months now (and so worn that it is
hardly red any more).

MaryL

GovtLawyer
April 3rd 04, 05:19 AM
>We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is), or
>lock them outside, but we might have to..

I know you probably don't want to hear this, but I'll say it anyway. As long
as you let them outside, in their wild state (some prefer this) they will
continue to do this. One day, one of them won't bring you anything, because a
bigger animal will bring him/her home to their brood as a gift.

GovtLawyer
April 3rd 04, 05:19 AM
>We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is), or
>lock them outside, but we might have to..

I know you probably don't want to hear this, but I'll say it anyway. As long
as you let them outside, in their wild state (some prefer this) they will
continue to do this. One day, one of them won't bring you anything, because a
bigger animal will bring him/her home to their brood as a gift.

Judy
April 3rd 04, 05:25 AM
"David Wright" > wrote in message
...
> Hello,
>
> Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two
cats
> bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
>
> Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have never
> brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and became
> the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and two
> frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
> normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up in
the
> morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!
>
> With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
> avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats
again,
> so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
> noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
> pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that
enjoyable
> really!
>
> We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is),

Why not?

>or lock them outside, but we might have to...

I can't imagine how anyone could consider locking cats outside overnight as
being an option.

If you want to nip this thing in the bud - I suggest you either lock them in
the kitchen with access to their door at night, or lock them inside
overnight.

Your cats are displaying a behavior that's considered inappropriate, so it's
up to you do correct this, something I'm sure you'll do when your child
exhibits the same.

I don't have a catdoor, my cat is "in and out." She has a curfew of 10pm.
Though she knows the rules and abides by them, there are moments of protest,
but - such is life. Cats are like kids, and rule are rules.

Good luck with finding the solution to your problem! :c)

Judy & Matilda

Judy
April 3rd 04, 05:25 AM
"David Wright" > wrote in message
...
> Hello,
>
> Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two
cats
> bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
>
> Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have never
> brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and became
> the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and two
> frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
> normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up in
the
> morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!
>
> With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
> avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats
again,
> so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
> noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
> pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that
enjoyable
> really!
>
> We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is),

Why not?

>or lock them outside, but we might have to...

I can't imagine how anyone could consider locking cats outside overnight as
being an option.

If you want to nip this thing in the bud - I suggest you either lock them in
the kitchen with access to their door at night, or lock them inside
overnight.

Your cats are displaying a behavior that's considered inappropriate, so it's
up to you do correct this, something I'm sure you'll do when your child
exhibits the same.

I don't have a catdoor, my cat is "in and out." She has a curfew of 10pm.
Though she knows the rules and abides by them, there are moments of protest,
but - such is life. Cats are like kids, and rule are rules.

Good luck with finding the solution to your problem! :c)

Judy & Matilda

MaryL
April 3rd 04, 05:52 AM
"Judy" > wrote in message
...
>
> "David Wright" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Hello,
> >
> > Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two
> cats
> > bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
> >
> >
> Your cats are displaying a behavior that's considered inappropriate, so
it's
> up to you do correct this, something I'm sure you'll do when your child
> exhibits the same.
>
>
> Judy & Matilda
>
>

No, this is not "inappropriate" behavior -- it is something that we
"hoomins" may not like, but it is perfectly normal behavior for a cat. In
fact, from the cat's perspective, this may be seen as a compliment when the
cat brings gifts. Certainly, it is not something to correct because the cat
will have no way to understand what he or she is being punished or
"corrected" for. In my opinion, this is something that simply has to be
accepted if a person is going to have an indoor/outdoor cat.

MaryL

MaryL
April 3rd 04, 05:52 AM
"Judy" > wrote in message
...
>
> "David Wright" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Hello,
> >
> > Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two
> cats
> > bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
> >
> >
> Your cats are displaying a behavior that's considered inappropriate, so
it's
> up to you do correct this, something I'm sure you'll do when your child
> exhibits the same.
>
>
> Judy & Matilda
>
>

No, this is not "inappropriate" behavior -- it is something that we
"hoomins" may not like, but it is perfectly normal behavior for a cat. In
fact, from the cat's perspective, this may be seen as a compliment when the
cat brings gifts. Certainly, it is not something to correct because the cat
will have no way to understand what he or she is being punished or
"corrected" for. In my opinion, this is something that simply has to be
accepted if a person is going to have an indoor/outdoor cat.

