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queenbee
April 9th 04, 07:52 PM
Hi, does anyone have any advice on re-covering a scratching post? My cats
(2) have a nice post that they adore. It's got an upright post covered in
carpet, a slanted post covered in sisal, and a curved part on top they can
lie in. I don't want to get them another post because a.) these posts are
SO EXPENSIVE and b.) they really like the one they have now and I haven't
been able to find the same one. I got some carpet remnants from a carpet
store, but I'll be darned if I can find sisal anywhere! And I'm a bit
perplexed as to how to adhere the carpet and sisal to the post. Any
advice?

Kristine Kochanski
April 9th 04, 08:06 PM
On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 14:52:17 -0400, "queenbee"
> wrote:

>Hi, does anyone have any advice on re-covering a scratching post? My cats
>(2) have a nice post that they adore. It's got an upright post covered in
>carpet, a slanted post covered in sisal, and a curved part on top they can
>lie in. I don't want to get them another post because a.) these posts are
>SO EXPENSIVE and b.) they really like the one they have now and I haven't
>been able to find the same one. I got some carpet remnants from a carpet
>store, but I'll be darned if I can find sisal anywhere! And I'm a bit
>perplexed as to how to adhere the carpet and sisal to the post. Any
>advice?

I bought sisal from the DIY store, also seen people selling it on
ebay. You need loads of it - I bought a roll of 15 metres - it covered
less than 2 feet of 2"x2"!!

Kristine Kochanski
April 9th 04, 08:06 PM
On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 14:52:17 -0400, "queenbee"
> wrote:

>Hi, does anyone have any advice on re-covering a scratching post? My cats
>(2) have a nice post that they adore. It's got an upright post covered in
>carpet, a slanted post covered in sisal, and a curved part on top they can
>lie in. I don't want to get them another post because a.) these posts are
>SO EXPENSIVE and b.) they really like the one they have now and I haven't
>been able to find the same one. I got some carpet remnants from a carpet
>store, but I'll be darned if I can find sisal anywhere! And I'm a bit
>perplexed as to how to adhere the carpet and sisal to the post. Any
>advice?

I bought sisal from the DIY store, also seen people selling it on
ebay. You need loads of it - I bought a roll of 15 metres - it covered
less than 2 feet of 2"x2"!!

Ted Davis
April 9th 04, 09:27 PM
On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 14:52:17 -0400, "queenbee"
> wrote:

>Hi, does anyone have any advice on re-covering a scratching post? My cats
>(2) have a nice post that they adore. It's got an upright post covered in
>carpet, a slanted post covered in sisal, and a curved part on top they can
>lie in. I don't want to get them another post because a.) these posts are
>SO EXPENSIVE and b.) they really like the one they have now and I haven't
>been able to find the same one. I got some carpet remnants from a carpet
>store, but I'll be darned if I can find sisal anywhere! And I'm a bit
>perplexed as to how to adhere the carpet and sisal to the post. Any
>advice?
>

If I were going to rewind a sisal post, I would buy some sisal, Manila
hemp, or similar bast fiber rope from my local Lowes, Family Center,
or maybe Walmart. The post I have has the rope attached (poorly) only
at the ends - I think I would put a few strips of Liquid Nails or
similar construction adhesive (from the same place as the rope) along
the post as well as stapling the ends.



T.E.D. )
SPAM filter: Messages to this address *must* contain "T.E.D."
somewhere in the body or they will be automatically rejected.

Ted Davis
April 9th 04, 09:27 PM
On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 14:52:17 -0400, "queenbee"
> wrote:

>Hi, does anyone have any advice on re-covering a scratching post? My cats
>(2) have a nice post that they adore. It's got an upright post covered in
>carpet, a slanted post covered in sisal, and a curved part on top they can
>lie in. I don't want to get them another post because a.) these posts are
>SO EXPENSIVE and b.) they really like the one they have now and I haven't
>been able to find the same one. I got some carpet remnants from a carpet
>store, but I'll be darned if I can find sisal anywhere! And I'm a bit
>perplexed as to how to adhere the carpet and sisal to the post. Any
>advice?
>

If I were going to rewind a sisal post, I would buy some sisal, Manila
hemp, or similar bast fiber rope from my local Lowes, Family Center,
or maybe Walmart. The post I have has the rope attached (poorly) only
at the ends - I think I would put a few strips of Liquid Nails or
similar construction adhesive (from the same place as the rope) along
the post as well as stapling the ends.