MaryL

rangitotogirl
April 3rd 04, 06:35 AM
> No, this is not "inappropriate" behavior -- it is something that we
> "hoomins" may not like, but it is perfectly normal behavior for a cat. In
> fact, from the cat's perspective, this may be seen as a compliment when
the
> cat brings gifts. Certainly, it is not something to correct because the
cat
> will have no way to understand what he or she is being punished or
> "corrected" for. In my opinion, this is something that simply has to be
> accepted if a person is going to have an indoor/outdoor cat.
>

I was just given a cat care book last weekend and it said that if you did
try to scold them, they would think their gift was inadequate and would
therefore try to find you a better gift.

rangitotogirl
April 3rd 04, 06:35 AM
> No, this is not "inappropriate" behavior -- it is something that we
> "hoomins" may not like, but it is perfectly normal behavior for a cat. In
> fact, from the cat's perspective, this may be seen as a compliment when
the
> cat brings gifts. Certainly, it is not something to correct because the
cat
> will have no way to understand what he or she is being punished or
> "corrected" for. In my opinion, this is something that simply has to be
> accepted if a person is going to have an indoor/outdoor cat.
>

I was just given a cat care book last weekend and it said that if you did
try to scold them, they would think their gift was inadequate and would
therefore try to find you a better gift.

M.C. Mullen
April 3rd 04, 07:47 AM
| With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
| avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats
again,
| so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
| noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
| pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that
enjoyable
| really!
|
| We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is),
or
| lock them outside, but we might have to...
|
| Thanks,
| David.


Please don't lock them outside. How about the kitchen plus another room?
The kitchen with food and water supply plus access to the outside would be a
fair compromise I think.
I need to go to the bathroom in the night but don't like to turn the light
on in order to remain half asleep. Do you know the feeling when stepping
barefoot on one of the gifts?? The present cats are good though, but the
last one was a terrible hunter.

Carola

M.C. Mullen
April 3rd 04, 07:47 AM
| With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
| avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats
again,
| so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
| noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
| pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that
enjoyable
| really!
|
| We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is),
or
| lock them outside, but we might have to...
|
| Thanks,
| David.


Please don't lock them outside. How about the kitchen plus another room?
The kitchen with food and water supply plus access to the outside would be a
fair compromise I think.
I need to go to the bathroom in the night but don't like to turn the light
on in order to remain half asleep. Do you know the feeling when stepping
barefoot on one of the gifts?? The present cats are good though, but the
last one was a terrible hunter.

Carola

Gwenhwyfaer de Tierveil
April 3rd 04, 02:11 PM
Quoth MaryL:
> No, this is not "inappropriate" behavior -- it is something that we
> "hoomins" may not like, but it is perfectly normal behavior for a cat. In
> fact, from the cat's perspective, this may be seen as a compliment when
> the cat brings gifts. Certainly, it is not something to correct because
> the cat will have no way to understand what he or she is being punished or
> "corrected" for. In my opinion, this is something that simply has to be
> accepted if a person is going to have an indoor/outdoor cat.

Not necessarily - my cats are in/out, and they never bring gifts home for
me. Occasionally Calli will bring a mouse home to eat herself, and when I
point out to her that she shouldn't have brought it in she runs back
outside to finish.

I don't think it's a compliment; I think it's a matter of training - as in,
the cat is trying to train you to hunt, in the absence of suitable evidence
that you're capable of doing it yourself (or maybe because the cat notes
that you have "kittens" and need to know how to provide for them?) I don't
know how to persuade a cat otherwise, except to note that my three seem to
think that I'm quite capable of catching my own (and once Blackie and I
caught one in co-operation).