T.E.D. )
SPAM filter: Messages to this address *must* contain "T.E.D."
somewhere in the body or they will be automatically rejected.

MaryL
April 9th 04, 11:20 PM
"queenbee" > wrote in message
lkaboutpets.com...
> Hi, does anyone have any advice on re-covering a scratching post? My cats
> (2) have a nice post that they adore. It's got an upright post covered in
> carpet, a slanted post covered in sisal, and a curved part on top they can
> lie in. I don't want to get them another post because a.) these posts are
> SO EXPENSIVE and b.) they really like the one they have now and I haven't
> been able to find the same one. I got some carpet remnants from a carpet
> store, but I'll be darned if I can find sisal anywhere! And I'm a bit
> perplexed as to how to adhere the carpet and sisal to the post. Any
> advice?
>
>

You might get some good responses if you post this question to
alt.home.repair. Also, it would be helpful if you could post a picture of
the scratching post with a URL where we can view it. I'm not very "handy"
(but fortunately have access to a "jack-of-all-trades" who does allkinds of
work for me), but I know a picture can often get the creative juices
flowing.

MaryL

MaryL
April 9th 04, 11:20 PM
"queenbee" > wrote in message
lkaboutpets.com...
> Hi, does anyone have any advice on re-covering a scratching post? My cats
> (2) have a nice post that they adore. It's got an upright post covered in
> carpet, a slanted post covered in sisal, and a curved part on top they can
> lie in. I don't want to get them another post because a.) these posts are
> SO EXPENSIVE and b.) they really like the one they have now and I haven't
> been able to find the same one. I got some carpet remnants from a carpet
> store, but I'll be darned if I can find sisal anywhere! And I'm a bit
> perplexed as to how to adhere the carpet and sisal to the post. Any
> advice?
>
>

You might get some good responses if you post this question to
alt.home.repair. Also, it would be helpful if you could post a picture of
the scratching post with a URL where we can view it. I'm not very "handy"
(but fortunately have access to a "jack-of-all-trades" who does allkinds of
work for me), but I know a picture can often get the creative juices
flowing.

MaryL

MIKE
April 9th 04, 11:37 PM
Sisal is available at most hardware stores. When you put it on, roll it
as tight as possible. Assuming 1/4" rope, it will take 48 turns for one
foot of post. If the post is 4" in diameter, it would take about 13" of
rope for each turn. That means 52 feet of sisal for each foot of post.
A four foot post would need over 200 feet of sisal! Most cats prefer
sisal to carpet. Don't buy it at Walmart since they sell pre-cut 50
foot packages and you want a continuous piece. If you roll it tight
enough, attaching at the top and bottom will work just fine.


-MIKE

MIKE
April 9th 04, 11:37 PM
Sisal is available at most hardware stores. When you put it on, roll it
as tight as possible. Assuming 1/4" rope, it will take 48 turns for one
foot of post. If the post is 4" in diameter, it would take about 13" of
rope for each turn. That means 52 feet of sisal for each foot of post.
A four foot post would need over 200 feet of sisal! Most cats prefer
sisal to carpet. Don't buy it at Walmart since they sell pre-cut 50
foot packages and you want a continuous piece. If you roll it tight
enough, attaching at the top and bottom will work just fine.


-MIKE

Ted Davis
April 10th 04, 01:31 AM
On Fri, 9 Apr 2004 18:37:36 -0400, (MIKE)
wrote:

>Sisal is available at most hardware stores. When you put it on, roll it
>as tight as possible. Assuming 1/4" rope, it will take 48 turns for one
>foot of post. If the post is 4" in diameter, it would take about 13" of
>rope for each turn. That means 52 feet of sisal for each foot of post.
>A four foot post would need over 200 feet of sisal! Most cats prefer
>sisal to carpet. Don't buy it at Walmart since they sell pre-cut 50
>foot packages and you want a continuous piece. If you roll it tight
>enough, attaching at the top and bottom will work just fine.

Any suggestions on attaching the ends? - the post I have (it was a
gift) appears to be a cardboard tube and the cats almost immediately
figured out how to get the end loose. I really haven't given it much
thought - my thinking has gone into how it could be done right, and
that doesn't involve cardboard tubes, but does involve concrete bases.


T.E.D. - e-mail must contain "T.E.D." or my .sig in the body)

Ted Davis
April 10th 04, 01:31 AM
On Fri, 9 Apr 2004 18:37:36 -0400, (MIKE)
wrote:

>Sisal is available at most hardware stores. When you put it on, roll it
>as tight as possible. Assuming 1/4" rope, it will take 48 turns for one
>foot of post. If the post is 4" in diameter, it would take about 13" of
>rope for each turn. That means 52 feet of sisal for each foot of post.
>A four foot post would need over 200 feet of sisal! Most cats prefer
>sisal to carpet. Don't buy it at Walmart since they sell pre-cut 50
>foot packages and you want a continuous piece. If you roll it tight
>enough, attaching at the top and bottom will work just fine.

Any suggestions on attaching the ends? - the post I have (it was a
gift) appears to be a cardboard tube and the cats almost immediately
figured out how to get the end loose. I really haven't given it much
thought - my thinking has gone into how it could be done right, and
that doesn't involve cardboard tubes, but does involve concrete bases.


T.E.D. - e-mail must contain "T.E.D." or my .sig in the body)

m. L. Briggs
April 10th 04, 01:46 AM
On Fri, 9 Apr 2004 18:37:36 -0400, (MIKE)
wrote:

>Sisal is available at most hardware stores. When you put it on, roll it
>as tight as possible. Assuming 1/4" rope, it will take 48 turns for one
>foot of post. If the post is 4" in diameter, it would take about 13" of
>rope for each turn. That means 52 feet of sisal for each foot of post.
>A four foot post would need over 200 feet of sisal! Most cats prefer
>sisal to carpet. Don't buy it at Walmart since they sell pre-cut 50
>foot packages and you want a continuous piece. If you roll it tight
>enough, attaching at the top and bottom will work just fine.
>
>
> -MIKE

I am glad this question was asked and I am happy you answered. I have
printed the instructions and hope to find someone to recover the post
I have. It has a larger base than the ones in the stores now -- no
chance of tipping over -- and a tall, slanted post. It is quite worn.
I was thinking a carpetlayer might do the job. A good handyman might
be the answer. Thanks again. MLB

m. L. Briggs
April 10th 04, 01:46 AM
On Fri, 9 Apr 2004 18:37:36 -0400, (MIKE)
wrote:

>Sisal is available at most hardware stores. When you put it on, roll it
>as tight as possible. Assuming 1/4" rope, it will take 48 turns for one
>foot of post. If the post is 4" in diameter, it would take about 13" of
>rope for each turn. That means 52 feet of sisal for each foot of post.
>A four foot post would need over 200 feet of sisal! Most cats prefer
>sisal to carpet. Don't buy it at Walmart since they sell pre-cut 50
>foot packages and you want a continuous piece. If you roll it tight
>enough, attaching at the top and bottom will work just fine.
>
>
> -MIKE

I am glad this question was asked and I am happy you answered. I have
printed the instructions and hope to find someone to recover the post
I have. It has a larger base than the ones in the stores now -- no
chance of tipping over -- and a tall, slanted post. It is quite worn.
I was thinking a carpetlayer might do the job. A good handyman might
be the answer. Thanks again. MLB

Tracy
April 10th 04, 01:47 AM
You can buy sisal rope at a big hardware store. It's usually with
other kinds of packing ropes. I used household "Goop" glue to attach
the sisal and it's held up reasonably well with a minor repair now and
then.