But a thought - do you feed them the odd scrap from your plate at mealtimes?
If so, they may be trying to return the favour... May not be that, but cats
are quite intelligent enough to figure these things out.
--
Gwenhwyfaer (emails need [Private] in header)

some girls wander by themselves

Gwenhwyfaer de Tierveil
April 3rd 04, 02:11 PM
Quoth MaryL:
> No, this is not "inappropriate" behavior -- it is something that we
> "hoomins" may not like, but it is perfectly normal behavior for a cat. In
> fact, from the cat's perspective, this may be seen as a compliment when
> the cat brings gifts. Certainly, it is not something to correct because
> the cat will have no way to understand what he or she is being punished or
> "corrected" for. In my opinion, this is something that simply has to be
> accepted if a person is going to have an indoor/outdoor cat.

Not necessarily - my cats are in/out, and they never bring gifts home for
me. Occasionally Calli will bring a mouse home to eat herself, and when I
point out to her that she shouldn't have brought it in she runs back
outside to finish.

I don't think it's a compliment; I think it's a matter of training - as in,
the cat is trying to train you to hunt, in the absence of suitable evidence
that you're capable of doing it yourself (or maybe because the cat notes
that you have "kittens" and need to know how to provide for them?) I don't
know how to persuade a cat otherwise, except to note that my three seem to
think that I'm quite capable of catching my own (and once Blackie and I
caught one in co-operation).

But a thought - do you feed them the odd scrap from your plate at mealtimes?
If so, they may be trying to return the favour... May not be that, but cats
are quite intelligent enough to figure these things out.
--
Gwenhwyfaer (emails need [Private] in header)

some girls wander by themselves

kilikini
April 3rd 04, 03:42 PM
"Andy Martin" > wrote in message
...
> I have a 3 legged cat who cant stretch to birds but often digs up worms
and
> offers them instead!
>
>


What a lovely gift to step on when you wake up to go to the bathroom in the
middle of the night. Blech!
kili

kilikini
April 3rd 04, 03:42 PM
"Andy Martin" > wrote in message
...
> I have a 3 legged cat who cant stretch to birds but often digs up worms
and
> offers them instead!
>
>


What a lovely gift to step on when you wake up to go to the bathroom in the
middle of the night. Blech!
kili

kilikini
April 3rd 04, 03:50 PM
"M.C. Mullen" > wrote in message
...
>
>

(snip)

>
>
> Please don't lock them outside. How about the kitchen plus another room?
> The kitchen with food and water supply plus access to the outside would be
a
> fair compromise I think.
> I need to go to the bathroom in the night but don't like to turn the light
> on in order to remain half asleep. Do you know the feeling when stepping
> barefoot on one of the gifts?? The present cats are good though, but the
> last one was a terrible hunter.
>
> Carola
>
>
>
>


Yep, I know the feeling of waking up in the middle of the night and stepping
on a gift. My cats always chase down geckos, but they never eat the head.
It's not a fun thing to feel squish in your toes. ICK!
kili

kilikini
April 3rd 04, 03:50 PM
"M.C. Mullen" > wrote in message
...
>
>

(snip)

>
>
> Please don't lock them outside. How about the kitchen plus another room?
> The kitchen with food and water supply plus access to the outside would be
a
> fair compromise I think.
> I need to go to the bathroom in the night but don't like to turn the light
> on in order to remain half asleep. Do you know the feeling when stepping
> barefoot on one of the gifts?? The present cats are good though, but the
> last one was a terrible hunter.
>
> Carola
>
>
>
>


Yep, I know the feeling of waking up in the middle of the night and stepping
on a gift. My cats always chase down geckos, but they never eat the head.
It's not a fun thing to feel squish in your toes. ICK!
kili

Finwood
April 3rd 04, 10:06 PM
Be thankful that they are usually dead and small. I spent a day and a
half trying to catch a chipmunk, and it was enclosed in the bathroom!
Every time I would get it out from behind the sink, and into the shower
stall, I would open the door, out it would run, and behind the sink
again. Finally, I stood on a step stool, threw a paper sack into the
shower, took a broom and hustled him into the sack, closed the sack with
the broom, opened the door, got the critter and took him outside. I was
exhausted and the chipmunk was too.

David Wright wrote:
> Hello,
>
> Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two cats
> bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
>
> Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have never
> brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and became
> the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and two
> frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
> normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up in the
> morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!
>
> With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
> avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats again,
> so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
> noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
> pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that enjoyable
> really!
>
> We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is), or
> lock them outside, but we might have to...
>
> Thanks,
> David.
>
> ps. Please excuse the cross-posting, there are just too many great cat
> newsgroups!!
>
>

Finwood
April 3rd 04, 10:06 PM
Be thankful that they are usually dead and small. I spent a day and a
half trying to catch a chipmunk, and it was enclosed in the bathroom!
Every time I would get it out from behind the sink, and into the shower
stall, I would open the door, out it would run, and behind the sink
again. Finally, I stood on a step stool, threw a paper sack into the
shower, took a broom and hustled him into the sack, closed the sack with
the broom, opened the door, got the critter and took him outside. I was
exhausted and the chipmunk was too.

David Wright wrote:
> Hello,
>
> Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two cats
> bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
>
> Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have never
> brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and became
> the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and two
> frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
> normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up in the
> morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!
>
> With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
> avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats again,
> so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
> noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
> pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that enjoyable
> really!
>
> We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is), or
> lock them outside, but we might have to...
>
> Thanks,
> David.
>
> ps. Please excuse the cross-posting, there are just too many great cat
> newsgroups!!
>
>

Gee
April 5th 04, 06:01 PM
"David Wright" > wrote in message
...
> Hello,
>
> Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two
cats
> bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
>
> Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have never
> brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and became
> the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and two
> frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
> normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up in
the
> morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!
>
> With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
> avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats
again,
> so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
> noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
> pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that
enjoyable
> really!
>
> We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is),
or
> lock them outside, but we might have to...
>
> Thanks,
> David.

Bringing in the food means the cat is looking after you, or most likely
after a baby. It is a compliment being so loved by a cat that it's mothering
you and the baby.

Maybe this behaviour is not up to human scratch, but since cats are our
family too, we need to understand them, and often put up with some of their
quirks, like they do with many of our quirks.

Try and feed the cats just before they go out. Put the loud bells on their
collars so they scare off the birds. Perhaps lock the cats in during the
night, and only let them out in the day.

Tigger brought me some live worms a few times then stopped. No idea why one
way and the other. But hopefully this mothering fase will pass. Perhaps once
baby becomes a wee bigger,and cats stop feeling that they "have to" look
after it :)

Gee

Gee
April 5th 04, 06:01 PM
"David Wright" > wrote in message
...
> Hello,
>
> Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two
cats
> bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
>
> Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have never
> brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and became
> the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and two
> frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
> normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up in
the
> morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!
>
> With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud to
> avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats
again,
> so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot of
> noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the neighbours
> pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that
enjoyable
> really!
>
> We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door is),
or
> lock them outside, but we might have to...
>
> Thanks,
> David.

Bringing in the food means the cat is looking after you, or most likely
after a baby. It is a compliment being so loved by a cat that it's mothering
you and the baby.

Maybe this behaviour is not up to human scratch, but since cats are our
family too, we need to understand them, and often put up with some of their
quirks, like they do with many of our quirks.

Try and feed the cats just before they go out. Put the loud bells on their
collars so they scare off the birds. Perhaps lock the cats in during the
night, and only let them out in the day.

Tigger brought me some live worms a few times then stopped. No idea why one
way and the other. But hopefully this mothering fase will pass. Perhaps once
baby becomes a wee bigger,and cats stop feeling that they "have to" look
after it :)

Gee

countertroll
April 6th 04, 04:44 AM
Gee wrote:

idiot, thats just addons for the casserole.

countertroll
April 6th 04, 04:44 AM
Gee wrote:

idiot, thats just addons for the casserole.