"queenbee" > wrote in message utpets.com>...
> Hi, does anyone have any advice on re-covering a scratching post? My cats
> (2) have a nice post that they adore. It's got an upright post covered in
> carpet, a slanted post covered in sisal, and a curved part on top they can
> lie in. I don't want to get them another post because a.) these posts are
> SO EXPENSIVE and b.) they really like the one they have now and I haven't
> been able to find the same one. I got some carpet remnants from a carpet
> store, but I'll be darned if I can find sisal anywhere! And I'm a bit
> perplexed as to how to adhere the carpet and sisal to the post. Any
> advice?

Tracy
April 10th 04, 01:47 AM
You can buy sisal rope at a big hardware store. It's usually with
other kinds of packing ropes. I used household "Goop" glue to attach
the sisal and it's held up reasonably well with a minor repair now and
then.

"queenbee" > wrote in message utpets.com>...
> Hi, does anyone have any advice on re-covering a scratching post? My cats
> (2) have a nice post that they adore. It's got an upright post covered in
> carpet, a slanted post covered in sisal, and a curved part on top they can
> lie in. I don't want to get them another post because a.) these posts are
> SO EXPENSIVE and b.) they really like the one they have now and I haven't
> been able to find the same one. I got some carpet remnants from a carpet
> store, but I'll be darned if I can find sisal anywhere! And I'm a bit
> perplexed as to how to adhere the carpet and sisal to the post. Any
> advice?

MIKE
April 10th 04, 01:51 PM
I attached the rope by drilling a hole just below the top of the tube,
threading the rope through from the outside and tying a knot on the
inside (I was using cardboard tubing I obtained from a carpet store).
At the bottom, I also threaded the rope through a hole. The base was a
large piece of MDF plywood (3/4 inch) which was 4 feet by 4 feet.
Screwed to this was a PVC pipe flange. A piece of PVC pipe was glued
into the flange and extended up into the cardboard tube. The fit was
tight enough to hold the rope in place. If you send me your e-mail
address, I can send you a picture of the completed post.


-MIKE

MIKE
April 10th 04, 01:51 PM
I attached the rope by drilling a hole just below the top of the tube,
threading the rope through from the outside and tying a knot on the
inside (I was using cardboard tubing I obtained from a carpet store).
At the bottom, I also threaded the rope through a hole. The base was a
large piece of MDF plywood (3/4 inch) which was 4 feet by 4 feet.
Screwed to this was a PVC pipe flange. A piece of PVC pipe was glued
into the flange and extended up into the cardboard tube. The fit was
tight enough to hold the rope in place. If you send me your e-mail
address, I can send you a picture of the completed post.


-MIKE

Ted Davis
April 10th 04, 05:41 PM
On Sat, 10 Apr 2004 08:51:17 -0400, (MIKE)
wrote:

>I attached the rope by drilling a hole just below the top of the tube,
>threading the rope through from the outside and tying a knot on the
>inside (I was using cardboard tubing I obtained from a carpet store).
>At the bottom, I also threaded the rope through a hole. The base was a
>large piece of MDF plywood (3/4 inch) which was 4 feet by 4 feet.
>Screwed to this was a PVC pipe flange. A piece of PVC pipe was glued
>into the flange and extended up into the cardboard tube. The fit was
>tight enough to hold the rope in place. If you send me your e-mail
>address, I can send you a picture of the completed post.

I can visualize it easily - at least the construction, which is what
interests me. That base would *definitely* stop the overturning
problem, but I don't have enough space to go big - when I get around
to building one from scratch, I'll have to go for the mass without the
area, probably a concrete slab such as the one I use as a drag-proof
base for the water bowl. I don't think I can use the threading
through a hole idea to fix the existing one because of the
wooden/plastic plugs in the ends, but I'll certainly try it - a knot
on the inside would keep it from slipping out if there is enough room.