Penelope Baker
April 6th 04, 08:52 AM
*squick* :P

--
Peace,
Pen
--
Pawbreakers - The Candy for Cats!
http://www.pawbreakers.com

"Andy Martin" > wrote in message
...
>I have a 3 legged cat who cant stretch to birds but often digs up worms and
> offers them instead!
>
>
> "'cedes" > wrote in message
> ...
>> There is no stopping the sacrificial gifting. As long as they are
>> allowed
>> outdoors, they are going to attempt to bring you "gifts".
>> A funny story; I don't allow my cats outdoors at all, but I have a huge
>> enclosed patio that they think is "outdoors. Yesterday I awoke from a
>> nap,
>> to find a dismembered bird in bed with me, and all my cats snoozing
> soundly.
>> This is the second time in two years that this has happened. The largest
> gap
>> in the wire meshed-in patio, is a 1 inch gap betwwen the base and the
> frame
>> of the wire. We are clueless as to HOW these birds how squeezed in to
>> meet
>> their doom. In any event, I truly can't stop my cats from doing this, IF
>> a
>> bird makes it's way into our patio, but you can probably curtail their
>> activity, by either keeping them indoors at night, OR making them some
> sort
>> of secure enclosure on your house, so that they can not obtain their
>> prey.
>>
>> http://www.cat-world.com.au/cat-worldenclosures.htm
>>
>>
>> "David Wright" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > Hello,
>> >
>> > Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two
>> cats
>> > bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
>> >
>> > Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have
>> > never
>> > brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and
> became
>> > the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and
> two
>> > frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
>> > normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up
>> > in
>> the
>> > morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!
>> >
>> > With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud
>> > to
>> > avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats
>> again,
>> > so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot
>> > of
>> > noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the
>> > neighbours
>> > pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that
>> enjoyable
>> > really!
>> >
>> > We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door
> is),
>> or
>> > lock them outside, but we might have to...
>> >
>> > Thanks,
>> > David.
>> >
>> > ps. Please excuse the cross-posting, there are just too many great cat
>> > newsgroups!!
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>

Penelope Baker
April 6th 04, 08:52 AM
*squick* :P

--
Peace,
Pen
--
Pawbreakers - The Candy for Cats!
http://www.pawbreakers.com

"Andy Martin" > wrote in message
...
>I have a 3 legged cat who cant stretch to birds but often digs up worms and
> offers them instead!
>
>
> "'cedes" > wrote in message
> ...
>> There is no stopping the sacrificial gifting. As long as they are
>> allowed
>> outdoors, they are going to attempt to bring you "gifts".
>> A funny story; I don't allow my cats outdoors at all, but I have a huge
>> enclosed patio that they think is "outdoors. Yesterday I awoke from a
>> nap,
>> to find a dismembered bird in bed with me, and all my cats snoozing
> soundly.
>> This is the second time in two years that this has happened. The largest
> gap
>> in the wire meshed-in patio, is a 1 inch gap betwwen the base and the
> frame
>> of the wire. We are clueless as to HOW these birds how squeezed in to
>> meet
>> their doom. In any event, I truly can't stop my cats from doing this, IF
>> a
>> bird makes it's way into our patio, but you can probably curtail their
>> activity, by either keeping them indoors at night, OR making them some
> sort
>> of secure enclosure on your house, so that they can not obtain their
>> prey.
>>
>> http://www.cat-world.com.au/cat-worldenclosures.htm
>>
>>
>> "David Wright" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > Hello,
>> >
>> > Just wondered if anyone could share some advice on how to stop our two
>> cats
>> > bringing home little "gifts" for us during the night.
>> >
>> > Both cats (1 male, 1 female) are just under 2 years old. They have
>> > never
>> > brought anything back before, but since our first baby was born and
> became
>> > the centre of attention 14 weeks ago, we have had 4 mice, one bird and
> two
>> > frogs. And, because they have a cat-flap door, we find the presents -
>> > normally dead but sometimes alive - in the living room when we get up
>> > in
>> the
>> > morning. The bird was the worst - feathers everywhere!
>> >
>> > With the baby about to start crawling, we want to nip this in the bud
>> > to
>> > avoid infections etc - we are trying to lavish attention on the cats
>> again,
>> > so they don't feel so left out, but this morning (2am!) - a whole lot
>> > of
>> > noise, and another frog. Still alive, and quickly back in the
>> > neighbours
>> > pond. And me disinfecting the carpet whilst half asleep, not that
>> enjoyable
>> > really!
>> >
>> > We don't want to lock them in the kitchen at night (where their door
> is),
>> or
>> > lock them outside, but we might have to...
>> >
>> > Thanks,
>> > David.
>> >
>> > ps. Please excuse the cross-posting, there are just too many great cat
>> > newsgroups!!
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>