Right now it looks like I need to deal with a couple of hostile cats
(Fluffy and Millie) on and beside my monitor - Millie wants Fluffy's
place on top and Fluffy wants to kill or seriously damage Millie.

T.E.D. - e-mail must contain "T.E.D." or my .sig in the body)

Ted Davis
April 10th 04, 05:41 PM
On Sat, 10 Apr 2004 08:51:17 -0400, (MIKE)
wrote:

>I attached the rope by drilling a hole just below the top of the tube,
>threading the rope through from the outside and tying a knot on the
>inside (I was using cardboard tubing I obtained from a carpet store).
>At the bottom, I also threaded the rope through a hole. The base was a
>large piece of MDF plywood (3/4 inch) which was 4 feet by 4 feet.
>Screwed to this was a PVC pipe flange. A piece of PVC pipe was glued
>into the flange and extended up into the cardboard tube. The fit was
>tight enough to hold the rope in place. If you send me your e-mail
>address, I can send you a picture of the completed post.

I can visualize it easily - at least the construction, which is what
interests me. That base would *definitely* stop the overturning
problem, but I don't have enough space to go big - when I get around
to building one from scratch, I'll have to go for the mass without the
area, probably a concrete slab such as the one I use as a drag-proof
base for the water bowl. I don't think I can use the threading
through a hole idea to fix the existing one because of the
wooden/plastic plugs in the ends, but I'll certainly try it - a knot
on the inside would keep it from slipping out if there is enough room.

Right now it looks like I need to deal with a couple of hostile cats
(Fluffy and Millie) on and beside my monitor - Millie wants Fluffy's
place on top and Fluffy wants to kill or seriously damage Millie.

T.E.D. - e-mail must contain "T.E.D." or my .sig in the body)

MIKE
April 10th 04, 07:43 PM
Ted, I don't think a heavy base will provide the stability that a large
base will. My Tiger (23 pounds) can climb right up the 4 foot post
without it tilting; A small heavy base would not allow that.


-MIKE

MIKE
April 10th 04, 07:43 PM
Ted, I don't think a heavy base will provide the stability that a large
base will. My Tiger (23 pounds) can climb right up the 4 foot post
without it tilting; A small heavy base would not allow that.


-MIKE

Ted Davis
April 11th 04, 01:27 AM
On Sat, 10 Apr 2004 14:43:56 -0400, (MIKE)
wrote:

>Ted, I don't think a heavy base will provide the stability that a large
>base will. My Tiger (23 pounds) can climb right up the 4 foot post
>without it tilting; A small heavy base would not allow that.

I'm not thinking four-feet - the inside scratching post is not for
climbing. They have trees outside for climbing. The post I have is
only a foot and a half or so, and I envision making a better one about
the same size. If I do go for an indoor climbing post at some point,
it will probably be a log (I have way too many post oak trees: in the
fences and down by the stock pond - they are weeds, but would make
nice climbing poles if I can figure out how to kill all the bugs).

The scratching post has an indented top - I may wind up with a notch
instead of a hole, but I'm pretty sure the idea will work.

T.E.D. - e-mail must contain "T.E.D." or my .sig in the body)

Ted Davis
April 11th 04, 01:27 AM
On Sat, 10 Apr 2004 14:43:56 -0400, (MIKE)
wrote:

>Ted, I don't think a heavy base will provide the stability that a large
>base will. My Tiger (23 pounds) can climb right up the 4 foot post
>without it tilting; A small heavy base would not allow that.

I'm not thinking four-feet - the inside scratching post is not for
climbing. They have trees outside for climbing. The post I have is
only a foot and a half or so, and I envision making a better one about
the same size. If I do go for an indoor climbing post at some point,
it will probably be a log (I have way too many post oak trees: in the
fences and down by the stock pond - they are weeds, but would make
nice climbing poles if I can figure out how to kill all the bugs).

The scratching post has an indented top - I may wind up with a notch
instead of a hole, but I'm pretty sure the idea will work.

T.E.D. - e-mail must contain "T.E.D." or my .sig in the body)