April 6th 04, 05:25 PM
never dealt with cat bringing a present inside but i had a stray cat do
this...found out one day that he was bringing home stuff just about all
the time...but another stray cat was eatingthem...lol so he probably
thought i served the best food and the other stray thoguht to bring me
home even more stuff......i did read in a book soon after i took him
in..if you put the "gift" in to thier bed they might dispose of it
cause they dont like it in thier sleeping areas...not sure but wortha
try with the dead ones

April 6th 04, 05:25 PM
never dealt with cat bringing a present inside but i had a stray cat do
this...found out one day that he was bringing home stuff just about all
the time...but another stray cat was eatingthem...lol so he probably
thought i served the best food and the other stray thoguht to bring me
home even more stuff......i did read in a book soon after i took him
in..if you put the "gift" in to thier bed they might dispose of it
cause they dont like it in thier sleeping areas...not sure but wortha
try with the dead ones

BarB
April 12th 04, 04:54 PM
On Mon, 12 Apr 2004 01:27:33 +0200, "BolleZijde"
> wrote:

>Just do not crosspost, ok?
>

Newsgroup line set back to alt.cats,alt.pets.cats,rec.pets.cats.misc
Followups set to alt.cats.

This is an example of a crosspost by a troll. The newsgroup line was set
to alt.cats,alt.space*******s,alt.startrek.vs.starwar s,alt.world,
alt.troll,alt.games.grand-theft-auto,rec.games.frp.dnd,alt.usenet.kooks,
and alt.troll. When one encounters this kind of crossposting, set the
newsgroup line back to the original groups. This was originally
crossposted to alt.cats,alt.pets.cats,rec.pets.cats.misc.

Crossposting is the correct way to get a message to more than one group,
provided all the groups are on topic. When a user multiposts the same
message to more than one cat group, the discussion is fragmented over a
number of groups. In addition users who read more than one feline group
are VERY annoyed to see the same post occurring over and over in the
groups they read. A crossposted article occurs only one time on the
server. Newsreaders can be set to show a crossposted message only once
in the first group you read.

It helps if the original poster sets followups to only one group.

BarB

BarB
April 12th 04, 04:54 PM
On Mon, 12 Apr 2004 01:27:33 +0200, "BolleZijde"
> wrote:

>Just do not crosspost, ok?
>

Newsgroup line set back to alt.cats,alt.pets.cats,rec.pets.cats.misc
Followups set to alt.cats.

This is an example of a crosspost by a troll. The newsgroup line was set
to alt.cats,alt.space*******s,alt.startrek.vs.starwar s,alt.world,
alt.troll,alt.games.grand-theft-auto,rec.games.frp.dnd,alt.usenet.kooks,
and alt.troll. When one encounters this kind of crossposting, set the
newsgroup line back to the original groups. This was originally
crossposted to alt.cats,alt.pets.cats,rec.pets.cats.misc.

Crossposting is the correct way to get a message to more than one group,
provided all the groups are on topic. When a user multiposts the same
message to more than one cat group, the discussion is fragmented over a
number of groups. In addition users who read more than one feline group
are VERY annoyed to see the same post occurring over and over in the
groups they read. A crossposted article occurs only one time on the
server. Newsreaders can be set to show a crossposted message only once
in the first group you read.

It helps if the original poster sets followups to only one group.

BarB